RSA-509 - Protection & Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR) Program Performance Report

Colorado (Center for Legal Advocacy) - H240A160006 - FY2016

General Information

Designated Agency Identification

NameDisability Law Colorado
Address455 Sherman Street
Address Line 2Suite 130
CityDenver
StateColorado
Zip Code80203
E-mail Addressmaharvey@disabilitylawco.org
Website Addresshttp://www.disabilitylawco.org
Phone303-722-0300
TTY 303-722-3619
Toll-free Phone800-288-1376
Toll-free TTY800-288-1376
Fax303-722-0720
Name of P&A Executive DirectorMary Anne Harvey
Name of PAIR Director/CoordinatorJennifer Purrington
Person to contact regarding reportMary Anne Harvey
Contact Person phone303-722-0300
Ext.506

Part I. Non-Case Services

A. Individual Information and Referral Services (I&R)

Multiple responses are not permitted.

1. Individuals receiving I&R within PAIR priority areas171
2. Individuals receiving I&R outside PAIR priority areas170
3. Total individuals receiving I&R (lines A1 + A2)341

B. Training Activities

1. Number of trainings presented by PAIR staff17
2. Number of individuals who attended training (approximate)472

FY2016 Trainings

• The Director of Legal Services gave a 1.5 hour overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act to 12 investigators and staff of Colorado Civil Rights Division in October 2015.

• Two PAIR staff presented for 90 minutes on Housing Law Hot Topics at the Housing NOW Conference in Beaver Creek, Colorado in October 2015. The audience was comprised of about 25 housing providers.

• The Director of Legal Services and PAIR Attorney presented to about 100 people (from a variety of economic and disability backgrounds) on legal resources available to people with disabilities. The program was held at the Ralph Carr Judicial Building and was sponsored by the Statewide Sherlock Program in October 2015.

• A PAIR staff member participated in a panel on a discussion/training on Disability Legal Issues to an international group of 20 leaders in disability rights issues in Kazakhstan in October 2015.

• The Director of Legal services presented to 20 student at DU Law School about the “Importance of Pro Bono Work” in October 2015.

• Two attorneys presented a 3 hour parent training in Colorado Springs, Colorado on “Restraint Rules in Colorado Schools”. Approximately 30 people attended, including school district staff, parents of children with disabilities and parent advocates. This training was a result of a collaboration with the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council and occurred in October 2015.

• A staff member presented a 20 minute training on “People First Language” to a group of 14 people at Bethany Free Church as part of Disability Ministry. The training was in November 2015.

• Two attorneys presented a 3 hour parent training in Denver, Colorado on “Restraint Rules in Colorado Schools”. Approximately 30 people attended, including school district staff, parents of children with disabilities and parent advocates. This training was a result of a collaboration with the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council and occurred in November 2015.

• Staff presented an overview of Disability Law Colorado services and priorities to a group of 30 people with disabilities and parents at the College Living Experience in January 2016.

• The Director of Legal Services presented a 3 hour parent training in Durango, Colorado on “Restraint Rules in Colorado Schools”. Approximately 7 people attended, including school district staff, parents of children with disabilities and parent advocates. This training was a result of a collaboration with the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council and occurred in March 2016.

• The Director of Legal Services and the Managing Attorney in Grand Junction presented a 3 hour parent training in Grand Junction, Colorado on “Restraint Rules in Colorado Schools”. Approximately 8 people attended, including school district staff, parents of children with disabilities and parent advocates. This training was a result of a collaboration with the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council and occurred in March 2016.

• A PAIR attorney and our Senior Intake Specialist presented to the MS Society staff of 8 on DLC services and priorities in April 2016.

• The Director of Legal Services presented a 90-minute webinar on Animals in Housing to 50 housing providers throughout Colorado in May 2016.

• A PAIR attorney presented for 90 minutes on Employment Law and the ADA to 15 employment advocates in May 2016.

