RSA-509 - Protection & Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR) Program Performance Report

Wisconsin (Disability Rights Wisconsin, Inc.) - H240A150050 - FY2015

General Information

Designated Agency Identification

NameDisability Rights Wisconsin
Address131 W. Wilson St. Suite 700
Address Line 2
CityMadison
StateWisconsin
Zip Code53703
E-mail Addressmonicam@drwi.org
Website Addresshttp://www.disabilityrightswi.org
Phone608-267-0214
TTY 888-758-6049
Toll-free Phone800-928-8778
Toll-free TTY888-758-6049
Fax608-267-0368
Name of P&A Executive DirectorDan Idzikowski
Name of PAIR Director/CoordinatorMonica Murphy
Person to contact regarding reportMonica Murphy
Contact Person phone414-773-4646
Ext.16

Part I. Non-Case Services

A. Individual Information and Referral Services (I&R)

Multiple responses are not permitted.

1. Individuals receiving I&R within PAIR priority areas192
2. Individuals receiving I&R outside PAIR priority areas658
3. Total individuals receiving I&R (lines A1 + A2)850

B. Training Activities

1. Number of trainings presented by PAIR staff25
2. Number of individuals who attended training (approximate)2,462

Training Name: Accessibility training to registrars in probate Description: train probate court on accessibility requirements Purpose: increase access to probate courts Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: ADA 25th Celebration and Education Description: The MHTF held a 25th celebration of the ADA which highlighted recent institutional closings and the needs that must still be addressed for people with mental illness to live in the community with independence and respect. Featured speaker was Darby Penney Co-author of The Lives They Left Behind: Suitcases from a State Hospital Attic. Another highlight was presentation of the 2nd Karen Avery award. Purpose: Recognize impact of the ADA, progress made to date in closing institutions, and the work still to be done. Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Ch 50 training for MCQS staff Description: Provided training to MCQs in the Bureau of Managed Care re: advocacy role in ch 50 process and residents rights Purpose: To provide info on role of advocates (DRW) on the ch 50 relocation team and resident rights in the process. Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Key to Your Future- PTP and Plan for Employment, 1 Description: DRW will provide training to students, parents and agenices on the new Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Post Secondary Transition Plan or the PTP and the use of DVR, Family Care and IRIS as it relates to employment. These training will take place over the course of the year and will include trainings with the following partners, Wraparound Milwaukee, MCFI, Independence First, Brown Deer High School, Milwaukee Public Schools, and the Latino Forum. Purpose: The objective is to allow students, families and agencies to understand the use of the PTP in the IEP Process, to understand how to access services from DVR and how to use long term care funding for employment related needs. Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Key to Your Future- PTP and Plan for Employment, 2 Description: DRW will provide training to students, parents and agenices on the new Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Post Secondary Transition Plan or the PTP and the use of DVR, Family Care and IRIS as it relates to employment. These training will take place over the course of the year and will include trainings with the following partners, Wraparound Milwaukee, MCFI, Independence First, Brown Deer High School, Milwaukee Public Schools, and the Latino Forum. Purpose: The objective is to allow students, families and agencies to understand the use of the PTP in the IEP Process, to understand how to access services from DVR and how to use long term care funding for employment related needs. Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Epilepsy support group Description: train epilepsy support group on ADA rights Purpose: increase awareness of rights Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: EPSDT for Adoptive Parents Description: Training to parents and advocates on EPSDT benefit. Purpose: Increase understanding of breadth and applicability of EPSDT Medicaid benefit. Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Ethics and Boundaries Description: Training for guardians on ethical obligation to involve ward in a all decisions possible. Purpose: To make sure guardians understand their obligation to involve ward in decisions as much as competency will permit; obligation to perform guardianship in the least restrictive manner as possible. Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Fair Housing Network training Description: Provide training at Fair Housing Network on service and emotional support animals Purpose: increase awareness of rights of pwd to have service and support animals in housing Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Journey Forward Description: This is a transition training for students attending MPS. Purpose: Educate students about transition. Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Kenosha briefing on biennial budget Description: Provided briefing to Kenosha area disability and aging community regarding proposed biennial budget and impact on people with disabilities and older adults. Purpose: to educate people with disabilities, family members and others in the disability community about proposed state budget and the impact on people with disabilities Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Latino Forum Description: Special Education Fair for Latino families Purpose: Increase appropriate special ed and transition services for Latino families Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Latino Forum Description: Special Education Fair for Latino families Purpose: Increase appropriate special ed and transition services for Latino families Method: Individual Instruction ***** Training Name: Milwaukee County Transition Fair Description: We had a booth at the transition fair where we handed out employment workbooks, PTP booklets and a lot of advice to parents and students in transition. Purpose: Encourage parents to become knowledgeable about transition and how it works. Method: Individual Instruction ***** Training Name: North Division High School Health Fair Description: Health fair held by MPS at the start of each school year that provides a wide variety of resources to students with and without disabilities Purpose: Educate parents and students about special education rights, rights during transition and how to access vocational rehabilitation Method: Individual Instruction ***** Training Name: Presentation to Congregation EmanuEl B'ne Jeshuran Description: Presentation to faith community group regarding DRW services, ADA, and rights of people with disabilities Purpose: Increase awareness of regarding DRW services, ADA, and rights of people with disabilities Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Rights in Employment Description: Training on rights of people with disabilities in employment. Purpose: Increase consumer's knowledge of their employment rights. Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Students and Educators Plan with Parents (STEP) Description: Provide training during a Saturday parent workshop on transition Purpose: Increase effective transition to post secondary settings. Method: Classroom Instruction, Individual Instruction ***** Training Name: Transition Conference Description: training at statewide transition conference Purpose: educate students, families, professionals on transition and employment Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Wauwatosa Committee for citizens with disabilities Description: education on state budget Purpose: to educate people with disabilities, family members, and others from the community regarding the impact of the proposed state budget on people with disabilities Method: Classroom Instruction ***** Training Name: Grant Park ADA celebration Description: ADA celebration event Purpose: outreach to community Method: Individual Instruction ***** Training Name: MPS Health Fairs- Bradley Tech Description: Provide information about DRW and our work with students with disabilities in the Milwaukee area. Attend 2 health fairs. Purpose: Provide information on students rights. Method: Individual Instruction ***** Training Name: MPS Health Fairs- North Division Description: Provide information about DRW and our work with students with disabilities in the Milwaukee area. Attend 2 health fairs. Purpose: To provide information to parents on student rights. Method: Individual Instruction ***** Training Name: North Country Independent Living Description: Setup a DRW booth for the North country Independent Living Expo held at Mariner Mall in Superior with other disability agencies, consumer businesses, recreation equipment demonstrations. Event was open to the public. Purpose: Setup a DRW booth for the North country Independent Living Expo held at Mariner Mall in Superior with other disability agencies, consumer businesses, recreation equipment demonstrations. Event was open to the public. Method: Individual Instruction ***** Training Name: Washington County transition fair Description: participate in transition fair Purpose: outreach Method: Individual Instruction *****

