RSA-509 - Protection & Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR) Program Performance Report

Colorado (Center for Legal Advocacy) - H240A170006 - FY2017

General Information

Designated Agency Identification

NameDisability Law Colorado
Address455 Sherman Street
Address Line 2Suite 130
CityDenver
StateColorado
Zip Code80203
E-mail Addressmaharvey@disabilitylawco.org
Website Addresshttp://www.disabilitylawco.org
Phone303-722-0300
TTY 303-722-3619
Toll-free Phone800-288-1376
Toll-free TTY800-288-1376
Fax303-722-0720
Name of P&A Executive DirectorMary Anne Harvey
Name of PAIR Director/CoordinatorJennifer Purrington
Person to contact regarding reportMary Anne Harvey
Contact Person phone303-722-0300
Ext.506

Part I. Non-Case Services

A. Individual Information and Referral Services (I&R)

Multiple responses are not permitted.

1. Individuals receiving I&R within PAIR priority areas190
2. Individuals receiving I&R outside PAIR priority areas179
3. Total individuals receiving I&R (lines A1 + A2)369

B. Training Activities

1. Number of trainings presented by PAIR staff19
2. Number of individuals who attended training (approximate)773

• October 11, 2016 — Presentation for the Combined Federal Campaign on DLC Services and Priorities. 100 individuals were present. • October 19, 2016- Presentation on service and assistance animals presentation in Grand Junction, CO. There were 15 school employees, health department staff and people with disabilities present. • October 28, 2106 — Presentation on service and assistance animals for the National Federation for the Blind in Denver, CO. There were 25 people with disabilities present. • October 28, 2016 — Presentation at Parents Encouraging Parents in Vail, CO on special education law, Section 504 and transition services. There were 100 parents and educators present. • November 4, 2016 — Presentation about service animals in food establishments to the Colorado food manager in Denver, CO. There were 10 individuals who work in the food service industry present. • November 7, 2016 — Presentation about service and assistance animals in housing in Denver, CO. There were 8 residents with disabilities present. • January 27, 2017 — Presentation about restraint and seclusion in schools to a local school district in Thornton, CO. There were 3 teachers present. • February 3, 2017 — Presentation at Parents Encouraging Parents in Colorado Springs, CO on special education law, Section 504 and transition services. There were 100 parents and educators present. • February 7, 2017 — Presentation on service and assistance animals in Denver, CO. There were 50 property managers present. • March 18, 2017 — Presentation on patients’ rights at the state hospital in Pueblo, CO. There were 30 social workers who work at the state hospital present. • April 20, 2017 — Presentation on service and assistance animals in Lakewood, CO. There were 40 animal control officers present. • May 5, 2017 — Presentation at Parents Encouraging Parents in Crested Butte, CO on Special Education Law, Section 504 and transition services. There were 110 parents and educators present. • May 22, 2017 — Presentation on service and assistance animals in Colorado Springs, CO. There were 8 people with disabilities present. • June 27, 2017 — Presentation on disability employment law for local company. There were 20 employees and supervisors present. • August 29, 2017 — Presentation to parents and advocates about special education law, Section 504 and transition services in Grand Junction, CO. There were 25 advocates and parents present. • September 1, 2017 — Presentation about restraint and seclusion in schools for local advocates and the Colorado Department of Education. There were 40 advocates and Colorado Department of Education task force members present. • September 11, 2017 - Presentation to parents and advocates about special education law, Section 504 and transition services in Fort Collins, CO. There were 25 advocates and parents present. • September 14, 2017 - Presentation to parents and advocates about special education law, Section 504 and transition services in Pueblo, CO. There were 25 advocates and parents present. • September 14, 2017 — Presentation on service animals and clinic policy in Denver, CO. There were 40 employees of the Rocky Mountain Cancer Center present.

