RSA-509 - Protection & Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR) Program Performance Report

Indiana (INDIANA P and A SERVICES) - H240A150015 - FY2015

General Information

Designated Agency Identification

NameIndiana Protection and Advocacy Services
Address4701 N. Keystone Ave.
Address Line 2Suite 222
CityIndianapolis
StateIndiana
Zip Code46205
E-mail Addressdawadams@ipas.in.gov
Website Addresshttp://www.in.gov/ipas
Phone317-722-5555
TTY 317-722-5563
Toll-free Phone800-622-4845
Toll-free TTY800-838-1131
Fax317-722-5564
Name of P&A Executive DirectorDawn Adams
Name of PAIR Director/CoordinatorDawn Adams
Person to contact regarding reportDawn Adams
Contact Person phone317-722-3455
Ext.

Part I. Non-Case Services

A. Individual Information and Referral Services (I&R)

Multiple responses are not permitted.

1. Individuals receiving I&R within PAIR priority areas329
2. Individuals receiving I&R outside PAIR priority areas75
3. Total individuals receiving I&R (lines A1 + A2)404

B. Training Activities

1. Number of trainings presented by PAIR staff9
2. Number of individuals who attended training (approximate)283

Using PAIR and other funding sources, Indiana Protection and Advocacy Services conducted trainings in varied settings in geographically diverse locations to educate Hoosiers with disabilities and their families, and advocates about their rights, effective methods of self-advocacy. IPAS advocates conducted trainings at four different Nursing Home facilities. The training conducted in a lecture format focused on educating the residents of the facility on their rights as residents. IPAS staff emphasized in their training materials what constituted abuse and neglect and how a resident would self-advocacy within that facility's grievance process. In total, 77 residents attended one of the four trainings conducted by IPAS staff. IPAS attorneys in collaboration with Indiana’s Parent Resource Center (IN*Source) conducted two training sessions for parents regarding to Section 504 as it related to Education. The lecture addressed topics 504 generally, eligibility, 504 plans, discipline, and complaint and the appeals processes. In total, 17 parents of children receiving educational services one of the two presentations. IPAS staff participated as a member of the roundtable presentation during one session of IN*Source’s statewide conference. IPAS staff along with the other participants of the roundtable offered information regarding their agencies in addition to providing information regarding Special Education and self-advocacy tips for family members working with their child’s Special Education Services. A mixture 150 parents, special education advocates and special education teachers attended the Ask-an-Expert session. IPAS Attorneys conducted a training collaboration with Indiana Legal Services regarding Indiana’s Access to Public Records Act (“APRA”) and The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) to public service attorneys whom serve individual with disabilities. The objective was to train the application and use APRA and FOIA to obtain public documents that would be assistance in their representation of individual with disabilities. There were 25 attorneys in attendance of this training event. IPAS staff completed training for the Ball State University undergraduate class "Introduction to Disability and Rehabilitation. IPAS’s presentation addressed the service delivery model in Indiana as well as disability rights and the appeals process. This classroom lecture reached fourteen students and instructors.  

C. Information Disseminated to the Public

1. Radio and TV appearances by PAIR staff2
2. Newspaper/magazine/journal articles0
3. PSAs/videos aired0
4. Hits on the PAIR/P&A website67,683
5. Publications/booklets/brochures disseminated6,128
6. Other (specify separately)114

Narrative

In addition to the PAIR topic specific trainings, IPAS conducts numerous other outreach and trainings for all its programs. At all presentations, IPAS uses these opportunities to promote awareness of all its programs and services including PAIR. Thus, awareness of the PAIR program reaches all geographically diverse locations, populations, and groups throughout Indiana. There were 112 such events, 32 Conferences/Transition Fairs and 80 Training Events which were attended by individuals with disabilities, family members, disability advocates and service provider, thus in total attended by 10,860 individuals. IPAS staff also conducted two web-pod cast training events. During these events IPAS staff provided an overview of the agency, programs and services.

Part II. Individuals Served

A. Individuals Served

Count individual once per FY. Multiple counts not permitted for lines A1 through A3.

