RSA-509 - Protection & Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR) Program Performance Report

Indiana (INDIANA P and A SERVICES) - H240A120015 - FY2012

General Information

Designated Agency Identification

NameIndiana Protection and Advocacy Services
Address4701 N. Keystone Ave.
Address Line 2Suite 222
CityIndianapolis
StateIndiana
Zip Code46205
E-mail Addresstcrishon@ipas.in.gov
Website Addresshttp://www.in.gov/ipas
Phone317-722-5555
TTY 317-722-5563
Toll-free Phone800-622-4845
Toll-free TTY800-838-1131
Fax317-722-5564
Name of P&A Executive DirectorGary Richter
Name of PAIR Director/CoordinatorThomas E. Crishon
Person to contact regarding reportThomas E. Crishon
Contact Person phone800-622-4845
Ext.443

Part I. Non-Case Services

A. Individual Information and Referral Services (I&R)

Multiple responses are not permitted.

1. Individuals receiving I&R within PAIR priority areas97
2. Individuals receiving I&R outside PAIR priority areas469
3. Total individuals receiving I&R (lines A1 + A2)566

B. Training Activities

1. Number of trainings presented by PAIR staff22
2. Number of individuals who attended training (approximate)353

During the past year, PAIR staff provided training at twenty-two public speaking events addressing disability rights, PAIR services, and other disability rights issues to over 350 participants including the following:

Twenty resident rights presentations - focusing on abuse, neglect, and grievance procedures - conducted at select Indiana nursing facilities to 307 participants;

One presentation to the Business Leadership Network to increase awareness of disability rights, IPAS services, and the ADA to thirty participants; and

One presentation about responding to Hoosiers with access and functional needs, conducted at Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI), to sixteen participants.

C. Information Disseminated to the Public

1. Radio and TV appearances by PAIR staff0
2. Newspaper/magazine/journal articles0
3. PSAs/videos aired0
4. Hits on the PAIR/P&A website77,720
5. Publications/booklets/brochures disseminated15,483
6. Other (specify separately)23

Narrative

The 23 others include fairs and conferences where IPAS staff disseminated information to the public through booths or exhibits, including how many individuals attended the fair or conference:

10/07/11 AT Expo Ball State University (50 individuals attended)

10/25/11 Jackson County Transition Fair Exhibit (40 individuals attended)

10/28/11 Bartholomew Con. School Corporation 2011 Transition Fair Exhibit (200 individuals attended)

10/28/11 The Association of Late-Deafened Adults International Convention (200 individuals attended)

11/01/11 ARC of Indiana 2011 Conference (200 individuals attended)

11/21/11 Greater Lafayette Special Services (GLASS) Transition Fair Exhibit (100 individuals attended)

11/30/11 IGCPD Conference (375 individuals attended)

12/08/11 INAPSE 21st Annual Conference (175 individuals attended)

03/02/12 Greensburg (Decatur County) Transition Fair Exhibit (130 individuals attended)

03/26/12 Lake County Transition Fair Hammond (220 individuals attended)

04/04/12 Monroe/Owen County Transition Fair Exhibit (60 individuals attended)

04/13/12 2012 Key Consumer Conference (200 individuals attended)

04/19/12 2012 PATINS Conference (400 individuals attended)

04/20/12 Morgan County Transition Fair Exhibit (65 individuals attended)

04/20/12 Scott County Transition Fair Exhibit (10 individuals attended)

05/07/12 2012 Disability Expo (1014 individuals attended)

08/24/12 2012 Perry Township Transition Carnival (30,000 individuals attended)

08/24/12 The ARC of Indiana 2012 Disability Celebration (100 individuals attended)

09/10/12 Voting Rights Display Table-Wabash Valley Employee Fair (100 individuals attended)

09/13/12 Brain Injury Association of Indiana Annual Conference 2012 (200 individuals attended)

09/14/12 Key Consumer Conference Exhibit (200 individuals attended)

09/17/12 PAVA display table at Wabash Center (200 individuals attended)

09/29/12 2012 Indiana Vision Expo (600 individuals attended)

