Annual Report - Independent Living Services For Older Individuals Who Are Blind

RSA-7-OB for Arizona Rehabilitation Services Administration - H177B160003 report through September 30, 2016

Instructions

Introduction

The revised ED RSA-7-OB form incorporates revisions to the four established performance measures for the Independent Living Services for Older Individuals who are Blind (IL-OIB) program. Added in 2007, these measures aim to better reflect the program’s impact on individual consumers and the community.

Added to capture information that may be required to meet GPRA guidelines, the performance measures can be found under Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures as follows:

Measure 1.1

Of individuals who received AT (assistive technology) services and training, the percentage who regained or improved functional abilities previously lost as a result of vision loss.

Measure 1.2

Of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services, the percentage who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their home and/or community environment.

Measure 1.3

Of individuals who received services or training in alternative non-visual or low vision techniques, the percentage that experienced functional gains or were able to successfully restore and maintain their functional ability to engage in their customary life activities within their home environment and community.

Measure 1.4

Of the total individuals served, the percentage that reported that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services.

Revisions to these established program performance measures consists of the following additional five items:

E1. Enter the Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only)

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (closed/inactive cases only)

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (closed/inactive cases only)

E4. Enter the number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only)

E5. Enter the number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only)

Submittal Instructions

OIB grantees are expected to complete and submit the 7-OB Report online through RSA’s website (https://rsa.ed.gov), unless RSA is notified of pertinent circumstances that may impede the online submission.

To register with RSA’s MIS, please go to https://rsa.ed.gov and click on Info for new users. The link provides instructions for obtaining an agency-specific username and password. Further instructions for completing and submitting the 7-OB Report online will be provided upon completion of the registration process.

OIB grantees submitting the 7-OB Report online are not required to mail signed copies of the 7-OB Report to RSA, but they must certify in the MIS that the signed and dated 7-OB Report and lobbying certification forms are retained on file.

The Report submittal deadline is no later than December 31 of the reporting year.

Part I: Funding Sources for Expenditures And Encumbrances — Instructions

Please note: Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services in Part I (C) must equal the total funds spent on service in Part IV. Part I C must equal the sum of Part IV A1+B1+C1+D1.

A. Funding SourceS for Expenditures and encumbrances in reported fy

A1. Enter the total amount of Title VII-Chapter 2 funds expended or encumbered during the reported FY. Include expenditures or encumbrances made from both carryover funds from the previous FY and from the reported FY grant funds.

A2. Enter the total of any other federal funds expended or encumbered in the Title VII-Chapter 2 program during the reported FY. Designate the funding sources and amounts in (a) through (e).

A3. Enter the total amount of state funds expended or encumbered in the Title VII - Chapter 2 program. Do not include in-kind contributions (e.g., documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space, or land).

A4. Enter the total amount of third party contributions including local and community funding, non-profit or for-profit agency funding, etc. Do not include in-kind contributions (e.g., documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space, or land).

A5. Enter the total amount of in-kind contributions from non-federal sources. Include value of property or services that benefit the Title VII-Chapter 2 program (e.g. the fairly evaluated documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space or land).

A6. Enter the total matching funds (A3 + A4 + A5). Reminder: The required non-federal match for the Title VII-Chapter 2 program is not less than $1 for each $9 of federal funds provided in the Title VII-Chapter 2 grant. Funds derived from or provided by the federal government, or services assisted or subsidized to any significant extent by the federal government, may not be included in determining the amount of non-federal contributions.

A7. Enter the total amount of all funds expended and encumbered (A1 + A2 + A6) during the reported fiscal year.

B. Total expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs

Enter the total amount of expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs. Do not include costs for direct services provided by agency staff or the costs of contract or sub-grantee staff that provide direct services under contracts or sub-grants. If an administrator spends a portion of his or her time providing administrative services and the remainder providing direct services, include only the expenditures for administrative services.

C. Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services

Enter the total amount of expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services by subtracting line B from line A7.

Part II: Staffing — Instructions

Base all FTE calculations upon a full-time 40-hour workweek or 2080 hours per year. Record all FTE assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program irrespective of whether salary is paid with Title VII-Chapter 2 funds.

A. Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Program Staff

A1. Under the “Administrative & Support” column (A1a), enter the full-time equivalent (FTE) of all administrative and support staff (e.g. management, program directors, supervisors, readers, drivers for staff, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from the State agency. (For example, if 20% or 8 hours per week of a staff person’s time were spent on administrative and support functions related to this program, the FTE for that staff person would be .2). Under the “Direct Services” column (A1b), enter the FTE of all direct service staff (e.g. rehabilitation teacher, IL specialist, orientation and mobility specialist, social worker, drivers for individuals receiving services, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from the State agency. If administrative or support staff of the State agency also provide direct services, report the FTE devoted to direct services in the “Direct Services” column (A1b). (For example, if 80% of a staff person’s time were spent in providing direct services, the FTE for that person would be 8). Finally, add across the “Administrative & Support” FTE (A1a) and “Direct Service” FTE (A1b) to enter the total State agency FTE in the TOTAL (A1c) column.

A2. Under the “Administrative & Support” column (A2a), enter the full-time equivalent (FTE) of all administrative and support staff (e.g. management, program directors, supervisors, readers, drivers for staff, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from contractors or sub-grantees. Under the “Direct Services” column (A2b), enter the FTE of all direct service staff (e.g. rehabilitation teacher, IL specialist, orientation and mobility specialist, social worker, driver for individuals receiving services, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from contractors and sub-grantees. If administrative staff of the contractors or sub-grantees also provides direct services, report the FTE devoted to direct services in the “Direct Services” column (A2b). Finally, add across the “Administrative & Support” FTE (A2a) and “Direct Service” FTE (A2b) to enter the total contractor or sub-grantee FTE in the TOTAL (A2c) column.

A3. Add each column for A1 and A2 and record totals on line A3.

B. Employed or advanced in employment

B1. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) with disabilities (include blind and visually impaired not 55 or older), including blindness or visual impairment, in B1a. Enter the FTE of employees with disabilities in B1b. (To calculate B1b, add the total number of hours worked by all employees with disabilities and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B2. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 and older in B2a. Enter the FTE of employees who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 or older in B2b. (To calculate B2b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 and older and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B3. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are members of racial/ethnic minorities in B3a. Enter the FTE of employees who are members of racial/ethnic minorities in B3b. (To calculate B3b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are members of racial/ethnic minorities and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B4. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are women in B4a. Enter the FTE of employees who are women in B4b. (To calculate B4b, add the total number of hours worked by women and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B5. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, in B5a. Enter the FTE of employees who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, in B5b. (To calculate B5b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

C. Volunteers

C1. Enter the FTE of program volunteers in C1. (To calculate C1, add the total number of hours worked by all program volunteers and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE).

Part III: Data on Individuals Served — Instructions

Provide data in all categories on program participants who received one or more services during the fiscal year being reported.

A. Individuals Served

A1. Enter the number of program participants carried over from the previous federal fiscal year who received services in this reported FY (e.g. someone received services in September (or any other month) of the previous FY and continued to receive additional services in the reported FY).

A2. Enter the number of program participants who began receiving services during the reported fiscal year irrespective of whether they have completed all services.

A3. Enter the total number served during the reported fiscal year (A1 + A2).

B. Age

B1-B10. Enter the total number of program participants served in each respective age category.

B11. Enter the sum of B1 through B10. This must agree with A3.

C. Gender

C1. Enter the total number of females receiving services.

C2. Enter the total number of males receiving services.

C3. Enter the sum of C1 and C2. This must agree with A3.

D. Race/Ethnicity

Hispanic or Latino means a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

D1. Enter the number of individuals served who are Hispanic/Latino of any race or Hispanic/Latino only. Hispanic/Latino means a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

D2. Enter the number of individuals served who are American Indian or Alaska Native. American Indian or Alaska Native means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.

D3. Enter the number of individuals served who are Asian. Asian means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.

D4. Enter the number of individuals served who are Black or African American. Black or African American means a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as “Haitian” may be used.

D5. Enter the number of individuals served who are Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.

D6. Enter the number of individuals served who are White or Caucasian. White means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

D7. Enter the number of individuals served who report two or more races but who are not Hispanic/Latino of any race.

D8. Enter “race and ethnicity unknown” only if the consumer refuses to identify race and ethnicity.

D9. Enter the total of D1 through D8. This number must agree with A3.

E. Degree of Visual Impairment

E1. Enter the number of individuals served who are totally blind (e.g. have light perception only or no light perception).

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who are legally blind (excluding those recorded in E1).

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who have severe visual impairment.

E4. Add E1 + E2 + E3 and enter the total. This number must agree with A3.

F. Major Cause of Visual Impairment

(Please note that the primary site for the definitions of diseases is http://www.nia.nih.gov/AboutNIA/StrategicPlan/ResearchGoalA/Subgoal1.htm.)

Enter only one major cause of visual impairment for each individual served.

F1. Enter the number of individuals served who have macular degeneration as the major cause of visual impairment. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive disease of the retina wherein the light-sensing cells in the central area of vision (the macula) stop working and eventually die. The cause of the disease is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and

It is most common in people who are age 60 and over. AMD is the leading cause of legal blindness in senior citizens.

F2. Enter the number of individuals served who have diabetic retinopathy as the major cause of visual impairment. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new cases of legal blindness among working-age Americans and is caused by damage to the small blood vessels in the retina. It is believed that poorly controlled blood sugar levels are related to its progression. Most persons with diabetes have non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or what is commonly called “adult-onset” or Type II diabetes, and control their blood sugar with oral medications or diet alone. Others have insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), also called "younger or juvenile-onset" or Type I diabetes, and must use insulin injections daily to regulate their blood sugar levels.

