RSA-509 - Protection & Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR) Program Performance Report

Wisconsin (Disability Rights Wisconsin, Inc.) - H240A180050 - FY2018

General Information

Designated Agency Identification

NameDisability Rights Wisconsin
Address131 W. Wilson St. Suite 700
Address Line 2
CityMadison
StateWisconsin
Zip Code53703
E-mail Addressmonicam@drwi.org
Website Addresshttp://www.disabilityrightswi.org
Phone608-267-0214
TTY 888-758-6049
Toll-free Phone800-928-8778
Toll-free TTY888-758-6049
Fax608-267-0368
Name of P&A Executive DirectorLea Kitz
Name of PAIR Director/CoordinatorMonica Murphy
Person to contact regarding reportMonica Murphy
Contact Person phone414-773-4646
Ext.2735

Part I. Non-Case Services

A. Individual Information and Referral Services (I&R)

Multiple responses are not permitted.

1. Individuals receiving I&R within PAIR priority areas141
2. Individuals receiving I&R outside PAIR priority areas696
3. Total individuals receiving I&R (lines A1 + A2)837

B. Training Activities

1. Number of trainings presented by PAIR staff22
2. Number of individuals who attended training (approximate)874

Training: ADA Training Red Granite

Description: ADA rights training to prison staff

Purpose: increase understanding and aware of rights of prisoners with disabilities

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: ADAPT training

Description: ADA training to ADAPT members

Purpose: increase consumer knowledge of rights

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Advocacy for Change

Description: Training for families of children and adults with disabilities who want to be educated on policy issues in the state.

Purpose: To provide education to families on policy issues around education.

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Advocacy Information & Training

Description: Training for participants from BCDSI (Barron County Developmental Services) on several facets of DRW and on self-advocacy.

Purpose: Inform & empower self-advocates, encourage to pursue full community integration including employment and housing, and give them tools to be able to advocate for themselves.

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Community Conversation- Voting Information

Description: We attended a local community conversation and provided an information table for voters to get information and for those who work in the community to get information so that they can share it. There was a short time when we were able to talk with the group about encouraging voting and understanding voting rights.

Purpose: Help voters to understand their rights and be prepared to vote in the upcoming election. Equip those who work in the community to share voting information and to encourage voters.

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Community Conversation- Voting Information

Description: We attended a local community conversation and provided an information table for voters to get information and for those who work in the community to get information so that they can share it. There was a short time when we were able to talk with the group about encouraging voting and understanding voting rights.

Purpose: Help voters to understand their rights and be prepared to vote in the upcoming election. Equip those who work in the community to share voting information and to encourage voters.

Method: Individual Instruction

Training: Disability 101 - Appleton

Description: training on disability law basics including special education, social security, ADA, and Fair Housing Act to social workers and domestic violence center staff

Purpose: give direct service providers information they need to better serve their disabled clients

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Disability 101 - Hmong Women's Association Mke

Description: training on disability law basics including special education, social security, ADA, and Fair Housing Act to social workers and domestic violence center staff

Purpose: give direct service providers information they need to better serve their disabled clients

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Disability 101 - Madison

Description: training on disability law basics including special education, social security, ADA, and Fair Housing Act to social workers and domestic violence center staff

Purpose: give direct service providers information they need to better serve their disabled clients

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Disability 101 - Milwaukee

Description: training on disability law basics including special education, social security, ADA, and Fair Housing Act to social workers and domestic violence center staff

Purpose: give direct service providers information they need to better serve their disabled clients

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Disability 101 - Rice Lake

Description: training on disability law basics including special education, social security, ADA, and Fair Housing Act to social workers and domestic violence center staff

Purpose: give direct service providers information they need to better serve their disabled clients

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Fair Housing and Service Animals

Description: training to subsidized senior housing on fair housing and service animals

Purpose: Make sure housing residents understand their rights and those of other tenants to accommodations and fair housing

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Greater Milwaukee Foundation Equal Treatment Project- MPS Social Worker Training

Description: DRW will host educational programs for families and for Community Connectors/ Partners

Purpose: Train MPS Social Workers on Milwaukee County Services

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Greater Milwaukee Foundation Equal Treatment Project- MPS Social Worker Training

Description: DRW will host educational programs for families and for Community Connectors/ Partners

Purpose: Train MPS School Psychologists on Milwaukee County Services

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Key to Your Future- Understanding College and Career Ready IEP's-Audubon Middle School

Description: DRW will provide training to students, parents and agencies on the new Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction college and career ready IEP's. These training will be in collaboration with MPS and community partners. It will include helping parents to look at their current IEP's and suggest ways to create a better IEP's.