Additionally, the following is a list of IPAS publications created in connection with PAIR, including the total number of each disseminated during FY2012:

Abuse and Neglect Information Cards (203 publications disseminated)

Accommodating Ideas for Persons with TBI (2 publications disseminated)

CAP Brochure (2,531 publications disseminated)

Developmental Disability Network Brochure (93 publications disseminated)

Disability Rights and Appeals Process Guide (60 publications disseminated)

Emergency Planning Guide (108 publications disseminated)

IMPACT Newsletter Annual Report (2 publications disseminated)

IMPACT Newsletter Priorities Publication (1,746 publications disseminated)

IPAS Agency Booklet (82 publications disseminated)

IPAS Agency Brochure (2,263 publications disseminated)

PABSS Brochure (1,535 publications disseminated)

PATBI Brochure (784 publications disseminated)

PAVA Brochure (548 publications disseminated)

Segregated and Exploited: The Failure of the Disability Service System to Provide Quality Work (1,801 publications disseminated)

Time-Out, Seclusion & Restraint in Indiana Schools (60 publications disseminated)

TIPS Guide (80 publications disseminated)

Toll-free resource page (1,506 publications disseminated)

Transition Planning Handbook (1,424 publications disseminated)

Voting Guide (194 publications disseminated)

Voting Information Bookmark (461 publications disseminated)

Part II. Individuals Served

A. Individuals Served

Count individual once per FY. Multiple counts not permitted for lines A1 through A3.

1. Individuals still served as of October 1 (carryover from prior FY)22
2. Additional individuals served during the year53
3. Total individuals served (lines A1 + A2)75
4. Individuals w. more than 1 case opened/closed during the FY. (Do not add this number to total on line A3 above.)6

B. Individuals served as of September 30

Carryover to next FY may not exceed total on line II. A.3 above 29

C. Problem Areas/Complaints of Individuals Served

1. Architectural accessibility17
2. Employment2
3. Program access6
4. Housing6
5. Government benefits/services1
6. Transportation2
7. Education2
8. Assistive technology2
9. Voting3
10. Health care2
11. Insurance0
12. Non-government services0
13. Privacy rights0
14. Access to records0
15. Abuse29
16. Neglect3
17. Other10

D. Reasons for Closing Individual Case Files

1. Issues resolved partially or completely in individual favor24
2. Other representation found3
3. Individual withdrew complaint13
4. Appeals unsuccessful1
5. PAIR Services not needed due to individual's death, relocation etc.4
6. PAIR withdrew from case1
7. PAIR unable to take case because of lack of resources0
8. Individual case lacks legal merit8
9. Other0

Please explain

E. Intervention Strategies Used in Serving Individuals

List the highest level of intervention used by PAIR prior to closing each case file.

1. Technical assistance in self-advocacy13
2. Short-term assistance29
3. Investigation/monitoring10
4. Negotiation2
5. Mediation/alternative dispute resolution0
6. Administrative hearings0
7. Litigation (including class actions)0
8. Systemic/policy activities0

Part III. Statistical Information on Individuals Served

A. Age of Individuals Served as of October 1

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. 0 - 41
2. 5 - 224
3. 23 - 5948
4. 60 - 649
5. 65 and over13

B. Gender of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Females30
2. Males45

C. Race/Ethnicity of Individuals Served

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race2
2. American Indian or Alaskan Native0
3. Asian0
4. Black or African American12
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander0
6. White61
7. Two or more races0
8. Race/ethnicity unknown0

D. Living Arrangements of Individuals Served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Independent34
2. Parental or other family home7
3. Community residential home0
4. Foster care0
5. Nursing home7
6. Public institutional living arrangement0
7. Private institutional living arrangement0
8. Jail/prison/detention center26
9. Homeless1
10. Other living arrangements0
11. Living arrangements not known0

E. Primary Disability of Individuals Served

Identify the individual's primary disability, namely the one directly related to the issues/complaints

