RSA-509 - Protection & Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR) Program Performance Report

New Mexico (NATIVE AMERICAN P and A PROJECT -- DNA - PEOPLES LEGAL SERVICES) - H240A170057 - FY2017

General Information

Designated Agency Identification

NameNative American Disability Law Center Inc.
Address3535 E 30th Street Suite 201
Address Line 2
CityFarmington
StateNew Mexico
Zip Code87402
E-mail Addresstyanan@nativedisabilitylaw.org
Website Addresshttp://www.nativedisabilitylaw.org
Phone505-566-5880
TTY
Toll-free Phone800-862-7271
Toll-free TTY
Fax505-566-5880
Name of P&A Executive DirectorTherese E. Yanan
Name of PAIR Director/CoordinatorTherese E, Yanan
Person to contact regarding reportTherese E, Yanan
Contact Person phone505-566-5880
Ext.

Part I. Non-Case Services

A. Individual Information and Referral Services (I&R)

Multiple responses are not permitted.

1. Individuals receiving I&R within PAIR priority areas121
2. Individuals receiving I&R outside PAIR priority areas13
3. Total individuals receiving I&R (lines A1 + A2)134

B. Training Activities

1. Number of trainings presented by PAIR staff3
2. Number of individuals who attended training (approximate)87

The Law Center provided monthly parent seminars, which were held at the Gallup Law Center’s office from August 2016 to September 2017. The parent seminars focused on training parents to strengthen their advocacy skills and knowledge under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The seminars trained eleven parents and two service providers. The seminars surveys feedback was good, and parents felt the seminars provided the one-to-one approach that fostered their natural advocacy skills. One service provider who attended one of the seminar made a recommendation to cover a topic when young adults turn age of majority and parents do not understand that process. A second feedback was they would like to extend seminar time, so more topics can be covered in the seminars. One recommendation was to teach a seminar to parents/legal guardians when their son/daughter reach the age of majority have a difficult in understand that process. The seminars attendees received two booklets that was published by the Law Center to help developed and build stronger advocacy skills, “Parents’ Guide to Special Education” booklet and “Resource Guide for Navajo’s with Disabilities” booklets. _________________________________________________ The Law Center participated in organizing & conducting the annual Navajo Disability Awareness Conference. On October 13, 2016, the conference held in Blanding, Utah, that borders the northern part of the Navajo Reservation. The Conference attracted 60 attendees comprised of people with disabilities, their families, & service providers. The Law Center had an Information Table providing general information & distributing brochures & guides. Also, 3 Law Center Staff provided workshops on the proposed Navajo Civil Rights Act, Public Housing Accessibility, and employment options & supports for people with disabilities. The Conference was aired on KNDN, a regional Navajo radio station.

C. Information Disseminated to the Public

1. Radio and TV appearances by PAIR staff2
2. Newspaper/magazine/journal articles5
3. PSAs/videos aired5
4. Hits on the PAIR/P&A website10,081
5. Publications/booklets/brochures disseminated1,537
6. Other (specify separately)0

Narrative

Part II. Individuals Served

A. Individuals Served

Count individual once per FY. Multiple counts not permitted for lines A1 through A3.

1. Individuals still served as of October 1 (carryover from prior FY)9
2. Additional individuals served during the year12
3. Total individuals served (lines A1 + A2)21
4. Individuals w. more than 1 case opened/closed during the FY. (Do not add this number to total on line A3 above.)1

B. Individuals served as of September 30

Carryover to next FY may not exceed total on line II. A.3 above 8

C. Problem Areas/Complaints of Individuals Served

1. Architectural accessibility0
2. Employment0
3. Program access0
4. Housing0
5. Government benefits/services1
6. Transportation0
7. Education17
8. Assistive technology0
9. Voting0
10. Health care0
11. Insurance0
12. Non-government services0
13. Privacy rights0
14. Access to records2
15. Abuse2
16. Neglect0
17. Other0

D. Reasons for Closing Individual Case Files

1. Issues resolved partially or completely in individual favor10
2. Other representation found0
3. Individual withdrew complaint0
4. Appeals unsuccessful0
5. PAIR Services not needed due to individual's death, relocation etc.3
6. PAIR withdrew from case0
7. PAIR unable to take case because of lack of resources1
8. Individual case lacks legal merit0
9. Other0

Please explain

Many of the clients who contact us with issues within our priorities & receive Information & Referral information, would have received more services if we had the resources to provide those services.