C. Information Disseminated to the Public

1. Radio and TV appearances by PAIR staff7
2. Newspaper/magazine/journal articles3
3. PSAs/videos aired1
4. Hits on the PAIR/P&A website88,729
5. Publications/booklets/brochures disseminated34
6. Other (specify separately)2

Narrative

121,892 = social media impressions. 1,365 — Publications sold/distributed (The Everyday Guide to Special Education Law, Guía de la Ley de Educación Especial, Residents Rights BINGO, Preventing Litigation in Special Education Workbook, But I Don’t Want Eldercare) • CBS Denver — 4/6/17 — Regular restaurant customer asked to show proof of service animal • KGNU — disability Rights Activist Sues Red Rocks for Access -12/6/16 • CPR — Lawsuit demands better wheelchair accessibility at Red Rocks -12/2/16 • CBS Denver — Lawsuit alleges ADA violations at Red Rocks — 2/7/17 • KDVR — Trial expected for Red Rocks federal discrimination suit -2/5/17 • 9NEWS — Advocacy groups sue Red Rocks over accessibility — 12/1/16 • KKTV.com - Red Rocks releases statement in response to lawsuit — 12/7/16 • Durango Herald 9/27/17 —Service dog owner butts heads with Vallecito restaurant • Denver Post - Wheelchair patrons sue Red Rocks, Denver claiming discrimination — 12/1/16 • The Coloradoan - Denver sued over disability access at Red Rocks — 12/4/16

Part II. Individuals Served

A. Individuals Served

Count individual once per FY. Multiple counts not permitted for lines A1 through A3.

1. Individuals still served as of October 1 (carryover from prior FY)20
2. Additional individuals served during the year47
3. Total individuals served (lines A1 + A2)67
4. Individuals w. more than 1 case opened/closed during the FY. (Do not add this number to total on line A3 above.)2

B. Individuals served as of September 30

Carryover to next FY may not exceed total on line II. A.3 above 17

C. Problem Areas/Complaints of Individuals Served

1. Architectural accessibility0
2. Employment21
3. Program access3
4. Housing21
5. Government benefits/services6
6. Transportation2
7. Education0
8. Assistive technology2
9. Voting0
10. Health care1
11. Insurance0
12. Non-government services6
13. Privacy rights0
14. Access to records0
15. Abuse0
16. Neglect1
17. Other11

D. Reasons for Closing Individual Case Files

1. Issues resolved partially or completely in individual favor22
2. Other representation found1
3. Individual withdrew complaint11
4. Appeals unsuccessful0
5. PAIR Services not needed due to individual's death, relocation etc.1
6. PAIR withdrew from case9
7. PAIR unable to take case because of lack of resources1
8. Individual case lacks legal merit5
9. Other2

Please explain

Individual's issue not favorable resolved.

E. Intervention Strategies Used in Serving Individuals

List the highest level of intervention used by PAIR prior to closing each case file.

1. Technical assistance in self-advocacy30
2. Short-term assistance13
3. Investigation/monitoring3
4. Negotiation1
5. Mediation/alternative dispute resolution1
6. Administrative hearings0
7. Litigation (including class actions)3
8. Systemic/policy activities0

Part III. Statistical Information on Individuals Served

A. Age of Individuals Served as of October 1

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. 0 - 43
2. 5 - 227
3. 23 - 5943
4. 60 - 647
5. 65 and over7

B. Gender of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Females44
2. Males23

C. Race/Ethnicity of Individuals Served

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race8
2. American Indian or Alaskan Native0
3. Asian0
4. Black or African American7
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander0
6. White39
7. Two or more races3
8. Race/ethnicity unknown10

D. Living Arrangements of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Independent41
2. Parental or other family home10
3. Community residential home0
4. Foster care0
5. Nursing home5
6. Public institutional living arrangement0
7. Private institutional living arrangement0
8. Jail/prison/detention center3
9. Homeless2
10. Other living arrangements1
11. Living arrangements not known5

E. Primary Disability of Individuals Served

Identify the individual's primary disability, namely the one directly related to the issues/complaints

1. Blind/visual impairment4
2. Deaf/hard of hearing9
3. Deaf-blind1
4. Orthopedic impairment10
5. Mental illness6
6. Substance abuse0
7. Mental retardation4
8. Learning disability2
9. Neurological impairment9
10. Respiratory impairment1
11. Heart/other circulatory impairment3
12. Muscular/skeletal impairment7
13. Speech impairment0
14. AIDS/HIV3
15. Traumatic brain injury2
16. Other disability6

Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation

A. Systemic Activities

1. Number of policies/practices changed as a result of non-litigation systemic activities5

2. Number of individuals potentially impacted by policy changes99,069

Describe your systemic activities. Be sure to include information about the policies that were changed and how these changes benefit individuals with disabilities. Include case examples of how your systemic activities impacted individuals served.

