Annual Report - Independent Living Services For Older Individuals Who Are Blind

RSA-7-OB for Colorado Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - H177B140006 report through September 30, 2014

Instructions

Introduction

The revised ED RSA-7-OB form incorporates revisions to the four established performance measures for the Independent Living Services for Older Individuals who are Blind (IL-OIB) program. Added in 2007, these measures aim to better reflect the program’s impact on individual consumers and the community.

Added to capture information that may be required to meet GPRA guidelines, the performance measures can be found under Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures as follows:

Measure 1.1

Of individuals who received AT (assistive technology) services and training, the percentage who regained or improved functional abilities previously lost as a result of vision loss.

Measure 1.2

Of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services, the percentage who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their home and/or community environment.

Measure 1.3

Of individuals who received services or training in alternative non-visual or low vision techniques, the percentage that experienced functional gains or were able to successfully restore and maintain their functional ability to engage in their customary life activities within their home environment and community.

Measure 1.4

Of the total individuals served, the percentage that reported that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services.

Revisions to these established program performance measures consists of the following additional five items:

E1. Enter the Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only)

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (closed/inactive cases only)

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (closed/inactive cases only)

E4. Enter the number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only)

E5. Enter the number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only)

Submittal Instructions

OIB grantees are expected to complete and submit the 7-OB Report online through RSA’s website (https://rsa.ed.gov), unless RSA is notified of pertinent circumstances that may impede the online submission.

To register with RSA’s MIS, please go to https://rsa.ed.gov and click on Info for new users. The link provides instructions for obtaining an agency-specific username and password. Further instructions for completing and submitting the 7-OB Report online will be provided upon completion of the registration process.

OIB grantees submitting the 7-OB Report online are not required to mail signed copies of the 7-OB Report to RSA, but they must certify in the MIS that the signed and dated 7-OB Report and lobbying certification forms are retained on file.

The Report submittal deadline is no later than December 31 of the reporting year.

Part I: Funding Sources for Expenditures And Encumbrances — Instructions

Please note: Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services in Part I (C) must equal the total funds spent on service in Part IV. Part I C must equal the sum of Part IV A1+B1+C1+D1.

A. Funding SourceS for Expenditures and encumbrances in reported fy

A1. Enter the total amount of Title VII-Chapter 2 funds expended or encumbered during the reported FY. Include expenditures or encumbrances made from both carryover funds from the previous FY and from the reported FY grant funds.

A2. Enter the total of any other federal funds expended or encumbered in the Title VII-Chapter 2 program during the reported FY. Designate the funding sources and amounts in (a) through (e).

A3. Enter the total amount of state funds expended or encumbered in the Title VII - Chapter 2 program. Do not include in-kind contributions (e.g., documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space, or land).

A4. Enter the total amount of third party contributions including local and community funding, non-profit or for-profit agency funding, etc. Do not include in-kind contributions (e.g., documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space, or land).

A5. Enter the total amount of in-kind contributions from non-federal sources. Include value of property or services that benefit the Title VII-Chapter 2 program (e.g. the fairly evaluated documented value of services, materials, equipment, buildings or office space or land).

A6. Enter the total matching funds (A3 + A4 + A5). Reminder: The required non-federal match for the Title VII-Chapter 2 program is not less than $1 for each $9 of federal funds provided in the Title VII-Chapter 2 grant. Funds derived from or provided by the federal government, or services assisted or subsidized to any significant extent by the federal government, may not be included in determining the amount of non-federal contributions.

A7. Enter the total amount of all funds expended and encumbered (A1 + A2 + A6) during the reported fiscal year.

B. Total expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs

Enter the total amount of expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs. Do not include costs for direct services provided by agency staff or the costs of contract or sub-grantee staff that provide direct services under contracts or sub-grants. If an administrator spends a portion of his or her time providing administrative services and the remainder providing direct services, include only the expenditures for administrative services.

C. Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services

Enter the total amount of expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services by subtracting line B from line A7.

Part II: Staffing — Instructions

Base all FTE calculations upon a full-time 40-hour workweek or 2080 hours per year. Record all FTE assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program irrespective of whether salary is paid with Title VII-Chapter 2 funds.

A. Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Program Staff

A1. Under the “Administrative & Support” column (A1a), enter the full-time equivalent (FTE) of all administrative and support staff (e.g. management, program directors, supervisors, readers, drivers for staff, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from the State agency. (For example, if 20% or 8 hours per week of a staff person’s time were spent on administrative and support functions related to this program, the FTE for that staff person would be .2). Under the “Direct Services” column (A1b), enter the FTE of all direct service staff (e.g. rehabilitation teacher, IL specialist, orientation and mobility specialist, social worker, drivers for individuals receiving services, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from the State agency. If administrative or support staff of the State agency also provide direct services, report the FTE devoted to direct services in the “Direct Services” column (A1b). (For example, if 80% of a staff person’s time were spent in providing direct services, the FTE for that person would be 8). Finally, add across the “Administrative & Support” FTE (A1a) and “Direct Service” FTE (A1b) to enter the total State agency FTE in the TOTAL (A1c) column.

A2. Under the “Administrative & Support” column (A2a), enter the full-time equivalent (FTE) of all administrative and support staff (e.g. management, program directors, supervisors, readers, drivers for staff, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from contractors or sub-grantees. Under the “Direct Services” column (A2b), enter the FTE of all direct service staff (e.g. rehabilitation teacher, IL specialist, orientation and mobility specialist, social worker, driver for individuals receiving services, etc.) assigned to the Title VII-Chapter 2 program from contractors and sub-grantees. If administrative staff of the contractors or sub-grantees also provides direct services, report the FTE devoted to direct services in the “Direct Services” column (A2b). Finally, add across the “Administrative & Support” FTE (A2a) and “Direct Service” FTE (A2b) to enter the total contractor or sub-grantee FTE in the TOTAL (A2c) column.

A3. Add each column for A1 and A2 and record totals on line A3.

B. Employed or advanced in employment

B1. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) with disabilities (include blind and visually impaired not 55 or older), including blindness or visual impairment, in B1a. Enter the FTE of employees with disabilities in B1b. (To calculate B1b, add the total number of hours worked by all employees with disabilities and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B2. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 and older in B2a. Enter the FTE of employees who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 or older in B2b. (To calculate B2b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are blind or visually impaired and age 55 and older and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B3. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are members of racial/ethnic minorities in B3a. Enter the FTE of employees who are members of racial/ethnic minorities in B3b. (To calculate B3b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are members of racial/ethnic minorities and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B4. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are women in B4a. Enter the FTE of employees who are women in B4b. (To calculate B4b, add the total number of hours worked by women and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

B5. Enter the total number of employees (agency and contractor/sub-grantee staff) who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, in B5a. Enter the FTE of employees who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, in B5b. (To calculate B5b, add the total number of hours worked by employees who are ages 55 and older, but not blind or visually impaired, and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE)

C. Volunteers

C1. Enter the FTE of program volunteers in C1. (To calculate C1, add the total number of hours worked by all program volunteers and divide by 2080 to arrive at the FTE).

Part III: Data on Individuals Served — Instructions

Provide data in all categories on program participants who received one or more services during the fiscal year being reported.

A. Individuals Served

A1. Enter the number of program participants carried over from the previous federal fiscal year who received services in this reported FY (e.g. someone received services in September (or any other month) of the previous FY and continued to receive additional services in the reported FY).

A2. Enter the number of program participants who began receiving services during the reported fiscal year irrespective of whether they have completed all services.

A3. Enter the total number served during the reported fiscal year (A1 + A2).

B. Age

B1-B10. Enter the total number of program participants served in each respective age category.

B11. Enter the sum of B1 through B10. This must agree with A3.

C. Gender

C1. Enter the total number of females receiving services.

C2. Enter the total number of males receiving services.

C3. Enter the sum of C1 and C2. This must agree with A3.

D. Race/Ethnicity

Hispanic or Latino means a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

D1. Enter the number of individuals served who are Hispanic/Latino of any race or Hispanic/Latino only. Hispanic/Latino means a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin, regardless of race.

D2. Enter the number of individuals served who are American Indian or Alaska Native. American Indian or Alaska Native means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of North and South America (including Central America), and who maintains tribal affiliation or community attachment.

D3. Enter the number of individuals served who are Asian. Asian means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam.

D4. Enter the number of individuals served who are Black or African American. Black or African American means a person having origins in any of the black racial groups of Africa. Terms such as “Haitian” may be used.

D5. Enter the number of individuals served who are Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands.

D6. Enter the number of individuals served who are White or Caucasian. White means a person having origins in any of the original peoples of Europe, the Middle East, or North Africa.

D7. Enter the number of individuals served who report two or more races but who are not Hispanic/Latino of any race.

