Annual Report - Independent Living Services For Older Individuals Who Are Blind

RSA-7-OB for Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - H177B150049 report through September 30, 2015

Instructions

Introduction

The revised ED RSA-7-OB form incorporates revisions to the four established performance measures for the Independent Living Services for Older Individuals who are Blind (IL-OIB) program. Added in 2007, these measures aim to better reflect the program’s impact on individual consumers and the community.

Added to capture information that may be required to meet GPRA guidelines, the performance measures can be found under Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures as follows:

Measure 1.1

Of individuals who received AT (assistive technology) services and training, the percentage who regained or improved functional abilities previously lost as a result of vision loss.

Measure 1.2

Of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services, the percentage who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their home and/or community environment.

Measure 1.3

Of individuals who received services or training in alternative non-visual or low vision techniques, the percentage that experienced functional gains or were able to successfully restore and maintain their functional ability to engage in their customary life activities within their home environment and community.

Measure 1.4

Of the total individuals served, the percentage that reported that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services.

Revisions to these established program performance measures consists of the following additional five items:

E1. Enter the Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only)

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (closed/inactive cases only)

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (closed/inactive cases only)

E4. Enter the number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only)

E5. Enter the number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only)

Submittal Instructions

OIB grantees are expected to complete and submit the 7-OB Report online through RSA’s website (https://rsa.ed.gov), unless RSA is notified of pertinent circumstances that may impede the online submission.

To register with RSA’s MIS, please go to https://rsa.ed.gov and click on Info for new users. The link provides instructions for obtaining an agency-specific username and password. Further instructions for completing and submitting the 7-OB Report online will be provided upon completion of the registration process.

OIB grantees submitting the 7-OB Report online are not required to mail signed copies of the 7-OB Report to RSA, but they must certify in the MIS that the signed and dated 7-OB Report and lobbying certification forms are retained on file.

The Report submittal deadline is no later than December 31 of the reporting year.

Part I: Funding Sources for Expenditures And Encumbrances — Instructions

Please note: Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services in Part I (C) must equal the total funds spent on service in Part IV. Part I C must equal the sum of Part IV A1+B1+C1+D1.

A. Funding SourceS for Expenditures and encumbrances in reported fy

A1. Enter the total amount of Title VII-Chapter 2 funds expended or encumbered during the reported FY. Include expenditures or encumbrances made from both carryover funds from the previous FY and from the reported FY grant funds.

A2. Enter the total of any other federal funds expended or encumbered in the Title VII-Chapter 2 program during the reported FY. Designate the funding sources and amounts in (a) through (e).

A3. Enter the total amount of state funds expended or encumbered in the Title VII - Chapter 2 program. Do not include in-kind contributions (e.g., documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space, or land).

A4. Enter the total amount of third party contributions including local and community funding, non-profit or for-profit agency funding, etc. Do not include in-kind contributions (e.g., documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space, or land).

A5. Enter the total amount of in-kind contributions from non-federal sources. Include value of property or services that benefit the Title VII-Chapter 2 program (e.g. the fairly evaluated documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space or land).

A6. Enter the total matching funds (A3 + A4 + A5). Reminder: The required non-federal match for the Title VII-Chapter 2 program is not less than $1 for each $9 of federal funds provided in the Title VII-Chapter 2 grant. Funds derived from or provided by the federal government, or services assisted or subsidized to any significant extent by the federal government, may not be included in determining the amount of non-federal contributions.

A7. Enter the total amount of all funds expended and encumbered (A1 + A2 + A6) during the reported fiscal year.

B. Total expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs

Enter the total amount of expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs. Do not include costs for direct services provided by agency staff or the costs of contract or sub-grantee staff that provide direct services under contracts or sub-grants. If an administrator spends a portion of his or her time providing administrative services and the remainder providing direct services, include only the expenditures for administrative services.

C. Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services

Enter the total amount of expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services by subtracting line B from line A7.

Part II: Staffing — Instructions

Base all FTE calculations upon a full-time 40-hour workweek or 2080 hours per year. Record all FTE assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program irrespective of whether salary is paid with Title VII-Chapter 2 funds.

A. Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Program Staff

A1. Under the “Administrative & Support” column (A1a), enter the full-time equivalent (FTE) of all administrative and support staff (e.g. management, program directors, supervisors, readers, drivers for staff, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from the State agency. (For example, if 20% or 8 hours per week of a staff person’s time were spent on administrative and support functions related to this program, the FTE for that staff person would be .2). Under the “Direct Services” column (A1b), enter the FTE of all direct service staff (e.g. rehabilitation teacher, IL specialist, orientation and mobility specialist, social worker, drivers for individuals receiving services, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from the State agency. If administrative or support staff of the State agency also provide direct services, report the FTE devoted to direct services in the “Direct Services” column (A1b). (For example, if 80% of a staff person’s time were spent in providing direct services, the FTE for that person would be 8). Finally, add across the “Administrative & Support” FTE (A1a) and “Direct Service” FTE (A1b) to enter the total State agency FTE in the TOTAL (A1c) column.

A2. Under the “Administrative & Support” column (A2a), enter the full-time equivalent (FTE) of all administrative and support staff (e.g. management, program directors, supervisors, readers, drivers for staff, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from contractors or sub-grantees. Under the “Direct Services” column (A2b), enter the FTE of all direct service staff (e.g. rehabilitation teacher, IL specialist, orientation and mobility specialist, social worker, driver for individuals receiving services, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from contractors and sub-grantees. If administrative staff of the contractors or sub-grantees also provides direct services, report the FTE devoted to direct services in the “Direct Services” column (A2b). Finally, add across the “Administrative & Support” FTE (A2a) and “Direct Service” FTE (A2b) to enter the total contractor or sub-grantee FTE in the TOTAL (A2c) column.

A3. Add each column for A1 and A2 and record totals on line A3.