***PAIR staff members continue collaborating with others at our organization to enforce the Olmstead Decision by advocating for all nursing home residents to have access to a system to learn about their community living options and to move into the community if appropriate services and supports are available. This year Disability Law Colorado took a major step in its advocacy by filing a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice regarding the failure of the Colorado Choice Transitions program (CCT), the State’s program to transition individuals out of nursing homes and into the community. Following approximately two years of monitoring the CCT program, advocating for improvements to the program with the state, and advocating on behalf of specific nursing home residents, DLC found that CCT has major systemic flaws and that the insufficient progress had been made to correct the problems with this program. Specifically, DLC found: (1) that there are large swaths of Colorado where the services and supports necessary to access programs and services to transition from nursing homes and into the community are simply non-existent; (2) in areas where the program’s components exist and the program is purportedly working, DLC has found that some former residents are not receiving appropriate services, and; (3) that the State has consistently failed to meet its annual transition benchmarks. Disability Law Colorado filed this complaint in November 2016. Its outcome is still pending. ***PAIR staff members continue collaborating with others at our organization to provide trainings about restraint and seclusion in schools to school staff, advocates, and parents of students with disabilities. This work helps create systemic change throughout Colorado by informing parents/students of their rights around seclusion and restraint and educating school staff about their responsibilities and obligations regarding their use of restraint and seclusion in schools. ***PAIR staff members have committed their time and resources over the past year to support people with disabilities who require service or assistance animals. We have done this through multiple trainings in the community, technical assistance over the phone, and individual advocacy with multiple clients. As part of our trainings, we have focused on informing people about the new Colorado Law that went into effect in January 2017: Misrepresentation of a Service or Assistance Animal. Additionally, we have prepared several different resources for people with disabilities dealing with rights violations related to service and assistance animals to assist with their own self-advocacy. Disability Law Colorado has received an overwhelmingly positive response from our efforts and we continue to get requests for advocacy assistance and trainings. ***PAIR staff members addressed systemic concerns at a local non-profit serving the homeless community. There were systemic concerns that the organization was not advising their clients, often people with disabilities, properly about the law regarding service and assistance animals. Disability Law Colorado met with leadership in the organization, provided resources and two separate trainings for organization staff and providers. ***PAIR staff members have attended a local Fair Housing Roundtable. The purpose of the roundtable group is to get entities in the community who are working on housing issues together to find gaps in services and highlight common issue areas. Although the group has only met three times, Disability Law Colorado has gained resources for our clients by making these connections. Also, the group has created a listserv so all entities working on housing issues can share their questions, advice, and successes. Overall, the group allows Disability Law Colorado to stay on-pulse with the ever-changing housing issues for people with disabilities, especially those with mental illness, in Colorado. Provided multiple trainings this year about service and assistance animals. This work helps create systemic change throughout Colorado by informing landlords, tenants, employers, employees, and community members of the rights of people with disabilities to live in the community with service and assistance animals.

B. Litigation/Class Actions

1. Number of individuals potentially impacted by changes as a result of PAIR litigation/class action efforts160,000
2. Number of individuals named in class actions6

Describe your litigation/class action activities. Explain how individuals with disabilities benefited from your litigation activities. Be sure to include case examples that demonstrate the impact of your litigation.