1. Individuals still served as of October 1 (carryover from prior FY)31
2. Additional individuals served during the year76
3. Total individuals served (lines A1 + A2)107
4. Individuals w. more than 1 case opened/closed during the FY. (Do not add this number to total on line A3 above.)4

B. Individuals served as of September 30

Carryover to next FY may not exceed total on line II. A.3 above 31

C. Problem Areas/Complaints of Individuals Served

1. Architectural accessibility21
2. Employment11
3. Program access1
4. Housing6
5. Government benefits/services1
6. Transportation3
7. Education32
8. Assistive technology0
9. Voting0
10. Health care1
11. Insurance0
12. Non-government services1
13. Privacy rights0
14. Access to records0
15. Abuse15
16. Neglect8
17. Other12

D. Reasons for Closing Individual Case Files

1. Issues resolved partially or completely in individual favor38
2. Other representation found2
3. Individual withdrew complaint15
4. Appeals unsuccessful0
5. PAIR Services not needed due to individual's death, relocation etc.1
6. PAIR withdrew from case7
7. PAIR unable to take case because of lack of resources0
8. Individual case lacks legal merit15
9. Other0

Please explain

E. Intervention Strategies Used in Serving Individuals

List the highest level of intervention used by PAIR prior to closing each case file.

1. Technical assistance in self-advocacy7
2. Short-term assistance43
3. Investigation/monitoring15
4. Negotiation8
5. Mediation/alternative dispute resolution2
6. Administrative hearings0
7. Litigation (including class actions)0
8. Systemic/policy activities3

Part III. Statistical Information on Individuals Served

A. Age of Individuals Served as of October 1

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. 0 - 42
2. 5 - 2230
3. 23 - 5945
4. 60 - 6410
5. 65 and over20

B. Gender of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Females46
2. Males61

C. Race/Ethnicity of Individuals Served

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race0
2. American Indian or Alaskan Native0
3. Asian0
4. Black or African American20
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander0
6. White86
7. Two or more races1
8. Race/ethnicity unknown0

D. Living Arrangements of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Independent50
2. Parental or other family home36
3. Community residential home0
4. Foster care0
5. Nursing home15
6. Public institutional living arrangement0
7. Private institutional living arrangement0
8. Jail/prison/detention center5
9. Homeless0
10. Other living arrangements1
11. Living arrangements not known0

E. Primary Disability of Individuals Served

Identify the individual's primary disability, namely the one directly related to the issues/complaints

1. Blind/visual impairment6
2. Deaf/hard of hearing8
3. Deaf-blind1
4. Orthopedic impairment36
5. Mental illness4
6. Substance abuse0
7. Mental retardation1
8. Learning disability9
9. Neurological impairment16
10. Respiratory impairment0
11. Heart/other circulatory impairment4
12. Muscular/skeletal impairment1
13. Speech impairment1
14. AIDS/HIV0
15. Traumatic brain injury0
16. Other disability20

Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation

A. Systemic Activities

1. Number of policies/practices changed as a result of non-litigation systemic activities3

2. Number of individuals potentially impacted by policy changes300,000

Describe your systemic activities. Be sure to include information about the policies that were changed and how these changes benefit individuals with disabilities. Include case examples of how your systemic activities impacted individuals served.

City of Indianapolis ADA Complaint Procedure: This project was opened to advocate for the City of Indianapolis to comply with Title II of the ADA and to adopt and publish an appropriate complaint procedure, as required by 28 C.F.R. § 35.107(b). IPAS initiated contact and subsequently met with the City's outside legal counsel. During the meeting, IPAS stated its position that the City needed to adopt and publish an appropriate Title II ADA complaint policy, procedure and form(s), and that those should be posted on the City's ADA website, so they are accessible to the public. The City's counsel acknowledged the City's responsibility to have an adopted and published ADA complaint policy, procedure and form(s) to comply with the applicable federal regulation. In subsequent meetings, the City agreed to post the grievance procedure currently being used by another Indiana city, with the following amendments: (1) all references to that city will be replaced with Indianapolis and (2) the word "complaint" will be replaced with the word "grievance." The launch date of the city’s revised website would contain a online grievance procedure operational by October 31, 2015.

Individuals wanting to lodge a grievance with the City of Indianapolis will now have a formal procedure to do so. The City of Indianapolis will provide responses to each everyone who files a formal grievance containing specific follow-up information regarding how their grievances will be addressed by the City.