F3. Enter the number of individuals served who have glaucoma as the major cause of visual impairment. Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases causing optic nerve damage that involves mechanical compression or decreased blood flow. It is permanent and is a leading cause of blindness in the world, especially in older people.

F4. Enter the number of individuals served who have cataracts as the major cause of visual impairment. A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens of the eye resulting in blurred vision, sensitivity to light and glare, distortion, and dimming of colors. Cataracts are usually a natural aging process in the eye (although they may be congenital) and may be caused or accelerated by other diseases such as glaucoma and diabetes.

F5. Enter the number of individuals served who have any other major cause of visual impairment.

F6. Enter the sum of F1 through F5. This number must agree with A3.

G. Other Age-Related Impairments

Enter the total number of individuals served in each category. Individuals may report one or more non-visual impairments/conditions. The National Institute on Aging (NIA) Strategic Plan identifies age-related diseases, disorders, and disability including the following categories.

G1. Hearing Impairment: Presbycusis is the gradual hearing loss that occurs with aging. An estimated one-third of Americans over 60 and one-half of those over 85 have some degree of hearing loss. Hearing impairment occurs when there is a problem with or damage to one or more parts of the ear, and may be a conductive hearing loss (outer or middle ear) or a sensorineural hearing loss (inner ear) or a combination. The degree of hearing impairment can vary widely from person to person. Some people have partial hearing loss, meaning that the

Ear can pick up some sounds; others have complete hearing loss, meaning that the ear cannot hear at all. One or both ears may be affected, and the impairment may be worse in one ear than in the other.

G2. Diabetes: Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Type 2 diabetes, which results from insulin resistance and abnormal insulin action, is most prevalent in the older population. Diabetes complications, such as heart disease and loss of sight, increase dramatically when blood sugar is poorly controlled and often develop before diabetes is diagnosed.

G3. Cardiovascular Disease and Strokes: Diseases of the heart and blood vessels are the leading cause of hospitalization and death in older Americans. Congestive heart failure is the most common diagnosis in hospitalized patients aged 65 and older.

G4. Cancer: The second leading cause of death among the elderly is cancer, with individuals age 65 and over accounting for 70 percent of cancer mortality in the United States. Breast, prostate, and colon cancers, are common in older people.

G5. Bone, Muscle, Skin, Joint, and Movement Disorders: Osteoporosis (loss of mass and quality of bones), osteoarthritis (inflammation and deterioration of joints), and sarcopenia (age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength) contribute to frailty and injury in millions of older people. Also contributing to loss of mobility and independence are changes in the central nervous system that control movement. Cells may die or become dysfunctional with age, as in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, older people may have difficulty with gross motor behavior, such as moving around in the environment, or with fine motor skills, such as writing.

G6. Alzheimer’s Disease/Cognitive Impairment: Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia (a brain disorder that significantly affects an individual’s ability to carry out daily life activities) in older people. It and other cognitive impairments impact parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language.

G7. Depression is widespread, often undiagnosed, and often under-treated in the elderly. It is believed to affect more than 6.5 million of the 35 million Americans who are 65 or older. Depression is closely associated with dependency and disability. Symptoms may include: loss of interest in normally pleasurable activities, persistent, vague or unexplained somatic complaints, memory complaints, change in weight, sleeping disorder, irritability or demanding behavior, lack of attention to personal care, difficulty with concentration, social withdrawal, change in appetite, confusion, delusions or hallucinations, feeling of worthlessness or hopelessness, and thought about suicide.

G8. Other Major Geriatric Concerns: Several conditions can compromise independence and quality of life in older persons including weakness and falls, urinary incontinence, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and co morbidity (co morbidity describes the effect of all other diseases an individual might have on the primary disease).

H. Type of Residence

H1. Enter the number of individuals served who live in private residence (house or apartment unrelated to senior living).

H2. Enter the number of Individuals served who live in senior living/retirement community (e.g. housing designed for those age 55 and older).

H3. Enter the number of individuals served who live in assisted living facility (e.g. housing that provides personal care and services which meet needs beyond basic provision of food, shelter and laundry).

H4. Enter the number of individuals served who live in nursing homes/long-term care facility (e.g. any facility that provides care to one or more persons who require nursing care and related medical services of such complexity to require professional nursing care under the direction of a physician on a 24 hour a day basis).

H5. Enter the number of individuals served who are homeless

H6. Enter the sum of H1, H2, H3, H4 and H5. This number must agree with A3.

I. Source of Referral

I1. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an ophthalmologist or optometrist.

I2. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a medical provider other than an ophthalmologist or optometrist.

I3. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a state vocational rehabilitation agency.

I4. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a government or social services agency defined as a public or private agency which provides assistance to consumers related to eligibility and securing entitlements and benefits, counseling, elder law services, assistance with housing, etc.

I5. Enter the number of individuals served referred by the Veterans Administration

I6. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a senior program defined as a community-based educational, recreational, or socialization program operated by a senior center, nutrition site, or senior club.

I7. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an assisted living facility defined as housing that provides personal care and services which meet needs beyond basic provision of food, shelter and laundry.

I8. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a nursing home/long-term care facility defined as any facility that provides care to one or more persons who require nursing care and related medical services of such complexity to require professional nursing care under the direction of a physician on a 24 hour a day basis.

I9. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a faith-based (religious affiliated) organization.

I10. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an independent living center (ILC) defined as a consumer-controlled, community-based, cross-disability, nonresidential private nonprofit agency that is designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities, and provides an array of independent living services.

I11. Enter the number of individuals referred by a family member or friend.

I12. Enter the number of individuals who were self-referred.

I13. Enter the number of individuals referred from all other sources aside from those listed above.

I14. Enter the sum of I1, I2, I3, I4, I5, I6, I7, I8, I9, I10, I11, I12, and I13. This number must agree with A3

Part IV: Types of Services Provided and Resources Allocated — Instructions

Please note: Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services in Part I C must equal the total funds spent on services in Part IV. Part I C must equal the sum of Part IV A1+B1+C1+D1.

In addition, salary or costs associated with direct service staff or contractors providing

direct services should be included in the cost of services provided in A, B, C, and D.

A. Clinical / Functional Vision Assessments and Services

A1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (A1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (A1b) for clinical and/or functional vision assessments and services, whether purchased or provided directly.

A2. Enter the total number of program participants who received clinical vision screening or vision examinations from qualified or certified professionals such as ophthalmologists or optometrists, and who received functional vision assessments or low vision evaluations to identify strategies for enhancing visual performance both without and with optical and low vision devices and equipment. Assessment areas may include functional visual acuity and fields, efficiency of vision in the performance of everyday tasks, and evaluation for low vision aids or equipment. These assessments are typically provided by skilled professionals or those who are certified or have a master’s degree in low vision rehabilitation. Do not include evaluations for orientation and mobility. These should be included in C3.

A3. Enter the total number of program participants who received surgical or therapeutic treatment to prevent, correct, or modify disabling eye conditions; and, hospitalizations related to such services. Include prescription optics in this service category. Nonprescription optics should be reported in B2.

B. Assistive Technology Devices, Aids, Services and Training

B1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (B1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (B1b) for the provision of assistive technology devices, aids, services and training.

B2. Enter the total number of program participants who received one or more assistive technology devices and aids. As defined in Section 3(4) of the Assistive Technology Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-364), “assistive technology device means any item, piece of equipment, or product system whether acquired commercially, modified, or customized that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.” Assistive technology devices may include such items as canes, slates, insulin gauges, CCTVs, computers, adaptive software, magnifiers, adaptive cooking items, adaptive recreational items, handwriting guides, Braillers, large button telephones, etc.

B3. Enter the total number of program participants who received one or more assistive technology services and training. As defined in Section 3(5) of the Assistive Technology Act of 2004 (PL 108-364), “assistive technology service means any service that directly assists an individual with a disability in the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device.” Services may include the evaluation of assistive technology needs of an individual, services related to acquisition of technology, costs of loan programs, maintenance and repair of assistive technology, training or technical assistance for the individual or professionals related to the use of assistive technology, programs to expand the availability of assistive technology, low vision therapy services related to the use of optical aids and devices, and other services related to the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device.

C. Independent Living and Adjustment Training and Services

C1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (C1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (C1b) for the provision of services and adjustment training leading to independent living. Evaluation and assessment services (excluding those included in A2 or B3) leading to the planning and implementation of services and training should be included in these costs.

C2. Enter the total number of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services or travel training (i.e. learning to access public or private transportation and to travel safely and as independently as possible in the home and community with or without the use of mobility aids and devices).

C3. Enter the total number of individuals who received communication skills training (e.g. reading and writing Braille, keyboarding and computer literacy, computer skills training, using the telephone, handwriting guides, telling time, using readers, use of audio and tactile technologies for home, recreational or educational use; etc.). Training in the use of newspaper reading services and radio services should be included.

C4. Enter the total number of individuals who received personal management and daily living skills training (e.g. training in the use of adaptive aids and assistive technology devices for personal management and daily living, blindness and low vision alternative techniques for food preparation, grooming and dress, household chores, medical management, shopping, recreational activities, etc.)

C5. Enter the total number of individuals who received supportive services (e.g. reader services, transportation, personal attendant services, support service providers, interpreters, etc.) while actively participating in the program or attaining independent living goals.

