Annual Report - Independent Living Services For Older Individuals Who Are Blind

RSA-7-OB for Colorado Department of Labor and Employment - H177B180059 report through September 30, 2018

Instructions

Introduction

The revised ED RSA-7-OB form incorporates revisions to the four established performance measures for the Independent Living Services for Older Individuals who are Blind (IL-OIB) program. Added in 2007, these measures aim to better reflect the program’s impact on individual consumers and the community.

Added to capture information that may be required to meet GPRA guidelines, the performance measures can be found under Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures as follows:

Measure 1.1

Of individuals who received AT (assistive technology) services and training, the percentage who regained or improved functional abilities previously lost as a result of vision loss.

Measure 1.2

Of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services, the percentage who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their home and/or community environment.

Measure 1.3

Of individuals who received services or training in alternative non-visual or low vision techniques, the percentage that experienced functional gains or were able to successfully restore and maintain their functional ability to engage in their customary life activities within their home environment and community.

Measure 1.4

Of the total individuals served, the percentage that reported that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services.

Revisions to these established program performance measures consists of the following additional five items:

E1. Enter the Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only)

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (closed/inactive cases only)

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (closed/inactive cases only)

E4. Enter the number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only)

E5. Enter the number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only)

Submittal Instructions

OIB grantees are expected to complete and submit the 7-OB Report online through RSA’s website (https://rsa.ed.gov), unless RSA is notified of pertinent circumstances that may impede the online submission.

To register with RSA’s MIS, please go to https://rsa.ed.gov and click on Info for new users. The link provides instructions for obtaining an agency-specific username and password. Further instructions for completing and submitting the 7-OB Report online will be provided upon completion of the registration process.

OIB grantees submitting the 7-OB Report online are not required to mail signed copies of the 7-OB Report to RSA, but they must certify in the MIS that the signed and dated 7-OB Report and lobbying certification forms are retained on file.

The Report submittal deadline is no later than December 31 of the reporting year.

Part I: Funding Sources for Expenditures And Encumbrances — Instructions

Please note: Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services in Part I (C) must equal the total funds spent on service in Part IV. Part I C must equal the sum of Part IV A1+B1+C1+D1.

A. Funding SourceS for Expenditures and encumbrances in reported fy

A1. Enter the total amount of Title VII-Chapter 2 funds expended or encumbered during the reported FY. Include expenditures or encumbrances made from both carryover funds from the previous FY and from the reported FY grant funds.

A2. Enter the total of any other federal funds expended or encumbered in the Title VII-Chapter 2 program during the reported FY. Designate the funding sources and amounts in (a) through (e).

A3. Enter the total amount of state funds expended or encumbered in the Title VII - Chapter 2 program. Do not include in-kind contributions (e.g., documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space, or land).

A4. Enter the total amount of third party contributions including local and community funding, non-profit or for-profit agency funding, etc. Do not include in-kind contributions (e.g., documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space, or land).

A5. Enter the total amount of in-kind contributions from non-federal sources. Include value of property or services that benefit the Title VII-Chapter 2 program (e.g. the fairly evaluated documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space or land).

A6. Enter the total matching funds (A3 + A4 + A5). Reminder: The required non-federal match for the Title VII-Chapter 2 program is not less than $1 for each $9 of federal funds provided in the Title VII-Chapter 2 grant. Funds derived from or provided by the federal government, or services assisted or subsidized to any significant extent by the federal government, may not be included in determining the amount of non-federal contributions.

A7. Enter the total amount of all funds expended and encumbered (A1 + A2 + A6) during the reported fiscal year.

B. Total expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs

Enter the total amount of expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs. Do not include costs for direct services provided by agency staff or the costs of contract or sub-grantee staff that provide direct services under contracts or sub-grants. If an administrator spends a portion of his or her time providing administrative services and the remainder providing direct services, include only the expenditures for administrative services.

C. Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services

Enter the total amount of expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services by subtracting line B from line A7.

Part II: Staffing — Instructions

Base all FTE calculations upon a full-time 40-hour workweek or 2080 hours per year. Record all FTE assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program irrespective of whether salary is paid with Title VII-Chapter 2 funds.

A. Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Program Staff

A1. Under the “Administrative & Support” column (A1a), enter the full-time equivalent (FTE) of all administrative and support staff (e.g. management, program directors, supervisors, readers, drivers for staff, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from the State agency. (For example, if 20% or 8 hours per week of a staff person’s time were spent on administrative and support functions related to this program, the FTE for that staff person would be .2). Under the “Direct Services” column (A1b), enter the FTE of all direct service staff (e.g. rehabilitation teacher, IL specialist, orientation and mobility specialist, social worker, drivers for individuals receiving services, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from the State agency. If administrative or support staff of the State agency also provide direct services, report the FTE devoted to direct services in the “Direct Services” column (A1b). (For example, if 80% of a staff person’s time were spent in providing direct services, the FTE for that person would be 8). Finally, add across the “Administrative & Support” FTE (A1a) and “Direct Service” FTE (A1b) to enter the total State agency FTE in the TOTAL (A1c) column.

A2. Under the “Administrative & Support” column (A2a), enter the full-time equivalent (FTE) of all administrative and support staff (e.g. management, program directors, supervisors, readers, drivers for staff, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from contractors or sub-grantees. Under the “Direct Services” column (A2b), enter the FTE of all direct service staff (e.g. rehabilitation teacher, IL specialist, orientation and mobility specialist, social worker, driver for individuals receiving services, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from contractors and sub-grantees. If administrative staff of the contractors or sub-grantees also provides direct services, report the FTE devoted to direct services in the “Direct Services” column (A2b). Finally, add across the “Administrative & Support” FTE (A2a) and “Direct Service” FTE (A2b) to enter the total contractor or sub-grantee FTE in the TOTAL (A2c) column.

A3. Add each column for A1 and A2 and record totals on line A3.