Gas America: This project involves accessibility at Gas America convenience stores and gas stations. Speedway LLC, the nation’s fourth largest company-owned and operated convenience store chain and an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Marathon Petroleum Corporation, acquired gas America. Counsel for Speedway LLC noted to IPAS that the company would review each location for compliance issues and make changes as needed. IPAS has received no complaints since the acquisition.

Ritz Charles ADA parking accessibility project. The Ritz Charles is a larger event site located in Central Indiana. The property consisted of a multiple building complex with the capacity of holding multiple private and public events. Following one such event, IPAS was contacted by a participant of an event expressing concerns regarding the lack of appropriate accessible parking and the lack of an accessible route from the parking spaces to the venues. Following IPAS' concerns being raised to the owner of the Ritz Charles, the parking lots have been repaved, allowing for the proper number of accessible parking spaces and appropriate accessible routes to be created.

B. Litigation/Class Actions

1. Number of individuals potentially impacted by changes as a result of PAIR litigation/class action efforts0
2. Number of individuals named in class actions0

Describe your litigation/class action activities. Explain how individuals with disabilities benefited from your litigation activities. Be sure to include case examples that demonstrate the impact of your litigation.

There were no instances this year where litigation on an individual or class action basis was required to resolve client concerns. Negotiation/mediation and use of established complaint processes were adequate to resolve the service requests handled this year.

 

Part V. PAIR'S Priorities and Objectives

A. Priorities and Objectives for the Fiscal Year Covered by this Report

For each of your PAIR program priorities for the fiscal year covered by this report, please:

  1. Identify and describe priority.
  2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority.
  3. Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.
  4. Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities. If so, describe this collaboration.
  5. Provide the number of cases handled under the priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.
  6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

Priority 1: Reduce or eliminate abuse and neglect of individuals with disabilities.

1.   Describe the priority.

Review allegations of abuse and neglect on behalf of individuals with disabilities to ensure that the allegation is reported to the responsible entities and advocate that necessary actions are taken to protect the health, safety and welfare of the individual.

2.   Identify the need, issue, or barrier addressed by this priority.

Based on public comment, staff experience, and the volume of requests for services in this area during the prior fiscal year, abuse and neglect remains a high priority and area of concern for individuals with disabilities and their families. People with disabilities too often are subjected to abuse and/or neglect. Incidents of abuse and neglect can occur in any facility as well as any community setting where individuals with disabilities live, work and receive treatment.

 

In a comprehensive review of literature published from 2000-2010, lifetime prevalence of any type of prevalence of interpersonal violence against adult women with disabilities was found to be 26-90%. Lifetime prevalence of prevalence of interpersonal violence against adult men with disabilities was found to be 28.7-86.7%. It was concluded that, over the course of their lives, prevalence of interpersonal violence occurs at disproportionate and elevated rates among men and women with disabilities. (Hughes, et al, 2011)

 

3.   Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.

If abuse and/or neglect is confirmed, IPAS staff would take appropriate measures to determine if corrective have been made to prevent future incidents.

IPAS would review at a minimum of 20 allegations of abuse and neglect on behalf of individuals with disabilities.

4.   Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities.  If so, describe this collaboration.

None required although, again, often the cooperation of service providers, family, and guardians was helpful in achieving positive outcomes.

5.   Provide the number of cases handled under this priority.  Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.

Twenty-three allegations were addressed, no class actions, the goal of reviewing at least twenty allegations was met.

6.       Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

 

IPAS became aware of “John” a PAIR eligible consumer residing in a nursing home in central Indiana following an allegation of neglect of treatment by his sibling. Specifically John’s sibling contacted IPAS with an allegation that John was scheduled to be discharged without appropriate or adequate planning to address his ongoing medical and treatment needs upon his return to the facility. IPAS’ subsequent investigation determined that John’s current care and treatment were appropriate and his discharge plan contained the apparent and necessary supports in place upon his discharge.