C6. Enter the total number of program participants who participated in advocacy training or support network activities such as consumer organization meetings, peer support groups, etc.

C7. Enter the total number of individuals who received counseling (peer, individual or group) to assist them in adjusting to visual impairment and blindness.

C8. Enter the total number of program participants that received information and referral to other service providers, programs, and agencies (e.g. senior programs, public and private social service programs, faith-based organizations, consumer groups, etc.) to enhance adjustment, independent living, and integration into the community. Do not include individuals who received only information and referral and for whom no other services were provided.

C9. Enter the total number of individuals served who were provided any other service not listed above.

D. Community Awareness Activities / Information and Referral

D1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (D1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (D1b) for providing information and referral services and community awareness activities/events to individuals for whom this was the only service provided (i.e. training for other professionals, telephone inquiries, general inquiries, etc.).

D2. Enter the number of individuals receiving information and referral services for whom this is the only service provided. (optional)

D3. Enter the number of community awareness events/activities in which the Chapter 2 program participated during the reported year (D3a) and the number or estimated number of individuals who benefited from these activities (D3b).

Part V: Comparison of Prior Year Activities to Current Reported Year — Instructions

A1. Program Expenditures and Encumbrances (all sources) Enter the total cost of the program for the prior fiscal year (A1a), and the fiscal year being reported (A1b). The total cost of the program can be found in Part I A7. Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the reported year (A1c).

A2. Number of Individuals Served Enter the total number of eligible individuals served in the prior year (A2a), and in the current reported year (A2b). The total number of individuals served can be found in Part III A3. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the numbers served from the prior year to the reported year (A2c).

A3. Number of Minority Individuals Served Enter the total number of minority individuals served in the prior year (A3a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A3b). The total number of minority individuals served is the total of Part III D1+D2+D3+D4+D5 +D7. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the numbers served from the prior year to the reported year (A3c).

A4. Number of Community Awareness Activities Enter the number of community awareness activities or events in which the Chapter 2 program participated during the prior year (A4a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A4b). The number of community awareness activities is found in Part IV D3a. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the number of events from the prior year to the year being reported (A4c).

A5. Number of Collaborating Agencies and Organizations Enter the number of collaborating organizations or agencies (formal agreements or informal activity) other than Chapter 2 paid sub-grantees or contractors in the prior year (A5a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A5b). Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the year being reported (A5c).

A6. Number of Sub-grantees/Contractors If you provide services through sub-grantee agencies or contract, enter the number of sub-grantees or contracts in the prior year (A6a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A6b). Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the year being reported (A6c). If you do not use sub-grantees, enter 0 in A6a, A6b, and A6c.

Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures — Instructions

A. Enter the number from Part IV B3 in A1. From available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training who maintained or improved functional abilities that were previously lost or diminished as a result of vision loss in A2. (closed/inactive cases only).

In A3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

B. Enter the number from Part IV C2 in B1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving orientation and mobility (O & M) services, enter the number of individuals who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their residence and/or community environment as a result of services in B2 (closed/inactive cases only).

In B3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

C. Enter the number from Part IV C3 in C1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving communication skills training, enter the number of individuals who gained or maintained their functional abilities as a result of services they received in C2 (Closed/inactive cases only).

In C3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

D. Enter the number from Part IV C4 in D1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving daily living skills training, enter the number of individuals that experienced functional gains or successfully restored or maintained their functional ability to engage in their customary daily life activities as a result of services or training in personal management and daily living skills In D2 (Closed/inactive cases only).

In D3, enter the Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

E1. Enter the Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E4. Enter the number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss (Closed/inactive cases only). “Change in lifestyle” is defined as any non-vision related event that results in the consumer’s reduced independence, such as moving from a private residence (house or apartment) to another type of residence e.g. living with family, senior living community, assisted living facility, nursing home/long-term facility, etc. Reduced independence could also result in employing a caregiver to enable the consumer continue to live in his/her home. Examples of events that could result in reduced independence of the consumer include loss of spouse and onset or worsening of other health conditions such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, etc.

E5. Enter the number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

Part VII: Training and Technical Assistance — Instructions

On July 22, 2014, Public Law 113-128, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) was enacted and included a new requirement under Section 751A that the RSA Commissioner shall conduct a survey of designated State agencies that receive grants under section 752 regarding training and technical assistance needs in order to determine funding priorities for such training and technical assistance. Please enter a brief description of training and technical assistance needs that you may have to assist in the implementation and improvement of the performance of your Independent Living Services for Older Individuals Who Are Blind grant (for example, financial management, reporting requirements on the 7-OB, program management, data analysis and program performance, law and applicable regulations, provision of services and service delivery, promising practices, resources and information, outreach, etc.).

Part VIII: Narrative — Instructions

Self-explanatory.

Part IX: Signature Instructions

Please sign and print the name, title and telephone number of the IL-OIB Program Director.

Part I: Funding Sources And Expenditures

Title VII-Chapter 2 Federal grant award for reported fiscal year643,759
Other federal grant award for reported fiscal year0
Title VII-Chapter 2 carryover from previous year490,775
Other federal grant carryover from previous year0
A. Funding Sources for Expenditures in Reported FY
A1. Title VII-Chapter 2880,443
A2. Total other federal420,082
(a) Title VII-Chapter 1-Part B0
(b) SSA reimbursement129,829
(c) Title XX - Social Security Act290,253
(d) Older Americans Act0
(e) Other0
A3. State (excluding in-kind)110,369
A4. Third party0
A5. In-kind0
A6. Total Matching Funds110,369
A7. Total All Funds Expended1,410,894
B. Total expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs420,081
C. Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services990,813

Part II: Staffing

FTE (full time equivalent) is based upon a 40-hour workweek or 2080 hours per year.

A. Full-time Equivalent (FTE)

Program Staff a) Administrative and Support b) Direct Service c) Total
1. FTE State Agency 3.1000 5.1000 8.2000
2. FTE Contractors 4.3200 8.3800 12.7000
3. Total FTE 7.4200 13.4800 20.9000

B. Employed or advanced in employment

a) Number employed b) FTE
1. Employees with Disabilities 15 5.9400
2. Employees with Blindness Age 55 and Older 6 1.3600
3. Employees who are Racial/Ethnic Minorities 14 3.8500
4. Employees who are Women 44 16.3400
5. Employees Age 55 and Older 23 9.0000

C. Volunteers

0.00

Part III: Data on Individuals Served

Provide data in each of the categories below related to the number of individuals for whom one or more services were provided during the reported fiscal year.

A. Individuals Served

1. Number of individuals who began receiving services in the previous FY and continued to receive services in the reported FY295
2. Number of individuals who began receiving services in the reported FY510
3. Total individuals served during the reported fiscal year (A1 + A2) 805

B. Age

1. 55-5956
2. 60-6478
3. 65-6977
4. 70-7491
5. 75-79133
6. 80-84141
7. 85-89132
8. 90-9474
9. 95-9921
10. 100 & over2
11. Total (must agree with A3)805

C. Gender

1. Female574
2. Male231
3. Total (must agree with A3)805

D. Race/Ethnicity

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race69
2. American Indian or Alaska Native14
3. Asian5
4. Black or African American39
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander0
6. White670
7. Two or more races4
8. Race and ethnicity unknown (only if consumer refuses to identify)4
9. Total (must agree with A3)805

E. Degree of Visual Impairment

1. Totally Blind (LP only or NLP)61
2. Legally Blind (excluding totally blind)408
3. Severe Visual Impairment336
4. Total (must agree with A3)805

F. Major Cause of Visual Impairment

1. Macular Degeneration425
2. Diabetic Retinopathy59
3. Glaucoma125
4. Cataracts15
5. Other181
6. Total (must agree with A3)805

G. Other Age-Related Impairments

1. Hearing Impairment148
2. Diabetes126
3. Cardiovascular Disease and Strokes204
4. Cancer54
5. Bone, Muscle, Skin, Joint, and Movement Disorders226
6. Alzheimer's Disease/Cognitive Impairment27
7. Depression/Mood Disorder45
8. Other Major Geriatric Concerns148

H. Type of Residence

1. Private residence (house or apartment)636
2. Senior Living/Retirement Community101
3. Assisted Living Facility57
4. Nursing Home/Long-term Care facility11
5. Homeless0
6. Total (must agree with A3)805

I. Source of Referral

1. Eye care provider (ophthalmologist, optometrist)24
2. Physician/medical provider43
3. State VR agency12
4. Government or Social Service Agency28
5. Veterans Administration3
6. Senior Center19
7. Assisted Living Facility1
8. Nursing Home/Long-term Care facility0
9. Faith-based organization1
10. Independent Living center29
11. Family member or friend62
12. Self-referral550
13. Other33
14. Total (must agree with A3)805

Part IV: Types of Services Provided and Resources Allocated

Provide data related to the number of older individuals who are blind receiving each type of service and resources committed to each type of service.