E. Intervention Strategies Used in Serving Individuals

List the highest level of intervention used by PAIR prior to closing each case file.

1. Technical assistance in self-advocacy5
2. Short-term assistance3
3. Investigation/monitoring1
4. Negotiation1
5. Mediation/alternative dispute resolution2
6. Administrative hearings1
7. Litigation (including class actions)1
8. Systemic/policy activities0

Part III. Statistical Information on Individuals Served

A. Age of Individuals Served as of October 1

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. 0 - 40
2. 5 - 2218
3. 23 - 592
4. 60 - 640
5. 65 and over1

B. Gender of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Females5
2. Males16

C. Race/Ethnicity of Individuals Served

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race0
2. American Indian or Alaskan Native21
3. Asian0
4. Black or African American0
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander0
6. White0
7. Two or more races0
8. Race/ethnicity unknown0

D. Living Arrangements of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Independent2
2. Parental or other family home18
3. Community residential home0
4. Foster care0
5. Nursing home1
6. Public institutional living arrangement0
7. Private institutional living arrangement0
8. Jail/prison/detention center0
9. Homeless0
10. Other living arrangements0
11. Living arrangements not known0

E. Primary Disability of Individuals Served

Identify the individual's primary disability, namely the one directly related to the issues/complaints

1. Blind/visual impairment2
2. Deaf/hard of hearing1
3. Deaf-blind0
4. Orthopedic impairment0
5. Mental illness1
6. Substance abuse0
7. Mental retardation0
8. Learning disability13
9. Neurological impairment2
10. Respiratory impairment0
11. Heart/other circulatory impairment0
12. Muscular/skeletal impairment0
13. Speech impairment0
14. AIDS/HIV0
15. Traumatic brain injury0
16. Other disability2

Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation

A. Systemic Activities

1. Number of policies/practices changed as a result of non-litigation systemic activities2

2. Number of individuals potentially impacted by policy changes50,000

Describe your systemic activities. Be sure to include information about the policies that were changed and how these changes benefit individuals with disabilities. Include case examples of how your systemic activities impacted individuals served.

The Native American Disability Law Center continued to work with Navajo Nation representatives to refine legislation that would ensure the civil rights of individuals with disabilities throughout the Navajo Nation. The Law Center became involved with this effort at the request of the Navajo Nation Advisory Council on Disabilities (the Advisory Council). The Civil Rights of Individuals with Disabilities Act recognizes civil rights in seven different substantive areas—housing, employment, education, voting, incarceration, government services, and public accommodations. Throughout the fiscal year, the Law Center, worked with the Advisory Council and the legislative sponsor, Delegate Jonathan Hale, as well as representatives from the Navajo Nation Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, the Navajo Nation Department of Justice, and the Navajo Nation Legislative Counsel’s office. After the several meetings with these various stakeholders, the Law Center adjusted the draft legislation to strengthen definitions of disability and reasonable accommodation. The Law Center also added a preference in employment for individuals with disabilities and provided statutory guidance to courts to construe definitions to ensure that individuals with disabilities have opportunities equal to those afforded individuals without disabilities. In addition, the legislation also strengthens the voice of individuals with disabilities on the Navajo Nation Advisory Council on Disabilities by ensuring that a majority of the Advisory Council is composed of individuals with disabilities. The Law Center anticipates that the legislation will be cleared through committees and before the Navajo Nation Council in the winter session, with enactment coming early in 2018. __________________________________

B. Litigation/Class Actions

1. Number of individuals potentially impacted by changes as a result of PAIR litigation/class action efforts9,000
2. Number of individuals named in class actions9

Describe your litigation/class action activities. Explain how individuals with disabilities benefited from your litigation activities. Be sure to include case examples that demonstrate the impact of your litigation.

