RSA-509 - Protection & Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR) Program Performance Report

Colorado (Center for Legal Advocacy) - H240A150006 - FY2015

General Information

Designated Agency Identification

NameDisability Law Colorado
Address455 Sherman Street
Address Line 2Suite 130
CityDenver
StateColorado
Zip Code80203
E-mail Addressmaharvey@disabilitylawco.org
Website Addresshttp://www.disabilitylawco.org
Phone303-722-0300
TTY 303-722-3619
Toll-free Phone800-288-1376
Toll-free TTY800-288-1376
Fax303-722-0720
Name of P&A Executive DirectorMary Anne Harvey
Name of PAIR Director/CoordinatorAlison Butler Daniels
Person to contact regarding reportMary Anne Harvey
Contact Person phone303-722-0300
Ext.506

Part I. Non-Case Services

A. Individual Information and Referral Services (I&R)

Multiple responses are not permitted.

1. Individuals receiving I&R within PAIR priority areas80
2. Individuals receiving I&R outside PAIR priority areas192
3. Total individuals receiving I&R (lines A1 + A2)272

B. Training Activities

1. Number of trainings presented by PAIR staff17
2. Number of individuals who attended training (approximate)377

2015 Trainings A PAIR attorney presented a 1.5 hour training to a group of approximately 12 parents of children with disabilities about the Protection & Advocacy System, our office priorities and the basics of special education. The presentation was in Denver in January 2015. Several staff members set up an exhibit table and provided information on Disability Law Colorado during the ADA Legacy Bus Tour stop at Atlantis in Denver in March 2015. Approximately 6 community members stopped by the booth to get information on DLC. Two attorneys presented a 3 hour training in Grand Junction, Colorado on “Restraint and Seclusion Laws & Rules” to school district staff. The training was in October 2014 and approximately 14 school district staff members attended. This training was a result of a collaboration with the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council. Two attorneys, including our Supervising Attorney, presented a 3 hour training in Glenwood Springs, Colorado on “Restraint and Seclusion Laws & Rules” to school district staff. The training was in October 2014 and approximately 12 school district staff members attended. This training was a result of a collaboration with the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council. The PAIR coordinator and a PAIR staff member presented a 1 hour training on “Fair Housing and Service Companion Animal Issues” to a group of approximately 25 tenants and housing providers at a senior living housing complex in Lakewood in October 2014. Two attorneys presented a 2 hour training via SKYPE to Mesa School District on “Restraint Rules in Colorado”. There were 8 school district staff members in attendance during this training in November 2014. Three attorneys, including our Supervising Attorney, presented a 3 hour training on “Restraint Rules in Colorado Schools”. The training was in Denver and approximately 40 school district staff members attended. This training was a result of a collaboration with the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council. Two attorneys, including our Supervising Attorney, presented a 3 hour training in Colorado Springs, Colorado on “Restraint Rules in Colorado Schools” to school district staff. The training was in January 2015 and approximately 50 people attended, including school district staff, parents of children with disabilities and parent advocates. This training was a result of a collaboration with the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council. Our Supervising Attorney presented a 2 hour training on “Service and Companion Animals in Housing” to a group of 15 volunteer mediators at Jefferson County Mediation Services in January 2015. Two attorneys presented a 3 hour training in Pueblo, Colorado on “Restraint Rules in Colorado Schools” to school district staff. The training was in February 2015 and approximately 25 school district staff members and parent advocates attended. This training was a result of a collaboration with the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council. A staff member presented a 25 minute training on “People First Language” to a group of 6 people at Bethany Free Church as part of Disability Ministry. The training was in June 2015. A PAIR attorney presented a 1.5 hour training on “An Overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act” for a group of 4 non-attorney advocates working at the Domestic Violence Initiative. The training was in Denver in July 2015. Three attorneys, including the Supervising Attorney and the Grand Junction Managing Attorney, presented a 1 hour training in July 2015 on “Disability Laws Overview” to a group of international visitors who were in the United States as part of the U.S. Department of State’s International Visitors Program. There were 15 people in attendance representing the international disability community. Our Managing Attorney presented a 1.5 hour discussion about “Pro Bono Opportunities” to a group of 75 senior attorneys in Denver in August 2015. Two attorneys presented a 3 hour training in Greeley, Colorado on “Restraint and Seclusion Laws & Rules” to school district staff. The training was in September 2015 and approximately 15 school district staff members attended. This training was a result of a collaboration with the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council. Two attorneys, including our Supervising Attorney, presented a 3 hour training in Alamosa, Colorado on “Restraint Rules in Colorado Schools” to school district staff. The training was in September 2015 and approximately 35 people attended. Our Supervising Attorney participated in a panel on “The Importance of Pro Bono Work” in September 2015 at University of Denver School of Law. The panel was sponsored by the Denver Bar Association’s Access to Justice Committee and was intended for law students and community members. Approximately 20 people were in attendance.