A. Clinical/functional vision assessments and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 0
1b. Total Cost from other funds 0
2. Vision screening / vision examination / low vision evaluation 439
3. Surgical or therapeutic treatment to prevent, correct, or modify disabling eye conditions 0

B. Assistive technology devices and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 66,663
1b. Total Cost from other funds 59,434
2. Provision of assistive technology devices and aids 391
3. Provision of assistive technology services 391

C. Independent living and adjustment training and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 213,593
1b. Total Cost from other funds 69,186
2. Orientation and Mobility training 502
3. Communication skills 611
4. Daily living skills 689
5. Supportive services (reader services, transportation, personal 20
6. Advocacy training and support networks 433
7. Counseling (peer, individual and group) 52
8. Information, referral and community integration 510
. Other IL services 0

D. Community Awareness: Events & Activities

Cost a. Events / Activities b. Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 213,593
1b. Total Cost from other funds 69,186
2. Information and Referral 510
3. Community Awareness: Events/Activities 29 4,403

Part V: Comparison of Prior Year Activities to Current Reported Year

A. Activity

a) Prior Year b) Reported FY c) Change ( + / - )
1. Program Cost (all sources) 1,392,915 1,410,894 17,979
2. Number of Individuals Served 705 805 100
3. Number of Minority Individuals Served 110 131 21
4. Number of Community Awareness Activities 25 29 4
5. Number of Collaborating agencies and organizations 70 67 -3
6. Number of Sub-grantees 11 8

Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures

Provide the following data for each of the performance measures below. This will assist RSA in reporting results and outcomes related to the program.

Number of persons Percent of persons
A1. Number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training 391 100.00%
A2. Number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training who maintained or improved functional abilities that were previously lost or diminished as a result of vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only) 37 9.46%
A3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 241 61.64%
B1. Number of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services 502 100.00%
B2. Of those receiving orientation and mobility (O & M) services, the number of individuals who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their residence and/or community environment as a result of services. (closed/inactive cases only) 46 9.16%
B3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 283 56.37%
C1. Number of individuals who received communication skills training 611 100.00%
C2. Of those receiving communication skills training, the number of individuals who gained or maintained their functional abilities as a result of services they received. (Closed/inactive cases only) 206 33.72%
C3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 299 48.94%
D1. Number of individuals who received daily living skills training 689 100.00%
D2. Number of individuals that experienced functional gains or successfully restored or maintained their functional ability to engage in their customary daily life activities as a result of services or training in personal management and daily living skills. (closed/inactive cases only) 237 34.40%
D3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 354 51.38%
E1. Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 271 n/a
E2. Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 42 n/a
E3. Number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 1 n/a
E4. Number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only) 21 n/a
E5. Number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 8 n/a

Part VII: Training and Technical Assistance Needs

During the 2016 Federal fiscal year, the Arizona OIB program worked with Mississippi State University Technical Assistance Center to address issues discussed in the 2015 7-OB report. This technical assistance included metrics development, review of the Arizona Client Satisfaction Survey and how it can be improved, review and possible updating of client case forms developing increased accountability to aid in monitoring program and case management, staff low vision training, working with persons with multiple disabilities including hearing loss, special needs of older adults with vision loss and various group training models. While information was presented by the MSU TAC group, the work of implementing this information is just beginning and will continue throughout the 2017Federal fiscal year and years to come. The Arizona OIB program is currently in the middle of an experimental project of redesigning our service delivery to gain efficiencies, accountability by providers and increased data collection regarding our program. This project was addressed during the work with the MSU TAC program.

Part VIII: Narrative

A. Briefly describe the agency's method of implementation for the Title VII-Chapter 2 program (i.e. in-house, through sub-grantees/contractors, or a combination) incorporating outreach efforts to reach underserved and/or unserved populations. Please list all sub-grantees/contractors.

The Arizona Rehabilitation Services Administration (AZRSA) Independent Living Blind Program (ILB) employs staff directly with the state agency; Arizona Independent Living Blind (ILB) Program, as well as individuals and agencies who contract to provide local and itinerant services, to administer the Title VII, Chapter II Independent Living Older Blind Program. During this reporting period, the Arizona ILB Program had seventeen internal staff, six contractors, and two agencies with thirty three direct and indirect service employees, for a total of fifty-six individuals who provided services statewide to our elderly blind clients. The services provided helped our clients live as safely and independently as possible in their homes or communities. AZRSA continues to provide services to older individuals who reside in rural Arizona. Vision Rehabilitation Therapists provide community outreach through in-service presentations to local health fairs, senior centers, nursing homes, retirement communities, medical facilities, hospitals, Veterans Special Needs events, and Assistive Technology Events. The focus of these outreach efforts is to educate interested individuals about the needs of seniors who are blind or visually impaired, including providing information on accessing RSA and community blindness related services. As a result of the efforts of the AZRSA ILB staff who conducted twenty nine in-service presentations throughout Arizona, four thousand four hundred and three clients, friends, family members, and service providers were given information about vision-related services. In addition, AZRSA continues to update the Arizona Directory of Services for Persons Who Are Blind and Visually Impaired which includes information for people who are deaf, hard of hearing or deaf-blind. This directory is available in alternative formats to address individual needs and is updated on a quarterly basis to keep the most current information available. AZRSA continues to maintain a website, which provides information and links to additional resources and services. Staff at the ILB program finish working with the Arizona Talking Book Library the searchable database for the Directory. The website address is “eyeknow.az.gov”. AGENCY/ORGANIZATION PROVIDERS: AZRSA Independent Living Blind providers consist of seventeen state agency employees and eight providers (including two agencies) as follows: State Agency Employees: 1. Garcia, Vasant (Certified Vision Rehabilitation Therapist) 2. Gunn, Suzi (Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist and Certified Teacher for the Visually Impaired) 3. Lindley, Pam (Certified Vision Rehabilitation Therapist) 4. Miller, Anna (Certified Vision Rehabilitation Therapist/Certified Rehabilitation Counselor) 5. Olson, Susan K. (Certified Vision Rehabilitation Therapist) 6. Steen, Todd (Certified Vision Rehabilitation Therapist and Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist) 7. Bonarrigo, Paul (Assistive Technology Specialist) 8. Crist, Lanelle (Vision Rehabilitation Therapist) 9. Shapiro, Beatrice (Assistive Technology Specialist) 10. Bones, Nataly (Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist) Seven Administrative Support Staff Provider Agencies: 1. Arizona Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ACBVI) 2. Southern Arizona Association for the Visually Impaired (SAAVI) Individual Providers: 1. Arnold, Patty (Certified Vision Rehabilitation Therapist/Certified Low Vision Therapist) 2. Bishop-Amavillah, Tamara (Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist) 3. Hanna, Georgeanne (Certified Vision Rehabilitation Therapist and Certified Low Vision Therapist) 4. Copado, Hector (Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist, certified Low Vision Therapist, and Assistive Technology Specialist) 5. Rutkoff, Ethan (Assistive Technology Specialist) 6. Vangueety, Venu (Assistive Technology Specialist)

B. Briefly describe any activities designed to expand or improve services including collaborative activities or community awareness; and efforts to incorporate new methods and approaches developed by the program into the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) under Section 704.

There were four major events that drew approximately three thousand three hundred and ten attendees during this reporting period. The Chase Stadium D-Backs disability expo held on August 6, 2016 in Phoenix, which drew approximately two thousand , the 19th Annual Vision Rehabilitation and Technology Expo (VRATE) held on December 11, 2015 in Phoenix, with more than five hundred attendees, the connecting Tucson community expo held on April 30, 2016 in Tucson, with four hundred ten participants, and the 20th Annual Vision Rehabilitation and Technology Expo (VRATE) held on September 30, 2016 in Glendale, with four hundred attendees. As a result of the efforts of the AZRSA Independent Living Blind (ILB) staff who conducted twenty nine in-service presentations throughout Arizona, four thousand four hundred and three clients, friends, family members, and service providers were given information about vision-related services. AZRSA Services for the Blind, Visually Impaired and Deaf (SBVID) has increased community awareness by presenting or attending twenty nine (29) events or activities and by collaborating with different organizations to better serve our older individuals who are blind, to update knowledge in the area of technology and teaching techniques, and the availability of new programs that could benefit clients by addressing their multiple needs. Some of the presentations and collaborations during FFY 2015 include, but are not limited to the following: 1. American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) 2. Area Agency on Aging 3. Arizona Bridge to Independent Living (ABIL) 4. Arizona Council of the Blind (ACB) 5. Arizona Low Vision 6. Arizona Technology Assistance Program 7. Arizona Telecommunications Equipment Distribution Program 8. Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually 11. Impaired (AER) 9. Atria Bell court Garden assisted living 10. Braille and Talking Book Library 11. Bread of Life Mission 12. Broadway Proper ILB Presentation 13. Brookdale Prescott (Senior & Assisted Living Residence) 14. Cascades of Tucson Assisted Living 15. Center for Disability Law 16. Chinle Blind and Visually Impaired Support Group 17. Chapparell Winds community support group 18. City of Phoenix 19. Connecting Tucson Community expo 20. Dependable Health Staff Conference 21. Desert Low Vision Center 22. Desert Palms Presbyterian, Low Vision Support Group 23. Digital Apex 24. DUET — Parish Nurse Training 25. East Valley Dial a Ride 26. El Dorado Community Support Group 27. EPAC/county community resource expo 28. Eschenbach 29. Fellowship Square health and wellness expo 30. Foundation for Blind Children —Low Vision Optometrist and social worker 31. Governor’s Council on Blindness and Visual Impairment 32. Guide Dogs for the Blind 33. Hadley School for the Blind 34. Healthy Living Alliance Health Northhealth and Wellness expo 35. Homewood Suites: Sensitivity Workshop 36. Low Vision Plus 37. LS & S Low Vision Products 38. Madison House support group, Spanish Trail, 39. Maricopa County Public Library (large Print materials) 40. Mississippi State University Rehabilitation Research Training Center 41. National Federation of the Blind 42. Next Level, Assistive Technology 43. Olive Branch Sr. Senior Program 44. Parish Nurses East 45. Parish Nurses West 46. Peckham, Inc. Sensitivity Training 47. Phoenix Dial a Ride 48. Phoenix Suns Disability Expo 49. Pima Council on Aging: 50. Pioneers' Home in Prescott, 51. Prescott Valley United Methodist Church 52. Rincon church women’s circle 53. Shepherd of the Hills Community Health Event 54. Spofit Disability Sport Fitness Center 55. Sun Sounds of Arizona 56. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing 57. The Fountains program presentation 58. Tuba City Assist to Independence 59. Tucson Society for the Blind (TSB) 60. Tucson Sun Van Transit 61. United Methodist Church: Spouse’s Support Group 62. University of Mass Boston 63. University of Arizona TVI Introduction to Blindness Summer Class 64. Veterans Affairs 65. ViewFinder Low Vision 66. Vision Rehabilitation and Assistive Technology Expo (VRATE) 67. White Cane Day These activities, combined with the smaller gatherings that occurred during this Federal fiscal year, provided outreach to four thousand four hundred and three participants, and enriched the Independent Living Blind provider’s knowledge and resources to better serve ILB clients. In addition, the ILB program collaborated with other agencies as follows: 1. Arizona Falls Prevention Coalition Working together to educate public on the increased risk of falls for older persons with vision loss. Collaboration also includes gaining knowledge on conducting risk assessments with older blind clients and activities to increase balance for older persons with vision loss. 2. Hadley Institute for the Visually Impaired Collaboration includes quarterly Hadley Ambassador meetings on new curriculum and programs at Hadley and distributing information on the Low Vision Focus program for older persons with vision loss. Information about this program has been given to low vision support groups for information, education and discussion. Plus it is used with our clients for reference as a follow up after blind rehabilitation services. 3. Area Agencies on Aging Collaboration includes resource information and referrals for our older persons with vision loss who face other live issues in addition to their vision loss. These issues include housing, financial, physical, mental and cognitive issues. 4. National Conversations on Aging sponsored by the American Foundation for the Blind Collaboration includes participation in phone calls regarding funding and best practices which could result in committee work regarding the future of blind service nationally. 5. Mississippi State University Technical Assistance