C. Information Disseminated to the Public

1. Radio and TV appearances by PAIR staff0
2. Newspaper/magazine/journal articles46
3. PSAs/videos aired0
4. Hits on the PAIR/P&A website131,985
5. Publications/booklets/brochures disseminated6,193
6. Other (specify separately)0

Narrative

The publications/booklets/brochures disseminated includes our general agency brochure, our annual report, and brochures for various advocacy programs within our agency. It also includes handout we have created for the various trainings we provide including a transition manual and our employment workbook. Also included is a manual that PAIR staff wrote a chapter for and that is distributed by the Wisconsin State Bar. Additionally, we distribute publications created by others such at DOJ, EEOC and Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law.

Part II. Individuals Served

A. Individuals Served

Count individual once per FY. Multiple counts not permitted for lines A1 through A3.

1. Individuals still served as of October 1 (carryover from prior FY)23
2. Additional individuals served during the year66
3. Total individuals served (lines A1 + A2)89
4. Individuals w. more than 1 case opened/closed during the FY. (Do not add this number to total on line A3 above.)2

B. Individuals served as of September 30

Carryover to next FY may not exceed total on line II. A.3 above 32

C. Problem Areas/Complaints of Individuals Served

1. Architectural accessibility2
2. Employment13
3. Program access1
4. Housing7
5. Government benefits/services14
6. Transportation13
7. Education17
8. Assistive technology1
9. Voting0
10. Health care13
11. Insurance0
12. Non-government services1
13. Privacy rights0
14. Access to records0
15. Abuse1
16. Neglect8
17. Other1

D. Reasons for Closing Individual Case Files

1. Issues resolved partially or completely in individual favor39
2. Other representation found1
3. Individual withdrew complaint4
4. Appeals unsuccessful4
5. PAIR Services not needed due to individual's death, relocation etc.3
6. PAIR withdrew from case0
7. PAIR unable to take case because of lack of resources3
8. Individual case lacks legal merit5
9. Other1

Please explain

Individual stopped contacting DRW.