1. Blind/visual impairment5
2. Deaf/hard of hearing7
3. Deaf-blind0
4. Orthopedic impairment40
5. Mental illness0
6. Substance abuse0
7. Mental retardation0
8. Learning disability1
9. Neurological impairment5
10. Respiratory impairment2
11. Heart/other circulatory impairment6
12. Muscular/skeletal impairment1
13. Speech impairment0
14. AIDS/HIV2
15. Traumatic brain injury0
16. Other disability6

Part IV. Systemic Activities and Litigation

A. Systemic Activities

1. Number of policies/practices changed as a result of non-litigation systemic activities2

2. Number of individuals potentially impacted by policy changes445,722

Describe your systemic activities. Be sure to include information about the policies that were changed and how these changes benefit individuals with disabilities. Include case examples of how your systemic activities impacted individuals served.

With funding from the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR) program and the Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities (PADD) program, IPAS initiated a project in 2009 to determine whether the Indiana Department of Workforce Development (DWD) WorkOne offices (WorkOne) complied with the accessibility guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). WorkOne offices are visited by over 500,000 people each year, of which more than 60,000 are individuals with a disability. DWD has ninety-two WorkOne offices spread throughout eleven regions within the state of Indiana. IPAS selected twenty WorkOne locations around the state to survey and DWD, based on IPAS’s recommendation, appointed ADA Coordinators for each of its eleven regions. The survey included accessibility of parking lots; access to the buildings and offices; access to office service areas; access to restrooms; and other apparent compliance issues. IPAS completed the surveys jointly with the regional ADA Coordinators and found accessibility issues at all of the facilities surveyed. IPAS provided the survey results and proposed plans of correction to DWD. Corrective actions have been fully completed at seven of the offices and are nearing completion at the other thirteen offices. Based on IPAS’s recommendation, DWD will complete accessibility self-surveys at its remaining offices and will correct any deficiencies found in those surveys. IPAS also recommended that WorkOne develop a satisfaction survey for its consumers to complete, in order to provide input about their experiences related to accessibility. WorkOne did create and implement that survey process during the course of this project. Due to IPAS’s involvement, accessibility at WorkOne offices in Indiana will be greatly increased for individuals with disabilities. These changes will benefit tens of thousands of Indiana residents.

IPAS also worked with Indiana Association for Persons in Supported Employment (IN-APSE) to remedy alleged discriminatory practices occurring at conferences sponsored by that association. Specifically, attendees reported that several areas where a conference was held were inaccessible. IN-APSE reported that the conference planning committee will now perform walkthroughs of intended conference sites to ensure they are accessible to all attendees with disabilities. This will impact attendees at future conferences by ensuring they have full access to all physical and programmatic aspects of the event.

B. Litigation/Class Actions

1. Number of individuals potentially impacted by changes as a result of PAIR litigation/class action efforts0
2. Number of individuals named in class actions0

Describe your litigation/class action activities. Explain how individuals with disabilities benefited from your litigation activities. Be sure to include case examples that demonstrate the impact of your litigation.

There were no instances this year where litigation on an individual or class action basis was required to resolve client concerns. Negotiation/mediation and use of established complaint processes were adequate to resolve the service requests handled this year.

Part V. PAIR'S Priorities and Objectives

A. Priorities and Objectives for the Fiscal Year Covered by this Report

For each of your PAIR program priorities for the fiscal year covered by this report, please:

  1. Identify and describe priority.
  2. Identify the need, issue or barrier addressed by this priority.
  3. Identify and describe indicators PAIR used to determine successful outcome of activities pursued under this priority.
  4. Explain whether pursuing this priority involved collaborative efforts by other entities. If so, describe this collaboration.
  5. Provide the number of cases handled under the priority. Indicate how many of these, if any, were class actions.
  6. Provide at least one case summary that demonstrates the impact of the priority.

Priority 1: Reduce or eliminate abuse and neglect of individuals with disabilities.

Needs addressed: Continuing vulnerability of individuals with disabilities to be subject to abuse or neglect.

Indicators of success: Outcomes of individual cases handled which result in improved safety and well-being of clients served.

Collaboration: None required although cooperation of service providers, family, and guardians was often a contributing factor to success.