Additionally IPAS staff conducts reviews of policies and procedures concerning the internal resident’s Grievance Procedure and those addressing staff’s response to allegations of abuse and/or neglect. During the review of these policies, IPAS staff found the current policies to be vague and substantially lacking numerous regulatory and best practice requirements. The Nursing Home Administration implemented the needed changes following IPAS’s request to correct the identified inadequacies and established ongoing training of all facility staff concerning their obligation to report and document all allegations of abuse and/or neglect. These systemic changes benefited all 126 residents of the facility. At the conclusion of the case John has since be discharged back into the community.

Priority 2: Reduce or eliminate discrimination or the denial of rights due to disability.

1.   Describe the priority.

Review allegations of discrimination or denial of rights on behalf of individuals focusing on the areas of housing and education. Priority was separated into the following objectives.

201) Review thirty allegations of discrimination under the Americans with Disabilities Act, Fair Housing Act, or other disability discrimination law.

202) Review three allegations of disability-based discrimination that may have systemic implications.

203) Review allegations on behalf of five students where the school is not providing appropriate educational services.

2.   Identify the need, issue, or barrier addressed by this priority.

Based on public comment, staff experience, and the volume of requests for services in this area during the prior fiscal year, that discrimination in housing and education remains a high priority and area of concern for individuals with disabilities and their families.

 

3.   Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.

For objective 201 the goal was to review 30 allegations, for the year IPAS provided representation for 55 requests for assistance thus meeting the objective.

For objective 202 the goal was to review three allegations, for the year IPAS was involved in one case and four projects thus meeting the objective.

For objective 203 the goal was to review five allegations, for the year IPAS provided representation for 33 requests thus meeting the objective.

4.   Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities.  If so, describe this collaboration.

None required although, again, often the cooperation of service providers, family, and guardians was helpful in achieving positive outcomes.

5.   Provide the number of cases handled under this priority.  Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.

Eighty-nine requests for representation were addressed, no class actions.

6.      Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

 

Case Summary example, an allegation of fair housing discrimination (objective 201)

 

IPAS represented a client in addressing an allegation of fair housing discrimination by an Indianapolis apartment complex. The client, a recipient of Supplemental Security Income, applied for a Section 8 housing unit at the complex. The complex would not consider her SSI as income since the checks were made out to the client's representative payee. Since this income was not counted, the complex determined that the client could not afford the unit and denied her housing. An IPAS attorney contacted the complex's ownership and negotiated a settlement. The complex agreed to pay the client compensatory damages and agreed to revise its lease agreement. The IPAS attorney also negotiated a change to the complex’s documents related to service animals, even though it was not an issue in the initial case. The complex also agreed to provide fair housing training for all employees responsible for making decisions within 90 days of settlement.

 

Case Summary example, an allegation of fair housing discrimination (objective 202)

 

IPAS was contacted by a student on the Bloomington campus of Indiana University (IU) regarding the accessibility of Merrill Hall and the music annex. Following an onsite review which confirmed the accessibility issues, IPAS legal staff provided an overview of the concerns to the General Counsel for IU. IPAS advocacy resulted in IPAS working with the Architect for IU who was enlisted to help resolve the accessibility issues. IU completed renovations to make an accessible entrance into the Music building as well as the needed changes to bring the elevator into compliance.

During the three months of renovation, IPAS staff worked with IU Bloomington’s Disability Student Services (DSS) on a list of accommodations for Ms. Smith, such as campus travel and staff available to assist her into the building and on the elevator during the business hours so that Ms. Smith could access her classes. These accommodations allowed Ms. Smith to continue her classes without interruption as the renovations progressed.

In addition to these accessibility changes for all current all future students, IU policy was changed giving preferential scheduling to students with disabilities for accessible practice rooms located on the ground floor.

Case Summary example, denial of educational rights (objective 203)

 

“John,” age 8, attended the first grade at an elementary school in Evansville, Indiana. John’s father contacted IPAS alleging that John’s school wanted to hold John back due to behavioral and maturity issues. John’s father stated that he requested an educational reevaluation and modification of John’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) but that the school did neither. IPAS agreed to represent John and advocate that he receive a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE), as required by state and federal law.