Purpose: The objective is to allow families and agencies to understand the new college and career ready IEP forms and to be more active participants in the IEP process.

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: National Voter Registration Day - Fond du Lac

Description: We held a voter registration day event. We had an information table for voters to get information, register and check registration information, and also explore the accessible voting machine. There was a one hour training about voting process and voting rights.

Purpose: Help voters to understand their rights and be prepared to vote in the upcoming election.

Method: Individual Instruction

Training: National Voter Registration Day - Goodwill

Description: We held a voter registration day event. We had an information table for voters to get information, register and check registration information, and also explore the accessible voting machine. There was a one hour training about voting process and voting rights.

Purpose: Help voters to understand their rights and be prepared to vote in the upcoming election.

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: National Voter Registration Day - Goodwill

Description: We held a voter registration day event. We had an information table for voters to get information, register and check registration information, and also explore the accessible voting machine. There was a one hour training about voting process and voting rights.

Purpose: Help voters to understand their rights and be prepared to vote in the upcoming election.

Method: Individual Instruction

Training: Special Education Basics

Description: Provide Special Education/IEP Basics training to Racine County agency staff.

Purpose: Educate more people on special education laws in attempt to help more students in Racine County.

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Supported Decision-Making Trainings-Kenosha

Description: Trained on concept of supported decision-making and recently enacted supported decision-making agreement statute.

Purpose: To make individuals and professionals aware of SDM and the new SDM Agreement statute.

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: Training and resource fair about Milwaukee County Services for Children and Youth with Disabilities And Their Families

Description: Held training and resource fair at Zoofari in collaboration with Milwaukee County Disability Services, Milwaukee Behavior Health Division, Katie Beckett, Regional Center. 250 registered for the training including educators, birth to three staff, human service workers, providers, and family members.

DRW’s Project EASSY is working to ensure that more Milwaukee children of color with special needs, and their families, are connected to the programs that can help them reach their full potential. These include Birth to 3, the Children’s’ Long-Term Support Medicaid Waiver, Children’s Community Options Program (CCOP), the Katie Beckett Program, Comprehensive Community Services (CCS) and Reach.

Purpose: To increase awareness of disability relates services and supports, including advocacy assistance, for children with disabilities, with a focus on Milwaukee African American children and their families.

Method: Classroom Instruction

Training: UEDA Employment Summit

Description: summit on the employment of people with disabilities

Purpose: educate public

Method: Classroom Instruction

C. Information Disseminated to the Public

1. Radio and TV appearances by PAIR staff6
2. Newspaper/magazine/journal articles65
3. PSAs/videos aired0
4. Hits on the PAIR/P&A website33,760
5. Publications/booklets/brochures disseminated9,414
6. Other (specify separately)0

Narrative

Part II. Individuals Served

A. Individuals Served

Count individual once per FY. Multiple counts not permitted for lines A1 through A3.

1. Individuals still served as of October 1 (carryover from prior FY)66
2. Additional individuals served during the year90
3. Total individuals served (lines A1 + A2)156
4. Individuals w. more than 1 case opened/closed during the FY. (Do not add this number to total on line A3 above.)7

B. Individuals served as of September 30

Carryover to next FY may not exceed total on line II. A.3 above 63

C. Problem Areas/Complaints of Individuals Served

1. Architectural accessibility2
2. Employment34
3. Program access6
4. Housing22
5. Government benefits/services12
6. Transportation25
7. Education24
8. Assistive technology3
9. Voting0
10. Health care18
11. Insurance0
12. Non-government services3
13. Privacy rights0
14. Access to records0
15. Abuse7
16. Neglect1
17. Other10