Stephen C. v. Bureau of Indian Education is a multi-plaintiff civil rights lawsuit that the Native American Disability Law Center (along with four other legal organizations and law firms) filed on behalf of nine Havasupai students against the federal government in January 2017. The lawsuit alleges that the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE), tasked with providing education to Native American students, including students with disabilities, who attend its schools, has failed to provide basic education services including special education services and necessary community wellness and mental health supports in violation of numerous federal laws including Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The lawsuit seeks to provide the nine students with compensatory education to “restore” what they missed by attending the school. Plaintiffs hope that the lawsuit will reform the school’s operations to create a school that will effectively educate generations of Havasupai children to come. The lawsuit is the first federal civil rights action ever filed to address a wholesale denial of educational opportunities for both the general education and special education of Native American students. It was filed in U.S. District Court in Phoenix. While BIE schools are routinely ranked as some of the worst schools in the country, Havasupai Elementary School is at the bottom of that list. Students who attend this school are only taught math and reading because the school does not have the capacity to provide the students with additional instruction. Students with disabilities are not provided with the special education or related services that they need access an appropriate education. Students do not have access to culturally appropriate curriculum, a library or extracurricular activities. Students who “graduate” from the 8th grade are often unable to access public or other BIE high schools around the country because they are so far behind academically. Six of the nine Havasupai students have disabilities that make them eligible to receive special education services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Some of the plaintiffs have been identified as having ADHD, specific learning disabilities, and mental illness. An additional four plaintiffs have been exposed to adverse childhood experiences that impact their abilities to learn. This impact is not being adequately addressed by the BIE. For example, Stephen C., an 11-year-old boy with ADHD who has been eligible to receive special education services at the Havasupai Elementary School, has been on a shortened school day for years and routinely sent home as a means of dealing with his behaviors. Since the lawsuit was filed, the School suggested that Stephen C. attend a residential treatment school in Phoenix where he currently attends school. Another student, Durell P., a 13-year-old Havasupai boy with Oppositional Defiant Disorder, has only been permitted to attend school for about 20% of the school year since he was 8-years-old. In Fall 2016, Durell was relegated to a homebound placement and received as little as 5 hours of instruction per week. Because the school lacks a system to address his behavioral and mental health needs, Durell has not attended school full-time for over 4 years, leading to large deficits in his academic performance. His mother was forced to place Durell in a residential placement in Utah for 45 days, as a condition of his continued enrollment at the school. During the placement, Durell was subjected to repeated use of physical restraints and was unable to communicate with his family for long periods. In addition, Durell, who has multiple disabilities and was the victim of sexual abuse as a young child, is being criminally prosecuted for assault for pushing a teacher. He spent over a week at a federal detention facility. When it was filed, the lawsuit received broad local and national media coverage. The Havasupai Tribal Council supports the lawsuit and has filed an amicus brief with the Court articulating its support. The Society of Indian Psychologists has also filed an amicus brief in support of the lawsuit. Currently, the lawsuit is still in the early stages of litigation and nothing has been decided on the merits. The Plaintiffs are presently awaiting a decision from the federal judge regarding a partial motion to dismiss filed by the BIE.

Part V. PAIR'S Priorities and Objectives

A. Priorities and Objectives for the Fiscal Year Covered by this Report

For each of your PAIR program priorities for the fiscal year covered by this report, please:

  1. Identify and describe priority.
  2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority.
  3. Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.
  4. Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities. If so, describe this collaboration.
  5. Provide the number of cases handled under the priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.
  6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