Objectives:

101 Review twenty (20) allegations of abuse and neglect on behalf of individuals with disabilities to ensure that the allegation is reported to the responsible entities and advocate that necessary actions are taken to protect the health, safety and welfare of the individual.

For the year, twenty-one service requests were closed. Fourteen service requests are being carried over into FY2013. For the year, with the twenty-one service requests closed and fourteen service requested carried over, the goal of reviewing twenty allegations was met.

Representative case: “Robert,” age 34, is an inmate within the Indiana Department of Correction (IDOC) system who utilizes a wheelchair. While being transferred to Wishard Hospital for a doctor’s appointment, Robert’s wheelchair was not properly secured in the transport vehicle. The driver suddenly braked during the trip and Robert was thrown forward, out of his wheelchair. Robert contacted IPAS to ensure such neglect would not occur in future trips. IPAS worked with the facility who conceded that Robert was inappropriately secured in the transport vehicle. Facility staff was then retrained on how to safely, appropriately transport individuals who utilize a wheelchair. This retraining will help ensure future inmates who utilize a wheelchair will be safely transported by IDOC staff.

Priority 2: Reduce or eliminate discrimination or the denial of rights due to disability.

Needs addressed: Continuing discrimination and denial of rights of individuals with disabilities.

Indicators of success: Interventions employed in individual cases results in cessation of discrimination and restoration of rights to individuals served.

Collaboration: None required although, again, often the cooperation of service providers, family, and guardians was helpful in achieving positive outcomes.

Objectives:

201 Review thirty (30) allegations of discrimination under Title II or III of the Americans with Disabilities Act, Fair Housing Act, or other disability discrimination law.

For the year, thirty-three service requests were closed. Seventeen service requests are being carried over into FY2013. For the year, with the thirty-three service requests closed and seventeen service requests carried over, the goal of reviewing thirty allegations was met.

Representative cases: “Jimmy,” age 64, frequently utilizes his county’s paratransit bus system. Jimmy, who has mobility issues, found that the buses were often late for scheduled pickups. It was difficult for Jimmy to stand and wait for the bus, which was often as much as an hour late. Jimmy called IPAS for assistance. IPAS contacted the county, explained Jimmy’s concerns, and advocated for a reasonable accommodation. Following several contacts, it was agreed that the county would move the bus stop to accommodate Jimmy’s needs. Additionally, the county implemented a plan so that if a bus was running more than fifteen minutes late, a second bus would be dispatched to the next stop so the late bus could get back on schedule. Finally, Jimmy’s apartment complex agreed to allow riders to wait for the bus in the clubhouse, so that Jimmy would no longer have to stand and wait outside. As a result of IPAS advocacy, Jimmy was granted a reasonable accommodation by the county, as is required under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act. Jimmy can now utilize the county’s paratransit bus system without worry.

“Amanda,” age 63, lives in an apartment complex in Valparaiso. Oftentimes, the parking lot in front of Amanda’s building would be full, requiring her to travel a great distance to get to her apartment. Due to disability-related mobility issues, this was often difficult. To alleviate these troubles, Amanda requested that complex management provide her with a personal parking space nearest her building. Management refused. IPAS contacted complex management and educated them on the requirements of the Fair Housing Act (FHA) including the rights of tenants with disabilities to request accommodations under the FHA. It was clear that Amanda’s requested accommodation was reasonable and supported by the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Department of Justice. After several discussions, complex management agreed to erect a sign that specifically designated a parking space close to Amanda’s building as being solely for her use. As a result of IPAS advocacy, Amanda’s right to request a reasonable accommodation under the FHA was properly observed and responded to by complex management. Going forward, Amanda will no longer have to worry about a long and difficult travel to and from her apartment.