B. Employed or advanced in employment

B1. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) with disabilities (include blind and visually impaired not 55 or older), including blindness or visual impairment, in B1a. Enter the FTE of employees with disabilities in B1b. (To calculate B1b, add the total number of hours worked by all employees with disabilities and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B2. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 and older in B2a. Enter the FTE of employees who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 or older in B2b. (To calculate B2b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 and older and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B3. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are members of racial/ethnic minorities in B3a. Enter the FTE of employees who are members of racial/ethnic minorities in B3b. (To calculate B3b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are members of racial/ethnic minorities and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B4. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are women in B4a. Enter the FTE of employees who are women in B4b. (To calculate B4b, add the total number of hours worked by women and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B5. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, in B5a. Enter the FTE of employees who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, in B5b. (To calculate B5b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

C. Volunteers

C1. Enter the FTE of program volunteers in C1. (To calculate C1, add the total number of hours worked by all program volunteers and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE).

Part III: Data on Individuals Served — Instructions

Provide data in all categories on program participants who received one or more services during the fiscal year being reported.

A. Individuals Served

A1. Enter the number of program participants carried over from the previous federal fiscal year who received services in this reported FY (e.g. someone received services in September (or any other month) of the previous FY and continued to receive additional services in the reported FY).

A2. Enter the number of program participants who began receiving services during the reported fiscal year irrespective of whether they have completed all services.

A3. Enter the total number served during the reported fiscal year (A1 + A2).

B. Age

B1-B10. Enter the total number of program participants served in each respective age category.

B11. Enter the sum of B1 through B10. This must agree with A3.

C. Gender

C1. Enter the total number of females receiving services.

C2. Enter the total number of males receiving services.

C3. Enter the sum of C1 and C2. This must agree with A3.

D. Race/Ethnicity

Hispanic or Latino means a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

D1. Enter the number of individuals served who are Hispanic/Latino of any race or Hispanic/Latino only. Hispanic/Latino means a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

D2. Enter the number of individuals served who are American Indian or Alaska Native. American Indian or Alaska Native means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.

D3. Enter the number of individuals served who are Asian. Asian means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.

D4. Enter the number of individuals served who are Black or African American. Black or African American means a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as “Haitian” may be used.

D5. Enter the number of individuals served who are Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.

D6. Enter the number of individuals served who are White or Caucasian. White means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

D7. Enter the number of individuals served who report two or more races but who are not Hispanic/Latino of any race.

D8. Enter “race and ethnicity unknown” only if the consumer refuses to identify race and ethnicity.

D9. Enter the total of D1 through D8. This number must agree with A3.

E. Degree of Visual Impairment

E1. Enter the number of individuals served who are totally blind (e.g. have light perception only or no light perception).

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who are legally blind (excluding those recorded in E1).

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who have severe visual impairment.

E4. Add E1 + E2 + E3 and enter the total. This number must agree with A3.

F. Major Cause of Visual Impairment

(Please note that the primary site for the definitions of diseases is http://www.nia.nih.gov/AboutNIA/StrategicPlan/ResearchGoalA/Subgoal1.htm.)

Enter only one major cause of visual impairment for each individual served.

F1. Enter the number of individuals served who have macular degeneration as the major cause of visual impairment. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive disease of the retina wherein the light-sensing cells in the central area of vision (the macula) stop working and eventually die. The cause of the disease is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and

It is most common in people who are age 60 and over. AMD is the leading cause of legal blindness in senior citizens.

F2. Enter the number of individuals served who have diabetic retinopathy as the major cause of visual impairment. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new cases of legal blindness among working-age Americans and is caused by damage to the small blood vessels in the retina. It is believed that poorly controlled blood sugar levels are related to its progression. Most persons with diabetes have non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or what is commonly called “adult-onset” or Type II diabetes, and control their blood sugar with oral medications or diet alone. Others have insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), also called "younger or juvenile-onset" or Type I diabetes, and must use insulin injections daily to regulate their blood sugar levels.

F3. Enter the number of individuals served who have glaucoma as the major cause of visual impairment. Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases causing optic nerve damage that involves mechanical compression or decreased blood flow. It is permanent and is a leading cause of blindness in the world, especially in older people.

F4. Enter the number of individuals served who have cataracts as the major cause of visual impairment. A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens of the eye resulting in blurred vision, sensitivity to light and glare, distortion, and dimming of colors. Cataracts are usually a natural aging process in the eye (although they may be congenital) and may be caused or accelerated by other diseases such as glaucoma and diabetes.

F5. Enter the number of individuals served who have any other major cause of visual impairment.

F6. Enter the sum of F1 through F5. This number must agree with A3.

G. Other Age-Related Impairments

Enter the total number of individuals served in each category. Individuals may report one or more non-visual impairments/conditions. The National Institute on Aging (NIA) Strategic Plan identifies age-related diseases, disorders, and disability including the following categories.

G1. Hearing Impairment: Presbycusis is the gradual hearing loss that occurs with aging. An estimated one-third of Americans over 60 and one-half of those over 85 have some degree of hearing loss. Hearing impairment occurs when there is a problem with or damage to one or more parts of the ear, and may be a conductive hearing loss (outer or middle ear) or a sensorineural hearing loss (inner ear) or a combination. The degree of hearing impairment can vary widely from person to person. Some people have partial hearing loss, meaning that the

Ear can pick up some sounds; others have complete hearing loss, meaning that the ear cannot hear at all. One or both ears may be affected, and the impairment may be worse in one ear than in the other.

G2. Diabetes: Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Type 2 diabetes, which results from insulin resistance and abnormal insulin action, is most prevalent in the older population. Diabetes complications, such as heart disease and loss of sight, increase dramatically when blood sugar is poorly controlled and often develop before diabetes is diagnosed.

G3. Cardiovascular Disease and Strokes: Diseases of the heart and blood vessels are the leading cause of hospitalization and death in older Americans. Congestive heart failure is the most common diagnosis in hospitalized patients aged 65 and older.