C. Briefly summarize results from any of the most recent evaluations or satisfaction surveys conducted for your program and attach a copy of applicable reports.

2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 MONTH/YEAR of this Survey (Upper Right Corner) Answer Options Response Percent Response Count 10/15 10.0% 3 11/15 0.0% 0 12/15 16.7% 5 1/16 0.0% 0 2/16 0.0% 0 3/16 0.0% 0 4/16 0.0% 0 5/16 0.0% 0 6/16 0.0% 0 7/16 0.0% 0 8/16 0.0% 0 9/16 73.3% 22 answered question 30 skipped question 0 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 STAFF MEMBER NAME/TEACHER: Answer Options Response Count 30 answered question 30 skipped question 0 Response Text Vasant Garcia Patty Arnold Frank Vance Suzi Gunn Christy Delmonico Frank Vance Frank Vance Christy Delmonico Frank Vance Frank Vance Venugopal Vangueety Frank Vance Jeffrey Thurber Deborah Macilroy Georgeanne Hanna Georgeann Hanna Frank Vance Frank Vance Frank Vance Joe Sizemore Pamela Lindley Georgeanna Hanna Anna Miller Ethan Rutkoff Lenetta Lefko Vasant Garcia Pamela Lindley Vasant Garcia Karla Rivas-Parker Georgeann Hanna 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 DATE OF BIRTH: (Ex: 00/00/0000) Answer Options Response Count 30 answered question 30 skipped question 0 Response Text 01/16/1933 05/19/1962 05/16/1966 06/27/1961 06/11/1932 06/01/1928 11/16/1930 12/10/1923 04/28/1938 07/05/1951 10/09/1943 04/05/1954 09/01/1925 09/17/1922 07/18/1914 04/29/1925 05/20/1959 10/08/1946 04/25/1954 05/28/1996 03/08/1924 07/04/1925 04/18/1930 09/14/1950 08/27/1925 09/19/1929 12/03/1922 07/04/1956 09/17/1923 09/15/1933 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Services were provided in a timely manner. Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Strongly Agree 46.7% 14 Agree 40.0% 12 Disagree 3.3% 1 Strongly Disagree 3.3% 1 No Response 6.7% 2 Comments: 3 answered question 30 skipped question 0 Comments: Categories Great Anna is an angel in regular clothing. When she came to my house the first time. How will she track me. She is blind. She did show me every visit was a measurable. Not only did she track me there alone but she taught me I can do things she gave me courage to not give up. I have lived for 70 years and here she is teaching me how to thread a needle. She made me laugh. What I dodo today Ann Miller did it thank you. You should be proud of all you do. 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 The instructor was attentive and interested in my well being. Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Strongly Agree 56.7% 17 Agree 30.0% 9 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 6.7% 2 No Response 6.7% 2 Comments: 2 answered question 30 skipped question 0 Comments: Categories Excellent She is my angel. 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 The instructor was familiar with techniques and aids used by blind and visually impaired individuals. Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Strongly Agree 66.7% 20 Agree 20.0% 6 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 3.3% 1 No Response 10.0% 3 Comments: 1 answered question 30 skipped question 0 Comments: Categories Excellent 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 I was satisfied with the quality of services provided by the program. Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Strongly Agree 53.3% 16 Agree 33.3% 10 Disagree 0.0% 0 Strongly Disagree 6.7% 2 No Response 6.7% 2 Comments: 2 answered question 30 skipped question 0 Comments: Categories Very much Satisfied is not strong enough to describe my feelings. 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 After receiving services, Answer Options Response Percent Response Count I am now better able to travel safely and independently in my home and/or community. 50.0% 15 There has been no change in my ability to travel safely and independently. 6.7% 2 I am now less able to travel safely and independently (please explain below). 3.3% 1 I did not receive services that would help me travel safely and independently in my home and/or community. 16.7% 5 I was not aware or offered these services. 6.7% 2 No Response 16.7% 5 Explantation/Comments: 10 answered question 30 skipped question 0 Explantation/Comments: Categories I was not aware or offered these services. I was trained on a blind cane some years ago but now have lost all my central vision and have had to devise my own methods of keeping myself safe. I would appreciate any other help in that manner. I feel more confident crossing cross walks. Some do not have audible signals. N/A More confidence in riding the bus to the center. I knew that I can ask for the services, but have not done so. I did not receive services that would help me travel safely and independently in my home and/or community. I was mainly helped by thinks being marked (microwave & radio) I have lost my peripheral vision only have frontal vision. I still have trouble reading mags bus routes. I'm ok at home but need work on travel. I cannot see well enough to travel unless my driver takes me in my car. Before Anna Life was doom & gloom. After Anna I live alone know what to do. Have an activity every day. I cannot drive 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 After receiving services, Answer Options Response Percent Response Count I am now better able to prepare meals for myself. 23.3% 7 There has been no change in my ability to prepare meals. 23.3% 7 I am now less able to prepare meals independently (please explain below). 0.0% 0 I did not request services that would help me prepare meals. 36.7% 11 I was not aware or offered these services. 3.3% 1 No Response 13.3% 4 Explantion/Comments: 9 answered question 30 skipped question 0 Explantion/Comments: Categories earlier 2009-2010 N/A I did not need this service. I did not request services that would help me prepare meals. I knew that I can ask for the services, but have not done so. I did no request services that would help me prepare meals. I was not aware or offered these services. Not Necessary My eye sight continues to worsen. The magnifier is a great help. I don't like fast foods. I cook for myself. Someone prepares most meals & I am able to prepare some meds. 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 After receiving services, Answer Options Response Percent Response Count I am better able to manage housekeeping tasks, such as cleaning floors/surfaces and organizing. 10.3% 3 There has been no change in my ability to manage housekeeping tasks. 24.1% 7 I am less able to manage housekeeping tasks (please explain below). 6.9% 2 I did not request services to help me manage housekeeping tasks. 44.8% 13 I was not aware or offered these services. 0.0% 0 No Response 13.8% 4 Explanation/Comments: 8 answered question 29 skipped question 1 Explanation/Comments: Categories Chronic pain only is the problem. N/A I was not aware or offered these services. I did not need this service but talking with others and my leader Frank Vance in my support group helped sooo much. Same as above. I did not request services that would help me prepare meals. I as not aware or offered these services. I was asked where I needed help. Did not really. I can change my bed & do my washing ok. Can't do floors. My friend Jody wrote this as I told her. I am able to do some cleaning & have a cleaning service. 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 After receiving services, Answer Options Response Percent Response Count I am better able to manage paperwork, such as mail, correspondence, and paying bills. 31.0% 9 There has been no change in my ability to manage paperwork. 24.1% 7 I am less able to manage paperwork (please explain below). 6.9% 2 I did not request services to help me manage paperwork. 24.1% 7 I was not aware or offered these services. 3.4% 1 No Response 10.3% 3 Explanation/Comments: 11 answered question 29 skipped question 1 Explanation/Comments: Categories Paperwork is very hard now my hand magnifier are not strong enough when I am away from home. N/A I was not aware or offered these services. I was not aware or offered these services. Due to talking and listening to others and leader Frank Vance in my support group gave me more confidence. He was great help with the computer. Same as on another page. I did not request services to help me manage paperwork. I was asked if I need help. The stronger magnifier helps in many ways. N/A-Blind I was not aware or offered these services. Comments: I manage my mind. 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 After receiving services, Answer Options Response Percent Response Count I am now better able to access reading materials, such as books, newspapers, and magazines (whether with magnifiers, large print, Braille, or on tape). 50.0% 15 There has been no change in my ability to access reading materials. 3.3% 1 I am now less able to access reading materials (please explain below). 10.0% 3 I did not request services to help me access reading materials. 23.3% 7 I was not aware or offered these services. 0.0% 0 No Response 13.3% 4 Explanation/Comments: 9 answered question 30 skipped question 0 Explanation/Comments: Categories My vision has degenerated. Thank you! CCTV screen N/A I did not request services to help me access reading materials. I was not aware or offered these services. I get books on tape & the Talking Book newsletter. I go to the Blind Center for social recreation service no rehab. I did not request services to help me manage paperwork. I was asked if I need help. NO audio With reader-some improvement 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Compared with my functioning before services, Answer Options Response Percent Response Count I am now less dependent upon others in performing my customary day-to-day activities, such as getting around, cooking, cleaning, reading, laundry, etc. 46.7% 14 There has been no change in my ability to perform my customary life activities. 