E. Intervention Strategies Used in Serving Individuals

List the highest level of intervention used by PAIR prior to closing each case file.

1. Technical assistance in self-advocacy4
2. Short-term assistance24
3. Investigation/monitoring12
4. Negotiation15
5. Mediation/alternative dispute resolution4
6. Administrative hearings1
7. Litigation (including class actions)0
8. Systemic/policy activities0

Part III. Statistical Information on Individuals Served

A. Age of Individuals Served as of October 1

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. 0 - 40
2. 5 - 2217
3. 23 - 5957
4. 60 - 647
5. 65 and over8

B. Gender of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Females45
2. Males44

C. Race/Ethnicity of Individuals Served

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race7
2. American Indian or Alaskan Native2
3. Asian0
4. Black or African American27
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander0
6. White46
7. Two or more races3
8. Race/ethnicity unknown4

D. Living Arrangements of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Independent44
2. Parental or other family home19
3. Community residential home1
4. Foster care0
5. Nursing home3
6. Public institutional living arrangement0
7. Private institutional living arrangement0
8. Jail/prison/detention center17
9. Homeless3
10. Other living arrangements2
11. Living arrangements not known0

E. Primary Disability of Individuals Served

Identify the individual's primary disability, namely the one directly related to the issues/complaints

1. Blind/visual impairment4
2. Deaf/hard of hearing4
3. Deaf-blind0
4. Orthopedic impairment36
5. Mental illness7
6. Substance abuse0
7. Mental retardation2
8. Learning disability4
9. Neurological impairment10
10. Respiratory impairment4
11. Heart/other circulatory impairment2
12. Muscular/skeletal impairment7
13. Speech impairment0
14. AIDS/HIV0
15. Traumatic brain injury1
16. Other disability8

Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation

A. Systemic Activities

1. Number of policies/practices changed as a result of non-litigation systemic activities14

2. Number of individuals potentially impacted by policy changes159,740

Describe your systemic activities. Be sure to include information about the policies that were changed and how these changes benefit individuals with disabilities. Include case examples of how your systemic activities impacted individuals served.