G4. Cancer: The second leading cause of death among the elderly is cancer, with individuals age 65 and over accounting for 70 percent of cancer mortality in the United States. Breast, prostate, and colon cancers, are common in older people.

G5. Bone, Muscle, Skin, Joint, and Movement Disorders: Osteoporosis (loss of mass and quality of bones), osteoarthritis (inflammation and deterioration of joints), and sarcopenia (age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength) contribute to frailty and injury in millions of older people. Also contributing to loss of mobility and independence are changes in the central nervous system that control movement. Cells may die or become dysfunctional with age, as in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, older people may have difficulty with gross motor behavior, such as moving around in the environment, or with fine motor skills, such as writing.

G6. Alzheimer’s Disease/Cognitive Impairment: Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia (a brain disorder that significantly affects an individual’s ability to carry out daily life activities) in older people. It and other cognitive impairments impact parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language.

G7. Depression is widespread, often undiagnosed, and often under-treated in the elderly. It is believed to affect more than 6.5 million of the 35 million Americans who are 65 or older. Depression is closely associated with dependency and disability. Symptoms may include: loss of interest in normally pleasurable activities, persistent, vague or unexplained somatic complaints, memory complaints, change in weight, sleeping disorder, irritability or demanding behavior, lack of attention to personal care, difficulty with concentration, social withdrawal, change in appetite, confusion, delusions or hallucinations, feeling of worthlessness or hopelessness, and thought about suicide.

G8. Other Major Geriatric Concerns: Several conditions can compromise independence and quality of life in older persons including weakness and falls, urinary incontinence, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and co morbidity (co morbidity describes the effect of all other diseases an individual might have on the primary disease).

H. Type of Residence

H1. Enter the number of individuals served who live in private residence (house or apartment unrelated to senior living).

H2. Enter the number of Individuals served who live in senior living/retirement community (e.g. housing designed for those age 55 and older).

H3. Enter the number of individuals served who live in assisted living facility (e.g. housing that provides personal care and services which meet needs beyond basic provision of food, shelter and laundry).

H4. Enter the number of individuals served who live in nursing homes/long-term care facility (e.g. any facility that provides care to one or more persons who require nursing care and related medical services of such complexity to require professional nursing care under the direction of a physician on a 24 hour a day basis).

H5. Enter the number of individuals served who are homeless

H6. Enter the sum of H1, H2, H3, H4 and H5. This number must agree with A3.

I. Source of Referral

I1. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an ophthalmologist or optometrist.

I2. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a medical provider other than an ophthalmologist or optometrist.

I3. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a state vocational rehabilitation agency.

I4. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a government or social services agency defined as a public or private agency which provides assistance to consumers related to eligibility and securing entitlements and benefits, counseling, elder law services, assistance with housing, etc.

I5. Enter the number of individuals served referred by the Veterans Administration

I6. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a senior program defined as a community-based educational, recreational, or socialization program operated by a senior center, nutrition site, or senior club.

I7. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an assisted living facility defined as housing that provides personal care and services which meet needs beyond basic provision of food, shelter and laundry.

I8. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a nursing home/long-term care facility defined as any facility that provides care to one or more persons who require nursing care and related medical services of such complexity to require professional nursing care under the direction of a physician on a 24 hour a day basis.

I9. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a faith-based (religious affiliated) organization.

I10. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an independent living center (ILC) defined as a consumer-controlled, community-based, cross-disability, nonresidential private nonprofit agency that is designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities, and provides an array of independent living services.

I11. Enter the number of individuals referred by a family member or friend.

I12. Enter the number of individuals who were self-referred.

I13. Enter the number of individuals referred from all other sources aside from those listed above.

I14. Enter the sum of I1, I2, I3, I4, I5, I6, I7, I8, I9, I10, I11, I12, and I13. This number must agree with A3

Part IV: Types of Services Provided and Resources Allocated — Instructions

Please note: Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services in Part I C must equal the total funds spent on services in Part IV. Part I C must equal the sum of Part IV A1+B1+C1+D1.

In addition, salary or costs associated with direct service staff or contractors providing

direct services should be included in the cost of services provided in A, B, C, and D.

A. Clinical / Functional Vision Assessments and Services

A1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (A1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (A1b) for clinical and/or functional vision assessments and services, whether purchased or provided directly.

A2. Enter the total number of program participants who received clinical vision screening or vision examinations from qualified or certified professionals such as ophthalmologists or optometrists, and who received functional vision assessments or low vision evaluations to identify strategies for enhancing visual performance both without and with optical and low vision devices and equipment. Assessment areas may include functional visual acuity and fields, efficiency of vision in the performance of everyday tasks, and evaluation for low vision aids or equipment. These assessments are typically provided by skilled professionals or those who are certified or have a master’s degree in low vision rehabilitation. Do not include evaluations for orientation and mobility. These should be included in C3.

A3. Enter the total number of program participants who received surgical or therapeutic treatment to prevent, correct, or modify disabling eye conditions; and, hospitalizations related to such services. Include prescription optics in this service category. Nonprescription optics should be reported in B2.

B. Assistive Technology Devices, Aids, Services and Training

B1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (B1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (B1b) for the provision of assistive technology devices, aids, services and training.

B2. Enter the total number of program participants who received one or more assistive technology devices and aids. As defined in Section 3(4) of the Assistive Technology Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-364), “assistive technology device means any item, piece of equipment, or product system whether acquired commercially, modified, or customized that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.” Assistive technology devices may include such items as canes, slates, insulin gauges, CCTVs, computers, adaptive software, magnifiers, adaptive cooking items, adaptive recreational items, handwriting guides, Braillers, large button telephones, etc.