• A PAIR attorney presented a two-hour presentation — Requirements for Service and Assistance Animals in Denver for an audience of 38 people, comprised of advocates, people with disabilities and healthcare workers in August 2016.

• A PAIR attorney presented a two-hour presentation — Requirements for Service and Assistance Animals in Colorado Springs for an audience of 30 people, comprised of people with disabilities, advocates, service animal users and trainers, business owners, landlords, and service providers in September 2016.

• A PAIR attorney presented a two-hour presentation — Requirements for Service and Assistance Animals in Denver for an audience of 35 people, comprised of people with disabilities, advocates, service animal users and trainers, business owners, landlords, and service providers in September 2016.

• 17 trainings — 472 people

C. Information Disseminated to the Public

1. Radio and TV appearances by PAIR staff2
2. Newspaper/magazine/journal articles3
3. PSAs/videos aired0
4. Hits on the PAIR/P&A website132,256
5. Publications/booklets/brochures disseminated8
6. Other (specify separately)6

Narrative

17,000 hits on Randy Chapman's AbilityBlog;

1,239 Facebook followers; 233,658 post impressions;

1,487 Twitter followers;

3 press releases issued;

TV Appearances- 2

• The Director of Legal Services was interviewed by Channel 9 News regarding the accessibility of Red Rocks Amphitheater in October 2015.

• The Director of Legal Services was interviewed by Denver 7 News about the restraint and seclusion laws in Colorado schools in May 2016.

Newspaper/magazine/journal articles- 3

• Opposition to failed Colorado legislation regarding service animals- Letter to the Editor- The Denver Post- April 2016

• Finally, Colorado Is Cracking Down On Service Dog Fraud. Colorado is saying enough to people with fake service dogs. But who does the bill really help?- Online Article- The Daily Beast- April 2016

• Discussion: Should impersonating a service dog be a punishable offense- Online Article- Iheartdogs.com- April 2016

Part II. Individuals Served

A. Individuals Served

Count individual once per FY. Multiple counts not permitted for lines A1 through A3.

1. Individuals still served as of October 1 (carryover from prior FY)29
2. Additional individuals served during the year37
3. Total individuals served (lines A1 + A2)66
4. Individuals w. more than 1 case opened/closed during the FY. (Do not add this number to total on line A3 above.)0

B. Individuals served as of September 30

Carryover to next FY may not exceed total on line II. A.3 above 19

C. Problem Areas/Complaints of Individuals Served

1. Architectural accessibility3
2. Employment15
3. Program access5
4. Housing20
5. Government benefits/services2
6. Transportation1
7. Education1
8. Assistive technology4
9. Voting0
10. Health care1
11. Insurance0
12. Non-government services6
13. Privacy rights0
14. Access to records0
15. Abuse0
16. Neglect1
17. Other7

D. Reasons for Closing Individual Case Files

1. Issues resolved partially or completely in individual favor28
2. Other representation found3
3. Individual withdrew complaint6
4. Appeals unsuccessful0
5. PAIR Services not needed due to individual's death, relocation etc.1
6. PAIR withdrew from case3
7. PAIR unable to take case because of lack of resources3
8. Individual case lacks legal merit1
9. Other2

Please explain

2 (Other) - Individual's issue not favorably resolved.

E. Intervention Strategies Used in Serving Individuals

List the highest level of intervention used by PAIR prior to closing each case file.