C. Information Disseminated to the Public

1. Radio and TV appearances by PAIR staff2
2. Newspaper/magazine/journal articles3
3. PSAs/videos aired0
4. Hits on the PAIR/P&A website52,238
5. Publications/booklets/brochures disseminated16
6. Other (specify separately)3

Narrative

Randy Chapman's Ability Law Blog - averages 17,000 hits annually. Facebook - more than 900 followers Twitter - more than 600 followers

Part II. Individuals Served

A. Individuals Served

Count individual once per FY. Multiple counts not permitted for lines A1 through A3.

1. Individuals still served as of October 1 (carryover from prior FY)25
2. Additional individuals served during the year35
3. Total individuals served (lines A1 + A2)60
4. Individuals w. more than 1 case opened/closed during the FY. (Do not add this number to total on line A3 above.)1

B. Individuals served as of September 30

Carryover to next FY may not exceed total on line II. A.3 above 29

C. Problem Areas/Complaints of Individuals Served

1. Architectural accessibility5
2. Employment13
3. Program access4
4. Housing15
5. Government benefits/services2
6. Transportation0
7. Education8
8. Assistive technology1
9. Voting0
10. Health care0
11. Insurance0
12. Non-government services5
13. Privacy rights0
14. Access to records0
15. Abuse0
16. Neglect1
17. Other6

D. Reasons for Closing Individual Case Files

1. Issues resolved partially or completely in individual favor14
2. Other representation found1
3. Individual withdrew complaint6
4. Appeals unsuccessful2
5. PAIR Services not needed due to individual's death, relocation etc.1
6. PAIR withdrew from case3
7. PAIR unable to take case because of lack of resources1
8. Individual case lacks legal merit3
9. Other0

Please explain

E. Intervention Strategies Used in Serving Individuals

List the highest level of intervention used by PAIR prior to closing each case file.

1. Technical assistance in self-advocacy9
2. Short-term assistance9
3. Investigation/monitoring0
4. Negotiation9
5. Mediation/alternative dispute resolution1
6. Administrative hearings1
7. Litigation (including class actions)2
8. Systemic/policy activities1

Part III. Statistical Information on Individuals Served

A. Age of Individuals Served as of October 1

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. 0 - 40
2. 5 - 226
3. 23 - 5947
4. 60 - 643
5. 65 and over4

B. Gender of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Females30
2. Males30

C. Race/Ethnicity of Individuals Served

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race7
2. American Indian or Alaskan Native0
3. Asian0
4. Black or African American2
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander0
6. White43
7. Two or more races0
8. Race/ethnicity unknown8

D. Living Arrangements of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Independent37
2. Parental or other family home11
3. Community residential home1
4. Foster care0
5. Nursing home4
6. Public institutional living arrangement1
7. Private institutional living arrangement0
8. Jail/prison/detention center0
9. Homeless1
10. Other living arrangements2
11. Living arrangements not known3

E. Primary Disability of Individuals Served

Identify the individual's primary disability, namely the one directly related to the issues/complaints

1. Blind/visual impairment2
2. Deaf/hard of hearing4
3. Deaf-blind0
4. Orthopedic impairment9
5. Mental illness11
6. Substance abuse0
7. Mental retardation8
8. Learning disability1
9. Neurological impairment9
10. Respiratory impairment0
11. Heart/other circulatory impairment1
12. Muscular/skeletal impairment2
13. Speech impairment0
14. AIDS/HIV2
15. Traumatic brain injury2
16. Other disability9

Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation

A. Systemic Activities

1. Number of policies/practices changed as a result of non-litigation systemic activities0

2. Number of individuals potentially impacted by policy changes0

Describe your systemic activities. Be sure to include information about the policies that were changed and how these changes benefit individuals with disabilities. Include case examples of how your systemic activities impacted individuals served.