B3. Enter the total number of program participants who received one or more assistive technology services and training. As defined in Section 3(5) of the Assistive Technology Act of 2004 (PL 108-364), “assistive technology service means any service that directly assists an individual with a disability in the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device.” Services may include the evaluation of assistive technology needs of an individual, services related to acquisition of technology, costs of loan programs, maintenance and repair of assistive technology, training or technical assistance for the individual or professionals related to the use of assistive technology, programs to expand the availability of assistive technology, low vision therapy services related to the use of optical aids and devices, and other services related to the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device.

C. Independent Living and Adjustment Training and Services

C1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (C1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (C1b) for the provision of services and adjustment training leading to independent living. Evaluation and assessment services (excluding those included in A2 or B3) leading to the planning and implementation of services and training should be included in these costs.

C2. Enter the total number of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services or travel training (i.e. learning to access public or private transportation and to travel safely and as independently as possible in the home and community with or without the use of mobility aids and devices).

C3. Enter the total number of individuals who received communication skills training (e.g. reading and writing Braille, keyboarding and computer literacy, computer skills training, using the telephone, handwriting guides, telling time, using readers, use of audio and tactile technologies for home, recreational or educational use; etc.). Training in the use of newspaper reading services and radio services should be included.

C4. Enter the total number of individuals who received personal management and daily living skills training (e.g. training in the use of adaptive aids and assistive technology devices for personal management and daily living, blindness and low vision alternative techniques for food preparation, grooming and dress, household chores, medical management, shopping, recreational activities, etc.)

C5. Enter the total number of individuals who received supportive services (e.g. reader services, transportation, personal attendant services, support service providers, interpreters, etc.) while actively participating in the program or attaining independent living goals.

C6. Enter the total number of program participants who participated in advocacy training or support network activities such as consumer organization meetings, peer support groups, etc.

C7. Enter the total number of individuals who received counseling (peer, individual or group) to assist them in adjusting to visual impairment and blindness.

C8. Enter the total number of program participants that received information and referral to other service providers, programs, and agencies (e.g. senior programs, public and private social service programs, faith-based organizations, consumer groups, etc.) to enhance adjustment, independent living, and integration into the community. Do not include individuals who received only information and referral and for whom no other services were provided.

C9. Enter the total number of individuals served who were provided any other service not listed above.

D. Community Awareness Activities / Information and Referral

D1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (D1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (D1b) for providing information and referral services and community awareness activities/events to individuals for whom this was the only service provided (i.e. training for other professionals, telephone inquiries, general inquiries, etc.).

D2. Enter the number of individuals receiving information and referral services for whom this is the only service provided. (optional)

D3. Enter the number of community awareness events/activities in which the Chapter 2 program participated during the reported year (D3a) and the number or estimated number of individuals who benefited from these activities (D3b).

Part V: Comparison of Prior Year Activities to Current Reported Year — Instructions

A1. Program Expenditures and Encumbrances (all sources) Enter the total cost of the program for the prior fiscal year (A1a), and the fiscal year being reported (A1b). The total cost of the program can be found in Part I A7. Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the reported year (A1c).

A2. Number of Individuals Served Enter the total number of eligible individuals served in the prior year (A2a), and in the current reported year (A2b). The total number of individuals served can be found in Part III A3. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the numbers served from the prior year to the reported year (A2c).

A3. Number of Minority Individuals Served Enter the total number of minority individuals served in the prior year (A3a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A3b). The total number of minority individuals served is the total of Part III D1+D2+D3+D4+D5 +D7. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the numbers served from the prior year to the reported year (A3c).

A4. Number of Community Awareness Activities Enter the number of community awareness activities or events in which the Chapter 2 program participated during the prior year (A4a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A4b). The number of community awareness activities is found in Part IV D3a. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the number of events from the prior year to the year being reported (A4c).

A5. Number of Collaborating Agencies and Organizations Enter the number of collaborating organizations or agencies (formal agreements or informal activity) other than Chapter 2 paid sub-grantees or contractors in the prior year (A5a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A5b). Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the year being reported (A5c).

A6. Number of Sub-grantees/Contractors If you provide services through sub-grantee agencies or contract, enter the number of sub-grantees or contracts in the prior year (A6a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A6b). Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the year being reported (A6c). If you do not use sub-grantees, enter 0 in A6a, A6b, and A6c.

Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures — Instructions

A. Enter the number from Part IV B3 in A1. From available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training who maintained or improved functional abilities that were previously lost or diminished as a result of vision loss in A2. (closed/inactive cases only).

In A3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

B. Enter the number from Part IV C2 in B1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving orientation and mobility (O & M) services, enter the number of individuals who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their residence and/or community environment as a result of services in B2 (closed/inactive cases only).

In B3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

C. Enter the number from Part IV C3 in C1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving communication skills training, enter the number of individuals who gained or maintained their functional abilities as a result of services they received in C2 (Closed/inactive cases only).

In C3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

D. Enter the number from Part IV C4 in D1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving daily living skills training, enter the number of individuals that experienced functional gains or successfully restored or maintained their functional ability to engage in their customary daily life activities as a result of services or training in personal management and daily living skills In D2 (Closed/inactive cases only).

In D3, enter the Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

E1. Enter the Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E4. Enter the number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss (Closed/inactive cases only). “Change in lifestyle” is defined as any non-vision related event that results in the consumer’s reduced independence, such as moving from a private residence (house or apartment) to another type of residence e.g. living with family, senior living community, assisted living facility, nursing home/long-term facility, etc. Reduced independence could also result in employing a caregiver to enable the consumer continue to live in his/her home. Examples of events that could result in reduced independence of the consumer include loss of spouse and onset or worsening of other health conditions such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, etc.

E5. Enter the number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

Part VII: Training and Technical Assistance — Instructions

On July 22, 2014, Public Law 113-128, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) was enacted and included a new requirement under Section 751A that the RSA Commissioner shall conduct a survey of designated State agencies that receive grants under section 752 regarding training and technical assistance needs in order to determine funding priorities for such training and technical assistance. Please enter a brief description of training and technical assistance needs that you may have to assist in the implementation and improvement of the performance of your Independent Living Services for Older Individuals Who Are Blind grant (for example, financial management, reporting requirements on the 7-OB, program management, data analysis and program performance, law and applicable regulations, provision of services and service delivery, promising practices, resources and information, outreach, etc.).