1. Technical assistance in self-advocacy31
2. Short-term assistance10
3. Investigation/monitoring1
4. Negotiation3
5. Mediation/alternative dispute resolution1
6. Administrative hearings0
7. Litigation (including class actions)1
8. Systemic/policy activities0

Part III. Statistical Information on Individuals Served

A. Age of Individuals Served as of October 1

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. 0 - 41
2. 5 - 226
3. 23 - 5945
4. 60 - 646
5. 65 and over8

B. Gender of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Females33
2. Males33

C. Race/Ethnicity of Individuals Served

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race5
2. American Indian or Alaskan Native0
3. Asian0
4. Black or African American1
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander0
6. White51
7. Two or more races0
8. Race/ethnicity unknown9

D. Living Arrangements of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Independent39
2. Parental or other family home11
3. Community residential home0
4. Foster care0
5. Nursing home5
6. Public institutional living arrangement0
7. Private institutional living arrangement0
8. Jail/prison/detention center4
9. Homeless1
10. Other living arrangements0
11. Living arrangements not known6

E. Primary Disability of Individuals Served

Identify the individual's primary disability, namely the one directly related to the issues/complaints

1. Blind/visual impairment3
2. Deaf/hard of hearing6
3. Deaf-blind0
4. Orthopedic impairment12
5. Mental illness12
6. Substance abuse0
7. Mental retardation8
8. Learning disability2
9. Neurological impairment12
10. Respiratory impairment0
11. Heart/other circulatory impairment1
12. Muscular/skeletal impairment2
13. Speech impairment0
14. AIDS/HIV3
15. Traumatic brain injury1
16. Other disability4

Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation

A. Systemic Activities

1. Number of policies/practices changed as a result of non-litigation systemic activities3

2. Number of individuals potentially impacted by policy changes920,300

Describe your systemic activities. Be sure to include information about the policies that were changed and how these changes benefit individuals with disabilities. Include case examples of how your systemic activities impacted individuals served.

***PAIR staff filed a complaint with the Colorado Civil Rights Division (CCRD) for a client who was harassed and kicked off of a city bus because the bus driver did not believe he had a disability and therefore told him that he could not use his discount pass. The complaint is currently pending with the CCRD, but if successful, this complaint could result in changes to the entire city bus system and prevent such discrimination from occurring within that system in the future.

***PAIR staff members continue collaborating with others at our organization to enforce the Olmstead Decision by advocating for all nursing home residents to have access to a system to learn about their community living options and to move into the community if appropriate services and supports are available. This year Disability Law Colorado took a major step in its advocacy by drafting a complaint to be filed with the U.S. Department of Justice regarding the failure of the Colorado Choice Transitions program (CCT), the State’s program to transition individuals out of nursing homes and into the community. Following approximately two years of monitoring the CCT program, advocating for improvements to the program with the state, and advocating on behalf of specific nursing home residents, DLC found that CCT has major systemic flaws and that the insufficient progress had been made to correct the problems with this program. Specifically, DLC found: (1) that there are large swaths of Colorado where the services and supports necessary to access programs and services to transition from nursing homes and into the community are simply non-existent; (2) in areas where the program’s components exist and the program is purportedly working, DLC has found that some former residents are not receiving appropriate services, and; (3) that the State has consistently failed to meet its annual transition benchmarks. Disability Law Colorado will file this complaint in the next fiscal year.

***PAIR staff became involved in a case involving an assisted living group home for older adults. The company owning the home wanted to open a second group home in another area of the community but the neighbors of that community filed a lawsuit in state court to block them from being able to live in their community based on restrictive community covenants. Disability Law Colorado became involved in representing three of the residents with disabilities who wanted to move to the new location. We prepared to file a federal lawsuit for disability discrimination, but during the state court mediation process, DLC persuaded the neighbors to drop their suit, so the federal court claim was never filed. There are now two assisted living group homes in different areas of the community where older adults with disabilities can live in an integrated setting and the community association now understands that the law requires reasonable accommodations be made to neighborhood covenants, when necessary, to accommodate disabilities.

***PAIR staff members continue collaborating with others at our organization to provide trainings about restraint and seclusion in schools to school staff, advocates, and parents of students with disabilities. This work helps create systemic change throughout Colorado by informing parents/students of their rights around seclusion and restraint and educating school staff about their responsibilities and obligations regarding their use of restraint and seclusion in schools.