***PAIR staff collaborated with two other civil rights organizations beginning in August 2016 to discuss filing a lawsuit against the City of Denver. The City owns a famous music venue, Red Rocks Amphitheatre, and due to ticketing practices and policies, the City has not provided the appropriate number and access to accessible seating within the venue. People with disabilities could not access tickets during online sales because they were being bought up by non-disabled patrons, namely scalpers. This left the only accessible seats in the venue in the final row of the amphitheater. Additionally, the shuttle, originally used to transport people with mobility disabilities up to the front of amphitheater was being misused by people without disabilities, forcing those with disabilities to wait much longer than necessary for an accessible entrance to the theater. Also, Red Rocks Amphitheater does not have the required amount of accessible seats and the seats that are available are smaller than the size of an average wheelchair, making it difficult for people using wheelchairs to sit in their assigned seats. Our work on this issue during the previous fiscal year involved a lot of planning and organizing, but we filed a lawsuit against the city with six named plaintiffs as a class action suit in December 2016. Since that time, we have engaged in some preliminary discovery and spent a lot of time negotiating with the city on a viable solution. We recently agreed to settle the case in December 2017. In FY2017, PAIR staff was again active in filing and pursuing administrative cases. Though we typically prefer to remedy issues directly with an organization through negotiation, when necessary, we file administrative complaints in any of the following areas: ***Disability discrimination complaints in the workplace — we file complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) or the Colorado Civil Rights Division (“CCRD”). ***Disability discrimination complaints against housing providers - we file complaints with the CCRD, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Fair Housing and/or the U.S. Department of Agriculture. ***Disability discrimination complaints against a public accommodation — we file complaints with the CCRD and/or the U.S. Department of Justice; ***Disability discrimination complaints in publicly funded post-secondary educational institutions — we file complaints with the U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights (“OCR”). If we deem it appropriate and necessary, we are also open to filing any of the above complaints in state or federal court. Similarly, we are open to filing or intervening in any state or federal case or class-action alleging discrimination against people with disabilities. For example: In August 2017, Disability Law Colorado filed a case in federal court based on discrimination. The case originated in 2013 when Disability Law Colorado was contacted by an individual with an intellectual disability who had been severely harassed for over a year at work based on his race, sex, and disability. In 2014, Disability Law Colorado attempted to negotiate with the client’s employer but ultimately filed an EEOC complaint on behalf of the client. After three years, the EEOC made a final determination of probable cause for the client in December 2016. Unable to conciliate the case with the defendant, Disability Law Colorado collaborated with another civil rights law firm and filed a case in federal court against the employer in August 2017. Our client and the defendants agreed to mediation in September 2017 and the case settled. Our client was able to put the terrible events behind him and move forward with his life after being awarded in the settlement. Our involvement in representing individual clients in litigation has served those individuals, and others following in their footsteps. Furthermore, we had a very active year in training, which we believe also serves a broad class of people with disabilities as well as those providing services.

Part V. PAIR'S Priorities and Objectives

A. Priorities and Objectives for the Fiscal Year Covered by this Report

For each of your PAIR program priorities for the fiscal year covered by this report, please:

  1. Identify and describe priority.
  2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority.
  3. Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.
  4. Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities. If so, describe this collaboration.
  5. Provide the number of cases handled under the priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.
  6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