203 Review three (3) allegations of disability based discrimination that may have systemic implications.

No service requests were successfully resolved under this objective. However, IPAS did complete advocacy under three projects. The first involved the Indiana Association for Persons in Supported Employment and possible discriminatory practices occurring at conferences sponsored by that association. IPAS successfully closed that project this fiscal year, having effectively advocated for systemic changes to occur at those conferences. The second involves IPAS surveying nursing facilities to ensure compliance with federal regulations and state law, which require posting of contact information of all pertinent client advocacy groups and state agencies. If violations are found, letters are sent to the noncompliant facilities, educating them on these legal obligations, and to the Director of Long Term Care at Indiana State Department of Health. This project is being carried over into FY2013. The third is a project regarding accessibility at Gas America convenience stores and gas station, which is also being carried over into FY2013. A sale occurred of Gas America to Speedway, LLC. Speedway is the nation’s fourth largest company-owned and operated convenience store chain and is an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Marathon Petroleum Corporation. When the sale was announced, IPAS decided to wait until the sale was finalized to contact Speedway about the non-compliance issues. IPAS legal plans to contact Speedway in FY2013.

204 Monitor the WorkOne Centers to ensure timely implementation of corrective action plans to address ADA compliance issues noted in the previous surveys.

With funding from the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights (PAIR) program and the Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities (PADD) program, IPAS initiated a project in 2009 to determine whether the Indiana Department of Workforce Development (DWD) WorkOne offices (WorkOne) complied with the accessibility guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). WorkOne offices are visited by over 500,000 people each year, of which more than 60,000 are individuals with a disability. DWD has ninety-two WorkOne offices spread throughout eleven regions within the state of Indiana.

IPAS selected twenty WorkOne locations around the state to survey and DWD, based on IPAS’s recommendation, appointed ADA Coordinators for each of its eleven regions. The survey included accessibility of parking lots; access to the buildings and offices; access to office service areas; access to restrooms; and other apparent compliance issues. IPAS completed the surveys jointly with the regional ADA Coordinators and found accessibility issues at all of the facilities surveyed. IPAS provided the survey results and proposed plans of correction to DWD. Corrective actions have been fully completed at seven of the offices and are nearing completion at the other thirteen offices. Based on IPAS’s recommendation, DWD will complete accessibility self-surveys at its remaining offices and will correct any deficiencies found in those surveys. IPAS also recommended that WorkOne develop a satisfaction survey for its consumers to complete, in order to provide input about their experiences related to accessibility. WorkOne did create and implement that survey process during the course of this project.

This project was successfully closed this fiscal year. The project’s accomplishments were the result of a collaborative and cooperative effort between state agencies. Due to IPAS’s involvement, accessibility at WorkOne offices in Indiana will be greatly increased for individuals with disabilities. These changes will benefit tens of thousands of Indiana residents.

Priority 3: Increase awareness and effective self-advocacy by providing education and training about disability rights and the exercise of these rights.

Needs addressed: Improve knowledge about disability rights and self-advocacy skills of individuals with disabilities and their families and guardians.

Indicators of success: Most training and public speaking events include an evaluation by participants. One indicator of success is the results of these evaluations, which attempt to assess the degree to which participants found the information to be helpful. Such results are overwhelmingly positive.

Collaboration: To achieve positive outcomes, IPAS worked in partnership with participating individuals, families, and guardians, as well as with organizations and agencies on whose committees or groups IPAS staff members participated.

Objectives:

301 Provide education and training about disability rights and IPAS to individuals with disabilities, parents, guardians, advocates, and/or service program providers.

For the year, IPAS conducted twenty-two education and training speaking engagements training approximately 353 individuals. Please refer to the previous listing of training and public information events.

302 Participate on selected committees, groups or task forces that have systemic implications concerning policies and practices affecting the rights of individuals with disabilities.

IPAS participated on three committees, groups or task forces this year.

First, IPAS continues to participate on the Indiana ADA Steering Committee. This group attempts to promote ADA awareness and compliance throughout the state. IPAS participated in eleven of twelve meetings conducted during the year. The Committee continues to promote the ADA Audio Conference series sponsored by ADA Indiana and the Disability and Business Technical Assistance Center (DBTAC), the Legal Issues Webinar Series, and ADA Community grants available to entities wanting to promote accessibility in their communities. The Committee also provides ongoing referrals, technical assistance, and information dissemination. IPAS will continue to participate on this committee in FY2013.