B. Employed or advanced in employment

B1. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) with disabilities (include blind and visually impaired not 55 or older), including blindness or visual impairment, in B1a. Enter the FTE of employees with disabilities in B1b. (To calculate B1b, add the total number of hours worked by all employees with disabilities and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B2. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 and older in B2a. Enter the FTE of employees who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 or older in B2b. (To calculate B2b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 and older and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B3. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are members of racial/ethnic minorities in B3a. Enter the FTE of employees who are members of racial/ethnic minorities in B3b. (To calculate B3b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are members of racial/ethnic minorities and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B4. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are women in B4a. Enter the FTE of employees who are women in B4b. (To calculate B4b, add the total number of hours worked by women and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B5. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, in B5a. Enter the FTE of employees who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, in B5b. (To calculate B5b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

C. Volunteers

C1. Enter the FTE of program volunteers in C1. (To calculate C1, add the total number of hours worked by all program volunteers and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE).

Part III: Data on Individuals Served — Instructions

Provide data in all categories on program participants who received one or more services during the fiscal year being reported.

A. Individuals Served

A1. Enter the number of program participants carried over from the previous federal fiscal year who received services in this reported FY (e.g. someone received services in September (or any other month) of the previous FY and continued to receive additional services in the reported FY).

A2. Enter the number of program participants who began receiving services during the reported fiscal year irrespective of whether they have completed all services.

A3. Enter the total number served during the reported fiscal year (A1 + A2).

B. Age

B1-B10. Enter the total number of program participants served in each respective age category.

B11. Enter the sum of B1 through B10. This must agree with A3.

C. Gender

C1. Enter the total number of females receiving services.

C2. Enter the total number of males receiving services.

C3. Enter the sum of C1 and C2. This must agree with A3.

D. Race/Ethnicity

Hispanic or Latino means a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

D1. Enter the number of individuals served who are Hispanic/Latino of any race or Hispanic/Latino only. Hispanic/Latino means a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

D2. Enter the number of individuals served who are American Indian or Alaska Native. American Indian or Alaska Native means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.

D3. Enter the number of individuals served who are Asian. Asian means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.

D4. Enter the number of individuals served who are Black or African American. Black or African American means a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as “Haitian” may be used.

D5. Enter the number of individuals served who are Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.

D6. Enter the number of individuals served who are White or Caucasian. White means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

D7. Enter the number of individuals served who report two or more races but who are not Hispanic/Latino of any race.

D8. Enter “race and ethnicity unknown” only if the consumer refuses to identify race and ethnicity.

D9. Enter the total of D1 through D8. This number must agree with A3.

E. Degree of Visual Impairment

E1. Enter the number of individuals served who are totally blind (e.g. have light perception only or no light perception).

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who are legally blind (excluding those recorded in E1).

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who have severe visual impairment.

E4. Add E1 + E2 + E3 and enter the total. This number must agree with A3.

F. Major Cause of Visual Impairment

(Please note that the primary site for the definitions of diseases is http://www.nia.nih.gov/AboutNIA/StrategicPlan/ResearchGoalA/Subgoal1.htm.)

Enter only one major cause of visual impairment for each individual served.

F1. Enter the number of individuals served who have macular degeneration as the major cause of visual impairment. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive disease of the retina wherein the light-sensing cells in the central area of vision (the macula) stop working and eventually die. The cause of the disease is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and

It is most common in people who are age 60 and over. AMD is the leading cause of legal blindness in senior citizens.

F2. Enter the number of individuals served who have diabetic retinopathy as the major cause of visual impairment. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new cases of legal blindness among working-age Americans and is caused by damage to the small blood vessels in the retina. It is believed that poorly controlled blood sugar levels are related to its progression. Most persons with diabetes have non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or what is commonly called “adult-onset” or Type II diabetes, and control their blood sugar with oral medications or diet alone. Others have insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), also called "younger or juvenile-onset" or Type I diabetes, and must use insulin injections daily to regulate their blood sugar levels.

F3. Enter the number of individuals served who have glaucoma as the major cause of visual impairment. Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases causing optic nerve damage that involves mechanical compression or decreased blood flow. It is permanent and is a leading cause of blindness in the world, especially in older people.

F4. Enter the number of individuals served who have cataracts as the major cause of visual impairment. A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens of the eye resulting in blurred vision, sensitivity to light and glare, distortion, and dimming of colors. Cataracts are usually a natural aging process in the eye (although they may be congenital) and may be caused or accelerated by other diseases such as glaucoma and diabetes.

F5. Enter the number of individuals served who have any other major cause of visual impairment.

F6. Enter the sum of F1 through F5. This number must agree with A3.

G. Other Age-Related Impairments

Enter the total number of individuals served in each category. Individuals may report one or more non-visual impairments/conditions. The National Institute on Aging (NIA) Strategic Plan identifies age-related diseases, disorders, and disability including the following categories.

G1. Hearing Impairment: Presbycusis is the gradual hearing loss that occurs with aging. An estimated one-third of Americans over 60 and one-half of those over 85 have some degree of hearing loss. Hearing impairment occurs when there is a problem with or damage to one or more parts of the ear, and may be a conductive hearing loss (outer or middle ear) or a sensorineural hearing loss (inner ear) or a combination. The degree of hearing impairment can vary widely from person to person. Some people have partial hearing loss, meaning that the

Ear can pick up some sounds; others have complete hearing loss, meaning that the ear cannot hear at all. One or both ears may be affected, and the impairment may be worse in one ear than in the other.

G2. Diabetes: Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Type 2 diabetes, which results from insulin resistance and abnormal insulin action, is most prevalent in the older population. Diabetes complications, such as heart disease and loss of sight, increase dramatically when blood sugar is poorly controlled and often develop before diabetes is diagnosed.

G3. Cardiovascular Disease and Strokes: Diseases of the heart and blood vessels are the leading cause of hospitalization and death in older Americans. Congestive heart failure is the most common diagnosis in hospitalized patients aged 65 and older.

G4. Cancer: The second leading cause of death among the elderly is cancer, with individuals age 65 and over accounting for 70 percent of cancer mortality in the United States. Breast, prostate, and colon cancers, are common in older people.