D8. Enter “race and ethnicity unknown” only if the consumer refuses to identify race and ethnicity.

D9. Enter the total of D1 through D8. This number must agree with A3.

E. Degree of Visual Impairment

E1. Enter the number of individuals served who are totally blind (e.g. have light perception only or no light perception).

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who are legally blind (excluding those recorded in E1).

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who have severe visual impairment.

E4. Add E1 + E2 + E3 and enter the total. This number must agree with A3.

F. Major Cause of Visual Impairment

(Please note that the primary site for the definitions of diseases is http://www.nia.nih.gov/AboutNIA/StrategicPlan/ResearchGoalA/Subgoal1.htm.)

Enter only one major cause of visual impairment for each individual served.

F1. Enter the number of individuals served who have macular degeneration as the major cause of visual impairment. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive disease of the retina wherein the light-sensing cells in the central area of vision (the macula) stop working and eventually die. The cause of the disease is thought to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors, and

It is most common in people who are age 60 and over. AMD is the leading cause of legal blindness in senior citizens.

F2. Enter the number of individuals served who have diabetic retinopathy as the major cause of visual impairment. Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new cases of legal blindness among working-age Americans and is caused by damage to the small blood vessels in the retina. It is believed that poorly controlled blood sugar levels are related to its progression. Most persons with diabetes have non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or what is commonly called “adult-onset” or Type II diabetes, and control their blood sugar with oral medications or diet alone. Others have insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), also called "younger or juvenile-onset" or Type I diabetes, and must use insulin injections daily to regulate their blood sugar levels.

F3. Enter the number of individuals served who have glaucoma as the major cause of visual impairment. Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases causing optic nerve damage that involves mechanical compression or decreased blood flow. It is permanent and is a leading cause of blindness in the world, especially in older people.

F4. Enter the number of individuals served who have cataracts as the major cause of visual impairment. A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens of the eye resulting in blurred vision, sensitivity to light and glare, distortion, and dimming of colors. Cataracts are usually a natural aging process in the eye (although they may be congenital) and may be caused or accelerated by other diseases such as glaucoma and diabetes.

F5. Enter the number of individuals served who have any other major cause of visual impairment.

F6. Enter the sum of F1 through F5. This number must agree with A3.

G. Other Age-Related Impairments

Enter the total number of individuals served in each category. Individuals may report one or more non-visual impairments/conditions. The National Institute on Aging (NIA) Strategic Plan identifies age-related diseases, disorders, and disability including the following categories.

G1. Hearing Impairment: Presbycusis is the gradual hearing loss that occurs with aging. An estimated one-third of Americans over 60 and one-half of those over 85 have some degree of hearing loss. Hearing impairment occurs when there is a problem with or damage to one or more parts of the ear, and may be a conductive hearing loss (outer or middle ear) or a sensorineural hearing loss (inner ear) or a combination. The degree of hearing impairment can vary widely from person to person. Some people have partial hearing loss, meaning that the

Ear can pick up some sounds; others have complete hearing loss, meaning that the ear cannot hear at all. One or both ears may be affected, and the impairment may be worse in one ear than in the other.

G2. Diabetes: Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. Type 2 diabetes, which results from insulin resistance and abnormal insulin action, is most prevalent in the older population. Diabetes complications, such as heart disease and loss of sight, increase dramatically when blood sugar is poorly controlled and often develop before diabetes is diagnosed.

G3. Cardiovascular Disease and Strokes: Diseases of the heart and blood vessels are the leading cause of hospitalization and death in older Americans. Congestive heart failure is the most common diagnosis in hospitalized patients aged 65 and older.

G4. Cancer: The second leading cause of death among the elderly is cancer, with individuals age 65 and over accounting for 70 percent of cancer mortality in the United States. Breast, prostate, and colon cancers, are common in older people.

G5. Bone, Muscle, Skin, Joint, and Movement Disorders: Osteoporosis (loss of mass and quality of bones), osteoarthritis (inflammation and deterioration of joints), and sarcopenia (age-related loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength) contribute to frailty and injury in millions of older people. Also contributing to loss of mobility and independence are changes in the central nervous system that control movement. Cells may die or become dysfunctional with age, as in Parkinson's disease. Therefore, older people may have difficulty with gross motor behavior, such as moving around in the environment, or with fine motor skills, such as writing.