Part VIII: Narrative — Instructions

Self-explanatory.

Part IX: Signature Instructions

Please sign and print the name, title and telephone number of the IL-OIB Program Director.

Part I: Funding Sources And Expenditures

Title VII-Chapter 2 Federal grant award for reported fiscal year580,534
Other federal grant award for reported fiscal year0
Title VII-Chapter 2 carryover from previous year0
Other federal grant carryover from previous year0
A. Funding Sources for Expenditures in Reported FY
A1. Title VII-Chapter 2580,534
A2. Total other federal0
(a) Title VII-Chapter 1-Part B0
(b) SSA reimbursement0
(c) Title XX - Social Security Act0
(d) Older Americans Act0
(e) Other0
A3. State (excluding in-kind)64,504
A4. Third party0
A5. In-kind0
A6. Total Matching Funds64,504
A7. Total All Funds Expended645,038
B. Total expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs144,830
C. Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services500,208

Part II: Staffing

FTE (full time equivalent) is based upon a 40-hour workweek or 2080 hours per year.

A. Full-time Equivalent (FTE)

Program Staff a) Administrative and Support b) Direct Service c) Total
1. FTE State Agency 1.1600 14.3400 15.5000
2. FTE Contractors 0.0000 2.3000 2.3000
3. Total FTE 1.1600 16.6400 17.8000

B. Employed or advanced in employment

a) Number employed b) FTE
1. Employees with Disabilities 4 2.0000
2. Employees with Blindness Age 55 and Older 2 2.0000
3. Employees who are Racial/Ethnic Minorities 2 2.0000
4. Employees who are Women 11 7.0000
5. Employees Age 55 and Older 4 4.0000

C. Volunteers

0.00

Part III: Data on Individuals Served

Provide data in each of the categories below related to the number of individuals for whom one or more services were provided during the reported fiscal year.

A. Individuals Served

1. Number of individuals who began receiving services in the previous FY and continued to receive services in the reported FY341
2. Number of individuals who began receiving services in the reported FY782
3. Total individuals served during the reported fiscal year (A1 + A2) 1,123

B. Age

1. 55-5955
2. 60-6459
3. 65-6993
4. 70-7477
5. 75-79123
6. 80-84163
7. 85-89270
8. 90-94198
9. 95-9969
10. 100 & over16
11. Total (must agree with A3)1,123

C. Gender

1. Female810
2. Male313
3. Total (must agree with A3)1,123

D. Race/Ethnicity

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race10
2. American Indian or Alaska Native15
3. Asian1
4. Black or African American21
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander1
6. White1,072
7. Two or more races3
8. Race and ethnicity unknown (only if consumer refuses to identify)0
9. Total (must agree with A3)1,123

E. Degree of Visual Impairment

1. Totally Blind (LP only or NLP)67
2. Legally Blind (excluding totally blind)412
3. Severe Visual Impairment644
4. Total (must agree with A3)1,123

F. Major Cause of Visual Impairment

1. Macular Degeneration676
2. Diabetic Retinopathy83
3. Glaucoma113
4. Cataracts29
5. Other222
6. Total (must agree with A3)1,123

G. Other Age-Related Impairments

1. Hearing Impairment166
2. Diabetes190
3. Cardiovascular Disease and Strokes309
4. Cancer47
5. Bone, Muscle, Skin, Joint, and Movement Disorders273
6. Alzheimer's Disease/Cognitive Impairment59
7. Depression/Mood Disorder39
8. Other Major Geriatric Concerns212

H. Type of Residence

1. Private residence (house or apartment)862
2. Senior Living/Retirement Community100
3. Assisted Living Facility98
4. Nursing Home/Long-term Care facility62
5. Homeless1
6. Total (must agree with A3)1,123

I. Source of Referral

1. Eye care provider (ophthalmologist, optometrist)187
2. Physician/medical provider69
3. State VR agency7
4. Government or Social Service Agency177
5. Veterans Administration6
6. Senior Center53
7. Assisted Living Facility6
8. Nursing Home/Long-term Care facility13
9. Faith-based organization9
10. Independent Living center21
11. Family member or friend243
12. Self-referral136
13. Other196
14. Total (must agree with A3)1,123

Part IV: Types of Services Provided and Resources Allocated

Provide data related to the number of older individuals who are blind receiving each type of service and resources committed to each type of service.

A. Clinical/functional vision assessments and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 30,900
1b. Total Cost from other funds 3,985
2. Vision screening / vision examination / low vision evaluation 412
3. Surgical or therapeutic treatment to prevent, correct, or modify disabling eye conditions 0

B. Assistive technology devices and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 121,740
1b. Total Cost from other funds 15,698
2. Provision of assistive technology devices and aids 1,123
3. Provision of assistive technology services 923

C. Independent living and adjustment training and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 306,828
1b. Total Cost from other funds 39,567
2. Orientation and Mobility training 229
3. Communication skills 1,123
4. Daily living skills 1,123
5. Supportive services (reader services, transportation, personal 49
6. Advocacy training and support networks 704
7. Counseling (peer, individual and group) 69
8. Information, referral and community integration 1,123
. Other IL services 203

D. Community Awareness: Events & Activities

Cost a. Events / Activities b. Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 40,740
1b. Total Cost from other funds 5,253
2. Information and Referral 0
3. Community Awareness: Events/Activities 411 9,986

Part V: Comparison of Prior Year Activities to Current Reported Year

A. Activity

a) Prior Year b) Reported FY c) Change ( + / - )
1. Program Cost (all sources) 656,564 645,038 -11,526
2. Number of Individuals Served 1,080 1,123 43
3. Number of Minority Individuals Served 47 22 -25
4. Number of Community Awareness Activities 481 411 -70
5. Number of Collaborating agencies and organizations 13 7 -6
6. Number of Sub-grantees 0 8

Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures

Provide the following data for each of the performance measures below. This will assist RSA in reporting results and outcomes related to the program.