B. Litigation/Class Actions

1. Number of individuals potentially impacted by changes as a result of PAIR litigation/class action efforts9
2. Number of individuals named in class actions0

Describe your litigation/class action activities. Explain how individuals with disabilities benefited from your litigation activities. Be sure to include case examples that demonstrate the impact of your litigation.

In FY2016, PAIR staff was again active in filing and pursuing administrative cases. Though we typically prefer to remedy issues directly with an organization through negotiation, when necessary, we file administrative complaints in any of the following areas:

***Disability discrimination complaints in the workplace — we file complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) or the Colorado Civil Rights Division (“CCRD”).

***Disability discrimination complaints against housing providers - we file complaints with the CCRD, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Fair Housing and/or the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

***Disability discrimination complaints against a public accommodation — we file complaints with the CCRD and/or the U.S. Department of Justice;

***Disability discrimination complaints in publicly funded post-secondary educational institutions — we file complaints with the U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights (“OCR”).

If we deem it appropriate and necessary, we are also open to filing any of the above complaints in state or federal court. Similarly, we are open to filing or intervening in any state or federal case or class-action alleging discrimination against people with disabilities.

While PAIR staff was not actively involved in any class action cases this year, our involvement in representing individual clients in litigation has served those individuals, and others following in their footsteps. Furthermore, we had a very active year in training, which we believe also serves a broad class of people with disabilities as well as those providing services.

***PAIR staff began collaborating with two other civil rights organizations in August 2016 to discuss potentially filing a lawsuit against the City of Denver. The City owns a famous music venue, Red Rocks Amphitheatre, and due to ticketing practices and policies, the City has not provided the appropriate number and access to accessible seating within the venue. Our work on this issue during the previous fiscal year involved a lot of planning and organizing, but the work, including filing a lawsuit against the City, will continue into FY2017.

Part V. PAIR'S Priorities and Objectives

A. Priorities and Objectives for the Fiscal Year Covered by this Report

For each of your PAIR program priorities for the fiscal year covered by this report, please:

  1. Identify and describe priority.
  2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority.
  3. Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.
  4. Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities. If so, describe this collaboration.
  5. Provide the number of cases handled under the priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.
  6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

Priority 1 — Assistance for Participants of State or Federally Funded Housing Programs

1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation as well as information, referral, technical assistance, and community outreach to help remedy disability discrimination — including issues involving service or companion animals - for tenants and applicants of subsidized, public, and other state or federally funded housing programs.

2. Need Addressed — Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who are ineligible for other federally funded protection and advocacy programs experience disability discrimination in housing and will benefit from direct representation, self-advocacy assistance, and activities designed to raise awareness and understanding of the rights of persons with disabilities in housing. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area.

3. Indicators of Success — An indicator of success under this priority is when a property manager, landlord, or housing authority allows an individual with a disability to remain in or obtain a home, with equal opportunity to use and enjoy that home or when, after talking to PAIR staff, a client or housing provider understands his/her rights and obligations related to fair housing.

4. Collaboration - Pursuing this priority involves cooperative efforts with Colorado Legal Services, Colorado Cross Disability Coalition, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Colorado Civil Rights Division, the Denver Metro Fair Housing Center, Colorado Affordable Legal Services, individual county housing authorities, the Colorado Housing and Finance Association, Colorado Self-Represented Litigant Coordinators, the Colorado Poverty Law Project, as well as individual members of the private bar who accept such cases.

5. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class action. 20 with no class action cases.