 

IPAS assisted John’s father in filing a formal request for reevaluation. The school finally agreed to conduct a reevaluation, which was done. During a case conference committee meeting discussing the reevaluation results, the school amended John’s IEP, and included numerous new and additional strategies and accommodations designed to help mitigate the effects of John’s disability in the classroom and increase his potential benefit from educational programming. IPAS and John’s father found the changes to be appropriate. Due to IPAS’s involvement, John received a needed reevaluation and John’s IEP was updated to include more and better strategies and accommodations to assist John in receiving FAPE.

 

Priority 3: Increase awareness and effective self-advocacy by providing education and training about disability rights and the exercise of these rights.

1.   Describe the priority.

The priority represents two approaches to address systemic needs, training of individuals with disabilities and their advocates concerning disability rights to become more effective self-advocates. Secondly, IPAS would take on the role to represent individuals in various committee and group settings that had the potential of effecting systemic change. This priority was separated into the following objectives.

301) Provide education and training about disability rights, self-advocacy skills and IPAS to individuals with disabilities, parents, guardians, advocates, and/or service program providers..

302) Participate on selected committees, groups or task forces that have systemic implications concerning policies and practices affecting the rights of individuals with disabilities.

2.   Identify the need, issue, or barrier addressed by this priority.

Based on staff experience, and the volume of requests for services, it was determined that if IPAS could assist individuals with disabilities and their advocates improved their knowledge about disability rights that they could become effective self-advocates without IPAS’s direct assistance. Additionally based on staff experience skills of individuals with disabilities and their families and guardians.

3.   Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.

Indicators of success: Most training and public speaking events include an evaluation by participants. One indicator of success is the results of these evaluations, which attempt to assess the degree to which participants found the information to be helpful. Such results are overwhelmingly positive.

For the year, IPAS conducted nine education and training speaking engagements training approximately 283 individuals. Please refer to the previous listing of training and public information events.

4.   Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities.  If so, describe this collaboration.

To achieve positive outcomes, IPAS worked in partnership with participating individuals, families, and guardians, as well as with organizations and agencies on whose committees or groups IPAS staff members participated.

5.   Provide the number of cases handled under this priority.  Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.

This Priority did not provide for the use of individual advocacy services hence there were no cases nor any class actions.

6.      Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

 

Priority 4: Provide timely and accurate information about disability rights and technical assistance concerning the exercise of these rights.

Needs addressed: Individuals with disabilities require information about their rights, technical assistance in self-advocacy efforts, and referral to other organizations based on their presenting needs.

1.   Describe the priority.

Respond to requests for information and referral and technical assistance to individuals with disabilities, their families, and professionals about disability rights and provide information and technical assistance concerning the exercise of these rights

2.   Identify the need, issue, or barrier addressed by this priority.

Needs addressed: Individuals with disabilities require information about their rights, technical assistance in self-advocacy efforts, and referral to other organizations based on their presenting needs.

3.   Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.

The contact was able to obtain the needed information to address their particular question or concern. IPAS conducts a follow-up telephone satisfaction survey on a sample of individuals who have recently received information and referral services. For the year, IPAS or the year, IPAS completed 405 requests for information and referral services.

 

4.   Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities.  If so, describe this collaboration.

No significant collaboration.

5.   Provide the number of cases handled under this priority.  Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.

This Priority did not provide for the use of individual advocacy services hence there were neither cases nor any class actions.

6.      Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

 

N/A

B. Priorities and Objectives for the Current Fiscal Year

Please include a statement of priorities and objectives for the current fiscal year (the fiscal year succeeding that covered by this report), which should contain the following information:

  1. a statement of each prioirty;
  2. the need addressed by each priority; and;
  3. a description of the activities to be carried out under each priority.

Priority  1: Preventing, finding, and stopping abuse and neglect of persons with disabilities.

 

1.  Describe the priority.

Investigate or review allegations of abuse and neglect on behalf of individuals with disabilities to ensure that the allegation is reported to the responsible entities and advocate that necessary actions are taken to protect the health, safety and welfare of the individual.

2.   Identify the need, issue, or barrier addressed by this priority.

Based on public comment, staff experience, and the volume of requests for services in this area during the prior fiscal year, abuse and neglect remains a high priority and area of concern for individuals with disabilities and their families. People with disabilities too often are subjected to abuse and/or neglect. Incidents of abuse and neglect can occur in any facility as well as any community setting where individuals with disabilities live, work and receive treatment.