Number of persons Percent of persons
A1. Number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training 923 100.00%
A2. Number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training who maintained or improved functional abilities that were previously lost or diminished as a result of vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only) 624 67.61%
A3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 335 36.29%
B1. Number of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services 229 100.00%
B2. Of those receiving orientation and mobility (O & M) services, the number of individuals who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their residence and/or community environment as a result of services. (closed/inactive cases only) 135 58.95%
B3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 108 47.16%
C1. Number of individuals who received communication skills training 1,123 100.00%
C2. Of those receiving communication skills training, the number of individuals who gained or maintained their functional abilities as a result of services they received. (Closed/inactive cases only) 506 45.06%
C3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 592 52.72%
D1. Number of individuals who received daily living skills training 1,123 100.00%
D2. Number of individuals that experienced functional gains or successfully restored or maintained their functional ability to engage in their customary daily life activities as a result of services or training in personal management and daily living skills. (closed/inactive cases only) 572 50.93%
D3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 566 50.40%
E1. Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 628 n/a
E2. Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 1 n/a
E3. Number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 48 n/a
E4. Number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only) 607 n/a
E5. Number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 0 n/a

Part VII: Training and Technical Assistance Needs

Obtaining training in the area of understanding the laws and how they are applied to the program would be most helpful. Also, ways to better improve data analysis.

Part VIII: Narrative

A. Briefly describe the agency's method of implementation for the Title VII-Chapter 2 program (i.e. in-house, through sub-grantees/contractors, or a combination) incorporating outreach efforts to reach underserved and/or unserved populations. Please list all sub-grantees/contractors.

GROUP TEACHING: The Office for the Blind and Visually Impaired (OBVI) continues to do more with less by implementing group teaching when practical throughout the state. In FFY 2015, the Office for the Blind & Visually Impaired had a total of fifteen (15) group teachings. There were a total of sixty-five consumers with low vision that participated in Low Vision101, and an Adjustment to Blindness group training. The Office for the Blind and Visually Impaired collaborated with the Aging and Disability Resource Center of Fond du Lac County to offer a new program. On the fourth Friday of every month, citizens of Fond du Lac County were offered a two-hour group teaching program. They could also participate in on-site drop-in hours for individualized direct services. The teaching curriculum allows participants to share experiences about living with low vision, learn about the common eye conditions, and explore adaptations for activities of daily living. Services such as Talking Books, Hadley School for the Blind and from private not-for-profit agencies within the state were also explained. Low vision aids, red and white canes and other assistive products were on display as well. The ADRC promoted this program in its newsletter as well as its online calendar. Further, OBVI staff answered questions live on a local talk radio show. Some participants who attended returned month after month and eventually, with mentoring from the OBVI staff, a support group was formed. The Office for the Blind and Visually Impaired has contracted with Vision Forward to implement a five week educational course in the form of group teaching to reach consumers in urban communities. DIRECT SERVICE STAFF: During the FFY 2015, the Office for the Blind and Visually Impaired (OBVI) used 14.34 FTE direct service staff, plus service agreements with four (4) organizations and private contractors for specific skills training such as Orientation and Mobility, Assistive Technology and Braille Instruction. The Office for the Blind & Visually Impaired has 11 Rehabilitation Specialists positioned throughout the state providing direct skills training, which covers all 72 counties. There is one Field Supervisor providing minimal direct service. Additionally, four (4) half-time LTE staff assists the Rehabilitation Specialists with specific skills training and outreach activities. The caseloads of the Rehabilitation Specialists are comprised mainly of individuals who are eligible for the Independent Living Services for Older Individuals grant. Of the 1,123 consumers seen, a little less than eleven hundred were over the age of sixty. Additionally, the staff has made a concerted effort to reach out to the underserved and/or unserved populations in their assigned counties. This FFY 2015, ninety minorities over the age of fifty-five received services. This FFY 2015, the OBVI exceeded their goal in the number of outreach events to minority groups. In prior years, the staff responded to the needs of their consumers by taking information about OBVI services to the communities. As a trend, the unserved/underserved populations were not seeking out information to help a family member or friend with vision loss. Partly due to cultural reasons, however, the OBVI was able to reach over one hundred seventy-five (175) individuals identified as unserved/underserved. OBVI continues to staff two Rehabilitation Specialists who are certified in Orientation and Mobility through the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation & Education Professionals (ACVREP). They are providing direct training to consumers in their assigned territories reducing the cost of private contracting and it continues to be an efficient use of the OBVI’s direct service staff. SERVICE AGREEMENTS: Service agreements were established with the Wisconsin Council of the Blind and Visually Impaired (WCBVI), to provide services in Southwestern Wisconsin; and the Vision Forward Association in the Southeastern Wisconsin areas. During FFY 2015, with the assistance of these service providers an additional fifty-five consumers received services, along with four (4) group trainings. The Vision Forward Association has a support group training series called “New Perspectives.” In the group, participants share information about their personal feelings and experiences with significant vision loss. The group discusses their frustration and sadness over the change in their life style and choices. The group also looks for alternative ways to confront issues of vision loss and how to move forward. Some specific areas addressed include: how to explain vision loss and its affects, asking for and refusing help, modifying home environments to increase independence, getting around safely in the community and how to develop a support system. FALL PREVENTION, STEPPING ON: The OBVI continued its collaboration with the statewide Aging and Disability Resource Centers (ADRC) in presenting at their Fall Prevention, Stepping On programs, which is an evidence-based educational program to prevent falls in older adults. The program is the work of Dr. Lindy Clemson and was published in the September 2004 issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The Stepping On program is held in local community venues and is run for seven, two-hour weekly sessions, with a follow-up home visit and a three-month booster session. The OBVI rehabilitation staff present at Session Five, the Vision and Falls component of the program. In FFY 2015, the OBVI staff presented as the Vision Specialist at 39 programs. Each presentation typically reaches 15 to 20 program participants and two service providers. STAFF OUTREACH: In FFY 2015, the Office for the Blind & Visually Impaired staff accomplished 411 Outreach and Information events on vision loss related issues. Community presentations continue to be an efficient method to reach the community-at-large. During FFY 2015, the OBVI reached out to family members living with a person with a vision loss, service providers, the community-at-large, adults with low vision, medical personnel and eye care professionals. The Office for the Blind & Visually Impaired reached more than 9,700 people and/or professionals through outreach. The OBVI’s staff presented information to 629 service providers, 78 eye care professionals, 21 medical professionals, 524 aging staff from the ADRCs, and 860 adults with low vision. The methodology used to disseminate information is brochures, health fairs, support groups, speaking at senior housing complexes and meal sites in the various counties.