20.0% 6 I am now more dependent upon others in performing my customary life activities (please explain below). 10.0% 3 No Response 23.3% 7 Explanation/Comments: 6 answered question 30 skipped question 0 Explanation/Comments: Categories There isn't much that can be done when I can no longer drive and live alone. I'm grateful for volunteers. I can read my mail :) N/A All---to see what others can do with less vision than myself. Endless, you want to say that I am better at wood turning. Otherwise same as the last question. Reset phone functions, install batteries, in some magnifiers gate remotes. 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Tell us the greatest difference this program has made in your life. Answer Options Response Percent Response Count No Response 100.0% 10 The greatest difference is: 23 answered question 10 skipped question 20 The greatest difference is: I could not have survived without the help of all my therapists from the DES. Especially Venu for keeping me on e-mail for my reading machine & Talking Books which really are my life! Thank you for all of it. I find reading and writing easier to keep kill or inventory better controlled reading mail is easier to understand. I don't feel like I'm in this alone. I feel I've made friends & teachers who truly understand what I'm going through and that they are here for me. It has given me more confidence to get around in a new environment -dress & eat go to bible study prayer group & church. My reader has helped but sometimes the paper is poor & unable to read. Do to color. Jan 28 2015 I have not had any contact w/the center since dated in deciage. I Alicia was never tried w/friendly communication by Frank. Was not given information about services that they offered. Sept 10, 2010 Frank asked to go away from the center because of my age. Friendship and support from support group leader Frank Vance and all others in my group and the friendliness of the people I met in lunch room and others participating in other classes in that building. Everything I have received with this program, has improved my life in all aspects. I'm truly grateful to Venu & the others that have always been professional in all things. Thank you for this opportunity to fill out this survey. Venu, got me Zoom Tex, Dragon Speaking, Bard he taught me how to use these programs until I could do them on my own. He was very patient with me. As of today I can call him with any problems I may have. He is very good with this position. It gets me out of the house and I have made a lot o new friends. Get to help other people around the facility and classes. (volunteer) Thank you for using large print and black color. Easier to see than most information. Everyone I have talked with or dealt with has been courteous and respectful. Thank you! The sunglasses & magnification glass have helped me read important documents & tolerate the bright sun better. I realize there are many other people with the same eye problem I have. Helps me cope with it better. It makes me feel better that I am not alone and there are people there to help me. Learning to use computers and phone w/ touch screens & traveling devices. To find my way around using public transportation. Learning to do some stuff on my own such as laundry cleaning. Still have trouble with travel and cooking. 411 on my phone is wonderful. The strongest mags. I have accepted Macular Degeneration in my life. What I have not accepted is no help from health insurance for magnifier. I have purchased 2 magnifiers cost over $2,000 (video) Made my computer experience much more accessible and easy to use. Things like timer & talking clock & calculator (talking) crock pot. Have made it much easier to stay independent at 90yr old 7 liquid measure. I learned a little more about computers. I am very happy with my service & very proud & thankfull. Computer software increased uses of my computer. Able to have a talking watch. 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Age: Answer Options Response Count 27 answered question 27 skipped question 3 Response Text 83 54 50 88 85 92 78 65 72 62 91 94 102 91 57 69 62 20 92 ½ 91 86 65 90 93 60 92 82 yrs 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Gender: Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Male 20.7% 6 Female 79.3% 23 answered question 29 skipped question 1 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Living Situation: Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Live alone 50.0% 15 Live with others (includes spouse, family, roommate, nursing home or retirement facility) 46.7% 14 No Response 3.3% 1 answered question 30 skipped question 0 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Ethnicity: Answer Options Response Percent Response Count White (includes all countries) 76.7% 23 Black or African American 0.0% 0 American Indian or Alaska Native 0.0% 0 Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 0.0% 0 Hispanic or Latino of any race 13.3% 4 Asian 3.3% 1 No Response 6.7% 2 answered question 30 skipped question 0 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Reason for visual loss (check all that apply) Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Macular Degeneration 56.7% 17 Glaucoma 20.0% 6 Diabetic Retinopathy 3.3% 1 Cataracts 10.0% 3 Other, list below: 26.7% 8 No Response 3.3% 1 Other (please specify) 11 answered question 30 skipped question 0 Other (please specify) Neurological ROP/RLF Tumor Failed Retina Detachment surgery and other laser surgeries which created massive floaters. In one good eye Retinopathy due to prematurity. old age (94) Retinitis Pigmentosa Stargartz, Macular Degeneration Retna Detachment Retinitis Pigmentosa RA 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Would you rate your vision? Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Poor (I can read some regular or large print with glasses or magnification) 69.0% 20 Completely Blind (I cannot read print at all, even with glasses or magnification) 27.6% 8 No Response 3.4% 1 answered question 29 skipped question 1 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 My ability to see has: Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Worsened during the past year 50.0% 15 Improved during the past year 3.3% 1 Remained the same and can see some 26.7% 8 Remained the same and cannot see at all 20.0% 6 No Response 0.0% 0 answered question 30 skipped question 0 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Do you have a hearing loss? Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Yes 53.3% 16 No 43.3% 13 No Response 3.3% 1 answered question 30 skipped question 0 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Do you have any significant health condition(s) other than vision loss? Answer Options Response Percent Response Count No 40.0% 12 Yes 53.3% 16 No Response 6.7% 2 If yes please list: 18 answered question 30 skipped question 0 If yes please list: Categories Neurological past, surgery for seizure removal "Coma". Diabetic Depression disorder 311, Anxiety, PTSD, Uterine Fibroids. Emphysema, COPD, on Oxygen. Back like eggshells, spine problems. Hip replacement & leg pain walks with walker. Recovery from Cancer. Extreme high blood pressure, Cholesterol, some depression but is better after this service@ I have had many heat/sun strokes over the last few years and cannot go out in the heat. "Avascular Necrosis" of left knee requiring the use of walker to move around. Have received injections of orthovise but still much pain. heart failure, hearing loss, old age. Hearing Diabetes, Hypertension High blood pressure. Had Hep C, was cured. high blood pressure 1/2 way to Kidney failure uneven heart bear. Spinal Stenosis, heart problems, Meniers Disease. Heart disease Malignant mass on Kidney 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 My overall health has: Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Worsened during the past year 36.7% 11 Improved during the past year 6.7% 2 Remained about the same 56.7% 17 No Response 0.0% 0 answered question 30 skipped question 0 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 On a scale of 1 to 5 (1 indicating no difficulty and 5 indicating significant difficulty), rate how much difficulty your health and your vision currently (right now) causes your ability to function independently. Answer Options 1 2 3 4 5 No Response Response Count Health 6 8 8 4 2 2 30 Vision 1 1 10 7 9 2 30 answered question 30 skipped question 0 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 On a scale of 1 to 5 (1 indicating no difficulty and 5 indicating significant difficulty), rate how much difficulty your health and your vision caused before receiving our services in your ability to function independently. Answer Options 1 2 3 4 5 No Response Response Count Health 9 9 4 0 5 3 30 Vision 3 1 5 8 11 2 30 answered question 30 skipped question 0 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Before you received services, did you consider going into a nursing home or other long-term care facility? Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Never 56.7% 17 Sometimes 26.7% 8 Often 0.0% 0 Already in a Nursing Home or Facility 6.7% 2 No Response 10.0% 3 answered question 30 skipped question 0 2015 Client Satisfaction Survey 10/1/15-9/30/16 Did the services you received help you remain in your home or private residence? Answer Options Response Percent Response Count Yes 63.0% 17 No 14.8% 4 Not Sure 18.5% 5 No Response 3.7% 1 answered question 27 skipped question 3

D. Briefly describe the impact of the Title VII-Chapter 2 program, citing examples from individual cases (without identifying information) in which services contributed significantly to increasing independence and quality of life for the individual(s).