Systemic Activities ***PAIR staff has continued to pursue a complaint that we filed with the U.S. Department of Justice based on a nationwide daycare chain refusing to provide care for children with diabetes when such care has been specifically authorized by state law. The DOJ is currently investigating the daycare chain and, along with an attorney from the U.S. Attorney’s Office, came to Colorado to interview our client and meet with PAIR staff. If we are successful in our complaint, the impact would affect children with diabetes in daycare settings across the county. ***PAIR staff members are collaborating with others at our organization to assist people who are living in nursing homes, but would like to live in less restrictive settings. We began this project by In order to accomplish this goal, we first identified everyone who was 50 years old or younger and living in a nursing home. Then, one by one, we have visited each such resident to inform them of their rights and determine if they would like assistance in moving to the community. While many of these residents have indicated they are satisfied with their housing, we have identified several people living in nursing homes who want to move. We have been successful in moving some of them already and are continuing to work to ensure that everyone who wants to be moved to the community can do so. ***In FY2015, PAIR staff made a concerted effort to provide trainings to the community on disability law and rights. We are proud of this effort and believe it has a systemic impact.

B. Litigation/Class Actions

1. Number of individuals potentially impacted by changes as a result of PAIR litigation/class action efforts9
2. Number of individuals named in class actions0

Describe your litigation/class action activities. Explain how individuals with disabilities benefited from your litigation activities. Be sure to include case examples that demonstrate the impact of your litigation.

Litigation In FY2015, PAIR staff was again active in filing and pursuing administrative cases. Though we typically prefer to remedy issues directly with an organization through negotiation, when necessary, we file administrative complaints in any of the following areas: ***Disability discrimination complaints in the workplace — we file complaints with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) or the Colorado Civil Rights Division (“CCRD”). PAIR staff was involved in several of these complaints during FY2015. ***Disability discrimination complaints against housing providers - we file complaints with the CCRD, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Fair Housing and/or the U.S. Department of Agriculture. PAIR staff was involved in two such complaints in FY2015. ***Disability discrimination complaints against a public accommodation — we file complaints with the CCRD and/or the U.S. Department of Justice. PAIR staff was involved in two complaints of this type in FY2015. ***Disability discrimination complaints in publicly funded post-secondary educational institutions — we file complaints with the U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights (“OCR”). PAIR staff assisted in the filing of two complaints with OCR in FY2015. If we deem it appropriate and necessary, we are also open to filing any of the above complaints in state or federal court. Similarly, we are open to filing or intervening in any state or federal case or class-action alleging discrimination against people with disabilities. In FY2015, PAIR staff has been working with counsel in a state court action in which a group of neighbors has filed suit against a group home owner who wishes to open a group home with people with disabilities in a residential neighborhood. PAIR staff has provided technical assistance to counsel and the homeowners and has begun working directly with the residents to pursue a reasonable accommodation and a possible federal court action on behalf of the residents with disabilities. Finally, PAIR staff are actively involved in working with groups who may need amicus briefs filed in cases concerning people with disabilities. Although no such requests were made of PAIR staff in FY2015, we remain open and available to assist when requested and appropriate. While PAIR staff were not actively involved in any class action cases this year, our involvement in representing individual clients in litigation has served those individuals, and others following in their footsteps. Furthermore, we had a very active year in training, which we believe also serves a broad class of people with disabilities as well as those providing services.

Part V. PAIR'S Priorities and Objectives

A. Priorities and Objectives for the Fiscal Year Covered by this Report

For each of your PAIR program priorities for the fiscal year covered by this report, please:

  1. Identify and describe priority.
  2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority.
  3. Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.
  4. Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities. If so, describe this collaboration.
  5. Provide the number of cases handled under the priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.
  6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