B. Briefly describe any activities designed to expand or improve services including collaborative activities or community awareness; and efforts to incorporate new methods and approaches developed by the program into the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) under Section 704.

SUMMER CAMP TRAINING: The Wisconsin Lions Camp, located in Rosholt, in Central Wisconsin provides a summer recreational camp for visually impaired adults. The Office for the Blind and Visually Impaired was invited to return to participate in the 2015 Lions Camp Adult Summer program. The Office for the Blind & Visually Impaired offered seven different workshops to seventy-four (74) participants. Upon completion of the training a survey was issued asking the consumers to indicate if the training helped increase confidence, less confidence or no change. Eighty-one percent of the campers felt their confidence increased, six percent responded less confident and seventeen percent responded no change. Ninety-four percent of the respondents believed the workshops are helpful. From last year, there was a two percent increase in satisfaction and a six percent decrease in no change in satisfaction. The Office for the Blind & Visually Impaired collaborated with one of the Two Rivers' Lions Clubs to provide transportation for one of the students that attended the Summer Training Camp. The service provided by the Two Rivers Lions Club and the Office for the Blind & Visually Impaired was later spotlighted in the Herald Times Reporter newspaper. “ADVENTURES IN VISION LOSS 2015: LEARNING TO DO THINGS DIFFERENTLY”: On September 20 to September 24, 2015, at the Wisconsin Lions Camp in Rosholt, the Office for the Blind & Visually Impaired held the third annual training event for individuals new to vision loss. The OBVI had 24 students respond and 21 students confirmed to come, but on the day of training, nineteen students participated in the week long training. During the week, each student either learned a new skill or had an opportunity to build on their current skill level. The classes offered were in Technology, Braille/Communication, Cooking, Orientation and Mobility, Daily Living, Adjusting to Vision Loss and Resources for the Blind. The exit surveys were completed and there was 100% participation. Comments from the exit surveys were, “Unexpectedly pleasant experience because I was apprehensive at first. All instructors were kind and helpful and everyone approachable.” Another student responded, “I learned more here than from the doctor. Tell all of you to continue to do the job you are doing because you are fantastic. Boost of confidence. Keep doing what you are doing,” A final response, “Although the food was good, it was never hot. Program could be a day or two longer (more time).” SAFETY FAIR: On May 16, 2015 the Village of Plover and their Fire Department hosted a Safety Fair at the local Toyota dealership. The Office for the Blind hosted a information booth and one of the staff was there with her service animal. This was a great opportunity to show and teach the community-at-large about service animals and share information about OBVI services. The event was well attended, and the staff shared information with an estimated one hundred and fifty people. STAFF TRAINING: ILOB and other funds were used to provide training to the OBVI staff during two semi-annual staff training meetings. On April 21-22, 2015, training was held in Eau Claire and the topics were “I Can’t See It, Wait…There it is!” presenters Kathleen Connell, CLVT, and Angie Zalig, Rehabilitation Specialists with the Office for the Blind and Visually Impaired. “Orientation and Mobility 101”, presenters Jean Kenevan, COMS, Arneetrice Ellerman, COMS, Office for the Blind and Visually Impaired. On October 27-28, 2015, training was held in Green Bay and the topics were, “Hot Spots and Your iPhone,” presenter Doug Martens, Rehabilitation Specialist, Office for the Blind and Visually Impaired. “Elder Tree,” presenter Scott Gatzke, Director of Dissemination, University of Wisconsin-Madison, The Center for Health Enhancement Systems Studies. All training sessions were approved and staff earned Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals (ACVREP) continuing education units. STAFF OUTREACH TO UNSERVED OR UNDERSERVED POPULATIONS-MINORITY EVENTS: During FFY 2015, the OBVI generated 22 minority outreach activities to reach unserved or underserved populations. A total of 1,140 people learned of the OBVI and the services they provide. The OBVI was able to meet, present and educate members of the Native American, Hmong, African American, Hispanic, and the Deaf and Hard of Hearing unserved or underserved populations. These activities included: Tribal Health Fairs, Oneida Diabetes Center, Stockbridge-Munsee Tribe, Hmong Interagency meeting, Stepping On for a Hmong community, Kenosha African American Ethnic Elders Group, and a project with the Office for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing for consumers who are deaf or hard of hearing, blind or visually impaired, and/or deaf blind. One example was the “Juneteenth Celebration” in Appleton on June 14, 2015. The OBVI staff shared information on services and community resources with members of the African American community. Another example, the Rehabilitation Specialist met with the Case Coordinator of the Sixteenth Clinic in Milwaukee to provide assessments and services to their Spanish speaking patients. STATUTORY COUNCIL ON BLINDNESS (SCOB): The OBVI has a strong working relationship with the Statutory Council on Blindness (SCOB), as well. The Statutory Council on Blindness meets on a quarterly basis to advise and make recommendations to state agencies regarding issues that affect people who are blind and visually impaired in Wisconsin. The SCOB has developed a website that shares information about their mission at: http://www.blindnesscouncil.wisconsin.gov/. During FFY 2015, the SCOB provided recommendations to the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR) on the Business Enterprise Program that they hope will provide additional transparency and clarity to the program and help convert it into a program of growth. Additional efforts have been encouraged by OBVI to clarify the role of the SCOB within the State system, and assist the SCOB to identify issues related to Family Care changes and how these proposed changes might impact individuals within Wisconsin who are experiencing visual impairments.