G5. Bone, Muscle, Skin, Joint, and Movement Disorders: Osteoporosis (loss of mass and quality of bones), osteoarthritis (inflammation and deterioration of joints), and sarcopenia (age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength) contribute to frailty and injury in millions of older people. Also contributing to loss of mobility and independence are changes in the central nervous system that control movement. Cells may die or become dysfunctional with age, as in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, older people may have difficulty with gross motor behavior, such as moving around in the environment, or with fine motor skills, such as writing.

G6. Alzheimer’s Disease/Cognitive Impairment: Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia (a brain disorder that significantly affects an individual’s ability to carry out daily life activities) in older people. It and other cognitive impairments impact parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language.

G7. Depression is widespread, often undiagnosed, and often under-treated in the elderly. It is believed to affect more than 6.5 million of the 35 million Americans who are 65 or older. Depression is closely associated with dependency and disability. Symptoms may include: loss of interest in normally pleasurable activities, persistent, vague or unexplained somatic complaints, memory complaints, change in weight, sleeping disorder, irritability or demanding behavior, lack of attention to personal care, difficulty with concentration, social withdrawal, change in appetite, confusion, delusions or hallucinations, feeling of worthlessness or hopelessness, and thought about suicide.

G8. Other Major Geriatric Concerns: Several conditions can compromise independence and quality of life in older persons including weakness and falls, urinary incontinence, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and co morbidity (co morbidity describes the effect of all other diseases an individual might have on the primary disease).

H. Type of Residence

H1. Enter the number of individuals served who live in private residence (house or apartment unrelated to senior living).

H2. Enter the number of Individuals served who live in senior living/retirement community (e.g. housing designed for those age 55 and older).

H3. Enter the number of individuals served who live in assisted living facility (e.g. housing that provides personal care and services which meet needs beyond basic provision of food, shelter and laundry).

H4. Enter the number of individuals served who live in nursing homes/long-term care facility (e.g. any facility that provides care to one or more persons who require nursing care and related medical services of such complexity to require professional nursing care under the direction of a physician on a 24 hour a day basis).

H5. Enter the number of individuals served who are homeless

H6. Enter the sum of H1, H2, H3, H4 and H5. This number must agree with A3.

I. Source of Referral

I1. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an ophthalmologist or optometrist.

I2. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a medical provider other than an ophthalmologist or optometrist.

I3. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a state vocational rehabilitation agency.

I4. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a government or social services agency defined as a public or private agency which provides assistance to consumers related to eligibility and securing entitlements and benefits, counseling, elder law services, assistance with housing, etc.

I5. Enter the number of individuals served referred by the Veterans Administration

I6. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a senior program defined as a community-based educational, recreational, or socialization program operated by a senior center, nutrition site, or senior club.

I7. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an assisted living facility defined as housing that provides personal care and services which meet needs beyond basic provision of food, shelter and laundry.

I8. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a nursing home/long-term care facility defined as any facility that provides care to one or more persons who require nursing care and related medical services of such complexity to require professional nursing care under the direction of a physician on a 24 hour a day basis.

I9. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a faith-based (religious affiliated) organization.

I10. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an independent living center (ILC) defined as a consumer-controlled, community-based, cross-disability, nonresidential private nonprofit agency that is designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities, and provides an array of independent living services.

I11. Enter the number of individuals referred by a family member or friend.

I12. Enter the number of individuals who were self-referred.

I13. Enter the number of individuals referred from all other sources aside from those listed above.

I14. Enter the sum of I1, I2, I3, I4, I5, I6, I7, I8, I9, I10, I11, I12, and I13. This number must agree with A3

Part IV: Types of Services Provided and Resources Allocated — Instructions

Please note: Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services in Part I C must equal the total funds spent on services in Part IV. Part I C must equal the sum of Part IV A1+B1+C1+D1.

In addition, salary or costs associated with direct service staff or contractors providing

direct services should be included in the cost of services provided in A, B, C, and D.

A. Clinical / Functional Vision Assessments and Services

A1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (A1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (A1b) for clinical and/or functional vision assessments and services, whether purchased or provided directly.

A2. Enter the total number of program participants who received clinical vision screening or vision examinations from qualified or certified professionals such as ophthalmologists or optometrists, and who received functional vision assessments or low vision evaluations to identify strategies for enhancing visual performance both without and with optical and low vision devices and equipment. Assessment areas may include functional visual acuity and fields, efficiency of vision in the performance of everyday tasks, and evaluation for low vision aids or equipment. These assessments are typically provided by skilled professionals or those who are certified or have a master’s degree in low vision rehabilitation. Do not include evaluations for orientation and mobility. These should be included in C3.

A3. Enter the total number of program participants who received surgical or therapeutic treatment to prevent, correct, or modify disabling eye conditions; and, hospitalizations related to such services. Include prescription optics in this service category. Nonprescription optics should be reported in B2.

B. Assistive Technology Devices, Aids, Services and Training

B1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (B1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (B1b) for the provision of assistive technology devices, aids, services and training.

B2. Enter the total number of program participants who received one or more assistive technology devices and aids. As defined in Section 3(4) of the Assistive Technology Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-364), “assistive technology device means any item, piece of equipment, or product system whether acquired commercially, modified, or customized that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.” Assistive technology devices may include such items as canes, slates, insulin gauges, CCTVs, computers, adaptive software, magnifiers, adaptive cooking items, adaptive recreational items, handwriting guides, Braillers, large button telephones, etc.

B3. Enter the total number of program participants who received one or more assistive technology services and training. As defined in Section 3(5) of the Assistive Technology Act of 2004 (PL 108-364), “assistive technology service means any service that directly assists an individual with a disability in the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device.” Services may include the evaluation of assistive technology needs of an individual, services related to acquisition of technology, costs of loan programs, maintenance and repair of assistive technology, training or technical assistance for the individual or professionals related to the use of assistive technology, programs to expand the availability of assistive technology, low vision therapy services related to the use of optical aids and devices, and other services related to the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device.

C. Independent Living and Adjustment Training and Services

C1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (C1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (C1b) for the provision of services and adjustment training leading to independent living. Evaluation and assessment services (excluding those included in A2 or B3) leading to the planning and implementation of services and training should be included in these costs.