Priority 1 — Assistance for Participants of Federally Funded Housing Programs 1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation as well as information, referral, technical assistance, and community outreach to help remedy disability discrimination for tenants and applicants of subsidized, public, and other federally funded housing programs. 2. Need Addressed — Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who are ineligible for other federally funded protection and advocacy programs experience disability discrimination in housing and will benefit from direct representation, self-advocacy assistance, and activities designed to raise awareness and understanding of the rights of persons with disabilities in housing. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area. 3. Indicators of Success — An indicator of success under this priority is when a property manager, landlord, or housing authority allows an individual with a disability to remain in or obtain a home, with equal opportunity to use and enjoy that home or when, after talking to PAIR staff, a client or housing provider understands his/her rights and obligations related to fair housing. 4. Collaboration - Pursuing this priority involves cooperative efforts with Colorado Legal Services, Colorado Cross Disability Coalition, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, the Colorado Civil Rights Division, the Denver Metro Fair Housing Center, Colorado Affordable Legal Services, individual county housing authorities, the Colorado Housing and Finance Association, Colorado Self-Represented Litigant Coordinators, as well as individual members of the private bar who accept such cases. PAIR staff members are involved in bar and legal associations with various of these agencies and consistently work on collaborative efforts to assist people with disabilities who are experiencing housing discrimination. 5. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class action. 19 cases with no class action cases. 6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority. *** PAIR staff became aware of a group of residents who live in a group home for people with disabilities and seek to move to another group home in a community closer to each of their homes. However, the neighbors of the new group home publicly opposed residents with disabilities moving into their neighborhood, citing a provision prohibiting “businesses” in the area. PAIR staff immediately intervened and requested a reasonable accommodation to the provision. Unfortunately, to date, the accommodation has not been granted, but PAIR staff continue to be involved in the situation and plan to file a lawsuit if final negotiations fail. *** A PAIR staff member was contacted by a man with multiple disabilities, including mobility issues, who was experiencing physical barriers in his apartment and the surrounding complex. Though the PAIR staff member determined that the Fair Housing Act did not apply to the structural issues, she was nonetheless able to negotiate a resolution with the apartment complex managers that included removing barriers in the parking lot and sidewalks and provided the client with a ramp into his apartment. Priority 2: Assistance to Remedy Discrimination in Post-Secondary Education, Public Accommodations, and Government Services. 1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation, advocacy, information, referrals, publications, and technical assistance to remedy disability discrimination for individuals who experience disability discrimination in post-secondary education, public accommodations and government services. 2. Need Addressed - Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who are ineligible for other federally funded protection and advocacy programs will benefit from receiving direct representation and self-advocacy assistance regarding their disability rights in post-secondary education, public accommodations and government services. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area. 3. Indicators of Success —Success is measured when a post-secondary education institution, place of public accommodation or governmental services provider allows an individual with a disability equal access to their program or place of business or when, after talking with PAIR staff, a client or public accommodation provider understands his/her rights and obligations relating to non-discrimination on the basis of disability. 4. Collaboration - Pursuing this priority involves on-going collaboration with other agencies and organizations working in the field and organizations to which complaints are made, including, Plaintiffs Employment Lawyers Association, Faculty of Federal Advocates, Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition, the Colorado Civil Rights Division, Civil Rights Education and Enforcement Center, and the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as individual members of the private bar who accept such cases. 5. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class action. 20 cases with no class action cases. 6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority. *** A Colorado school district would not allow a home-schooled first grader with autism to participate in the district’s home school enrichment program due to his disability. The district claimed that because of his disability, the home school enrichment program did not have the resources to allow him to participate in the program — making the assumption that the student would require a high level of services in order to access the programs curriculum. PAIR staff immediately contacted the school district and attended a meeting with the district’s lawyer and program director, ready to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education Office of Civil Rights. However, the district agreed to enroll the student in the program and to provide the accommodations necessary for him to have an equal opportunity to benefit from the program. *** PAIR staff worked with a client who had various disabilities, including mental illness. Part of her disability involved anxiety and fear of leaving her home due to a history of abuse. The client had a companion animal (a dog) who provided her comfort and support. The client felt she needed to have her dog accompany her to therapy sessions, but the therapist refused because the dog was not a “service dog.” PAIR staff intervened and worked with the client’s case manager to request that — as a reasonable accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act — the client be allowed to bring her dog to therapy appointments. The therapist granted the accommodation and the client was able to return to therapy. Priority 3: Assistance to Remedy Discrimination in Employment. 1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation, advocacy, information, referrals, and technical assistance to remedy disability discrimination for individuals who experience disability discrimination in the employment setting. 2. Need Addressed - Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who are ineligible for other federally funded protection and advocacy programs will benefit from receiving direct representation and self-advocacy assistance regarding their disability rights in employment. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area. 3. Indicators of Success — Success is measured when an employer treats an individual with a disability equally to an employee without a disability and agrees to make appropriate accommodations for such a person’s disability or when, after talking with PAIR staff, a client or employer understands his/her rights and obligations relating to non-discrimination on the basis of disability. 4. Collaboration - Pursuing this priority involves on-going collaboration with other agencies and organizations working in the field and organizations to which complaints are made, including, Plaintiffs Employment Lawyers Association, Faculty of Federal Advocates, Colorado Cross-Disability Coalition, the Colorado Civil Rights Division, Civil Rights Education and Enforcement Center, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as individual members of the private bar who accept such cases. PAIR staff members are involved in bar and legal associations with various of these agencies and attorneys to continue to stay involved in the plaintiffs’ employment law community. 5. Provide the number of cases handled under this priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class action. 13 cases with no class action cases. 6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority. *** PAIR staff was contacted by a parent of an adult with a disability who was not receiving accommodations on the job at a national retail store. PAIR staff members set up a meeting with the client and his parents to determine what accommodations the client needed and what accommodations were being refused on the job. Thereafter, PAIR staff contacted the employer, outlining the client’s needs and the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act. In response, the employer met with the client and his job coach and provided the necessary accommodations. The client remains happy in his job six months later. ***PAIR staff has been working with a young man with cognitive disabilities who worked at a local restaurant chain. The client described harassment he suffered on the job — all related to his disabilities. PAIR staff immediately contacted the attorney for the restaurant chain and arranged an interview with our client. Much to PAIR staff’s surprise, following the interview, the attorney took the position that the restaurant chain was not at fault, but the client was to blame. PAIR staff filed a charge of discrimination with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission describing the harassment. The EEOC recently made a determination of probable cause — finding that the restaurant chain engaged in unlawful disability harassment. At this time, PAIR staff are in negotiations with the EEOC and the restaurant chain to find an appropriate resolution.