FY17 Priorities & Objectives 1. Identify & Describe the Priority Priority A: Abuse and Neglect 2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority. The Law Center exists primarily to prevent abuse & neglect & address it when it does occur. 3. Identify & describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority. Objective 1: Monitor the investigation by the appropriate agency of all reported incidents of abuse and neglect. Objective 2: Represent children in abuse & neglect cases as appointed by relevant courts. Objective 3: Provide information regarding rights and services to individuals living in group homes, institutions, detention centers and prisons across the service area by visiting them on a quarterly basis. 4. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions. The Law Center addressed 2 cases under this priority using PAIR funds. The vast majority of cases were handled with other funding. 5. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority. The 2 cases that were addressed did not have substantive outcomes. _________________________________________ 1. Identify & Describe the Priority Priority B: Community Services 2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority. People with disabilities continue to face discrimination, which frequently manifests itself as a lack of access to public services & building, lack of employment opportunities & other civil rights violations. Without adequate civil rights protections, this type of discrimination will continue & prohibit people with disabilities from living, working & fully participating in their communities. 3. Identify & describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority. Objective 1: Advocate for improved civil right protections that guarantee access to community services. Objective 2: Work with other disability advocacy organizations to address systemic discrimination toward individuals with disabilities and to increase the awareness of their needs and services; pass the VR act in collaboration with the Navajo Nation. Objective 3: Pass a Hopi Adult Protection Act that addresses abuse & neglect of adults with disabilities. 4. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions. This Priority focuses on systemic & policy changes, so is not generally used for individual cases. 5. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority. The Native American Disability Law Center continued to work with Navajo Nation representatives to refine legislation that would ensure the civil rights of individuals with disabilities throughout the Navajo Nation. The Law Center became involved with this effort at the request of the Navajo Nation Advisory Council on Disabilities (the Advisory Council). The Civil Rights of Individuals with Disabilities Act recognizes civil rights in seven different substantive areas—housing, employment, education, voting, incarceration, government services, and public accommodations. Throughout the fiscal year, the Law Center, worked with the Advisory Council and the legislative sponsor, Delegate Jonathan Hale, as well as representatives from the Navajo Nation Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services, the Navajo Nation Department of Justice, and the Navajo Nation Legislative Counsel’s office. After the several meetings with these various stakeholders, the Law Center adjusted the draft legislation to strengthen definitions of disability and reasonable accommodation. The Law Center also added a preference in employment for individuals with disabilities and provided statutory guidance to courts to construe definitions to ensure that individuals with disabilities have opportunities equal to those afforded individuals without disabilities. In addition, the legislation also strengthens the voice of individuals with disabilities on the Navajo Nation Advisory Council on Disabilities by ensuring that a majority of the Advisory Council is composed of individuals with disabilities. The Law Center anticipates that the legislation will be cleared through committees and before the Navajo Nation Council in the winter session, with enactment coming early in 2018. _______________________________ 1. Identify & Describe the Priority Priority C: Government Benefits 2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority. In 2011, the Law Center updated the community needs assessment by conducting several community based focus groups & surveying previous clients, advocacy groups & service providers. The needs assessment & the Law Center’s experience identified financial or income security as one of the primary concerns facing our client community. As a result, we began assisting clients to establish their eligibility for appropriate government benefits. The demand for services far exceeded our ability to meet it & it diverted already scarce resources to work that had an important individual impact, but did not address the systemic issues facing our community. As a result, after our 2015 needs assessment we eliminated the priority. We used the past year to wrap up the services, finish cases & notify the client community & service providers that we no longer provide these services. 3. Identify & describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority. Objective 1: Provide information and referrals to individuals with disabilities to increase their understanding of the process for benefits provided by the Social Security Administration. 4. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions. The Law Center provided information & guidance to 85 Native Americans with disabilities. 5. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority. One of the primary problems people have with obtaining Social Security benefits is understanding the application and appeal process. During the past year, the Law Center helped 83 people understand & complete the process to obtain Social Security benefits. Typically, these callers were either at the beginning of the application process or had not appealed earlier denials, so they had to begin the process again with an initial application. The Law Center disseminated general information that explains the application process. The Law Center posted this information on its website and distributed hard copies at all community education and outreach events. Additionally, the Law Center provided representation to 2 clients at the administrative hearing to establish eligibility for benefits. ________________________________ 1. Identify & Describe the Priority Priority D: Special Education 2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority. In 2015, the Law Center updated the community needs assessment by conducting several community based focus groups & surveying previous clients, advocacy groups & service providers. The needs assessment & the Law Center’s experience continually identify special education cases as the primary concern facing our client community. The community feels that providing appropriate services to children with disabilities is essential to later providing these children with the opportunity to fully participate in their communities. 3. Identify & describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority. Objective 1: Provide one (1) training on education rights to students with disabilities and their parents reaching 80 individuals. Objective 2: Provide 10 seminars &/or clinics in Gallup area for students with disabilities and their parents to provide training & support in smaller group setting. Objective 3: Provide technical assistance to students or their parents or guardians of twenty-five (25) children with disabilities to empower them to advocate for their children to obtain and receive appropriate education services in their community and in the least restrictive environment. Objective 4: Provide direct representation in meetings and other informal settings for fifteen (15) children with disabilities who are not receiving a free appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment. Objective 5: Provide direct representation in administrative proceedings for ten (10) children with disabilities who are not receiving a free appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment. Objective 6: Work with other advocacy organizations to address systemic education issues facing students with disabilities. 4. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions. The Law Center addressed the needs of 19 clients under this priority. 5. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority. The Law Center presented at the annual Native American Conference on Special Education Conference on September 20 and 21, 2017 in Albuquerque. The Law Center provided attendees with two presentations. The first was titled “From School to Work: How Transition and Vocational Rehabilitation Services Can Help You Work.” Approximately 45 people attended the session including parents, professionals and other family members. The presentation focused on the interplay between IDEA/ WOIA and other federal laws in ensuring that people with disabilities are provided appropriate transition services in high school and beyond to prepare them to enter the workforce, attend post-secondary education opportunities or pursue other career goals. Presentation feedback was strong with over 60% of participants reporting they would be able to use the information presented in the session in the future. 74% of the participants indicated that the presentation was “useful.” The second presentation was titled “Advocacy Strategies for Children with Disabilities Attending Bureau of Indian Education Schools.” This presentation was attended by nearly 90 people including parents, BIE employees, related services providers and other family members. This session focused on the unique legal issues facing Native American students with disabilities attending BIE schools in Indian Country and how parents/ advocates can best address those unique issues. Nearly 85% perfect of the participants found the presentation “useful.” 78% indicated they would be able to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the presentation to the future. One participant comment was “Should give you a 2-hour block. Your information is invaluable!” In addition to the presentations, Law Center staff presented informational brochures and advocacy guides to participants who stopped by the Law Center’s booth. Over the course of three days the Law Center handed out: 130 “Parent’s Guide to Special Education;” 10 “Housing Rental Rights;” 40 general Law Center brochures; 13 “Legal Services for Individuals with Mental Illness;” 10 “Programs to Help Individuals Return to Work;” 10 “Social Security Benefits for Children with Disabilities;” 14 “Client Assistance Program” brochures; and 12 “Social Security Benefits for Adults with Disabilities.” D is a cheerful young Navajo