C2. Enter the total number of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services or travel training (i.e. learning to access public or private transportation and to travel safely and as independently as possible in the home and community with or without the use of mobility aids and devices).

C3. Enter the total number of individuals who received communication skills training (e.g. reading and writing Braille, keyboarding and computer literacy, computer skills training, using the telephone, handwriting guides, telling time, using readers, use of audio and tactile technologies for home, recreational or educational use; etc.). Training in the use of newspaper reading services and radio services should be included.

C4. Enter the total number of individuals who received personal management and daily living skills training (e.g. training in the use of adaptive aids and assistive technology devices for personal management and daily living, blindness and low vision alternative techniques for food preparation, grooming and dress, household chores, medical management, shopping, recreational activities, etc.)

C5. Enter the total number of individuals who received supportive services (e.g. reader services, transportation, personal attendant services, support service providers, interpreters, etc.) while actively participating in the program or attaining independent living goals.

C6. Enter the total number of program participants who participated in advocacy training or support network activities such as consumer organization meetings, peer support groups, etc.

C7. Enter the total number of individuals who received counseling (peer, individual or group) to assist them in adjusting to visual impairment and blindness.

C8. Enter the total number of program participants that received information and referral to other service providers, programs, and agencies (e.g. senior programs, public and private social service programs, faith-based organizations, consumer groups, etc.) to enhance adjustment, independent living, and integration into the community. Do not include individuals who received only information and referral and for whom no other services were provided.

C9. Enter the total number of individuals served who were provided any other service not listed above.

D. Community Awareness Activities / Information and Referral

D1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (D1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (D1b) for providing information and referral services and community awareness activities/events to individuals for whom this was the only service provided (i.e. training for other professionals, telephone inquiries, general inquiries, etc.).

D2. Enter the number of individuals receiving information and referral services for whom this is the only service provided. (optional)

D3. Enter the number of community awareness events/activities in which the Chapter 2 program participated during the reported year (D3a) and the number or estimated number of individuals who benefited from these activities (D3b).

Part V: Comparison of Prior Year Activities to Current Reported Year — Instructions

A1. Program Expenditures and Encumbrances (all sources) Enter the total cost of the program for the prior fiscal year (A1a), and the fiscal year being reported (A1b). The total cost of the program can be found in Part I A7. Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the reported year (A1c).

A2. Number of Individuals Served Enter the total number of eligible individuals served in the prior year (A2a), and in the current reported year (A2b). The total number of individuals served can be found in Part III A3. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the numbers served from the prior year to the reported year (A2c).

A3. Number of Minority Individuals Served Enter the total number of minority individuals served in the prior year (A3a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A3b). The total number of minority individuals served is the total of Part III D1+D2+D3+D4+D5 +D7. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the numbers served from the prior year to the reported year (A3c).

A4. Number of Community Awareness Activities Enter the number of community awareness activities or events in which the Chapter 2 program participated during the prior year (A4a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A4b). The number of community awareness activities is found in Part IV D3a. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the number of events from the prior year to the year being reported (A4c).

A5. Number of Collaborating Agencies and Organizations Enter the number of collaborating organizations or agencies (formal agreements or informal activity) other than Chapter 2 paid sub-grantees or contractors in the prior year (A5a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A5b). Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the year being reported (A5c).

A6. Number of Sub-grantees/Contractors If you provide services through sub-grantee agencies or contract, enter the number of sub-grantees or contracts in the prior year (A6a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A6b). Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the year being reported (A6c). If you do not use sub-grantees, enter 0 in A6a, A6b, and A6c.

Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures — Instructions

A. Enter the number from Part IV B3 in A1. From available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training who maintained or improved functional abilities that were previously lost or diminished as a result of vision loss in A2. (closed/inactive cases only).

In A3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

B. Enter the number from Part IV C2 in B1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving orientation and mobility (O & M) services, enter the number of individuals who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their residence and/or community environment as a result of services in B2 (closed/inactive cases only).

In B3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

C. Enter the number from Part IV C3 in C1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving communication skills training, enter the number of individuals who gained or maintained their functional abilities as a result of services they received in C2 (Closed/inactive cases only).

In C3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

D. Enter the number from Part IV C4 in D1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving daily living skills training, enter the number of individuals that experienced functional gains or successfully restored or maintained their functional ability to engage in their customary daily life activities as a result of services or training in personal management and daily living skills In D2 (Closed/inactive cases only).

In D3, enter the Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

E1. Enter the Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E4. Enter the number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss (Closed/inactive cases only). “Change in lifestyle” is defined as any non-vision related event that results in the consumer’s reduced independence, such as moving from a private residence (house or apartment) to another type of residence e.g. living with family, senior living community, assisted living facility, nursing home/long-term facility, etc. Reduced independence could also result in employing a caregiver to enable the consumer continue to live in his/her home. Examples of events that could result in reduced independence of the consumer include loss of spouse and onset or worsening of other health conditions such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, etc.

E5. Enter the number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

Part VII: Training and Technical Assistance — Instructions

On July 22, 2014, Public Law 113-128, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) was enacted and included a new requirement under Section 751A that the RSA Commissioner shall conduct a survey of designated State agencies that receive grants under section 752 regarding training and technical assistance needs in order to determine funding priorities for such training and technical assistance. Please enter a brief description of training and technical assistance needs that you may have to assist in the implementation and improvement of the performance of your Independent Living Services for Older Individuals Who Are Blind grant (for example, financial management, reporting requirements on the 7-OB, program management, data analysis and program performance, law and applicable regulations, provision of services and service delivery, promising practices, resources and information, outreach, etc.).

Part VIII: Narrative — Instructions

Self-explanatory.

Part IX: Signature Instructions

Please sign and print the name, title and telephone number of the IL-OIB Program Director.