6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

a. In August of 2016, Disability Law Colorado was contacted by an individual with a disability because her housing provider was denying her request for an emotional support animal. The housing provider was asking that this individual have her doctor fill out a specific reasonable accommodation request form that required the doctor to verify that the animal did not need to be one of a list of breeds of dogs, that the doctor be licensed in Colorado, and that the doctor’s signature be notarized. Disability Law Colorado wrote a letter to the housing provider on behalf of this individual explaining that requiring a specific form for requesting reasonable accommodations was illegal and further asking that the housing provider grant our client’s request to have her emotional support animal. Upon receipt of the letter from Disability Law Colorado, the housing provider quickly contacted our client and let her know she could keep her emotional support animal with her in her unit.

b. In June of 2016, Disability Law Colorado was contacted by an individual with a disability who had obtained housing through a local nonprofit that assists individuals who are chronically homeless. Unfortunately, the client’s case manager was unwilling to allow him to have a companion animal with him in his unit. Disability Law Colorado assisted the client in obtaining stronger documentation regarding the need for a companion animal from his medical provider and also spoke with his case manager and advocated on his behalf during those discussions. After a lot of pushback from his case manager against our advocacy efforts, the client was finally allowed to keep his animal in his unit with him.

c. Attorneys from Disability Law Colorado represented a man in an effort to provide him with a reasonable accommodation in order for him to participate in a home-purchase program through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Due to the client’s disabilities he finds living in an apartment setting to be extremely stressful. Both the client and his medical provider agreed that living in his own home would provide the client with the sense of stability necessary for him to feel secure and reduce his anxiety; however, the county housing authority denied him access to this program asserting that it was not offered in his county. The housing authority also failed to inform him on numerous occasions that he could ask for a reasonable accommodation to participate in a home-purchase program. DLC attorneys assisted him in requesting a reasonable accommodation in order for the client to participate in the home purchase program. This request was denied by the county housing authority. In response DLC attorneys represented the client in an informal hearing to appeal the denial before a non-lawyer hearing officer and employee of the county. Again, the reasonable accommodation request was denied without a clear legal basis for the denial. DLC has now agreed to file a complaint with HUD, which will be filed in FY2017.

Priority 2: Assistance to Remedy Discrimination in Employment.

1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation, advocacy, information, referrals, and technical assistance to remedy disability discrimination for individuals who are not employed by the federal government and experience disability discrimination in the employment setting.

2. Need Addressed - Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who are ineligible for other federally-funded protection and advocacy programs will benefit from receiving direct representation and self-advocacy assistance regarding their disability rights in employment. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area.

3. Indicators of Success — Success is measured when an employer treats an individual with a disability equally to an employee without a disability and agrees to make appropriate accommodations for such a person’s disability or when, after talking with PAIR staff, a client or employer understands his/her rights and obligations relating to non-discrimination on the basis of disability.

4. Collaboration - Pursuing this priority involves on-going collaboration with other agencies and organizations working in the field and organizations to which complaints are made, including, Plaintiffs Employment Lawyers Association, Faculty of Federal Advocates, Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition, the Colorado Civil Rights Division, Civil Rights Education and Enforcement Center, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as individual members of the private bar who accept such cases.

5. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class action. 15 with no class action cases.

6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

a. Disability Law Colorado was contacted by an individual diagnosed with Parkinson’s earlier in the year. He began to need some accommodations in his job that he had held with the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) for the past 18 years. He wanted to keep working and at the very least, be able to continue to work until his full retirement age of 66, which was a little over a year away. Initially, his employer suggested very restrictive accommodations and removed some of his job duties. After Disability Law Colorado became involved, through their advocacy, appropriate accommodations were put in place throughout the 2015-2016 year and the client was able to work until his planned retirement date, with a small leave of absence toward the end of this time. In addition to requesting accommodations for the client, DLC assisted in advocating for a disability sensitivity training at CDOT for multiple employees. This occurred before the client retired.

b. Disability Law Colorado was contacted by an individual diagnosed with nerve damage in her hands from a car accident. She was a pit boss at a local casino and originally asked for a reasonable accommodation to wear gloves on the job, which were necessary to keep her hands warm due to the nerve damage. The employer refused her accommodation request and terminated her because they felt they couldn’t accommodate her disability. Disability Law Colorado assisted her in filing a complaint with the EEOC. The client received a cause finding, attended a conciliation with the assistance of DLC, and negotiated a settlement with her former employer.