-Changes to Vocational Rehabilitation Policy At the end of 2015, the Wisconsin State Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) proposed two significant policy changes that would affect people with disabilities in an adverse way. Specifically, the changes would disallow farm equipment purchases for farmers with physical disabilities and the provision of cars or vans, modified or not, for individuals with physical disabilities. Disability Rights Wisconsin worked together with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the Wisconsin Rehabilitation Council (WRC) to prevent these detrimental changes. We were able to stop the farm equipment provision through testimony and advocacy at the state level. We did not prevail on the purchase of automobiles and vans. Farm equipment was the second highest category of expenditures by Wisconsin DVR. The number of people potentially impacted by the coverage for farm equipment is 33,000 per year. -WI Coalition Against Assisted Suicide DRW staff worked in coalition with other to stop legislation that would have allowed physician assisted suicide, a practice that can be used against people with disabilities whose lives others do not value. It is impossible to put a number on the number of folks whose lives will be saved because physician assisted suicide is not an option in Wisconsin. -Racine School District During the 2014-2015 school year, DRW received a large number of calls in regard to special education in the Racine School District. The calls focused around the issues of close adult supervision, school exclusion and the inappropriate use of seclusion and restraint. It was identified early on that children with significant behaviors issues were being affected the most due to the policies of the District Administration regarding close adult supervision. The District Administration has made a change to their service delivery model regarding the use of aides for children and it began to impact the students in a negative manner. We took several cases for direct advocacy and began compiling information about the practices of the District. We also filed individual complaints with the State and encouraged other parents we worked with to do the same. We also began regular communication with the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction Special Education department about our concern and asked them to increase their overall monitoring of special education in the Racine School District. DPI agreed to monitor the District for a year in the focus areas we identified, The focus should be on the three areas identified in the letter; inappropriate levels of support, school exclusion, and seclusion/restraint. DPI also instructed the District that they could not unilaterally take the services of “one on one aide” off the table through a District policy and each decision needed to be individualized. The District is under a corrective action plan which includes increased staff training and monitoring by DPI if individual IEP’s on a monthly basis for the entire school year. The policy/practice changes that resulted were the following: • The District must consider the use of the one on one aide when determining close adult supervision and document the need for such support on an individual basis. • The District may not reduce a student’s school day due to disability and must document the disability related need for a shortened day and the plan to increase the student’s day. • The District had to develop a checklist to ensure compliance in the four identified compliance areas. This checklist would be completed by the Special Education Supervisors and a monthly review of all IEP’s. • The District must include a supervisor in all IEP’s where direct adult support and reeducation of a school day is being discussed. • All IEP’s for students with shortened days had to be reviewed by September 30, 2015 to determine if they were appropriate. We represented a young student who was attending school on a shortened day because the school refused to provide the appropriate level of adult support. The parent asked for the student to have a one on one aide and the LEA said they were not allowed to write one on one aide in the IEP. The student needed the support of aide full time due to safety reasons and also to access his academics. The parent with our help filed a complaint. The District was required to document the level of support and to provide an individual aide for this student. Due to our advocacy, the student was able to attend school full days. The District was also required to put a corrective action plan in place around adult support. There are 3600 special education students in the Racine Unified School District that are impacted by these changes. -Community Living Arrangement-Resident’s Rights DRW got involved when we represented a client whose guardian told the group home that she was not allowed to socialize with anyone but the guardian. The group home was enforcing the guardian’s wishes. We discovered that it was the provider’s policy to do what the guardian requested regardless of the right of the person with a disability to freely associate and communicate. We worked with the administrator of 14 community based residential facilities to ensure that all of the administrators had an in-service training on resident’s rights and how they interface with guardian’s responsibilities. This has a significant impact on our client and the 140 other people that reside in this provider’s group homes. -Expanding Family Care Family Care is the State of Wisconsin’s long term care program for people with disabilities. It is a Medicaid waiver program. It has not been operating in all counties in Wisconsin and those people who reside in non-Family Care counties were often on a waiting list for services. Through these efforts we succeeded in getting Family Care expanded to 8 of the remaining 15 counties that did not have it. As a result 5000 more people are now able to access Family Care and the immediate services it provides. For example, a person residing in Door County who was forced to go to a nursing home because there was a waiting list for the programs funded by the county for community supports was able to move to the community with the assistance of Family Care. -IRIS Functional Screen Problem IRIS is a self -directed long term care program that allows individuals with disabilities to direct their own supports. There were problems in the eligibility screen that screened out people with high levels of nursing care needs. The state clarified the policy to provide that there is no exclusion of such people. This policy change could impact as many as 13,000 people. DRW assisted a woman who because of her high level of nursing care need was told she was not eligible to participate in IRIS. -Milwaukee County Budget DRW worked with county board and advocates to support and implement the GO pass initiative which provides a free bus pass for people with disabilities. Has the potential to benefit approximately 90,000 people with disabilities. Now our clients with disabilities who do not require paratransit can take the bus for free in Milwaukee County wherever they want to go. DRW worked to retain funding for emergency shelters in Milwaukee County which serve many people with disabilities. We were successful in retaining this funding for 2015 and 2016 which has the potential to benefit 300 people with disabilities. This will keep people with disabilities from living on the street. Working with Wisconsin DHS, DRW has co-led a Community Advisory Council for the Complex Care pilot which will provide wrapround services to approximately 700 Milwaukee County residents with disabilities who have complex medical needs and are in fee for service Medicaid. The services will address both medical and non-medical services that are important to independent living and maintaining their health. This Council has provided recommendations regarding the service delivery model and how to engage participants. This continues into the current fiscal year and implementation is expected for 2016. In September 2015 - DRW took the lead in holding a budget briefing to educate people with disabilities and other community stakeholders about disability issues in the budget for 2016 including transportation, long term care, corrections, mental health and substance abuse, etc. About 80 people attended. We also helped turn out people with disabilities for budget listening sessions to educate policy makers about the importance of transit and paratransit in the budget. As a result of this advocacy effort services continued with some modest additions, and rates were not increased. The lack of increase in paratransit fares will benefit the approximately 14,000 paratransit riders in Milwaukee County.

B. Litigation/Class Actions

1. Number of individuals potentially impacted by changes as a result of PAIR litigation/class action efforts0
2. Number of individuals named in class actions0

Describe your litigation/class action activities. Explain how individuals with disabilities benefited from your litigation activities. Be sure to include case examples that demonstrate the impact of your litigation.