Part I: Funding Sources And Expenditures

Title VII-Chapter 2 Federal grant award for reported fiscal year484,805
Other federal grant award for reported fiscal year0
Title VII-Chapter 2 carryover from previous year35,119
Other federal grant carryover from previous year0
A. Funding Sources for Expenditures in Reported FY
A1. Title VII-Chapter 2496,556
A2. Total other federal0
(a) Title VII-Chapter 1-Part B0
(b) SSA reimbursement0
(c) Title XX - Social Security Act0
(d) Older Americans Act0
(e) Other0
A3. State (excluding in-kind)0
A4. Third party49,505
A5. In-kind48,793
A6. Total Matching Funds98,298
A7. Total All Funds Expended594,854
B. Total expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs256,889
C. Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services337,965

Part II: Staffing

FTE (full time equivalent) is based upon a 40-hour workweek or 2080 hours per year.

A. Full-time Equivalent (FTE)

Program Staff a) Administrative and Support b) Direct Service c) Total
1. FTE State Agency 0.4000 0.0000 0.4000
2. FTE Contractors 3.7000 6.9100 10.6100
3. Total FTE 4.1000 6.9100 11.0100

B. Employed or advanced in employment

a) Number employed b) FTE
1. Employees with Disabilities 42 27.9175
2. Employees with Blindness Age 55 and Older 9 6.5000
3. Employees who are Racial/Ethnic Minorities 31 23.7750
4. Employees who are Women 77 45.2950
5. Employees Age 55 and Older 26 8.7775

C. Volunteers

4.20

Part III: Data on Individuals Served

Provide data in each of the categories below related to the number of individuals for whom one or more services were provided during the reported fiscal year.

A. Individuals Served

1. Number of individuals who began receiving services in the previous FY and continued to receive services in the reported FY438
2. Number of individuals who began receiving services in the reported FY359
3. Total individuals served during the reported fiscal year (A1 + A2) 797

B. Age

1. 55-5945
2. 60-6466
3. 65-6975
4. 70-7487
5. 75-79111
6. 80-84118
7. 85-89127
8. 90-94120
9. 95-9941
10. 100 & over7
11. Total (must agree with A3)797

C. Gender

1. Female564
2. Male233
3. Total (must agree with A3)797

D. Race/Ethnicity

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race71
2. American Indian or Alaska Native9
3. Asian7
4. Black or African American23
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander1
6. White624
7. Two or more races8
8. Race and ethnicity unknown (only if consumer refuses to identify)54
9. Total (must agree with A3)797

E. Degree of Visual Impairment

1. Totally Blind (LP only or NLP)90
2. Legally Blind (excluding totally blind)413
3. Severe Visual Impairment294
4. Total (must agree with A3)797

F. Major Cause of Visual Impairment

1. Macular Degeneration470
2. Diabetic Retinopathy58
3. Glaucoma80
4. Cataracts27
5. Other162
6. Total (must agree with A3)797

G. Other Age-Related Impairments

1. Hearing Impairment129
2. Diabetes88
3. Cardiovascular Disease and Strokes77
4. Cancer31
5. Bone, Muscle, Skin, Joint, and Movement Disorders87
6. Alzheimer's Disease/Cognitive Impairment38
7. Depression/Mood Disorder40
8. Other Major Geriatric Concerns218

H. Type of Residence

1. Private residence (house or apartment)521
2. Senior Living/Retirement Community160
3. Assisted Living Facility89
4. Nursing Home/Long-term Care facility20
5. Homeless7
6. Total (must agree with A3)797

I. Source of Referral

1. Eye care provider (ophthalmologist, optometrist)101
2. Physician/medical provider29
3. State VR agency10
4. Government or Social Service Agency97
5. Veterans Administration28
6. Senior Center71
7. Assisted Living Facility16
8. Nursing Home/Long-term Care facility17
9. Faith-based organization28
10. Independent Living center85
11. Family member or friend124
12. Self-referral150
13. Other41
14. Total (must agree with A3)797

Part IV: Types of Services Provided and Resources Allocated

Provide data related to the number of older individuals who are blind receiving each type of service and resources committed to each type of service.

A. Clinical/functional vision assessments and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 11,938
1b. Total Cost from other funds 100
2. Vision screening / vision examination / low vision evaluation 89
3. Surgical or therapeutic treatment to prevent, correct, or modify disabling eye conditions 0

B. Assistive technology devices and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 34,036
1b. Total Cost from other funds 31,818
2. Provision of assistive technology devices and aids 334
3. Provision of assistive technology services 457

C. Independent living and adjustment training and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 139,998
1b. Total Cost from other funds 4,806
2. Orientation and Mobility training 225
3. Communication skills 179
4. Daily living skills 324
5. Supportive services (reader services, transportation, personal 238
6. Advocacy training and support networks 406
7. Counseling (peer, individual and group) 636
8. Information, referral and community integration 369
. Other IL services 109

D. Community Awareness: Events & Activities

Cost a. Events / Activities b. Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 13,243
1b. Total Cost from other funds 1,195
2. Information and Referral 631
3. Community Awareness: Events/Activities 227 997

Part V: Comparison of Prior Year Activities to Current Reported Year

A. Activity

a) Prior Year b) Reported FY c) Change ( + / - )
1. Program Cost (all sources) 250,896 398,299 147,403
2. Number of Individuals Served 550 797 247
3. Number of Minority Individuals Served 80 107 27
4. Number of Community Awareness Activities 215 227 12
5. Number of Collaborating agencies and organizations 449 569 120
6. Number of Sub-grantees 7 4

Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures

Provide the following data for each of the performance measures below. This will assist RSA in reporting results and outcomes related to the program.