student who attends a public-school district in Arizona. D’s parents contacted the Law Center requesting assistance with their daughter’s education program in school. Mom received a telephone call from the school administrator that D’s was suspended for three days because she was caught with a male student in a private area on the school campus. D’s parents traveled to the school to pick-up their daughter and to learn more about the incident. D’s parents arrived at the school very upset their daughter was not supervised by school staff. D’s mother was frustrated and upset that her daughter’s safety was not being addressed. The Law Center Advocate, who is a parent of children with disabilities, sat with D parents and had an open discussion about D growing up and experiencing the physical & emotional changes as any typical teenager. D parents took a pause and really did not think their daughter would experiment with her sexuality. The Law Center assisted D’s parents by providing technical assistance to help them develop teaching goals for their daughter that addressed her personal care and social skills. The IEP team members talked about counseling services and providing one-to-one sessions with the school psychologist to provide information on sexuality and being safe. D’s parents felt the school help developed a good safety plan by taking a role in educating D on appropriate social behaviors. D’s parents were happy the IEP team developed goals & added them to their daughter’s IEP. HS is a 10-year old Native American boy with ADHD. HS’s mother was concerned that her son was being segregated in his public education school setting for no reason. As a sophisticated advocate for her son, she was growing concerned that the school was unlawfully segregating him and refusing to integrate him into the general education classroom based solely on his behavioral needs. The Law Center provided HS’s mother with technical assistance regarding HS and her right’s under IDEA in addition to providing specific advocacy strategies to assist her in advocating for HS’s least restrictive environment. The Law Center assisted HS’s mother in writing letters to the school to document her concerns, request Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings in person and to document proposals in the Prior Written Notice (PWN). Using the Law Center’s technical assistance, HS’s mother was able to get HS fully integrated into the general education curriculum. In addition, he was provided with a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) and Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) to address his behavioral needs and to provide him with more support during the school day. HS’s mother told the Law Center that she felt like the Law Center’s involvement in his case helped the school take her concerns seriously. _________________________________ 1. Identify & Describe the Priority Priority F: Housing 2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority. The lack of accessible housing is the primary reason people with disabilities are unable to live in their community & are either placed in institutional or supportive living settings or are forced to move from tribal communities to the border communities. 3. Identify & describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority. Objective 1: Advocate for Navajo and Hopi housing that accommodates the needs of people with disabilities. Objective 2: Assist 5 individuals with disabilities in their efforts to obtain public housing, when they have been denied housing or reasonable accommodations because of their disability. 4. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions. The Law Center did not provide any representation for clients using PAIR funds. We did provide information & referral resources to 5 PAIR eligible clients. 5. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority. The Law Center continued to try to address housing barriers facing Navajos with disabilities. The Navajo Housing Authority (NHA) is the largest source of housing for Navajos living on the Navajo Nation. The Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) found that NHA violated Section 504 by not providing an appropriate level of accessible housing. HUD & NHA entered into a Voluntary Compliance Agreement (VCA) that required NHA to redraft policies to more appropriately meet the needs of people with disabilities & to increase the number of accessible homes. The terms of the VCA met the needs that the Law Center identified in past needs assessments. Over the past several years, the Law Center made several efforts to work with NHA to meet the terms of the VCA. The NHA representatives repeatedly met with the Law Center’s attorneys & advocates & asked for input on proposed policies. After providing this input with specific recommendations several times, the NHA stopped responding to the Law Center’s phone calls & letters. Over the past year, the Law Center continued to reach out to the NHA, but also developed different strategies to access the NHA’s policies. The Law Center sent a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to HUD to access the documents demonstrating compliance with the VCA. The Law Center also used a parallel Navajo statute to request the same information from NHA. At this point, the Law Center received information from HUD & is pursuing legal remedies to access the information from NHA.