D. Reasons for Closing Individual Case Files

1. Issues resolved partially or completely in individual favor68
2. Other representation found5
3. Individual withdrew complaint8
4. Appeals unsuccessful6
5. PAIR Services not needed due to individual's death, relocation etc.1
6. PAIR withdrew from case0
7. PAIR unable to take case because of lack of resources6
8. Individual case lacks legal merit3
9. Other4

Please explain

not within priorities (4)

E. Intervention Strategies Used in Serving Individuals

List the highest level of intervention used by PAIR prior to closing each case file.

1. Technical assistance in self-advocacy17
2. Short-term assistance26
3. Investigation/monitoring17
4. Negotiation27
5. Mediation/alternative dispute resolution11
6. Administrative hearings1
7. Litigation (including class actions)2
8. Systemic/policy activities0

Part III. Statistical Information on Individuals Served

A. Age of Individuals Served as of October 1

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. 0 - 41
2. 5 - 2226
3. 23 - 5998
4. 60 - 6420
5. 65 and over11

B. Gender of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Females72
2. Males84

C. Race/Ethnicity of Individuals Served

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race8
2. American Indian or Alaskan Native0
3. Asian0
4. Black or African American43
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander0
6. White92
7. Two or more races6
8. Race/ethnicity unknown7

D. Living Arrangements of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Independent83
2. Parental or other family home29
3. Community residential home0
4. Foster care0
5. Nursing home5
6. Public institutional living arrangement0
7. Private institutional living arrangement0
8. Jail/prison/detention center38
9. Homeless1
10. Other living arrangements0
11. Living arrangements not known0

E. Primary Disability of Individuals Served

Identify the individual's primary disability, namely the one directly related to the issues/complaints

1. Blind/visual impairment8
2. Deaf/hard of hearing18
3. Deaf-blind0
4. Orthopedic impairment54
5. Mental illness7
6. Substance abuse0
7. Mental retardation2
8. Learning disability11
9. Neurological impairment29
10. Respiratory impairment3
11. Heart/other circulatory impairment5
12. Muscular/skeletal impairment10
13. Speech impairment0
14. AIDS/HIV0
15. Traumatic brain injury0
16. Other disability9

Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation

A. Systemic Activities

1. Number of policies/practices changed as a result of non-litigation systemic activities10

2. Number of individuals potentially impacted by policy changes890,271

Describe your systemic activities. Be sure to include information about the policies that were changed and how these changes benefit individuals with disabilities. Include case examples of how your systemic activities impacted individuals served.

Some of our systemic activities this year centered around preventing bad things from happening to people with disabilities rather than securing new policies or practices that benefit them.

1) Educating Policymakers regarding health care reform

DRW staff worked to create materials to use for grassroots advocates to educate policymakers on the potentially devastating effects of proposed changes to the Affordable Care Act. These materials highlighted the importance of Medicaid and affordable healthcare to people around the state. The proposed changes could have caused people to lose their Medicaid or other healthcare coverage or make the cost of insurance too burdensome. Wisconsin’s total Medicaid enrollment is 1.2 million. Kaiser Family Foundation estimated there are 852,000 people in Wisconsin with pre-existing health conditions that would not have been able to buy health insurance if the protections of the affordable care act were repealed.

One family offered this description of the impact their child would face if “reforms” went through:

We adopted our special needs son when he was a baby. He is a survivor of extreme abuse and neglect. He has emotional and behavioral issues that keep him from participating in regular childhood social activities in school and the community. He has received help from Medicaid from the beginning, birth to 3, In-home Autism support, Therapy horse riding, a mentor from CCS program to take him into the community, and soon summer programs he can be with other kids to learn socialization and interaction with peers. He also receives in home psychotherapy and special education services at school-full time and medication support from a psychiatrist. Without these supports our son could not function in the home and we would not be able to manage him. The trauma he sustained will never go away but it can improve with professional help. Our insurance can’t cover the total cost of all his medications and programs. We would be financially strapped without Medicaid. I had to quit my job to stay home with our son, we are a one income family because of it.