Priority 1 — Assistance to Remedy Discrimination against Tenants and Homeowners Based on their need for an Assistance Animal 1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation as well as information, referral, technical assistance, and community outreach to help remedy disability discrimination — including issues involving assistance animals - for tenants and applicants of subsidized, public, and other state or federally funded housing programs. 2. Need Addressed — Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who are ineligible for other federally funded protection and advocacy programs experience disability discrimination in housing and will benefit from direct representation, self-advocacy assistance, and activities designed to raise awareness and understanding of the rights of persons with disabilities in housing. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area. 3. Indicators of Success — An indicator of success under this priority is when a property manager, landlord, or housing authority allows an individual with a disability to remain in or obtain a home with their assistance animal, with equal opportunity to use and enjoy that home or when, after talking to PAIR staff, a client or housing provider understands his/her rights and obligations related to fair housing and assistance animals. 4. Collaboration - Pursuing this priority involves cooperative efforts with Colorado Legal Services, Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Colorado Civil Rights Division, the Denver Metro Fair Housing Center, Colorado Affordable Legal Services, individual county housing authorities, the Colorado Housing and Finance Association, Colorado Self-Represented Litigant Coordinators, the Colorado Poverty Law Project, as well as individual members of the private bar who accept such cases. 5. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class action. 17 individual cases with no class action cases. 6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority. a. In March 2017, Disability Law Colorado was contacted by an individual with a disability who needed to have service animal with her in an assisted living facility, but was denied because of a no pets policy. Disability Law Colorado wrote a letter to the assisted living facility explaining the law and requesting that they allow service animals in their facility. The facility responded by allowing the client to tour the facility with her service animal and added her to the waiting list for a unit. b. In June 2017, Disability Law Colorado was contacted by an individual with a disability who requested an emotional support animal, but her landlord told her the unit was a no pets unit and she therefore could not have an emotional support animal. Disability Law Colorado wrote a demand letter to the landlord on the client’s behalf explaining the law and the requirement that they waive the no pets policy so our client could have an emotional support animal. The landlord responded to the letter by calling the client and notifying her that she could have her emotional support animal. c. In March 2017, Disability Law Colorado was contacted by a client with mental illness who was residing in public housing. He had recently received a notice denying his request for an assistance animal from the local housing authority, stating that the animal barked and was a nuisance. The housing authority received this information from neighbors of the client. Client was adamant that the neighbors were lying and his dog was not causing any additional noise. Client has difficulty regulating his emotions due to his disability and his dog allows him to stay calm and conflict free in his home. Client had paperwork to support his need for the animal. Disability Law Colorado reviewed documents provided by the client, met with him multiple times at his home, and assisted him in gathering evidence to support his claims. Disability Law Colorado also assisted the client in following the housing authority appeal process. Disability Law Colorado organized an informal grievance meeting with the local housing authority to advocate for the client. Ultimately, the housing authority allowed client’s dog as an assistance animal as long as client filled out some additional paperwork. Client was facing possible eviction due to this issue, and Disability Law Colorado provided a reasonable solution for him to keep his housing. Priority 2: Assistance to Remedy Systemic Discrimination in Employment. 1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation, advocacy, information, referrals, and technical assistance to remedy disability discrimination for individuals who are not employed by the federal government and experience disability discrimination in the employment setting. 2. Need Addressed - Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who are ineligible for other federally-funded protection and advocacy programs will benefit from receiving direct representation and self-advocacy assistance regarding their disability rights in employment. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area. 3. Indicators of Success — Success is measured when an employer treats an individual with a disability equally to an employee without a disability and agrees to make appropriate accommodations for such a person’s disability or when, after talking with PAIR staff, a client or employer understands his/her rights and obligations relating to non-discrimination on the basis of disability. 4. Collaboration - Pursuing this priority involves on-going collaboration with other agencies and organizations working in the field and organizations to which complaints are made, including, Plaintiffs Employment Lawyers Association, Faculty of Federal Advocates, Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition, the Colorado Civil Rights Division, Civil Rights Education and Enforcement Center, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as individual members of the private bar who accept such cases. 5. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class action. 22 individual cases with no class action cases. 6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority. a. Disability Law Colorado was contacted by an individual with an intellectual disability in 2013 who had been severely harassed for over a year at work based on his race, sex, and disability. In 2014, Disability Law Colorado attempted to negotiate with the client’s employer but ultimately filed an EEOC complaint on behalf on the client. After three years, the EEOC made a final determination of probable cause for the client in December 2016. Unable to conciliate the case with the defendant, Disability Law Colorado collaborated with another civil rights law firm and filed a case in federal court against the employer in August 2017. Our client and the defendants agreed to mediation in September 2017 and the case settled. Our client was able to put the terrible events behind him and move forward with his life after being awarded in the settlement. b. In February 2017, Disability Law Colorado was contacted by a Deaf individual who was denied an interpreter for a job interview. The employer told our client that they did not have the money for the interpreter and they had many other qualified candidates to choose from and therefore could not justify the cost of an interpreter in order to interview him. Disability Law Colorado filed a complaint on his behalf with the Colorado Civil Rights Division (CCRD). The employer requested mediation with the CCRD and the client agreed, so we attended mediation with the client. Although mediation was unsuccessful, we were able to negotiate a successful settlement agreement after the mediation. As part of the settlement, a press release was issued regarding the discriminatory practices of the business, agreed to by both parties. That press release can be found at: http://www.disabilitylawco.org/sites/default/files/uploads/PRESS%20RELEASE%20-%20DLC%20Rhumb%20Line%20Business%20Logistics%2C%20Inc_0.pdf Priority 3: Assistance to Remedy Systemic Discrimination in Places of Public Accommodation 1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation, advocacy, information, referrals, and technical assistance to remedy systemic disability discrimination in Title II and Title III public entities under the ADA. 2. Need Addressed - Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who interact with Title II and Title III entities will benefit from receiving direct representation and self-advocacy assistance regarding their disability rights while interacting with public entities. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area. 3. Indicators of Success — Success is measured when a Title II and/or Title III entity provides the required access and accommodations to the person with a disability or when, after talking with PAIR staff, a client or public entity understands his/her rights and obligations relating to non-discrimination on the basis of disability. 4. Collaboration - Pursuing this priority involves on-going collaboration with other agencies and organizations working in the field and organizations to which complaints are made, including, Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition, the Colorado Civil Rights Division, Civil Rights Education and Enforcement Center, and the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as individual members of the private bar who accept such cases. 5. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class action. 4 individual cases with 1 class action case. 6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority. a. As stated above, Disability Law Colorado collaborated with two other civil rights organizations beginning in August 2016 to discuss filing a lawsuit against the City of Denver. The City owns a famous music venue, Red Rocks Amphitheatre, and due to ticketing practices and policies, the City has not provided the appropriate number and access to accessible seating within the venue. People with disabilities could not access tickets during online sales because they were being bought up by non-disabled patrons, namely scalpers. This left the only accessible seats in the venue in the final row of the amphitheater. Additionally, the shuttle, originally used to transport people with mobility disabilities up to the front of amphitheater was being misused by people without disabilities, forcing those with disabilities to wait much longer than necessary for an accessible entrance to the theater. Also, Red Rocks Amphitheater does not have the required amount of accessible seats and the seats that are available are smaller than the size of an average wheelchair, making it difficult for people using wheelchairs to sit in their assigned seats. Our work on this issue during the previous fiscal year involved a lot of planning and organizing, but we filed a lawsuit against the city with six named plaintiffs as a class action suit in December 2016. Since that time, we have engaged in some preliminary discovery and spent a lot of time negotiating with the city on a viable solution. We recently agreed to settle the case in December 2017. b. Disability Law Colorado was contacted in July of 2016 by a parent of a Deaf child regarding the failure of their home healthcare agency to provide effective communication during occupational therapy sessions. We wrote a demand letter to the home healthcare agency on behalf of the child and her parents regarding the home healthcare agency’s obligation to provide effective communication during all of the occupational therapy appointments. Following receipt of our demand letter and subsequent negotiations, the home healthcare agency ultimately agreed to provide an ASL interpreter for all of the child’s occupational therapy sessions at no cost to the client. Upon our request, the home healthcare agency also developed and provided us with a copy of their new policies and procedures regarding requests for reasonable accommodations and filing of grievances based on discrimination and posted this information on their website.