Number of persons Percent of persons
A1. Number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training 457 100.00%
A2. Number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training who maintained or improved functional abilities that were previously lost or diminished as a result of vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only) 132 28.88%
A3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 186 40.70%
B1. Number of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services 225 100.00%
B2. Of those receiving orientation and mobility (O & M) services, the number of individuals who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their residence and/or community environment as a result of services. (closed/inactive cases only) 65 28.89%
B3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 26 11.56%
C1. Number of individuals who received communication skills training 179 100.00%
C2. Of those receiving communication skills training, the number of individuals who gained or maintained their functional abilities as a result of services they received. (Closed/inactive cases only) 96 53.63%
C3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 47 26.26%
D1. Number of individuals who received daily living skills training 324 100.00%
D2. Number of individuals that experienced functional gains or successfully restored or maintained their functional ability to engage in their customary daily life activities as a result of services or training in personal management and daily living skills. (closed/inactive cases only) 184 56.79%
D3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 151 46.60%
E1. Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 213 n/a
E2. Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 5 n/a
E3. Number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 17 n/a
E4. Number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only) 18 n/a
E5. Number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 7 n/a

Part VII: Training and Technical Assistance Needs

Our providers would like to receive training on technology, especially with Apple computers and devices, so that they are providing the seniors with instruction on up to date and accessible technology. They also would like an annual state-wide consortium of all OIB program providers at which potential service modalities would be discussed from either agencies providing those services or federal government oversight agencies that understand the operations and intent of the OIB program. They would like us to continue our quarterly conference calls in which best practices and program ideas are shared. They would also like ideas and templates for customer satisfaction surveys.

Part VIII: Narrative

A. Briefly describe the agency's method of implementation for the Title VII-Chapter 2 program (i.e. in-house, through sub-grantees/contractors, or a combination) incorporating outreach efforts to reach underserved and/or unserved populations. Please list all sub-grantees/contractors.

The Colorado Division of Vocational Rehabilitation uses contracts to six (6) sub-recipient providers for the implementation of the Title VII-Chapter 2 program. The list of our contractors: Colorado Center for the Blind, Center for Disabilities, Center for Independence, Colorado Springs Independence Center, Ensight Skills Center and Southwest Center for Independence. Colorado Center for the Blind: We have four staff members: the Director of Senior Services, two Senior Instructors and an Outreach Specialist. We lead support groups and provide home visits to seniors throughout the greater Denver metro area as well as Douglas County. We also have group and individualized training sessions at our Center, with classes in the areas of Orientation & Mobility, assistive technology, communication and daily living skills. We attend senior fairs and speak at senior residences in underserved areas, including rural and mountain areas. Center for Disabilities: CFD has provided a multi-faceted approach to reach out to the underserved/ or unserved populations in our catchment area of seventeen (17) counties in southeastern Colorado. We have hired additional workers to provide us with an ongoing presence in Baca, Prowers, Bent and Kiowa Counties. We hired a worker for Las Animas and Huerfano Counties who has already impacted both of those counties by being able to shift an OIB group meeting to a more conducive Saturday scheduling. We have opened permanent offices in the San Luis Valley (Alamosa) and in Fremont County (Canon City). This presence has allowed for more consistent coverage to consumers in these locales and is providing for an increase in both consumers and low vision services by 19.8%. These services included home visits, needs assessments and free/low cost assistive technology devices, marking appliances and daily living skills training. We connect consumers with resources (through information and referral) by maintaining a Resource Directory for each of the 17 counties. Group services include monthly meetings of 8 OIB Vision Support groups in 7 counties. On the community level, 263 agencies and organizations received monthly invitations to OIB activities and events. Center for Independence: CFI is a direct service provider. We collaborate with a number of other agencies, most notably Ensight Skills for bi-annual low-vision presentations and assessments. CFI has diversified our staffing to offer OIB services in our 3 satellite offices. We have built up our inventory of assistive devices to equip each of these offices with a full array of low tech magnifiers to high tech electronic optical character recognition reading machines. This enables consumers to have a hands on trial before they buy or we acquire funds on their behalf. We have set up displays in meal sites, nursing homes and assisted living places, ADRC senior showcase activities and senior housing complexes. We purchased Advertorial space in the Western Slope Senior Beacon and the Senior Blue Book to outreach to the local populations, covering low-vision lighting, voter registration, and home safety. Colorado Springs Independence Center: Services are provided using The Independence Centers OIB staff, as well as other IL Center staff. Outreach efforts include collaboration and partnership with other agencies that work with the unserved/and underserved seniors, including National Federation of the Blind, Area Agency on Aging, DVR Services, local assisted living and nursing homes, Silver Key, and public transportation agencies, technology vendors, eye care professionals and many others. We have made great strides in our rural communities and have consistent and active consumer participants in the support groups. The total number of OIB facilitated support groups is currently ten monthly. The newest group is Health and wellness and also a social support group at a community center where other integrated activities happen. Ensight Skills Center: Ensight implements a comprehensive model in the operation of our Title V-II program. Our program begins at time of referral. By working in partnership with local eye care specialist information and assistance begins earlier. Our team of low vision skills providers assess for need, set goals, provide in home/workplace assessments, provide safety and fall prevention, and review and provide tools training. We contract with a mental health professional, orientation and mobility specialists, and eye care professionals. Outreach efforts are made throughout Colorado. Our focus is heavy along the front range where we reside, but our outreach team regularly serves Mesa, Delta, Montrose, and Rio Blanco counties. Logan, Yuma, and Morgan counties have hosted Onsite programs regularly each year. More people find services and tools each year because of the collaboration between Colorado’s low vision services. Southwest Center for Independence All services and supports occur in house. The Low Vision Coordinator assist consumers with filling out OIB Intake forms (in alternative formats as requested) to assess eligibility and services. Low vision medical records are requested to assist with determining best services. SWCI holds Support Groups that incorporate presentations and training in all 5 counties we serve. Specifically, in FFY 2017-18 we had 20 Support Groups in Durango, Dove Creek, Cortez, and Ignacio. Outreach to start others is presently occurring in Pagosa Springs, Valley Inn Nursing Home in Mancos, and Four Corners Nursing Home in Durango. Outreach activities for the year include: Pagosa Human Services, Cedar View Apartments, Meals on Wheels, Low Vision Expo’s, Durango Adult Education Housing Solutions, Axis Health Care, Veterans Outreach, Colorado Talking Books and San Juan Basin Public Health, Presentations to: La Plata County Adult Protection Team, Lions Club, the Durango Chamber and the Economic Development Council, Montezuma County Transit Authority and the city/county Public Libraries. Provided 100 large print wall calendars to consumers and Eye Care Clinics

B. Briefly describe any activities designed to expand or improve services including collaborative activities or community awareness; and efforts to incorporate new methods and approaches developed by the program into the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) under Section 704.