G6. Alzheimer’s Disease/Cognitive Impairment: Alzheimer’s disease is the most common type of dementia (a brain disorder that significantly affects an individual’s ability to carry out daily life activities) in older people. It and other cognitive impairments impact parts of the brain that control thought, memory, and language.

G7. Depression is widespread, often undiagnosed, and often under-treated in the elderly. It is believed to affect more than 6.5 million of the 35 million Americans who are 65 or older. Depression is closely associated with dependency and disability. Symptoms may include: loss of interest in normally pleasurable activities, persistent, vague or unexplained somatic complaints, memory complaints, change in weight, sleeping disorder, irritability or demanding behavior, lack of attention to personal care, difficulty with concentration, social withdrawal, change in appetite, confusion, delusions or hallucinations, feeling of worthlessness or hopelessness, and thought about suicide.

G8. Other Major Geriatric Concerns: Several conditions can compromise independence and quality of life in older persons including weakness and falls, urinary incontinence, benign prostatic hyperplasia, and co morbidity (co morbidity describes the effect of all other diseases an individual might have on the primary disease).

H. Type of Residence

H1. Enter the number of individuals served who live in private residence (house or apartment unrelated to senior living).

H2. Enter the number of Individuals served who live in senior living/retirement community (e.g. housing designed for those age 55 and older).

H3. Enter the number of individuals served who live in assisted living facility (e.g. housing that provides personal care and services which meet needs beyond basic provision of food, shelter and laundry).

H4. Enter the number of individuals served who live in nursing homes/long-term care facility (e.g. any facility that provides care to one or more persons who require nursing care and related medical services of such complexity to require professional nursing care under the direction of a physician on a 24 hour a day basis).

H5. Enter the number of individuals served who are homeless

H6. Enter the sum of H1, H2, H3, H4 and H5. This number must agree with A3.

I. Source of Referral

I1. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an ophthalmologist or optometrist.

I2. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a medical provider other than an ophthalmologist or optometrist.

I3. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a state vocational rehabilitation agency.

I4. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a government or social services agency defined as a public or private agency which provides assistance to consumers related to eligibility and securing entitlements and benefits, counseling, elder law services, assistance with housing, etc.

I5. Enter the number of individuals served referred by the Veterans Administration

I6. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a senior program defined as a community-based educational, recreational, or socialization program operated by a senior center, nutrition site, or senior club.

I7. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an assisted living facility defined as housing that provides personal care and services which meet needs beyond basic provision of food, shelter and laundry.

I8. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a nursing home/long-term care facility defined as any facility that provides care to one or more persons who require nursing care and related medical services of such complexity to require professional nursing care under the direction of a physician on a 24 hour a day basis.

I9. Enter the number of individuals served referred by a faith-based (religious affiliated) organization.

I10. Enter the number of individuals served referred by an independent living center (ILC) defined as a consumer-controlled, community-based, cross-disability, nonresidential private nonprofit agency that is designed and operated within a local community by individuals with disabilities, and provides an array of independent living services.

I11. Enter the number of individuals referred by a family member or friend.

I12. Enter the number of individuals who were self-referred.

I13. Enter the number of individuals referred from all other sources aside from those listed above.

I14. Enter the sum of I1, I2, I3, I4, I5, I6, I7, I8, I9, I10, I11, I12, and I13. This number must agree with A3

Part IV: Types of Services Provided and Resources Allocated — Instructions

Please note: Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services in Part I C must equal the total funds spent on services in Part IV. Part I C must equal the sum of Part IV A1+B1+C1+D1.

In addition, salary or costs associated with direct service staff or contractors providing

direct services should be included in the cost of services provided in A, B, C, and D.

A. Clinical / Functional Vision Assessments and Services

A1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (A1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (A1b) for clinical and/or functional vision assessments and services, whether purchased or provided directly.

A2. Enter the total number of program participants who received clinical vision screening or vision examinations from qualified or certified professionals such as ophthalmologists or optometrists, and who received functional vision assessments or low vision evaluations to identify strategies for enhancing visual performance both without and with optical and low vision devices and equipment. Assessment areas may include functional visual acuity and fields, efficiency of vision in the performance of everyday tasks, and evaluation for low vision aids or equipment. These assessments are typically provided by skilled professionals or those who are certified or have a master’s degree in low vision rehabilitation. Do not include evaluations for orientation and mobility. These should be included in C3.