 

In a comprehensive review of literature published from 2000-2010, lifetime prevalence of any type of prevalence of interpersonal violence against adult women with disabilities was found to be 26-90%. Lifetime prevalence of prevalence of interpersonal violence against adult men with disabilities was found to be 28.7-86.7%. It was concluded that, over the course of their lives, prevalence of interpersonal violence occurs at disproportionate and elevated rates among men and women with disabilities. (Hughes, et al, 2011)

 

3.  Description of the activities to be carried out.

IPAS will investigate or provide as needed individual or of a systemic advocacy concerning allegations of abuse or neglect. IPAS’ services will focus on those of neglect and abuse allegations stemming from facilities, medical, financial exploitation and the inappropriate use of restraint and seclusion.

 

Objectives to address:

1.      Ensure appropriate mental health treatment of facility residents.

2.      Investigate and eliminate staff abuse in facilities or by a service provider.

3.      Reduce and eliminate staff and medical neglect in facilities or by a service provider.

4.      Identify and stop the financial exploitation of individuals with disabilities.

5.      Stop the inappropriate use of restraint and seclusion in facilities or by a service provider.

Priority 2: Breaking down barriers and ensuring supports are available for persons with disabilities to ensure equality and inclusion in society.

 

1.     Describe the priority.

Provide representation and advocacy assistance concerning allegations of discrimination or denial of a right based on an individual’s disability that prevents them from having full equally and inclusion in society.

2.     Identify the need, issue, or barrier addressed by this priority.

Based on public comment, staff experience, and the volume of requests for services in this area during the prior fiscal year, that discrimination in education, employment, , housing, juvenile justice, community integration and access to public services all remains a high priority and area of concern for individuals with disabilities and their families.

 

Indiana’s disabled population continue to be denied access to the job market and challenges should they become employed. According to the 2014 Annual Disability Statistics Compendium, the employment gap between Indiana’s disabled and nondisabled populations was 42.3%. In Indiana, only 33.8% of those with a disability were employed compared to 76% of the nondisabled.

 

Indiana’s children with disabilities still face challenges in attending school. The U.S. Department of Education, Office for Civil Rights, Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC), reported that for students with disabilities in Indiana, 25 local education authorities (LEAs) reported using mechanical restraints, 88 reported using physical restraints, 146 reported using seclusion and 245 received at least on allegation of bullying on the basis of disability. Students with disabilities are subjected to segregated learning environments, suspended, or expelled for disability related conduct, or are not adequately prepared for work.

 

3.  Description of the activities to be carried out.

IPAS will provide representation as needed in individual advocacy or systemic litigation. IPAS’ focus will be to assist clients in asserting their rights in individual cases of discrimination or denial of rights due to their disability in education employment, access to public services, housing and community integration.

 

Objectives to address:

1.      Ensure access to a free appropriate public education in both a safe and least restrictive environment.

2.      Support integrated, community-based, and competitive employment of persons with disabilities.

3.      Address rights issues in regards to accessibility including, but not limited to: physical access, web and technology access, transportation, voting, and conditional rights.

4.      Encourage community integration of persons with disabilities into inclusive, livable, supportive communities.

5.      Ensure persons with disabilities, from youth through adulthood, are treated appropriately in justice settings.

 

Priority 3: Empowering persons with disabilities by serving as a partner in rights issues, providing resources for self-advocacy and by bringing awareness to society to eliminate discrimination.

 

1.   Describe the priority.Indiana is a state with a high population in rural areas. Because of the geography of the state, it is determined to be a priority to provide more support for self advocacy efforts and increase outreach efforts to make people aware of the organization and its services.

 

2.   Identify the need, issue, or barrier addressed by this priority.IPAS has identified that general lack of awareness of the organization and its services has resulted in a need to develop a communication and outreach program. This program is led by the newly appointed Director of Communication and Outreach.

 

3.  Description of the activities to be carried out.

Objectives to address:

1.      Promote and grow the self-advocacy movement in Indiana.

2.      Develop strategies for involvement in policy-making activities.

3.      Develop and disseminate accessible publications and electronic resources.

4.      Create and implement a communication plan to bring awareness of IPAS.

5.      Build and foster relationships with community partners.

 

Part VI. Narrative

At a minimum, you must include all of the information requested. You may include any other information, not otherwise collected on this reporting form that would be helpful in describing the extent of PAIR activities during the prior fiscal year. Please limit the narrative portion of this report, including attachments, to 20 pages or less.