Success Stories submitted by state agency staff members: Vasant Garcia Mrs. D. is a 90 year old woman who lives alone. At the time of assessment, her main goal was to be able to read her mail. She was using a self-purchased portable video magnifier which was inadequate for the task of reading her mail. She was provided a desktop video magnifier with a near/distance camera. With this device she was able to read her mail and determine what was important and what was junk. She was quite relieved to be able to perform this task independently again. In addition, she learned to use the desktop video magnifier to read food packaging instructions and other recipes which provided her the opportunity to do some cooking again. A surprise benefit of this device was turning the camera so she could see her face and apply make-up which she had not done in a long time. Mrs. D was not able to organize her medications independently often having to ask for assistance from her neighbor. With the provision of a talking labeler, she learned to make audio labels for all her medications. Additionally, Mrs. D was provided with a talking watch and talking clock so she had a reliable method of knowing the time. Prior to this, she would rely on the TV to figure out the time. Mrs. D was thrilled with her new skills and equipment. She was motivated to learn and accomplished her goals quickly. Anna Miller Mrs. T is an eighty-eight-year-old woman who resides alone in a home she has lived in for over forty years. She was diagnosed with age related macular degeneration ten years ago resulting in steadily declining functional vision. At the time of her assessment, she expressed having difficulty in the following areas: handwriting, tracking phone numbers, dialing the phone, tracking appointments, knowing the current time and performing banking activities. She also stated her current lighting and magnification were inadequate for completing numerous daily tasks such as reading food labels and restaurant menus, reading her mail, and in locating items in her pantry. Mrs. T was provided adaptive writing guides, instruction in the use of contrast, a simple digital recorder, large print address book, a talking clock, talking watch, large print check register and check writing guide. Since she also has hearing loss, she received assistance with obtaining an amplifying phone and instruction in adaptive dialing techniques. Additionally, she received a desktop video magnifier for both reading and writing activities including banking and financial management. To assist her in having adequate lighting for reading, preparing meals, and locating items in her pantry, closets, and other areas with low lighting, she was given a rechargeable task lamp and LED flashlight. Finally, Mrs. T was provided with a portable video magnifier for activities away from her home such as reading food labels and prices at the grocery store and reading restaurant menus. As a result of the instruction she received, Mrs. T reported that she felt significantly more confident in her ability to complete daily activities. She stated she felt less stress and was pleased to be able to dial her phone to call her family and read a menu when dining out with friends. Overall, Mrs. T indicated that because of her participation in the Independent Living Older Blind program, she has the ability to maintain her independence and remain in her home for many years to come. Todd Steen T, age 80, is legally blind with the advancement of Age Related Macular Degeneration and a Cornea transplant due to a congenital disease. She lives with her son in the city where she has resided for many years. Her vision loss was affecting her ability to accomplish many activities of daily living safely, timely and confidently. She began thinking that she was becoming a burden to her son and could not live independently while her son was away at work. She was contemplating moving into an assisted living facility. The core daily living tasks she was having difficulty with included; handwriting, telephone use, time management, appliance usage, banking, mail management and medication management. Each area of concern was addressed focusing first on safety concerns then moving forward. To facilitate writing activities, T was provided writing templates, bold line paper and bold writing pen. She was also provided with talking and large number time pieces and a large print calendar. Marking all controls on her appliances created independence and safety with kitchen, laundry and thermostat setting needs. The provision of magnification devices truly enhanced her independence in almost all areas of daily living and greatly improved her quality of life. With her desktop video magnifier, she was able to access recipes, mail, product labels and medications. With her new confidence and independence T wanted to regain her previous lifestyle of being active in her community, church, shopping and going on appointments independently. With no public transportation options where she resides, she was connected with her county transportation authority which provided her with taxi vouchers. These vouchers have given her the ability to truly live an independent lifestyle. With the assistive devices and instruction in adaptive techniques she received, T has become a confident, independent and active member of her home and community. She is quite appreciative of everything provided to her and excited about her future which does not include moving to an assistive living facility. Suzi Gunn D, a 92 year old widow, with end stage age related macular degeneration lives with her daughter in a large home in a rural city. Prior to retirement she was an elementary school teacher for over 22 years. After retirement, she continued to teach herself becoming quite technology savvy. She has successfully adapted to her visual impairment. She has set up what she called her command center in her breakfast nook with her desktop video magnifier, her separate 36 inch monitor for computer, and other tech devices. She organized everything in her cupboards, shelves and drawers in clear bins, baskets, plastic sandwich bags, or binders with big bold print labels. An avid cook, she has several bookshelves in this area that contained binders labeled in bold black letters at 72 pt font with every cooking topic and recipe from figs to pasta. These are arranged alphabetically on her bookshelves; readily at her fingertips. Even at her age, she has continued to operate an informal bed and breakfast including cooking for her intermittent guests. With her advancing AMD she could no longer read her large font labels. She was provided a talking labeler with auditory output and a desktop video magnifier with speech. Although D was an avid cook, she would cut her fingers when cooking. She was provided a knife” with protective shield and cut resistant glove as well as adaptive techniques on cutting food items using high contrast cutting boards and curling fingers back away from the object being cut. D was also provided info on using trays to contain and manage items. She reported she was ecstatic that she could now simply cut a loaf of French bread into sandwich slices and did not cut her finger once. This is one of the things she loves most about Independent Living Older Blind service and instruction which have helped her maintain a sense of well-being and improve her quality of life. Pam Lindley M was a World War II bride who moved from her town in Italy to live life in America. She worked hard for many decades to support her family, using her talents in business, art and sewing. After retiring from her tailoring business, she noticed decreased vision and was diagnosed with macular degeneration. She pursued her first loves, painting and writing a book of her life experiences in Italy and her adopted country of USA. Her vision gradually became worse. However, she did publish her book of her life and created a houseful of her paintings. M has continued to paint but was frustrated at the inability to see her work adequately. Based on the recommendations of her eye report and a functional low vision evaluation, it was determined that M would benefit from improved lighting, yellow indoor tints and an OCR desktop video magnifier with a near/distance camera. M was eager to use this new equipment and resumed her painting. She has been able to use the distance camera to focus on her painting on an easel as she works with it. She also has placed the smaller paintings under the desktop video magnifier to add additional strokes where needed. In addition, M has used the OCR portion of the desktop video magnifier to read her mail. She has also used the OCR to read her autobiography. She was thrilled to listen to a different voice other than her own read it to her. M experienced high blood pressure which must be monitored daily. Her self-purchased blood pressure device stopped working. She was provided with a talking blood pressure device. M had it calibrated with her doctor’s equipment and stated that it is more accurate than her old one. She was pleased that she was able to take her blood pressure independently without assistance from any one. M started experiencing ill effects from taking two medications which were not supposed to be taken together. She did not know this because she could not read her prescription labels. With the assistance of the vision rehabilitation therapist and some research with her pharmacy, she was provided a talking prescription label reader. This device read all the information on the prescription label including the warnings. She was excited about how easy this device was to use and the important information she was able to obtain. Previously M relied on her daughter to assist with filling her medications. She was provided with a contrast tray and pill containers so she could independently set up her medications on a weekly basis. M had enjoyed cooking. She was provided some adaptive aids that would benefit her in the kitchen. The devices that she liked the most were the contrast cutting board and the vegetable chopper. However, she stated the EZ Fill was the one she uses most often, on a daily basis. M missed getting out since she gave up driving. She was encouraged to inquire about taxi coupons and to participate in the low vision support group in her area. Since she obtained the taxi coupons, M has attended the support group every Monday. This has provided a new social outlet for her which enabled her to make new friends and share stories from her life to encourage others. M was so grateful for the services she received from Arizona Rehabilitation Service Administration Independent Living Blind office that she wanted to give back. She picked one of her paintings, framed it and donated it to the Independent Living Blind office as her way of expressing her appreciation. Anna Miller LS is a seventy-five-year-old woman who currently resides with her husband. She is legally blind due to Stargardt’s disease and had experienced a significant change in her vision within the last few years. LS indicated she was experiencing difficulty in completing numerous activities of daily living due to her vision loss. She reported she had difficulty with handwriting, dialing the phone and tracking phone numbers and addresses, telling time and keeping track of her appointments. She experienced challenges in basic food preparation activities such as measuring wet and dry ingredients, identifying food package contents, and adjusting appliances to desired settings. Furthermore, LS also indicated she was having difficulty with threading needles and organizing sewing materials. Finally, LS stated she had difficulty completing banking activities such as writing checks and tracking finances. Her biggest frustration was her inability to read her mail and religious materials. She was provided adaptive handwriting templates, shown methods for dialing and tactually marking buttons on the phone and provided a large print address book to track contact information. She was provided a talking clock and watch. Plus a large print wall calendar to manage appointments. She was provided training in the use of large print measuring cups and spoons, using adaptive and common house hold products to label a variety of appliances, and in the use of large print labels and the use of her other senses to identify food packaging contents. She was provided instruction in the use of an adaptive needle threader and in the use of trays and other materials to organize supplies when completing projects.LS was provided a plastic check writing template, a talking calculator, a large print check register, and bank by phone services. She was instructed how to identify paper money and coins. LS could not perform sustained reading. She was provided a desktop video magnifier with optical character recognition which would read documents and other material to her. She also applied for the National Library Service Talking books. As a result of the blind rehabilitation services LS received, she reported she felt more confident, and she had the ability to manage her life “no matter what comes my way”. While she initially reported the daily activities she enjoys, LS stated the training she has received from the Arizona Rehabilitation Services Administration, Independent Living Blind office have also enhanced her experience of them. LS reported she now uses her text to speech desktop video magnifier to review her daily religious materials before going to church, and the talking scale she received has enabled her to continue to track her progress at the gym. At