B. Priorities and Objectives for the Current Fiscal Year

Please include a statement of priorities and objectives for the current fiscal year (the fiscal year succeeding that covered by this report), which should contain the following information:

  1. a statement of each prioirty;
  2. the need addressed by each priority; and;
  3. a description of the activities to be carried out under each priority.

FY18 Priorities & Objectives 1. Statement of Each Priority Priority A: Abuse and Neglect 2. The Need Addressed by each Priority The Law Center exists primarily to prevent abuse & neglect. 3. Description of the Activities to be Carried Out under Each Priority Objective 1: Monitor the investigation by the appropriate agency of all reported incidents of abuse and neglect. Objective 2: Represent children in abuse & neglect cases as appointed by relevant courts. Objective 3: Provide information regarding rights and services to individuals living in group homes, institutions, detention centers and prisons across the service area by visiting them on a quarterly basis. 1. Statement of Each Priority Priority B: Community Services 2. The Need Addressed by each Priority People with disabilities continue to face discrimination, which frequently manifests itself as a lack of access to public services & building, lack of employment opportunities & other civil rights violations. Without adequate civil rights protections, this type of discrimination will continue & prohibit people with disabilities from living, working & fully participating in their communities. 3. Description of the Activities to be Carried Out under Each Priority Objective 1: Advocate for improved civil right protections that guarantee access to community services. Objective 2: Work with other disability advocacy organizations to address systemic discrimination toward individuals with disabilities and to increase the awareness of their needs and services. Objective 3: Pass a Hopi Adult Protection Act that addresses abuse & neglect of adults with disabilities. Objective 4: Develop self-advocacy groups comprised of individuals with developmental disabilities. 1. Statement of Each Priority Priority C: Special Education 2. The Need Addressed by each Priority In 2015, the Law Center updated the community needs assessment by conducting several community based focus groups & surveying previous clients, advocacy groups & service providers. The needs assessment & the Law Center’s experience continually identify special education cases as the primary concern facing our client community. The community feels that providing appropriate services to children with disabilities is essential to later providing these children with the opportunity to fully participate in their communities. 3. Description of the Activities to be Carried Out under Each Priority Objective 1: Provide one (1) training on education rights to students with disabilities and their parents reaching 80 individuals. Objective 2: Provide technical assistance to students or their parents or guardians of twenty-five (25) children with disabilities to empower them to advocate for their children to obtain and receive appropriate education services in their community and in the least restrictive environment. Objective 3: Provide direct representation in meetings and other informal settings and administrative proceedings for twenty (20) children with disabilities who are not receiving a free appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment. Objective 4: Work with other advocacy organizations to address systemic education issues facing students with disabilities. 1. Statement of Each Priority Priority D: Housing 2. The Need Addressed by each Priority The lack of accessible housing is the primary reason people with disabilities are unable to live in their community & are either placed in institutional or supportive living settings or are forced to move from tribal communities to the border communities. 3. Description of the Activities to be Carried Out under Each Priority Objective 1: Advocate for Navajo and Hopi housing that accommodates the needs of people with disabilities. Objective 2: Assist 5 individuals with disabilities in their efforts to obtain public housing, when they have been denied housing or reasonable accommodations because of their disability.

Part VI. Narrative

At a minimum, you must include all of the information requested. You may include any other information, not otherwise collected on this reporting form that would be helpful in describing the extent of PAIR activities during the prior fiscal year. Please limit the narrative portion of this report, including attachments, to 20 pages or less.

The narrative should contain the following information. The instructions for this form outline the information that should be contained in each section.

  1. Sources of funds received and expended
  2. Budget for the fiscal year covered by this report
  3. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years)
  4. Involvement with advisory boards (if any)
  5. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure
  6. Coordination with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the State long-term care program, if these programs are not part of the P&A agency

A. Source of funds received & expended Received Expended Federal $73,600.00 $72,129.00 State 0 0 Program Income 0 0 Private 0 0 All Other Funds $73,600.00 $72,129.00 B. Budget for the fiscal year covered by this report Expenses Salaries & Related Expenses $48,319.00 Contract Services 9,683.00 Non-Personnel 2,513.00 Occupancy 4,014.00 Travel/Mileage 4,637.00 Miscellaneous Expenses 2,963.00 Total 72,129.00 C. Description of PAIR Staff (duties & person-years) Program Staff Full-Time 0.23 FTE Part-Time 0.02 FTE Vacant 0 Administrative Staff Full-Time 0.30 FTE Part-Time 0.10 FTE Vacant 0 The Full-Time staff include 3 attorneys, 2 advocates & 1 Community & Government Liaison. The attorneys experience ranges from over 20 years to 4 years. The advocates have 18 years & 2 years of experience & the Community & Government Liaison has been with the Law Center for 8 years, but has 20 years of community advocacy & organizing experience. D. Involvement with advisory boards The Law Center is an active member of the Navajo Advisory Council for People with disabilities. The Law Center provides technical assistance to the Council, works with them on parallel initiatives, & the Law Center’s Government & Community Liaison is the President of the Council. E. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure The Law Center did not receive any grievances under its grievance procedures. F. Coordination with the CAP & State long-term care program There is not a long-term care program located on the Navajo Nation or the Hopi reservation with which the Law Center can coordinate.

Certification

Signed?Yes
Signed ByTherese E. Yanan
TitleExecutive Director
Signed Date12/15/2017