2) IRIS Support Broker

DRW successfully stopped the Department of Health Services from amending its definition of support broker service in the self directed long term support program called IRIS. DHS wanted to limit the role of the support brokers so they would provide fewer services to IRIS participants.

3) Department of Health Services Policies for Therapies for Children (4)

DRW staff worked for many years to make it easier for children with significant disabilities to access speech therapy, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Finally, in 2018, the Department of Health Services (DHS) changed several of its policies that will make it easier and quicker for children to receive services. The DHS removed a requirement to get a prior authorization for therapy evaluations so these evaluations will be able to be completed much quicker. DHS changed its position that school-based therapy services duplicate community based therapy. Previously if a child had any school-based therapy in his/her IEP it was almost impossible to get community based therapy as well. DHS has agreed to apply the EPSDT standard of “correct or ameliorate” medically necessary standard for services for children and young adults. This will allow children to get a wider array of services than were previously available. DHS agreed to extend the prior authorization period for children under 6 to 12 months up from the previous 3 and 6 month periods. This will allow children to receive services for a longer period of time without having to go back and get another prior authorization approved.

For example: Jordan who gets school-based speech therapy in a group was not able to get additional one on one therapy in the community under the previous prior authorization rules. Now the coverage for community therapy will be decided without regard to what he receives at school and he will get more service.

4) Youth Justice Milwaukee

DRW works as part of a coalition of partners trying to create a continuum of community based non-residential services within the juvenile justice system. Wisconsin’s juvenile justice system has been plagued with abuses the last several years with conditions for youth with disabilities been especially harsh in the youth residential facilities. Youth Justice Milwaukee was instrumental in pushing through juvenile justice reforms with the passage of Wisconsin Act 185 overhauling juvenile justice in Wisconsin. The reforms are designed to result in fewer youth being placed in residential facilities and in them being housed in facilities much closer to their home communities and increasing the capacity to house youth with mental health needs at the state hospital.

In recent year there have been about 750 youth in residential juvenile corrections in Wisconsin.

DRW worked with a youth that was isolated for many hours for behavioral issues that were considered a violation of the code at Lincoln Hills. This youth was unable to access regular programming and had limited mental health services and limited education during this time. The individual would get back to regular programming and then have another violation and again be isolated with limited access to services. We are hopeful with the system reform, which includes closing Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake and going to smaller regional facilities a youth like this in the future, will have access to better supports and services. In addition to closing the large facility, the planned changes in the youth justice system are focused on programming, education and mental health services which we hope will better serve youth with disabilities that touch the system.

5) SSI Managed Care Expansion (3)

The DHS Complex Care Management Community Advisory Council of which DRW is a member changed three policies regard the expansion of SSI managed care. The council convince the department to expand the network of personal care providers. They advise of the need to add providers with linguistic and cultural competence to serve diverse communities and the department added such providers to its network. The Council recommended the Department address social determinants including accessible affordable housing and the Department moved forward with several pilots.

20,000 people who were moved from fee for service Medicaid to Managed Care were impacted by these changes.

With the shift from card service Medicaid to Managed Care Medicaid several of our Hmong clients who used their card to get personal care from a Hmong run personal care agency were going to lose their culturally sensitive provider until the Managed Care Organization agreed to contract with the Hmong run personal care agency.

B. Litigation/Class Actions

1. Number of individuals potentially impacted by changes as a result of PAIR litigation/class action efforts267,000
2. Number of individuals named in class actions0

Describe your litigation/class action activities. Explain how individuals with disabilities benefited from your litigation activities. Be sure to include case examples that demonstrate the impact of your litigation.

PAIR submitted an amicus brief in a Wisconsin Supreme Court Case analyzing how failure to accommodate cases are handled under the Wisconsin Fair Employment Act. Initially the majority opinion took a very hard line against accommodation cases, requiring employees to show discriminatory intent before succeeding on a failure to accommodate claim. The Court went beyond the parameters of the case in a footnote. After a request for reconsideration, joined by DRW the damaging footnote we removed and accommodation law preserved as to burden of proof. If the Court's original footnote had remained it would have caused confusion and difficulty in proving disability discrimination based on failure to reasonably accommodate. Now our clients need only proved that an employer failed to provide a reasonable accommodation. They do not have to prove that an employer intended to discriminate against them because of their disability.