B. Priorities and Objectives for the Current Fiscal Year

Please include a statement of priorities and objectives for the current fiscal year (the fiscal year succeeding that covered by this report), which should contain the following information:

  1. a statement of each prioirty;
  2. the need addressed by each priority; and;
  3. a description of the activities to be carried out under each priority.

Priority 1 — Assistance for Participants of State or Federally Funded Housing Programs 1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation as well as information, referral, technical assistance, and community outreach to help remedy disability discrimination — including issues involving service or companion animals - for tenants and applicants of subsidized, public, and other state or federally funded housing programs. 2. Need Addressed — Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who are ineligible for other federally funded protection and advocacy programs experience disability discrimination in housing and will benefit from direct representation, self-advocacy assistance, and activities designed to raise awareness and understanding of the rights of persons with disabilities in housing. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area. 3. Activities — Disability Law Colorado will engage in negotiation, alternative dispute resolution, administrative remedies, and/or litigation to remedy disability discrimination for tenants and applicants of subsidized, public, and other federally funded housing programs. Additionally, Disability Law Colorado shall provide information, referrals, advice, guidance, technical assistance, and education and training activities designed to raise awareness and understanding of the rights of persons with disabilities in housing. Disability Law Colorado will not be offering direct representation for clients in eviction proceedings. Priority 2: Assistance to Remedy Discrimination in Employment. 1. Identify Priority - Provide direct representation, advocacy, information, referrals, and technical assistance to remedy disability discrimination for individuals who are not employed by the federal government and experience disability discrimination in an employment setting. 2. Need Addressed - Through client and advocate feedback, communication with service and legal providers, and input received from individuals with disabilities, Disability Law Colorado has concluded that persons with disabilities who are ineligible for other federally funded protection and advocacy programs will benefit from receiving direct representation and self-advocacy assistance regarding their disability rights in employment. We have also determined that such individuals would be unlikely to receive any assistance without our intervention in this area. 3. Activities — Disability Law Colorado will engage in negotiation, alternative dispute resolution, administrative remedies, and/or litigation to remedy disability discrimination in employment. Additionally, Disability Law Colorado shall provide information, referrals, and technical assistance to assist individuals who experience disability discrimination in employment to assist them in self-advocating for their rights.