B. Priorities and Objectives for the Current Fiscal Year

Please include a statement of priorities and objectives for the current fiscal year (the fiscal year succeeding that covered by this report), which should contain the following information:

  1. a statement of each prioirty;
  2. the need addressed by each priority; and;
  3. a description of the activities to be carried out under each priority.

PAIR FY 2017 PRIORITIES AND OBJECTIVES

Priority 1 — Assistance to Remedy Discrimination against Tenants and Homeowners Based on their need for an Assistance Animal

1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation as well as information, referral, technical assistance, and community outreach to help remedy disability discrimination relating to assistance animals for tenants and homeowners.

2. Need Addressed — Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, website traffic on our P&A website, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who need assistance animals in housing experience disability discrimination and will benefit from direct representation, self-advocacy assistance, and activities designed to raise awareness and understanding of the rights of persons with disabilities in housing. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area.

3. Activities — Disability Law Colorado will engage in negotiation, alternative dispute resolution, administrative remedies, and/or litigation to remedy disability discrimination related to the need for assistance animals for tenants and homeowners. Additionally, Disability Law Colorado will provide information, referrals, advice, guidance, technical assistance, and education and training activities designed to raise awareness and understanding of the rights of persons with disabilities in housing. Disability Law Colorado will not be offering direct representation for clients in eviction proceedings.

Priority 2: Assistance to Remedy Systemic Discrimination in Employment.

1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation, advocacy, information, referrals, and technical assistance to remedy disability discrimination for individuals who are not employed by the federal government and experience disability discrimination in the employment setting which may have systemic implications for all employees or potential employees with disabilities.

2. Need Addressed - Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who are ineligible for other federally funded protection and advocacy programs will benefit from receiving direct representation and self-advocacy assistance regarding their disability rights in employment. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area.

3. Activities — Disability Law Colorado will engage in negotiation, alternative dispute resolution, administrative remedies, and/or litigation to remedy disability discrimination in employment. Additionally, Disability Law Colorado shall provide information, referrals, and technical assistance to assist individuals who experience disability discrimination in employment to assist them in self-advocating for their disability rights.

Priority 3: Assistance to Remedy Systemic Discrimination in Places of Public Accommodation

1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation, advocacy, information, referrals, and technical assistance to remedy systemic disability discrimination occurring in places of public accommodation. In particular, Disability Law Colorado will focus on issues involving assistance animals or outdoor concert venues.

2. Need Addressed - Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, website traffic on our P&A website, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities utilizing places of public accommodation experience disability discrimination, especially those who need assistance animals, and therefore, will benefit from systemic advocacy, self-advocacy assistance, and activities designed to raise awareness and understanding of the rights of persons with disabilities in places of public accommodation. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area.

3. Activities — Disability Law Colorado will engage in negotiation, alternative dispute resolution, administrative remedies, and/or litigation to remedy systemic disability discrimination in places of public accommodation, focusing on discrimination issues involving assistance animals and outdoor concert venues. Additionally, Disability Law Colorado shall provide information, referrals, and technical assistance to assist individuals who experience disability discrimination in places of public accommodation to assist them in self-advocating for their disability rights.

Part VI. Narrative

At a minimum, you must include all of the information requested. You may include any other information, not otherwise collected on this reporting form that would be helpful in describing the extent of PAIR activities during the prior fiscal year. Please limit the narrative portion of this report, including attachments, to 20 pages or less.

The narrative should contain the following information. The instructions for this form outline the information that should be contained in each section.

  1. Sources of funds received and expended
  2. Budget for the fiscal year covered by this report
  3. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years)
  4. Involvement with advisory boards (if any)
  5. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure
  6. Coordination with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the State long-term care program, if these programs are not part of the P&A agency

A.

Sources of Funding received and expended:

PAIR P & A Grant 207,603.00

Workshop Income 150.00

Court Awards & Client fees 5,000.00

B.