Part V. PAIR'S Priorities and Objectives

A. Priorities and Objectives for the Fiscal Year Covered by this Report

For each of your PAIR program priorities for the fiscal year covered by this report, please:

  1. Identify and describe priority.
  2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority.
  3. Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.
  4. Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities. If so, describe this collaboration.
  5. Provide the number of cases handled under the priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.
  6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

1. Priority 1: End Abuse and Neglect of people with disabilities.

2. Need: Too many children are physically restrained and placed in seclusion at school and their parents are not provided with sufficient information about what happened.

3. Indicators of success;

a) Schools reduce their use of seclusion and restraint

b) People receive needed services in a safe manner

c) Passage of new law restricting the use of restraint and seclusion in schools (ongoing)

4. Partners in these efforts include Family Ties and FACETS to improve the restraint and seclusion law that applies to schools. We have all worked together to get a bill drafted and legislative support for the changes. We are hoping to get the bill signed into law in the upcoming legislative session.

5. Cases: 16

6. Case Examples:

DRW assisted a man who was being neglected and exposed to filth in a rehabilitation hospital after hip surgery. We help him file a complaint with the state and transfer to a different facility.

DRW helped the parent of a student with ADHD and EBD file a complaint with the state education agency regarding the improper use of restraint.

1. Priority 2: Combat Disability Discrimination by Government entities and Places of Public Accommodation.

2. Need: People with disabilities are being denied reasonable accommodations, effective communication, and face access limitations from public entities and places of public accommodation.

3. Indicators of Success:

People with disabilities will get the accommodations they need in the community. We will no longer get complaints about entities not providing accommodations.

4. Partners: the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District has assisted us in some of the failure to provide interpreter cases.

5. Cases: 45

6. Case Examples:

We assisted a dad who is deaf who has been trying for years to get his daughter’s school to communicate with him via email instead of telephone to finally provide email communication.

DRW staff helped an individual to advocate with a court for assistive listening devices so that he could follow court proceedings that he was a part of.

We currently have complaints pending against five different hospitals for failure to provide ASL interpreters to patients and family members who are deaf including for one woman who was undergoing brain surgery, another woman who was raped, and a dad whose young daughter was hospitalized for a week with a serious illness.

1. Priority 3: Combat Disability Discrimination in Employment

2. Need: People with disabilities continue to face discrimination in the workplace and have a much lower employment rate than their non-disabled counterparts.

3. Indicators of Success: People with disabilities will get the reasonable accommodations they need to do their jobs, those who have lost their jobs due to discrimination or failure to accommodate with have the situation remedied, and DRW will get fewer calls asking for assistance with these problems.

4. Partners: We have worked with Wisconsin Employment Lawyers Association on referrals, consult, and an amicus brief.

5. Cases: 32

6. Case Examples:

PAIR staff helped get a financial settlement for a man with a physical disability who was told he would not be hired for a job because of his disability despite a long history of doing the identical job at another employer.

We helped a man with learning disabilities getting testing accommodations so that he could take necessary tests to become a journeyman electrician. He passed the test with accommodations.

DRW secured a financial settlement for woman undergoing cancer treatment who was told by her employer that they could no longer provide the accommodations she needed.

1. Priority 4: Combat Housing discrimination

2. Need: People with disabilities continue to experience housing discrimination and are denied reasonable accommodations and reasonable modifications.

3. Indicators of Success:

People with disabilities will get the reasonable accommodations and reasonable modifications they need to enjoy their housing and they will not be denied housing because of their disability.

4. Partners: We have a work sharing agreement with the Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Housing Council and we routinely work together on cases.

5. Cases: 18

6. Case Examples:

PAIR staff negotiated with a landlord of a man with chronic health conditions whose lease was ending to have an accommodation of additional time to find a new place to live which was difficult for him due to his limitations.