B. Priorities and Objectives for the Current Fiscal Year

Please include a statement of priorities and objectives for the current fiscal year (the fiscal year succeeding that covered by this report), which should contain the following information:

  1. a statement of each prioirty;
  2. the need addressed by each priority; and;
  3. a description of the activities to be carried out under each priority.

PAIR FY 2018 PRIORITIES AND OBJECTIVES Priority 1 — Assistance to Remedy Systemic Discrimination against Tenants and Homeowners 1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation as well as information, referral, technical assistance, and community outreach to help remedy systemic disability discrimination for tenants and homeowners. 2. Need Addressed — Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, website traffic on our P&A website, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities in housing experience disability discrimination and will benefit from direct representation, self-advocacy assistance, and activities designed to raise awareness and understanding of the rights of persons with disabilities in housing. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area. 3. Activities — Disability Law Colorado will engage in negotiation, alternative dispute resolution, administrative remedies, and/or litigation to remedy disability discrimination for tenants and homeowners. Additionally, Disability Law Colorado will provide information, referrals, advice, guidance, technical assistance, and education and training activities designed to raise awareness and understanding of the rights of persons with disabilities in housing. Disability Law Colorado will not be offering direct representation for clients in eviction proceedings. Priority 2: Assistance to Remedy Systemic Discrimination in Employment. 1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation, advocacy, information, referrals, and technical assistance to remedy disability discrimination for individuals who are not employed by the federal government and experience disability discrimination in the employment setting which may have systemic implications for all employees or potential employees with disabilities. 2. Need Addressed - Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who are ineligible for other federally funded protection and advocacy programs will benefit from receiving direct representation and self-advocacy assistance regarding their disability rights in employment. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area. 3. Activities — Disability Law Colorado will engage in negotiation, alternative dispute resolution, administrative remedies, and/or litigation to remedy disability discrimination in employment. Additionally, Disability Law Colorado shall provide information, referrals, and technical assistance to assist individuals who experience disability discrimination in employment to assist them in self-advocating for their disability rights. Priority 3: Assistance to Remedy Systemic Discrimination in Places of Public Accommodation 1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation, advocacy, information, referrals, and technical assistance to remedy systemic disability discrimination occurring in places of public accommodation. 2. Need Addressed - Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, website traffic on our P&A website, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities utilizing places of public accommodation experience disability discrimination, and therefore, will benefit from systemic advocacy, self-advocacy assistance, and activities designed to raise awareness and understanding of the rights of persons with disabilities in places of public accommodation. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area. 3. Activities — Disability Law Colorado will engage in negotiation, alternative dispute resolution, administrative remedies, and/or litigation to remedy systemic disability discrimination in places of public accommodation, focusing on systemic discrimination. Additionally, Disability Law Colorado shall provide information, referrals, and technical assistance to assist individuals who experience disability discrimination in places of public accommodation to assist them in self-advocating for their disability rights.