INCOME TOTAL 212,753.00

Expenses for FY 2016:

EXPENSES

Salaries, Staff 126,600.29

Health Insur. 17,655.94

Workers Comp 308.76

Unemployment 144.16

FICA Expense 9,122.90

TSA Retirement 7,253.80

Temporary Employees 1,779.50

HR services 541.53

Contract Employees 0.00

Misc. Personnel Expenses 70.80

HUMAN SERVICES TOTAL 163,477.68

Pro Fees, Accounting 752.17

Pro Fees, Audit 960.38

Pro Fees, Consulting 1,089.21

Travel 857.54

Staff Development 1,029.84

NDRN Conferences 3,585.98

Meeting Expenses 205.21

Outreach 1,508.63

Training 102.24

Office & Gen. Supply 1,648.47

Leased Equipment 593.64

Equipment purchased 117.19

Office Equip. Repair 1,262.20

Computer Systems & Web Exp. 1,489.06

Rent & Parking 21,749.40

Building Utilities & Maint. - G.J. 422.11

Building Maintenance - Den 10.21

Interest Exp. 200.37

Telephone 1,945.22

Postage 494.00

Printing/Copying 785.95

Subscription & Refer. 2,874.20

Dues & Memberships 2,061.28

Insurance, Malpractice 1,293.53

Insurance, Other 193.45

File Storage 592.42

Accommodation Services 473.92

Miscellaneous 67.90

Depr 909.46

EXPENSES TOTAL 212,752.88

C. 2017 Budget

FY 2017 Budget

Salaries, Staff 122,889

Health Insur. 18,333

Workers Comp 286

Unemployment 98

FICA Expense 9,401

TSA Retirement 4,993

Temporary Employees 617

Contract Employees 0

Human resources contract 1,963

Misc. Personnel Expenses 42

----------

HUMAN SERVICES TOTAL 158,622

Pro Fees, Accounting 657

Pro Fees, Audit 903

Pro Fees, Legal 125

Pro Fees, Consulting 707

Litigation Expense 1,500

Travel 2,041

Staff Development 1,033

NAPAS Conference 2,800

Meeting Expenses 508

Marketing Expenses 493

Training Exp. 1,000

Recruiting Costs 21

Office & Gen. Supply 1,478

Leased Equipment 493

Equipment purchased 1,221

Office Equip. Repair 1,889

Computer Systems Exp. 903

Rent & Parking 17,245

Rent - Grand Junction 5,224

Building Utilities & Maint. - G.J. 736

Building Maintenance - Den 123

Capital Lease Interest Exp. 66

Telephone 1,396

Postage 666

Printing/Copying 829

Subscription & Refer. 3,000

Dues & Memberships 2,062

Insurance, Malpractice 1,150

Insurance, Other 166

Depreciation 491

Publication Expense 205

File Storage 534

Accommodation Services 1,541

EXPENSES Sub-TOTAL 211,828

C. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years)

Advocate 42.7%

Staff Attorney 36.1%

Legal Dir. 21.4%

Legal Dir. 7.4%

Staff Attorney 16.2%

Senior Attorney 11.2%

Staff Attorney 10.1%

Staff Attorney 8.1%

Staff Attorney 4.7%

Senior Attorney 0.6%

Senior Attorney 0.4%

Advocate 0.3%

Admin Assistant 12.0%

Accounting Assistant 11.5%

Financial Manager 11.0%

Office Manager 2.8%

Executive Director 0.8%

Admin Assistant 7.2%

Admin Assistant 6.6%

Admin Assistant 4.3%

Admin Assistant 2.8%

Training/Development 0.8%

D. Involvement with Advisory boards: Colorado Choice Transitions (CCT) Advisory Council

E. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure:

No grievances filed.

F. Coordination with CAP and State Ombudsman: N/A - both programs are part of Disability Law Colorado.

Certification

Signed?Yes
Signed ByMary Anne Harvey
TitleExecutive Director
Signed Date12/23/2016