A3. Enter the total number of program participants who received surgical or therapeutic treatment to prevent, correct, or modify disabling eye conditions; and, hospitalizations related to such services. Include prescription optics in this service category. Nonprescription optics should be reported in B2.

B. Assistive Technology Devices, Aids, Services and Training

B1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (B1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (B1b) for the provision of assistive technology devices, aids, services and training.

B2. Enter the total number of program participants who received one or more assistive technology devices and aids. As defined in Section 3(4) of the Assistive Technology Act of 2004 (Pub. L. 108-364), “assistive technology device means any item, piece of equipment, or product system whether acquired commercially, modified, or customized that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of individuals with disabilities.” Assistive technology devices may include such items as canes, slates, insulin gauges, CCTVs, computers, adaptive software, magnifiers, adaptive cooking items, adaptive recreational items, handwriting guides, Braillers, large button telephones, etc.

B3. Enter the total number of program participants who received one or more assistive technology services and training. As defined in Section 3(5) of the Assistive Technology Act of 2004 (PL 108-364), “assistive technology service means any service that directly assists an individual with a disability in the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device.” Services may include the evaluation of assistive technology needs of an individual, services related to acquisition of technology, costs of loan programs, maintenance and repair of assistive technology, training or technical assistance for the individual or professionals related to the use of assistive technology, programs to expand the availability of assistive technology, low vision therapy services related to the use of optical aids and devices, and other services related to the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device.

C. Independent Living and Adjustment Training and Services

C1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (C1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (C1b) for the provision of services and adjustment training leading to independent living. Evaluation and assessment services (excluding those included in A2 or B3) leading to the planning and implementation of services and training should be included in these costs.

C2. Enter the total number of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services or travel training (i.e. learning to access public or private transportation and to travel safely and as independently as possible in the home and community with or without the use of mobility aids and devices).

C3. Enter the total number of individuals who received communication skills training (e.g. reading and writing Braille, keyboarding and computer literacy, computer skills training, using the telephone, handwriting guides, telling time, using readers, use of audio and tactile technologies for home, recreational or educational use; etc.). Training in the use of newspaper reading services and radio services should be included.

C4. Enter the total number of individuals who received personal management and daily living skills training (e.g. training in the use of adaptive aids and assistive technology devices for personal management and daily living, blindness and low vision alternative techniques for food preparation, grooming and dress, household chores, medical management, shopping, recreational activities, etc.)

C5. Enter the total number of individuals who received supportive services (e.g. reader services, transportation, personal attendant services, support service providers, interpreters, etc.) while actively participating in the program or attaining independent living goals.

C6. Enter the total number of program participants who participated in advocacy training or support network activities such as consumer organization meetings, peer support groups, etc.

C7. Enter the total number of individuals who received counseling (peer, individual or group) to assist them in adjusting to visual impairment and blindness.

C8. Enter the total number of program participants that received information and referral to other service providers, programs, and agencies (e.g. senior programs, public and private social service programs, faith-based organizations, consumer groups, etc.) to enhance adjustment, independent living, and integration into the community. Do not include individuals who received only information and referral and for whom no other services were provided.

C9. Enter the total number of individuals served who were provided any other service not listed above.

D. Community Awareness Activities / Information and Referral

D1. Enter the total cost from Title VII-Chapter 2 federal grant funds (D1a) and the total cost from all other sources of program funding (D1b) for providing information and referral services and community awareness activities/events to individuals for whom this was the only service provided (i.e. training for other professionals, telephone inquiries, general inquiries, etc.).

D2. Enter the number of individuals receiving information and referral services for whom this is the only service provided. (optional)

D3. Enter the number of community awareness events/activities in which the Chapter 2 program participated during the reported year (D3a) and the number or estimated number of individuals who benefited from these activities (D3b).

Part V: Comparison of Prior Year Activities to Current Reported Year — Instructions

A1. Program Expenditures and Encumbrances (all sources) Enter the total cost of the program for the prior fiscal year (A1a), and the fiscal year being reported (A1b). The total cost of the program can be found in Part I A7. Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the reported year (A1c).

A2. Number of Individuals Served Enter the total number of eligible individuals served in the prior year (A2a), and in the current reported year (A2b). The total number of individuals served can be found in Part III A3. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the numbers served from the prior year to the reported year (A2c).

A3. Number of Minority Individuals Served Enter the total number of minority individuals served in the prior year (A3a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A3b). The total number of minority individuals served is the total of Part III D1+D2+D3+D4+D5 +D7. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the numbers served from the prior year to the reported year (A3c).