In addition to the services and outreach already described, our contractors provided additional activities as follows: CCB: We provide a number of educational programs to help seniors stay healthy and fit, including inviting guest speakers on topics of nutrition, diabetes awareness, brain health and more. We offer tactile art and yoga classes to our seniors and partner with We Fit Wellness, an organization dedicated to promoting the fitness of people with disabilities of all ages. We also work closely with Colorado Talking Book Library, Newsline, Audio Information Network and the National Federation of the Blind. We have worked with many individuals who are deaf-blind, partnering with the Colorado Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing to assist seniors to find services through the iCan Connect Program and Support Services Provider Program. CFD: Ongoing collaborative effort with the Pueblo County AAA in distributing a number of Assistive Technology devices including some talking watches/alarm clocks, scanner/readers and t.v. glasses. We have participated in joint outreach activities in 11 of the 17 counties in our catchment area including events such as Occuvites annual expo in Rocky Ford, the Pueblo Library ADA expo, the Huerfano County Senior Living Expo, the Prowers County Senior Fair, and the annual Fremont County Senior Fair. CFI: We increased community events held 30% over last year and had more attendees. We sent the entire OIB Staff to the AER Conference in Reno in July. This helped build a foundation of technical and programmatic knowledge that all the staff could share. We collaborate with organizations including Paratransit, Senior companions, Stepping Balance programs, Grey Gourmet, housing authority, Aging and Disability Resources (ADRC) and Senior Blue Book. We host Iphone and Apple device clubs. CSIC: Close collaboration is done through IC participation in Rural Advisory committee, Community Transition Services, Inter agency Transition Teams, Brown Bag Lunches which are informational sharing meeting facilitated in partnership with Department of Human Services and Rocky Mountain Options , Ethics Committee, Transit passenger advisory committee, care collaboration project with local and rural hospitals and representation at transit training for all staff/drivers. The IC brochure is printed in Spanish, have Spanish speaking staff, and has started a Hispanic support group. Assistive technology has expended office hours to rural communities and brings vendors in for demonstrations. Our home modification grant process allows assistance with funding for needed technology for consumers. Ensight: We strive to educate and empower our clients through groups, seminars, and classes. The Education and Empowerment program allows Ensight to collaborate with the state independent living services, other organizations serving the population we aim to serve and service clubs to expand understanding and public awareness. The feedback we receive through this program allows us to improve services and our approach to better meet the needs of our consumers and those who are in the target population that may become OIB consumers in the future. We partner with Disabled Resource Services, Connections for Independent Living, Center for People with Disabilities, and Center for Independence in Grand Junction. We work closely with the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and the Veterans Administration to run demonstrations for latest tools on the market and support groups. SWCI: We promote rural radio & newspaper coverage about low vision services; our Facebook page includes lots of low vision information; we partner with the local Area Agency on Aging; we host two Low Vision Expo’s each year; we have an AT lending library; we partner with the Southern Ute reservation senior center; and we regularly participate in the AFB and OIB-TAC web based training and events.

C. Briefly summarize results from any of the most recent evaluations or satisfaction surveys conducted for your program and attach a copy of applicable reports.

CCB: We completed a satisfaction survey earlier this year. 81 seniors responded to our survey and of these seniors, 89% stated that they were able to maintain or increase their level of independence because of services received from us. CFD: This year we received consumer satisfaction survey responses from 42 of the 106 individuals that were served through our program (39.6% return). The low number of responders appears to be resultant of two ongoing issues. First, the consumers indicated that they really did not have anything of significance to report or secondly, they felt that a survey was relatively intrusive into their life and chose not to get involved. Of the 42 respondents 40 (95%) of them indicated that they were satisfied with the services provided by the OIB staff members. Comments focused on the value experienced from group participation, both in learning about vision loss and technology as well as the social-emotional benefit and reduced feelings of isolation. CFI: Consumers are satisfied or very satisfied in their responses. They also express positive interaction in their peer support groups. Comments included: togetherness, what you learn, comradery, learning to live within my limitations, The CFI Bus ( Consumers travel on CFI bus to get to meetings), Sharing food and having fun (potlucks & eating out), Helps me come out of my 'pity party', The people overcoming adversity. I'm blessed to be a part of this group, I like adventures, Keeps me from being inside, Getting away from my husband, Gets me out of depression CSIC: We were able to complete phone surveys in July-September 2018 for OIB with active consumers of The Independent Center. We were able to get responses back from 27 individuals of 50 call outs. Our consumers reported having complete satisfaction with the program, and liked the department staff. Some of the consumer comments include a desire for more nutrition information and a form of self-defense focused on low vision for aging individuals. Ensight: Our 2017-2018 Results show that the comprehensive, multi-disciplinary model that we implement for our consumers works. This year we reported that more than 90% of clients report an improvement in their independence and 85% report an improvement in their quality of life. This is up from last year and we attribute that to having extra hands on training with the occupational therapy staff and orientation and mobility team. SWCI: Our organization needs to focus on better implementation strategies specific to OIB services in the coming year. We did solicit feedback on our Low Vision program (OIB and AAA). We surveyed AAA program participants with a result of 100% saying that Southwest Center for Independence assist you to be more independent. Due to change in staff, no OIB satisfaction surveys were sent out.

D. Briefly describe the impact of the Title VII-Chapter 2 program, citing examples from individual cases (without identifying information) in which services contributed significantly to increasing independence and quality of life for the individual(s).