Part VI. Narrative

At a minimum, you must include all of the information requested. You may include any other information, not otherwise collected on this reporting form that would be helpful in describing the extent of PAIR activities during the prior fiscal year. Please limit the narrative portion of this report, including attachments, to 20 pages or less.

The narrative should contain the following information. The instructions for this form outline the information that should be contained in each section.

  1. Sources of funds received and expended
  2. Budget for the fiscal year covered by this report
  3. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years)
  4. Involvement with advisory boards (if any)
  5. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure
  6. Coordination with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the State long-term care program, if these programs are not part of the P&A agency

PART VI. NARRATIVE: A. Sources of funds received and expended FY 2015 P&A Grant 227,643 Private contributions 1,250 TOTAL ALL SOURCES of FUNDS 228,893 B. Expenses for the fiscal year covered by this report EXPENSES Human Resources Salaries 138,940 Temporary Employees 359 HR Services 695 Insurances 17,553 Worker’s Compensation 352 Unemployment Tax 128 FICA Expense 10,393 403(b) TSA Expense 7,338 Other Personnel Expense 48 Total Human Resources 175,806 Operating Expenses Accounting Services 743 Auditing Fees 1,289 Legal Fees 0 Consultant Fees 3,937 Litigation Exp 0 Travel 1,152 Staff & Board Development 1,574 NDRN Conference Exp. 2,929 Meeting Expenses 97 Outreach 796 Recruiting costs 49 Office & General Supplies 1,745 Equipment Purchased 420 Leased Equipment 1,648 Equipment Maintenance 1,848 Computer System Expense 251 Rent and Utilities 22,356 Building Maintenance 511 Telephone 2,024 Postage 425 Printing/Copying 1,011 Subscriptions/Reference 2,668 Dues & Memberships 2,396 Malpractice Insurance 1,303 Business Insurance 197 Accommodation Services 730 Depreciation 1,134 File Storage 644 Relocation Expenses 337 Total Operating Expenses 53,086 TOTAL EXPENSES 228,893 BUDGET FOR FY 2016 EXPENSES Human Resources Salaries 147811 Temporary Employees 831 HR Services 795 Insurances 21791 Worker’s Compensation 387 Unemployment Tax 133 FICA Expense 11255 403(b) TSA Expense 8154 Other Personnel Expense 498 Total Human Resources 191654 Operating Expenses Accounting Services 837 Auditing Fees 1,217 Legal Fees 279 Consultant Fees 161 Litigation Exp 250 Travel 1,106 Staff & Board Development 742 NDRN Conference Exp. 500 Meeting Expenses 659 Outreach 268 Recruiting costs 83 Ofice & General Supplies 1,660 Equipment Purchased 1053 Leased Equipment 812 Equipment Maintenance 664 Computer System Expense 1660 Rent and Utilities 24728 Building Maintenance 553 Telephone 2257 Postage 685 Printing/Copying 1116 Subscriptions/Reference 2797 Dues & Memberships 2080 Malpractice Insurance 1,116 Business Insurance 223 Accomodation Services 555 Depreciation 1,445 File Storage 575 Publication Expense 279 Total Operating Expenses 50359 TOTAL EXPENSES 242013 C. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years):FY 2015 TOTAL FTEs: 2.39 PAIR Coordinator - Attorney 46.0% Attorney 16.3% Attorney 9.1% Attorney - Grand Junction 14.5% Advocate - Grand Junction 17.0% Dir. of Legal Services 6.6% Rights Advocate 39.7% Attorney 12.9% Attorney 1.3% Attorney 15.4% Executive Director 1.5% Administrative Assistant 12.3% Financial Manager 10.8% Dir. Administrative Services 10.0% Office Manager 8.6% Administrative Assistant 13.5% Administrative Assistant 3.2% D. Involvement with advisory boards (if any): N/A E. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure: None. F. Coordination with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the State long-term care program, if these programs are not part of the P & A agency: THESE PROGRAMS ARE PART OF THE AGENCY

Certification

Signed?Yes
Signed ByMary Anne Harvey
TitleExecutive Director
Signed Date12/18/2015