the end of her instruction, LS reported the organizational and adaptive techniques she received to manage sewing projects inspired her to engage in other crafting activities such as making cards that she had thought would never be possible again. Vasant Garcia P is a 71 year old woman with macular degeneration. Her original goal was to be able to read her mail independently. At first P did not think she needed much help because she lived with family members who took care of her. However, they took full time jobs so P had to prepare her meals while they worked. She really wanted to be able to cook chicken for herself. She was provided a tactile dial electric skillet and double spatula for this purpose. She was so excited after her initial lesson she fried chicken four more times that week. In addition to receiving a knife with guide and vegetable chopper, P learned adaptive techniques for cutting and chopping so she could also make a salad. She was also provided with a talking clock and talking watch. Her main goal of reading her mail independently was addressed with the provision of two magnifiers, a 4X handheld magnifier and a 5X stand magnifier. She used the 4X magnifier for checking Facebook on her tablet and reading the thermostat. She used the 5X stand magnifier for more intensive reading such as her mail, cooking directions on food packages and some of her old books. She was also able to organize her medications using her magnifiers. To make reading more comfortable and assist with using writing templates to address envelopes and write checks, P was provided a lap desk. P was quite pleased with the blind rehabilitation services she received. She was quite pleasantly surprised with all the devices and adaptive techniques that were available for her. She is excited to know there are more devices she could utilize in the future should she need them. Southern Arizona Association for the Visually Impaired (contracted vendor) DH, fifty-six years of age has been losing his vision from glaucoma and cataracts. He does not have any vision in his right eye due to a detached retina. DH stated the following regarding his life before receiving blind rehabilitation services. “It was dark, rock bottom and I felt hopeless because I couldn’t do certain things that I always could do and needed to do. When you are an adult and living alone, you take for granted what you have to do. I had a hard time adjusting and it messed with my mind. Now I know how to keep my life in order both physically and mentally. I would have been a lost cause if I had kept going on by myself. I couldn’t figure out how to do it, but with blind rehabilitation services I learned new things and it saved my life.” During blind rehabilitation services, DH received and was trained on the following devices: portable video magnifier, digital voice recorder and book player, electric grill, crock pot, talking microwave, heat resistant gloves, double spatula, contrast cutting board, talking timer, adaptive measuring cups and spoons, trays, pair of tints, task lamp, talking calendar, bold line paper, set of writing templates, bold writing pen and assorted tactile marking dots. After receiving blind rehabilitation services DH stated, “Right now I’m not depending on my sister to do my laundry and to take me places like the store. I used to have to rely on her to do everything. I feel more comfortable going out and going places, taking care of my bills and responsibilities. I wanted to be able to take care of myself and get my independence back.” He also stated, “My life was a loss of independence and now it’s not. Every day is a new lesson for me as my vision isn’t going to get any better, but I am stronger than I was, because of what I learned” Southern Arizona Association for the visually Impaired (contracted vendor) BC, eighty-six years old, is legally blind due to age related macular degeneration. She stated that she was a very independent person and the vision loss made her feel quite vulnerable. After receiving blind rehabilitation services, BC stated she regained the ability to read again. She received a desktop video magnifier with which she is able to read her mail and other printed material. Reading has always been something BC like to do, something she wasn’t able to do before and now she can read independently. She learned multiple marking systems for household appliances, medications, and other items that she needed to identify. In order to mark items, various sized and textured bump dots and High Marks were used. Although she did not do much cooking before blind rehabilitation services, with her oven tactilely marked, she has resumed some baking again. BC has been quite pleased with the blind rehabilitation services she received. In one word she stated they were “Great!” She stated she would be telling everyone about the benefit of blind rehabilitation services. Arizona Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired (contracted vendor) GH, a 61 year old female, lost her vision due to receiving too high a dosage of a prescription drug for arthritis. It affected her vision in a way that is similar to macular degeneration. GH could no longer do daily living tasks which she had been able to do all her life and took for granted. This was a serious blow to her level of confidence. She was unaware of the available programs and services that could help her resume her independence. She elected to join an Orientation and Adjustment to Blindness support group where she learned much about living successfully with vision loss. Because she was afraid to go outside of her home on her own, she also participated in Orientation and Mobility training with a white cane so she could resume independent travel. GH had severe anxiety about leaving her home, but she faithfully attended and participated in her group sessions and in her mobility lessons. She said that she has become like her old self before her vision loss. She has been quick to encourage others and to share her own successes. With the restored confidence, she has been much happier and more hopeful about her future. Arizona Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired (contracted vendor) NT is a 60 year old female who has had low vision from Glaucoma for most of her life. She lived alone and independently with the low vision until recently. Within the past year, NT began to experience a rapid loss in her remaining vision. The result was that she was no longer able to read any print and it was very difficult for her to recognize anything visually. This caused much fear and anxiety for NT. She said that she had lost all confidence in herself and her ability to continue living on her own. NT decided to join an Orientation to Blindness groups and to receive instruction in Orientation and Mobility. She knew that other people who are blind have learned to enjoy the ability to live on their own and she wanted the same thing for herself. Since she started with the Orientation to Blindness group, NT said she has learned how to be more confident in herself. She felt as though she has learned how to access her personal strengths which helped her to cope with the emotional anxiety associated with her vision loss. The Orientation and Mobility training has been very helpful for NT. In addition to a white cane, NT must also rely upon a walker due to orthopedic issues. NT learned how to use some GPS technology available through an electronic device that gives her information about her surroundings and how to navigate to her destination. She learned how to safely cross streets and navigate in various types of environmental conditions. NT said she has a lot more self-confidence and is looking forward to opportunities to be with other people instead of being withdrawn and remaining by herself in her apartment. She has eagerly shared her success and experiences as encouragement to have others in the process of learning how to adjust to their own vision loss. Hector Capado (contracted vendor) WS, a76 year old male living in a predominantly urban area, developed glaucoma nearly two decades ago. At the time of assessment, he described himself as nearly totally blind with about a 2-3-degree residual field of view in the periphery of both eyes. He also had photophobia. His remaining vision was almost impossible for him to use for spotting and travel purposes.WS identified his primary goal as having the ability to become an independent traveler anywhere within his immediate residential area, including picking up his mail at the mail box and walking his 1.5-mile circuit which he used to do as a form of exercise. Secondly, he wanted to be able to travel independently within his church environment and within indoor shopping center which he and his spouse frequented. WS had become sedentary, he stated he was watching too much TV and was totally dependent on his wife. WS learned to use the long cane and various cane skills plus the layout of his immediate residential area. However his learning went much farther than that, it expanded into nearby light business environment to include negotiating traffic light intersections. He was also provided with Cocoon medium gray slim line sunglasses to alleviate his overwhelming glare issues when outdoors. He learned to safely negotiate street crossings and the 1.5-mile circuit he wanted so badly to be able to negotiate again. He learned the circuit, walking clockwise and counterclockwise, learning about specific danger points and when to increase his walking speed safely; his independent goal was to do the walk 2 to 3 times a week. WS also learned the whole layout of his church including being able to independently enter it, find a proper pew and seat, get up, be able to move forward and participate in the “offering” and relocate his seat. Lastly, he was able to exit the church on his own. WS was familiarized to key anchor stores at the “Promenade” shopping center whereby he could also independently travel to the men’s areas and do his own shopping while his spouse did hers. WS S felt a great deal of satisfaction and independence after accomplishing all these goals and wished he had learned about cane travel skills much earlier. Tamara Bishop-Amavilah (contracted vendor) Eighty year old, LW was diagnosed with glaucoma. She had light perception and occasionally could see an object in her very small tunnel of vision. Her vision has continued to worsen. During her orientation and mobility training, her husband passed away, leaving her to live alone. She wanted to learn to get around her trailer park community independently. This included learning to walk around her block for exercise, to the community mailboxes, to the club house, and to two friends' houses. She had a great attitude, and really worked hard. She learned to use a cane and learned all the routes, including crossing residential streets in the community. Using a tactual map of her community helped her develop a good mental map of the routes. LW stated she is much more independent now and able to continue living on her own, which she wants to do as long as she can. She was very happy with the training. Venu Vangueety (contracted vendor) LL is totally blind as a result of a gunshot wound. She wanted to be able to use her iPhone and computer efficiently. On her I phone she learned voiceover navigation, Siri commands and an OCR app to read printed documents. She was able to use her phone more easily, send and receive texts and emails. This has helped her to feel better connected with the outside world. With the Guide software for her computer, LL was able to learn to surf the internet and listen to news stories. After training LL stated she is more confident and not afraid of technology, this has helped her to feel more independent. Georgeanne Hanna Living alone, eighty two year old AK has been legally blind from glaucoma, corneal edema & central retinal vein occlusion. She had difficulty reading, writing, cooking, doing laundry and walking safely. A low vision evaluation was conducted. She was provided a desktop video magnifier for reading and writing and taking care of banking and bills. She also received adaptive writing guides, bold line paper and bold pen with training in writing skills. Her kitchen and laundry appliances were tactually marked for accessibility. A support cane with training was provided for use in walking in her immediate home environment. She was most grateful for the desktop video magnifier so she could read again.

E. Finally, note any problematic areas or concerns related to implementing the Title VII-Chapter 2 program in your state.

During this reporting period, AZRSA continues having several staff vacancies and also half of the individual contractors were lost due to the high cost of insurance requested by the state. Arizona continues to struggle to fill vacancies due to the state salary range. This two issues contributed to the increase in the number of people waiting for services. Also when conducting an audit of cases open for more than 2 years, it was found that approximately 200 cases were inactive for 2 years or more and were reported as active in the previous annual reports. Our current number of open cases truly reflects active cases and AZRSA will continue monitoring cases so inactive cases will not ever be an issue.

Part IX: Signature

Please sign and print the name, title and telephone number of the IL-OIB Program Director below.

I certify that the data herein reported are statistically accurate to the best of my knowledge.

Signed byKristen Mackey
TitleRSA Administrator
Telephone602-364-2907
Date signed12/27/2016