Part VI. Narrative

At a minimum, you must include all of the information requested. You may include any other information, not otherwise collected on this reporting form that would be helpful in describing the extent of PAIR activities during the prior fiscal year. Please limit the narrative portion of this report, including attachments, to 20 pages or less.

The narrative should contain the following information. The instructions for this form outline the information that should be contained in each section.

  1. Sources of funds received and expended
  2. Budget for the fiscal year covered by this report
  3. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years)
  4. Involvement with advisory boards (if any)
  5. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure
  6. Coordination with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the State long-term care program, if these programs are not part of the P&A agency

A. Sources of Funding PAIR Grant 226,399.00 Workshop/Consulting Income 1,100.00 Private Contribution 78.00 B. Expenses for Fiscal Year EXPENSES Salaries, Staff 129,519.36 Health Insur. 17,468.85 Workers Comp 360.70 Unemployment 664.75 FICA Expense 9,430.68 TSA Retirement 7,193.54 HR services 1,751.70 Misc. Personnel Expenses 56.25 HUMAN SERVICES TOTAL 166,445.83 Pro Fees, Accounting 797.21 Pro Fees, Audit 577.15 Pro Fees, Consulting 1,068.76 Litigation Expense 36.15 Travel 1,216.47 Staff Development 542.62 NDRN Conferences 3,689.21 Meeting Expenses 210.93 Outreach 101.32 Training 1,306.43 Recruiting Costs 270.83 Office & Gen. Supply 1,691.69 Leased Equipment 814.16 Equipment purchased 3,035.74 Office Equip. Repair 3,981.99 Computer Systems 311.43 Rent & Parking 27,399.74 Building Utilities GJ 1,052.53 Building Maintenance - Den 20.50 Interest Exp. 88.39 Telephone 1,796.03 Postage 395.70 Printing/Copying 906.80 Subscription & Refer. 3,778.10 Dues & Memberships 2,113.57 Insurance, Malpractice 1,540.57 Insurance, Other 315.37 Depreciation 572.40 File Storage 876.58 Accomodation Services 448.96 Miscellaneous 173.5 Sub-Total 61,130.81 EXPENSES GRAND TOTAL 227,576.64 Carryover P&A Grant from FY16 54,653 FY 2017 P&A Grant 248,421 TOTAL AVAILABLE for FY17 303,074 TOTAL Grants SPENT FY 17 226,399.00 Carryover to FY18 76,675 C. Total FTE = 2.23 Program Coordinator 53.7% Advocate 22.4% Staff Attorney 11.2% Legal Director 22.7% Staff Attorney 16.3% Senior Attorney 16.2% Staff Attorney 5.0% Advocate 20.7% Admin Assistant 10.0% Financial Manager 9.% Office Manager 8.9% Executive Director 6.0% Accounting Assistant 9.5% Admin Assistant 9.2% Admin Assistant 2.2% D. Involvement with Advisory boards: Colorado Choice Transitions (CCT) Advisory Council, Early Dispute Resolution Advisory Board E. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure: We received and responded to one grievance. F. Coordination with CAP and State Ombudsman: N/A - both programs are part of Disability Law Colorado.

Certification

Signed?Yes
Signed ByMary Anne Harvey
TitleExecutive Director
Signed Date12/22/2017