Second, IPAS continued to participate on the Disaster Housing and Emergency Services Advisory Committee. IPAS participated in two meetings during the year. IPAS provided input regarding issues facing individuals with disabilities (access and functional needs) in the area of housing. IPAS also participated in the “Disaster Housing and Emergency Services TTX 2012” exercise. The purpose of the exercise was to evaluate the participants’ actions relative to current response plans and capabilities for a catastrophic event response. The Exercise Planning Team selected objectives that focused on evaluating weather-related and earthquake catastrophic emergency response procedures, identifying areas for improvement, and achieving a collaborative attitude. IPAS’s participation in this event was to serve as a subject-matter expert representing the interests of persons with disabilities in the community and to assess the ability of these plans to meet their needs. Following this exercise, the Committee completed its work and, therefore, dismantled. For this reason, IPAS will not continue to participate in this committee in FY2013.

Third, IPAS continued to participate on the Back Home in Indiana Alliance Steering Committee. This organization comprises representatives from federal, state, and local housing, advocacy, and disability-related organizations and is working to increase the availability of individual, affordable, and accessible housing for people with disabilities. IPAS participated in two of three meetings this year. IPAS will continue to participate on this committee in FY2013.

Priority 4: Provide timely and accurate information about disability rights and technical assistance concerning the exercise of these rights.

Needs addressed: Individuals with disabilities require information about their rights, technical assistance in self-advocacy efforts, and referral to other organizations based on their presenting needs.

Indicators of success: IPAS conducts a follow-up telephone satisfaction survey on a sample of individuals who have recently received information and referral services. A goal has been established to achieve at least 88% affirmative responses to the question “would you call IPAS again if you have another disability rights concern?” This year, of those individuals calling about PAIR services, IPAS exceeded that goal by 12% achieving a positive response from 100% of the respondents.

Collaboration: None.

Objectives:

401 Respond to requests for information and referral and technical assistance to individuals with disabilities, their families, and professionals about disability rights and provide information and technical assistance concerning the exercise of these rights.

For the year, IPAS fielded 566 PAIR service requests for information and referral services. Of these, follow-up calls were made to forty-one individuals who participated in the satisfaction survey. This constitutes a 7.2% survey sample. Of the forty-one participants, 97.6% indicated that they found the information which they gained to be helpful and 100% said they would call IPAS again if they should have a disability rights concern or problem.

B. Priorities and Objectives for the Current Fiscal Year

Please include a statement of priorities and objectives for the current fiscal year (the fiscal year succeeding that covered by this report), which should contain the following information:

  1. a statement of each prioirty;
  2. the need addressed by each priority; and;
  3. a description of the activities to be carried out under each priority.

Priority 1: Reduce or eliminate abuse and neglect of individuals with disabilities.

Needs addressed: Continuing vulnerability of individuals with disabilities to be subject to abuse or neglect.

Activities: Activities are described by objectives below.

Objectives:

101 Review twenty allegations of abuse and neglect on behalf of individuals with disabilities to ensure that the allegation is reported to the responsible entities and advocate that necessary actions are taken to protect the health, safety and welfare of the individual.

Priority 2: Reduce or eliminate discrimination or the denial of rights due to disability.

Needs addressed: Continuing discrimination and denial of rights of individuals with disabilities.

Activities: Activities are described by objectives below.

Objectives:

201 Review thirty allegations of discrimination under the Americans with Disabilities Act, Fair Housing Act, or other disability discrimination law.

203 Review three allegations of disability based discrimination that may have systemic implications.

Priority 3: Increase awareness and effective self-advocacy by providing education and training about disability rights and the exercise of these rights.

Needs addressed: Improve knowledge about disability rights and self-advocacy skills of individuals with disabilities and their families and guardians.

Activities: Activities are described by objectives below.

Objectives:

301 Provide education and training about disability rights and IPAS to individuals with disabilities, parents, guardians, advocates, and/or service program providers.

302 Participate on selected committees, groups or task forces that have systemic implications concerning policies and practices affecting the rights of individuals with disabilities.

Priority 4: Provide timely and accurate information about disability rights and technical assistance concerning the exercise of these rights.