Part V. PAIR'S Priorities and Objectives

A. Priorities and Objectives for the Fiscal Year Covered by this Report

For each of your PAIR program priorities for the fiscal year covered by this report, please:

  1. Identify and describe priority.
  2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority.
  3. Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.
  4. Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities. If so, describe this collaboration.
  5. Provide the number of cases handled under the priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.
  6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

1) Priority 1. Abuse and Neglect of people with disabilities takes many forms including use of seclusion, restraints and disability harassment. 2) (a) Need: DRW will work to end the use of seclusion and restraint in schools. Activity to be carried out include; 3)(a) Indicators of success include collecting and publishing the data on the use of seclusion and restraint in schools so that parents and families will have access to information about the use of seclusion and restraint in their schools and so that administrators, school boards, and special education staff can compare their schools to other districts. Additional indicators of success would be seeing a decrease in reported numbers of incidents of seclusion and restraint from year to year, and getting improvements in the controlling legislation to expand who is covered by it, create uniformity in reporting, and require reporting to state Department of Public Instruction. Additionally getting DPI to issue guidance to school districts on the reporting requirements. 4)(a) We have collaborated with FACETS, the parent training center, and Family Ties to publish a report on restraint and seclusion data in Wisconsin. We have worked with our the Department of Public Instruction, our SEA, to issue guidance on the reporting and to pull together other stakeholders including the associations for special education directors and school administrators. 5)(a) We handled 14 PAIR cases under this priority. None of them were class actions. 6)(a) Case Example: DRW represented a teenage boy who was sent home from school for bouncing a ball in the cafeteria. He tried to leave the school building by the back door which was closer to the bus stop in the rain. The school administrator shoved him and put him down on the floor and held him there along with two other male teachers until the police arrived and he was arrested. When the matter went to court and the judge saw the video tape of the incident he dismissed the charges and criticized the school district’s handling of the matter. 2) (b) People with disabilities are subjected to bullying and disability harassment that interferes with their ability to learn and live peaceably. 3)(b) Indicators of success include stopping disability harassment of individual students and getting school districts to institute strong anti-bullying policies. 4)(b) We have worked with FACETS, our parent training center on this issue. 5)(b) We handled two PAIR cases that dealt specifically with bullying but it is a factor in many other cases we handle as well including school discipline cases, school exclusion cases, and workplace discrimination case. We did not handle any class actions on this issue. 6)(b) Case example: DRW represented a 15 year old girl with learning disabilities and depression who was being bullied at school. One day she struck her bully with a pencil. The police were called and she was arrested and taken to jail. Her mother was reluctant to send her back to school. DRW represented the girl at an IEP meeting and negotiated an appropriate program and her return to school. 1) Priority Issue 2. Deinstitutionalization/Least Restrictive Environment. People with disabilities are forces to live and attend schools in segregated settings. 2) Need: There is an increasing reliance on segregated schools and segregated alternative settings. 3) Indicators of success: Children and adults we represent will be served in the least restrictive environment. Government entities will have policies that promote serving people in the most integrated settings. 4) We have worked on these issues with a number of different organizations including the Board for People with Developmental Disabilities, FACETS, Employment First Coalition, Survival Coalition, Family Ties and others. 5) We handled 22 cases under this priority. None of them were class actions. 6) Case Examples: DRW represented a second grader with ADHD. He was being served in regular education classroom but his behavior was escalating and the school wanted to move him to a segregated special education classroom. With DRW assistance the mom was able to negotiate a better IEP with appropriate supports and services so he could stay in the regular education classroom. DRW represented a man with a neurological disorder who lived in the community but was having difficulty taking care of himself and paying his bills. He had been denied services from the County. DRW represented him at a fair hearing and he was found eligible for services. He was able to get the services and supports he needed to live independently. 1) Priority Issue 3. Promoting Community Employment 2) Need: Too many people with disabilities are stuck in sheltered workshops and earning significantly below the minimum wage. 3) Indicators of success include more people understanding their rights to community based employment and more people being employed in the community at competitive wages. 4) We have worked with several partners on this including the Board for People with Developmental Disabilities, the Wisconsin Rehabilitation Council, the Client Assistance Program, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of Public Instruction, the state legislature, the Employment Work Group in long term care, and various school districts. One of our staff is involved in these issues at a national level as part of the presidents committee for people with intellectual disabilities and the department of labor advisory committee on increasing competitive employment for individuals with disabilities. 5) We handled 12 cases under this priority, none of which were class actions. 6) We represented an individual who is blind in one eye and deaf in one ear. He was in danger of losing his community job but DRW got involved and helped negotiate the appropriate accommodations so he did not lose his job. 1) Priority Issue 4. Appropriate Community Services and Supports 2) Need: The lack of adequate transportation impairs ability to work or otherwise participate in community activities. 3) Indicators of success include increase availability of transportation services and increased reliability and safety of those services, free transportation for people with disabilities in Milwaukee County through GO pass. 4) We worked on transportation issues with Make It Work Milwaukee, Independence First Independent Living Center, and SSI Managed Care Advocates. 5) We handled 17 cases under this priority, none of which were class actions. 6) DRW represented a woman who because of her severe allergies could only ride with one transportation provider that deep cleaned their vans daily. We worked with the transportation program to arrange accommodations so that she only got services from that one provider. We also advocated for Milwaukee County to adopt the GO pass which provides free bus transportation to people with disabilities. 1) Priority Issue 5. Rights of people with disabilities to be free from discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations. 2) Need: Employment discrimination based on disability interferes with people’s ability to obtain and maintain jobs, housing discrimination interferes with people’s ability to live in the community, and public accommodation discrimination interferes with people’s right to community participation. 3) Indicators include a reduction in employment discrimination, an increase in individual’s access to community living, and freedom to get the services and goods they need in the community without discrimination. 4) We work with the Wisconsin Employment Lawyers on employment matters and we work with the Metropolitan Milwaukee Fair Housing Council on housing matters. In addition we worked with the ADA 25 committee to promote all aspects of the ADA. 5) DRW handled 24 cases under this priority, none of which we class actions. 6) DRW helped a woman with respiratory disorders negotiate a settlement with her former employer who refused to provide appropriate accommodations. DRW helped a man with paraplegia get an appropriate ramp on his apartment building. DRW helped a woman with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome negotiate accommodations so she could access the fitness club she joined.