PAIR staff worked with a woman and her landlord so that she could get necessary modifications to common areas such as a door handle and railings on the steps.

1. Priority 5: Promote Community integration

2. Need: Student with disabilities need transition services to move on to post-secondary education and competitive community employment.

3. Indicators of Success:

Students and families will be trained on student rights under WIOA and the PTP to insure proper transition planning. Students will not be exited from school until they receive appropriate transition services.

4. Partners: PAIR staff worked with community partners Alianza and Parent University to provide comprehensive training on transition services and rights.

5. Cases: 2

6. Case Example: PAIR staff assisted a high school student with mild intellectual disabilities who was being served in segregated classes and was on a track to get only a certificate of completion. With PAIR staff assistance her program was changed. She got credit recovery, work experiences, and ultimately graduated with a regular diploma.

1. Priority 6: Ensure students with disabilities receive FAPE in the Least Restrictive Environment.

2. Need: Student with disabilities continue to be repeatedly removed from schools through suspension and expulsion, shortened school day, and put in alternative placements.

3. Indicators of Success:

Reduce de facto suspensions and suspension over 10 days. Reduce the use of shortened school days. Reduce the use of segregated and alternative placements.

4. Partners: None

5. Cases: 22

6. Case Examples:

PAIR staff assisted a teenager who had been suspended more than 12 days because of her behavior. The school wanted to transfer her to a different high school. Through our assistance she was properly evaluated for an emotional behavior disability and found eligible. Her behavior was found to be a manifestation of her disability and she was able to stay at the school.

A 12-year-old student with learning disabilities who could not read or write was told he could not return to school after he got in a fight. He was placed at an out of school site receiving two hours of education per day. DRW got involved and got him placed back at this school with reintegration to some of his classes and one-on-one service to address academic delays and a plan for eventual total reintegration.

1. Priority 7: Ensure people with disabilities will have access to adequate and accessible transportation.

2. Need: People with disabilities need public transportation to get to work, medical appointments, and other community places. There is a shortage of accessible transportation.

3. Indicator of Success:

People with disabilities get the accessible transportation they need for medical appointments and other needs.

4. Partners: PAIR works with an internal program funded by the state, the SSI Managed Care Ombudsman, to investigate complaints and to ensure transportation services are properly provided.

5. Cases: 26

6. Case Example:

DRW represented a woman who missed medical appointments because her medical transportation was repeated late to pick her up. In additional she needed a handrail to get down the steps to get to the transit van. Staff helped her process her complaints against the van company and to connect with a community agency that put up the necessary handrail.

1. Priority 8: Ensure People with Disabilities have access to needed Benefits.

2. Need: People with disabilities need full access to Medicaid Programs, benefits, and services.

3. Indicators of Success:

Policymakers will understand the impact of their decisions regarding Medicaid programs have on the people with disabilities who rely on them.

Children with significant disabilities have access to the CLTS waiver and EPSDT services.

4. Partners: DRW collaborated with Survival Coalition, Wisconsin Health Matters, and Wisconsin Alliance for Women’s Health to preserve and protect Medicaid and the Affordable Care Act.

5. Cases: 6

6. Case Example:

DRW assisted a family with four children with disabilities to access the Children’s Long Term Support Waiver (CLTS). The mom had been provided conflicting information and denied services. With DRW assistance the family was able to access in-home therapy, crisis stabilization and transportation to medical appointments.

DRW assisted a woman with a seizure disorder get Medicaid coverage for vet services for her seizure alert dog.

B. Priorities and Objectives for the Current Fiscal Year

Please include a statement of priorities and objectives for the current fiscal year (the fiscal year succeeding that covered by this report), which should contain the following information:

  1. a statement of each prioirty;
  2. the need addressed by each priority; and;
  3. a description of the activities to be carried out under each priority.

Priority 1: Employment

Disability Rights Wisconsin will work to ensure that people with disabilities are free from workplace discrimination and have needed job accommodations.