The narrative should contain the following information. The instructions for this form outline the information that should be contained in each section.

  1. Sources of funds received and expended
  2. Budget for the fiscal year covered by this report
  3. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years)
  4. Involvement with advisory boards (if any)
  5. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure
  6. Coordination with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the State long-term care program, if these programs are not part of the P&A agency

A. Sources of funds received and expended.

 

Source of Funding

Amount Received

Amount Spent

Federal (section 509)$304,363$218,181
State$0$0
Program income$0$0
Private$0$0
All other funds

(2014 Carryover)

$153,483$153,483
Total (from all sources)$457,846$371,664

 

B. Budget for the fiscal year covered by the report: 

Category

Prior Fiscal Year

Current Fiscal Year

Wages/salaries$210,616$211,000
Fringe benefits (FICA, unemployment, etc.)$102,221$105,000
Materials/supplies$2,975$3,000
Postage$1,026$1,100
Telephone

Telecommunications

$6,449$7,000
Rent$7,162$8,500
Travel$11,021$11,000
Copying & Printing$1,218$1,300
Bonding/insurance$1,702$1,800
Equipment (rental/purchase)$0$0
Legal services$0$0
Indirect costs$0$0
Miscellaneous$27,274$28,000
Total Budget$371,664$377,700

 

C. Description of PAIR staff

 

During the 2015 federal fiscal year, IPAS employed 29 staff members. IPAS administers eight federally funded advocacy programs: Client Assistance Program (CAP), Protection & Advocacy: Assistive Technology (PAAT), Protection & Advocacy for Beneficiaries of Social Security (PABSS), Protection & Advocacy: Developmental Disabilities (PADD), Protection & Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI), Protection & Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR), Protection & Advocacy: Traumatic Brain Injury (PATBI), Protection & Advocacy: Voting Access (PAVA). All staff work under each of the various programs, including PAIR. The time reporting system utilized by IPAS requires staff to closely track and report their work activities under each program. Bi-weekly, each staff member accounts for their amount of time worked in each program. This accounting process determines the portion of each staff member’s salary and benefits paid by each of the federal programs for that bi-weekly period. This cost allocation approach ensures that each funding source supports only those activities and expenses, which are authorized under that source’s legislation and regulations.

 

The number and type of position are listed here and the “person-years” are summarized below.

 

1 Executive Director

1 Chief Operating & Information Officer

1 Chief Financial Officer

1 Legal Services Director

1 Director of Communication & Outreach

1 Managing Attorney

4 Staff Attorneys

2 Advocate Supervisors

2 Intake Advocates

10 Advocacy Specialists

1 Communications Specialist

1 Technology Clerk

1 Administrative Assistant

2 Accountants

 

Type of Position

FTE

% of year filled

Person-years

Professional2782.09%22.17
Full-time2782.09%22.17
Part-time000
Vacant000
Clerical2100%2
Full-time2100%2
Part-time000
Vacant000

 

D. Involvement with advisory boards (if any)

IPAS staff participated in six committees, continuing this year its participation on the ADA Indiana Steering Committee; the Back Home in Indiana Alliance Steering Committee; Indiana Task Force on Disability and Health; the Adult Guardianship Task Force; and the Elder Justice Convening. New during the fiscal year, IPAS began its participation on the Fair Housing Center of Central Indiana Board of Directors.

E. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure

IPAS had no grievances filed during FY2015, concerning the administration and application of the PAIR Program.

F. Coordination with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the State long-term care program, if these programs are not part of the P&A agency

The Client Assistance Program (CAP) administered by IPAS. The Indiana Family and Social Services Administration, Division of Aging administers the State long-term care program. IPAS has an on-going arrangement with the administering agency based on a prior written agreement, which defined coordination and referrals between all IPAS programs and the State long-term care ombudsman program

Certification

Signed?Yes
Signed ByDawn M. Adams
TitleExecutive Director
Signed Date12/16/2015