B. Priorities and Objectives for the Current Fiscal Year

Please include a statement of priorities and objectives for the current fiscal year (the fiscal year succeeding that covered by this report), which should contain the following information:

  1. a statement of each prioirty;
  2. the need addressed by each priority; and;
  3. a description of the activities to be carried out under each priority.

Priority 1-Least Restrictive Environment 1) Students with disabilities are not always served in the least restrictive environment in schools. 2) The need for advocacy arises from the following issues. Issues i. Cut in aides means more restrictive services ii. Lack of continuum results in more segregated placement iii. Younger children sent to segregated programs iv. Children being educated by themselves v. Segregated work placements for transition vi. State continues to fund segregated schools without accountability 3) The strategies we will use include: i. Intake questionnaire for all children’s calls (workgroup, SF to convene) ii. Individual cases iii. DPI complaints/system complaint about lack of continuum iv. Training — WIOA transition v. Advocate for segregated schools accountability — legislative & DPI vi. Advocate with DPI based on Georgia’s case Priority 2-Inadequate transition 1) Students with disabilities need good transition services to help them reach post-secondary education, competitive integrated employment, and independent living goals. 2) The need for advocacy arises from the following issues: i. One size fits all ii. No coordination of services iii. Early graduation without transition iv. Pipeline to workshops v. PTP not used with families vi. Low expectations vii. No transition at all viii. 800 subminimum wage licenses for kids under 18 in WI ix. Post-secondary goal not lined up with services x. No connection to adult services (DVR, FC) 3) Activities to be carried out include: a. Strategies (Employment/Transition) i. Look for advocacy around DVR audit ii. Work with DPI on transition/PTP requirements iii. Give inputs to waivers — LTC redesign — to improve services for community employment iv. Educate about WIOA v. Individual cases vi. Monitoring of sheltered workshops — leading to report/white paper vii. Consider Olmstead/Lane type action viii. Get involved with WIOA required DVR, DPI & DHS collaboration ix. Form internal Employment workgroup around DVR/rehab council Priority 3 -Employment Discrimination 1) People with disabilities continue to face discrimination in getting and keeping employment. 2) The need for advocacy arises due to the following issues: i. Failure to accommodate ii. FMLA issues — under attack from WMAC iii. Employers want broad releases 3) Activities to be carried out include: i. Create Fact sheets on rights ii. Provide Technical assistance iii. Limited of cases — esp. mediation/negotiation iv. Monitor proposed changes to WI FMLA v. Look for training opportunities Priority 4- Transportation 1) There is continued lack of adequate transportation services for people with disabilities. 2) The need for advocacy arises due to the following issues: i. Future of transportation is unclear under LTC redesign ii. Uber — pros & cons iii. DVR no longer buying cars iv. People cannot get to work v. Unevenness of providers 3) Activities to be carried out include: i. Participate with Superior transportation group ii. Provide input on LTC redesign iii. Advocating for transportation as part of employment services iv. Milwaukee transportation coalition Priority 5-Housing 1) There is a shortage of accessible, affordable housing for people with disabilities and people with disabilities face discrimination in housing. 2) The need for advocacy arises due to the following issues: i. Lack of accessible housing — including transitional housing ii. Emotional support/service animals iii. Failure to provide accommodations iv. Discrimination by landlords based on PWD — kids/people with MI v. NIMBY — peer run respites vi. Home modification concerns 3) Activities to be carried out include: i. Provide Technical assistance ii. Provide Self-advocacy coaching iii. Work on cases with MMFHC iv. NIMBY — participate in community meeting Priority 6-Deaf Access 1) There is a particular problem for people in the deaf community getting need effective communication from health care providers, courts, law enforcement, and other public accommodations. 2) The need for advocacy arises due to the following issues: i. Lack of interpreters generally (capacity) ii. Failure to provide effective communication — courts, lawyers, crisis, prisons/jails iii. Lack of understanding of rights 3) Activities to be carried out include: i. Provide Technical assistance ii. Provide Self-advocacy coaching iii. Provide direct advocacy in a limited number of cases iv. Look for training opportunities v. Collaborate with Wisconsin Association for the Deaf

Part VI. Narrative

At a minimum, you must include all of the information requested. You may include any other information, not otherwise collected on this reporting form that would be helpful in describing the extent of PAIR activities during the prior fiscal year. Please limit the narrative portion of this report, including attachments, to 20 pages or less.

The narrative should contain the following information. The instructions for this form outline the information that should be contained in each section.

  1. Sources of funds received and expended
  2. Budget for the fiscal year covered by this report
  3. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years)
  4. Involvement with advisory boards (if any)
  5. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure
  6. Coordination with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the State long-term care program, if these programs are not part of the P&A agency

A. Sources of Funds received and expended Federal (section 509): $243,380 State: 0 Program Income: $1000 Private (foundations): 0 All other funds: 0 Total (from all sources): $244,380 B. Budget for the fiscal year covered by the report: Wages/salaries: $148,770 Fringe benefits: 39,597 Materials/supplies/Prof Fees: 12,135 Postage: 356 Communications/I.T.: 3,011 Rent: 13,559 Travel: 7,867 Copying: 575 Bonding/insurance: 1,250 Equipment (rental/purchase): 1,228 Legal services: 0 Indirect costs: 0 Miscellaneous: 16,032 Total budget: $244,380 C. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years) Professional -Full Time: 140% FTE, 100% of year, 1.40 Person-years -Part-time: 40% FTE, 100% of the year, 0.40 Person-years -Vacant: 0% FTE, 100% of Year, 0.00 Person-years Executive-Clerical -Full Time: 45% FTE, 100% of year, 0.45 Person-years -Part-time: 33% FTE, 100% of the year, 0.33 Person-years -Vacant: 0% FTE, 100% of Year, 0.00 Person-years Total: 2.58 Person-years D. We do not have a PAIR advisory board. However, the Board of Directors for our agency holds listening sessions four times per year around the state which influences our priorities and objectives. E. No grievances were filed against PAIR staff or activities. F. We do have regular email contact with the Client Assistance Program and have a face to face meeting with them at least once per year. Our states long term care Medicaid waiver programs (Family Care and IRIS) have an ombudsmen program for people under 60 which is housed within Disability Rights Wisconsin. The Board on Aging and Long Term Care (BOALTC) represents people over 60 and is a separate agency. We coordinate with them through activities including joint meetings and trainings with our internal Family Care staff.

Certification

Signed?Yes
Signed ByMonica Murphy
TitleManaging Attorney
Signed Date12/21/2015