A4. Number of Community Awareness Activities Enter the number of community awareness activities or events in which the Chapter 2 program participated during the prior year (A4a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A4b). The number of community awareness activities is found in Part IV D3a. Calculate the change (plus or minus) in the number of events from the prior year to the year being reported (A4c).

A5. Number of Collaborating Agencies and Organizations Enter the number of collaborating organizations or agencies (formal agreements or informal activity) other than Chapter 2 paid sub-grantees or contractors in the prior year (A5a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A5b). Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the year being reported (A5c).

A6. Number of Sub-grantees/Contractors If you provide services through sub-grantee agencies or contract, enter the number of sub-grantees or contracts in the prior year (A6a), and in the fiscal year currently being reported (A6b). Calculate the change (plus or minus) from the prior year to the year being reported (A6c). If you do not use sub-grantees, enter 0 in A6a, A6b, and A6c.

Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures — Instructions

A. Enter the number from Part IV B3 in A1. From available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training who maintained or improved functional abilities that were previously lost or diminished as a result of vision loss in A2. (closed/inactive cases only).

In A3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

B. Enter the number from Part IV C2 in B1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving orientation and mobility (O & M) services, enter the number of individuals who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their residence and/or community environment as a result of services in B2 (closed/inactive cases only).

In B3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

C. Enter the number from Part IV C3 in C1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving communication skills training, enter the number of individuals who gained or maintained their functional abilities as a result of services they received in C2 (Closed/inactive cases only).

In C3, from available program data and evaluations, enter the number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

D. Enter the number from Part IV C4 in D1. From available program data and evaluations, of those receiving daily living skills training, enter the number of individuals that experienced functional gains or successfully restored or maintained their functional ability to engage in their customary daily life activities as a result of services or training in personal management and daily living skills In D2 (Closed/inactive cases only).

In D3, enter the Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period (This number would not include those individuals who are no longer receiving services and who either did not make functional gains or maintain functional ability before case closure or inactivity).

E1. Enter the Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E2. Enter the number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E3. Enter the number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

E4. Enter the number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss (Closed/inactive cases only). “Change in lifestyle” is defined as any non-vision related event that results in the consumer’s reduced independence, such as moving from a private residence (house or apartment) to another type of residence e.g. living with family, senior living community, assisted living facility, nursing home/long-term facility, etc. Reduced independence could also result in employing a caregiver to enable the consumer continue to live in his/her home. Examples of events that could result in reduced independence of the consumer include loss of spouse and onset or worsening of other health conditions such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, etc.

E5. Enter the number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received (Closed/inactive cases only).

Part VII: Training and Technical Assistance — Instructions

On July 22, 2014, Public Law 113-128, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) was enacted and included a new requirement under Section 751A that the RSA Commissioner shall conduct a survey of designated State agencies that receive grants under section 752 regarding training and technical assistance needs in order to determine funding priorities for such training and technical assistance. Please enter a brief description of training and technical assistance needs that you may have to assist in the implementation and improvement of the performance of your Independent Living Services for Older Individuals Who Are Blind grant (for example, financial management, reporting requirements on the 7-OB, program management, data analysis and program performance, law and applicable regulations, provision of services and service delivery, promising practices, resources and information, outreach, etc.).

Part VIII: Narrative — Instructions

Self-explanatory.

Part IX: Signature Instructions

Please sign and print the name, title and telephone number of the IL-OIB Program Director.

Part I: Funding Sources And Expenditures

Title VII-Chapter 2 Federal grant award for reported fiscal year472,304
Other federal grant award for reported fiscal year0
Title VII-Chapter 2 carryover from previous year112,493
Other federal grant carryover from previous year0
A. Funding Sources for Expenditures in Reported FY
A1. Title VII-Chapter 2528,147
A2. Total other federal0
(a) Title VII-Chapter 1-Part B0
(b) SSA reimbursement0
(c) Title XX - Social Security Act0
(d) Older Americans Act0
(e) Other0
A3. State (excluding in-kind)16,504
A4. Third party65,772
A5. In-kind75,860
A6. Total Matching Funds158,136
A7. Total All Funds Expended686,283
B. Total expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs81,524
C. Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services604,759

Part II: Staffing

FTE (full time equivalent) is based upon a 40-hour workweek or 2080 hours per year.