C. Briefly summarize results from any of the most recent evaluations or satisfaction surveys conducted for your program and attach a copy of applicable reports.

Since FFY 2009, the OBVI has incorporated a consumer survey upon completion of services documenting consumer response into the Manage Information for Blind and Visual Impairment Services (MiBVI) data tracking program based on the Federal 7-OB outcome and performance measures. The consumer satisfaction survey provides a yearly evaluation of the OBVI’s outcomes. In FFY 2015, a total of 903 surveys were completed for individuals 55 and older. Results showed that 628 individuals (70%) reported feeling they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. One individual reported feeling they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation. Forty-eight individuals (5%) reported no change in their feeling of control and confidence. Additionally, 607 individuals reported changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss.

D. Briefly describe the impact of the Title VII-Chapter 2 program, citing examples from individual cases (without identifying information) in which services contributed significantly to increasing independence and quality of life for the individual(s).

Consumer Case 1: Low Vision/Reading: DB's Age Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD) interfered with her ability to effectively read the large print on her e-reader, to spot check fine print materials, to read the Wall Street Journal and to read the books she enjoyed for extended periods of time. The Rehabilitation Specialist Assistant (RSA) demonstrated proper light positioning to enable her to more effectively read the enlarged print on her e-reader, assisted her in finding the proper pocket magnifier for spot checking, showed her how to enlarge print on her computer (using the control + buttons) to enable her to read the Wall Street Journal, and introduced her to talking books for sustained reading. Writing: DB was also having difficulty with reading her own writing, writing checks, and writing her signature. The RSA taught her how to visually enhance what she writes by printing instead of using cursive, enlarging what she prints and using a fine black felt tipped pen with black lined white paper. DB also worked on how to use a signature guide and a check writing guide to address her difficulties with appropriate placement of her signature and positioning on her checks. The RSA also demonstrated large print checks as another option for check writing. Home Management/Microwave Operation/Electrical Outlet: DB does not cook, but she does use the microwave for reheating, and was having difficulty finding the start button on her microwave. She also reported having difficulty plugging appliances into her electrical outlet because the plate and the outlet are both white. The RSA marked her start button for ease of access on her microwave and educated her on ways to add contrast to her electrical outlet for visual enhancement by using either a dark colored plate or covering or putting a bright tape around the outlet. She used a dark colored plate for visual enhancement. Glare Reduction: While DB has dark fit-over filters to manage outdoor glare, she finds indoor glare to be blinding, including the new overhead lighting in her home. DB was educated on ways to eliminate overhead glare by wearing a visor or a cap with a visor. The RSA also assisted her in finding an appropriate indoor filter, one that would minimize the light but still enable her to easily navigate in her home and in stores, etc. and provide her with comfort and contrast. (From Susan Dachelet, Field Supervisor) After the RSA last meeting with DB, I received a phone call from DB stating, "I wanted to say how wonderful she has been. She's been so helpful. She's given me lots of ideas, information, and resources. I just wanted to call and thank you, and tell you that she's at the top of her game." Consumer Case 2: JF is a 97 year old woman who still lives alone in her home and she is thriving! With OBVIs rehabilitation services, she is now able to read her mail and write greeting cards using a loaned video magnifier. With magnification she can see to set her thermostat and oven dials. She continues to bake for others and prepares all her own meals with the simple help of using tactile bumps on her appliances and high contrast measuring cups. She attends a monthly low vision support group and remains an active member in her local community. Consumer Case 3: WK is an 85 year old male living with his wife. He thought there was no hope for him since his vision had deteriorated to the point he could only see shadows. His doctor had told him there was nothing he could do, so WK thought that was the end. His wife saw an article in the newspaper about the local support group meeting. She called the facilitator and they gave her the Office for the Blind and Visually Impaired number. The Rehabilitation Specialist met with WK and assessed his level of independence in mobility. He was issued a 52” long cane with a marshmallow tip. After several training sessions at the local mall, WK began to trust his cane and walk with more confidence. He uses the constant contact technique and he commented on how now he can use his remaining vision for looking around or looking ahead. He also likes how the cane helps him identify obstacles in his path. His wife was shown human guide techniques, the proper grasps, how to guide going through doors, narrow passage and transferring sides. After about three months of using his cane, WK called the OBVI indicating his doctor wants him to use a support cane. WK was introduced to learning how to use his support cane and the long cane together. WK walks safely around his block for exercise. Consumer Case 4: BM’s anniversary date of his accident was September 23, 2015. BM was crossing a street and was hit by a car in 2014. He was told by his physical therapist that once brain injured, BM would most likely be a candidate for re-injury, left side neglect, inattention and lack of focus. To address the issue, BM spent much time walking with friends and family. Then last summer, the Office for the Blind & Visually Impaired contracted with an Orientation & Mobility instructor to assist BM’s with re-learning cane skills to travel independently. BM crossed many complex intersections and challenges himself by walking up to 4.4 miles daily.

E. Finally, note any problematic areas or concerns related to implementing the Title VII-Chapter 2 program in your state.

N/A

Part IX: Signature

Please sign and print the name, title and telephone number of the IL-OIB Program Director below.

I certify that the data herein reported are statistically accurate to the best of my knowledge.

Signed byDelora Newton
TitleDVR Administrator
Telephone608-261-4576
Date signed12/22/2015