CCB: We offer a week-long residential training program called seniors in Charge. I would like to tell you about two seniors who attended the program held in September 2018. R. is an 89 year old man who became blind due to macular degeneration. He came to the program from a rural area of the state where there were no services for blind persons. He did not use a cane when he arrived but began learning to use one on the first day. He was very motivated to wear sleep shades, a tool that we use for teaching independence to blind seniors. He quickly learned technology and started to use Voice Over on his iPhone. He left the program excited to be able to travel independently with his white cane, cook for himself and use his phone. He exhibited a great deal of confidence on his last day in the program. He said that the experience was profound. G., another gentleman attended the same program. He was very much in denial about his blindness and angry about it too. He worked with our instructors who are excellent blind role models and learned that he could continue to live a successful life as a blind person. On the last day, his son came to pick him up and offered his arm to provide a sighted guide. G. replied that he didn’t need sighted guide any longer, he had learned to travel on his own. CFD: The quality of Independent Life has been greatly impacted for many of our OIB consumers this year. One of our consumers who is nearing one hundred years of age was having a number of issues involved in maintaining her independence. She had not been able to use her phone in quite some time due to its configuration and the service provider. Our worker collaborated with her and obtained both a land line (with a different service provider) as well as free cell phone which has allowed her to reestablish consistent communication with her family and friends. Furthermore, the agency worker installed bump dots so that the consumer could safely use her appliances and cook some of her own meals. She is involved on a consistent basis with the support group in Pueblo, which she seems to enjoy. She indicated to the worker that she is quite happy with all of the changes that her contact with the agency has allowed her to accomplish in just a short time. We also assisted the client in signing up for Colorado Talking Books. CFI: Consumer (Patty) - Attended CFI workshop on sewing. She said she was inspired because she saw other members of the group whose vision level was worse than her own continuing to sew. The experience gave her the resolve to find ways to continue sewing herself. Andy - Through attending CFI low Vision program, Andy has acquired over $5000 of technology (his own money plus grants). He is now an 'ambassador' for all things 'low vision tech' at the senior apartments where he lives. He has helped other resident who have low vision research equipment and apply for grants and services. He is now working on a project to create virtual low vision support groups using Zoom Room and Skype. CSIC: We continue the practice of accepting and donating technology and products which are looked at by a technology specialist for functionality when needed before it is given out to consumers. We are able to store these donations in a storage unit and we log the items on a spreadsheet. This has allowed consumers access to technology they may otherwise not have been able to access because of the cost. We were able to match an individual with a CCTV with an arm so she could continue silk painting. This consumer was a part of our first art show at the center where she sold some of her work. The CCTVs that have been donated out allowed individuals to continue reading, pay their own bills, and read their own mail. Ensight: The services that contributed significantly to increasing independence and quality of life were skills training, orientation and mobility training, assistive technology training, counselling, tool placement, and information and assistance. These services, often combined, create a holistic approach that helps the consumers to understand all available options to maintaining their independence and quality of life. Most recently, Ensight’s team had the pleasure of working with 4 residents of the Eastern Plains. Each one of these residents had been diagnosed with an age-related eye disease and one was also dealing with significant complications from diabetes. 3 of the 4 had fixed incomes and were struggling to find services. Their local eye care specialist teamed up with Ensight to hold an Onsite clinic. All four received tools, mental health consultations, and comprehensive low vision care. 2 received orientation and mobility. 2 received training on assistive technology such as iPhone and ZoomText. 1 was given a demo on OrCam and we are currently working with their community to fundraise the necessary monies to secure them an OrCam unit. SWCI: Several Audio Information Receivers were distributed to consumers & coordinated with Colorado Talking Books and AIN. Consumers developed natural supports with individuals who are not paid to care for them. Consumers volunteered & got involved in community activities. Consumers accessed Medicaid Home and Community Based Services and were diverted nursing home placement. Consumers had access to white canes, CCTVs and computers for the blind, and magnifiers, readers/scanners, and AT catalogs. People learned to use tools to access information and recreation. Consumers received low and high technology demonstrations to design a functional routine for their barriers and maintain independence in their daily living. People learned independent living skills to help them continue to live at home after blindness occurs or spouse passes. A consumer in La Plata County benefited highly from procurement of digital magnifier, which she said made a huge impact in her daily living, including more involvement in household finances. A consumer in La Plata County was able to work closely with Low Vision Coordinator to identify software for an existing device, which allowed him to read for the first time in 5 years. A consumer in Montezuma County returned to doing art work with specialized lighting.

E. Finally, note any problematic areas or concerns related to implementing the Title VII-Chapter 2 program in your state.

Provide more services to Spanish elders who are blind. They had difficulty reaching this population and have hired a Spanish speaking instructor to begin working with their program and plan to provide many more services to this underserved population and their families. Outreach to underserved/unserved clients is a slow process particularly due to the fact that a large portion of our catchment area is designated as rural. This somewhat intensifies the slow growth of the number of individuals which we might impact with our program. Transportation continues to be an issue, particularly in aforementioned rural areas. The consumers that we serve, by definition, are normally unable to drive themselves to where services and supports are available. Quite frequently our agency workers must make contact on a one-one basis with these individuals often in their residence, which does exacerbate a problem of time management for our agency workers. One of the major issues facing our consumers is the expense involved in obtaining assistive technology devices that will enhance their independence. As an example sight has glasses which could be used to address the issue of blindness caused by macular degeneration. However, the cost of a set of these glasses is nearly $10,000. Most of our consumers could not afford such an outlay nor could our agency afford to fund such a device with the current funding structure. Two of our staff do not drive, this presented some challenges with home visits and support groups in the local community that are not on city bus routes, and accessing our rural communities when public transportation is not an option. We have been able to hire a driver to meet most staff and consumer needs in these areas. We also have noted that consumers are desiring additional product training which we have contracted with technology trainer when needed. This is challenging as it requires 1:1 for the most benefit. We also struggle with orientation and mobility staff trained in our area. Our area does not have a large amount of O&M instructors. This can be a challenge. • Staff turnover is challenging in our rural area. Our rural community lacks critical resources and specific skill sets that would benefit low vision services. We have had a lack of understanding around best practice and regulatory compliance for many years. We had our very first TA from our DSE after the close of the reporting year. Our database has not been effective in gathering information for this report.

Part IX: Signature

Please sign and print the name, title and telephone number of the IL-OIB Program Director below.

I certify that the data herein reported are statistically accurate to the best of my knowledge.

Signed bySteve Anton
TitleDirector, DVR
Telephone303-318-8570
Date signed11/29/2018