Need: People with disabilities are often denied workplace accommodations or are terminated from employment for reasons related to their disability. They need assistance in understanding their rights to accommodations and how to secure accommodations. If they are discriminated against by their employer because of their disability they need assistance in remedying the situation.

Activities:

1) DRW staff will train people with disabilities on their rights under the ADA, WFEA, and WIOA.

2) DRW staff will provide technical assistance to people with disabilities seeking reasonable accommodations on the job.

3) DRW staff will provide technical assistance and if necessary, direct representation to individuals seeking to redress employment discrimination.

Priority 2: Special Education

Disability Rights Wisconsin will assist students with disabilities who are being denied a Free Appropriate Public Education due to school exclusion, improper restraint and seclusion, and denial of services in the most integrated setting.

Need: Students with special education needs are being increasingly excluded from school through suspensions, expulsions, and shortened school days. They are being subjected to improper seclusion and restraint. Students are being forced into more restrictive settings because schools refuse to provide the appropriate supports and services that would allow the student to be served in the most integrated setting.

Activities:

1) Work to promote the passage into law of 2019 LRB-0669/P1, improvements to the restraint and seclusion law.

2) Staff will file a group complaint regarding Racine Unified School District’s failure to provide appropriate supports and services resulting students being placed in more restrictive settings.

3) DRW will provide technical assistance and if necessary, direct representation to students who are being denied FAPE due to exclusion, improper restraint and seclusion, and who are being forced into more restrictive settings.

4) DRW will monitor School Safety Grants to ensure they are not used to exclude students with disabilities.

5) Staff will participate on the Special Ed Council, the Equity Council, the Survival Coalition Education Team, and the Mental Health in Schools committee and monitor state budget proposals for upcoming biennium.

Priority 3: Community Living

Disability Rights Wisconsin will work to ensure that people with disabilities will have access to housing, services, and transportation even when that requires reasonable accommodations and modifications.

Need: People with disabilities face barriers in housing that discriminates against people with disabilities by refusing to provide reasonable accommodations or modifications. They face barriers from providers both public and private who fail to provide effective communication or auxiliary aids and services. They face transportation barriers due to lack of accessible transportation.

Activities:

1) DRW will provide technical assistance and information and referral to people seeking reasonable accommodations and reasonable modifications in their housing or who are facing direct disability discrimination in housing.

2) DRW will provide technical assistance and direct representation to individuals with disabilities who are denied effective communication or auxiliary aids and services by government entities or places of public accommodation.

3) DRW will advocate for increased funding for accessible transportation.

4) DRW will provide technical assistance to individuals denied appropriate transportation.

Part VI. Narrative

At a minimum, you must include all of the information requested. You may include any other information, not otherwise collected on this reporting form that would be helpful in describing the extent of PAIR activities during the prior fiscal year. Please limit the narrative portion of this report, including attachments, to 20 pages or less.

The narrative should contain the following information. The instructions for this form outline the information that should be contained in each section.

  1. Sources of funds received and expended
  2. Budget for the fiscal year covered by this report
  3. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years)
  4. Involvement with advisory boards (if any)
  5. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure
  6. Coordination with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the State long-term care program, if these programs are not part of the P&A agency

A. Sources of funds received and expended

Total (from all sources): $267,283

B. Budget for the fiscal year covered by this report

Total budget: $267,283

C. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years)

Professional

Executive/Clerical

Total: 2.32 person-years

D. Involvement with Advisory Boards: The Wisconsin PAIR program does not have an advisory board.

E. Grievances: There were no grievances filed by PAIR clients this year.

F. Coordination with the Client Assistance Project (CAP) and the State long term care program: the CAP is not housed in our agency, but we do have regular contact with CAP staff and we share information about and experiences with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and employment programs. Our agency also houses the Family Care and IRIS Ombudsman Program for our state’s long term care program. We assist people under age 60 in long term care in this program and people over 60 are served by the Board on Aging and Long Term Care (BOALTC). Because of this connection we collaborate with BOALTC on policy and advocacy initiatives.

Certification

Signed?Yes
Signed ByMonica Murphy
TitleManaging Attorney
Signed Date12/31/2018