Needs addressed: Individuals with disabilities require information about their rights, technical assistance in self-advocacy efforts and referral to other organizations based on their presenting needs.

Activities: Activities are described by objectives below.

Objectives:

401 Respond to requests for information and referral and technical assistance to individuals with disabilities, their families, and professionals about disability rights and provide information and technical assistance concerning the exercise of these rights.

Part VI. Narrative

At a minimum, you must include all of the information requested. You may include any other information, not otherwise collected on this reporting form that would be helpful in describing the extent of PAIR activities during the prior fiscal year. Please limit the narrative portion of this report, including attachments, to 20 pages or less.

The narrative should contain the following information. The instructions for this form outline the information that should be contained in each section.

  1. Sources of funds received and expended
  2. Budget for the fiscal year covered by this report
  3. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years)
  4. Involvement with advisory boards (if any)
  5. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure
  6. Coordination with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the State long-term care program, if these programs are not part of the P&A agency

A. Sources of funds received and expended:

The PAIR grant is the sole source of funds received and expended for the PAIR program activities.

B. Budget for the fiscal year covered by this report:

The following includes the actual amount expended in each category for FY2012, and the proposed budget for each category for FY2013.

SALARIES & FRINGE BENEFITS Expended: $308,089 Proposed: $229,496

UTILITIES Expended: $0 Proposed: $2,620

CONTRACTS/AGREEMENTS Expended: $21,939 Proposed: $7,591

MATERIALS/SUPPLIES Expended: $972 Proposed: $16,062

EQUIPMENT Expended: $1,028 Proposed: $808

OTHER (Work, Comp, ID bills, etc.) Expended: $58,754 Proposed: $10,850

ADMINISTRATIVE/OPERATING EXPENSES Expended: $10,053 Proposed: $17,948

TOTAL Expenses for 2012: $400,835 TOTAL Proposed for 2013: $285,375

CARRYOVER 2012 Grant: $191,187

C. Description of PAIR staff (duties and person-years):

IPAS has twenty-six staff members. IPAS administers eight federally-funded advocacy programs: the PAIR program; Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities (PADD); Protection and Advocacy for Individuals with Mental Illness (PAIMI); the Client Assistance Program (CAP); Protection and Advocacy for Assistive Technology (PAAT); Protection and Advocacy for Beneficiaries of Social Security (PABSS); Protection and Advocacy for Traumatic Brain Injury (PATBI); and Protection and Advocacy for Voting Accessibility (PAVA). All staff work under the various programs, including the PAIR program. Staff are required to closely track their work activities under each program. Bi-weekly, each staff member accounts for the amount of time spent in each program. This accounting is used to determine the portion of each staff member’s salary and benefits paid by each of the federal programs for that bi-weekly pay period. This cost allocation approach assures that each funding source supports only those activities and expenses which are authorized under that source’s legislation and regulations.

The entire IPAS staff:

1 Executive Director

1 Director of Legal and Client Services

1 Support Services Director

3 Staff Attorneys

3 Assistant Client Services Directors

10 Advocacy Specialists

2 Intake Specialists

1 Education and Training Coordinator

2 Accountants

1 Executive Secretary

1 Data Entry Clerk

D. Involvement with advisory boards (if any):

IPAS is represented by staff serving on the ADA State Steering Committee, the Disaster Housing and Emergency Services Advisory Committee, and the Back Home in Indiana Alliance Steering Committee. The IPAS Executive Director is a member of the Governor’s Council for People with Disabilities.

E. Grievances filed under the grievance procedure:

There were no PAIR grievances filed under the IPAS grievance procedure in FY2012.

F. Coordination with the Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the State long-term care program, if these programs are not part of the P&A agency:

CAP is also administered by IPAS. The State long-term care program is administered by the Indiana Family and Social Services Administration, Division of Aging. IPAS has an on-going arrangement with the administering agency based on a prior written agreement, which defined coordination and referrals between all IPAS programs and the State long-term care ombudsman program.

Certification

Signed?Yes
Signed ByGary Richter
TitleInterim Executive Director, IPAS
Signed Date12/20/2012