A. Full-time Equivalent (FTE)

Program Staff a) Administrative and Support b) Direct Service c) Total
1. FTE State Agency 0.5000 0.0000 0.5000
2. FTE Contractors 2.2200 10.5700 12.7900
3. Total FTE 2.7200 10.5700 13.2900

B. Employed or advanced in employment

a) Number employed b) FTE
1. Employees with Disabilities 41 24.8200
2. Employees with Blindness Age 55 and Older 6 4.3400
3. Employees who are Racial/Ethnic Minorities 9 6.3000
4. Employees who are Women 36 20.4100
5. Employees Age 55 and Older 15 6.3900

C. Volunteers

1.65

Part III: Data on Individuals Served

Provide data in each of the categories below related to the number of individuals for whom one or more services were provided during the reported fiscal year.

A. Individuals Served

1. Number of individuals who began receiving services in the previous FY and continued to receive services in the reported FY815
2. Number of individuals who began receiving services in the reported FY383
3. Total individuals served during the reported fiscal year (A1 + A2) 1,198

B. Age

1. 55-59102
2. 60-64103
3. 65-6997
4. 70-74133
5. 75-79133
6. 80-84191
7. 85-89229
8. 90-94146
9. 95-9961
10. 100 & over3
11. Total (must agree with A3)1,198

C. Gender

1. Female867
2. Male331
3. Total (must agree with A3)1,198

D. Race/Ethnicity

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race134
2. American Indian or Alaska Native7
3. Asian8
4. Black or African American13
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander1
6. White1,011
7. Two or more races13
8. Race and ethnicity unknown (only if consumer refuses to identify)11
9. Total (must agree with A3)1,198

E. Degree of Visual Impairment

1. Totally Blind (LP only or NLP)114
2. Legally Blind (excluding totally blind)544
3. Severe Visual Impairment540
4. Total (must agree with A3)1,198

F. Major Cause of Visual Impairment

1. Macular Degeneration618
2. Diabetic Retinopathy86
3. Glaucoma133
4. Cataracts177
5. Other184
6. Total (must agree with A3)1,198

G. Other Age-Related Impairments

1. Hearing Impairment287
2. Diabetes102
3. Cardiovascular Disease and Strokes318
4. Cancer111
5. Bone, Muscle, Skin, Joint, and Movement Disorders426
6. Alzheimer's Disease/Cognitive Impairment50
7. Depression/Mood Disorder112
8. Other Major Geriatric Concerns461

H. Type of Residence

1. Private residence (house or apartment)701
2. Senior Living/Retirement Community280
3. Assisted Living Facility169
4. Nursing Home/Long-term Care facility36
5. Homeless12
6. Total (must agree with A3)1,198

I. Source of Referral

1. Eye care provider (ophthalmologist, optometrist)68
2. Physician/medical provider60
3. State VR agency23
4. Government or Social Service Agency43
5. Veterans Administration19
6. Senior Center132
7. Assisted Living Facility80
8. Nursing Home/Long-term Care facility13
9. Faith-based organization28
10. Independent Living center49
11. Family member or friend364
12. Self-referral246
13. Other73
14. Total (must agree with A3)1,198

Part IV: Types of Services Provided and Resources Allocated

Provide data related to the number of older individuals who are blind receiving each type of service and resources committed to each type of service.

A. Clinical/functional vision assessments and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 1,370
1b. Total Cost from other funds 2,289
2. Vision screening / vision examination / low vision evaluation 33
3. Surgical or therapeutic treatment to prevent, correct, or modify disabling eye conditions 1

B. Assistive technology devices and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 51,598
1b. Total Cost from other funds 13,421
2. Provision of assistive technology devices and aids 840
3. Provision of assistive technology services 720

C. Independent living and adjustment training and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 153,296
1b. Total Cost from other funds 15,381
2. Orientation and Mobility training 123
3. Communication skills 219
4. Daily living skills 1,131
5. Supportive services (reader services, transportation, personal 279
6. Advocacy training and support networks 202
7. Counseling (peer, individual and group) 761
8. Information, referral and community integration 1,331
. Other IL services 116

D. Community Awareness: Events & Activities

Cost a. Events / Activities b. Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 38,165
1b. Total Cost from other funds 5,199
2. Information and Referral 2,658
3. Community Awareness: Events/Activities 217 4,100

Part V: Comparison of Prior Year Activities to Current Reported Year

A. Activity

a) Prior Year b) Reported FY c) Change ( + / - )
1. Program Cost (all sources) 715,762 452,275 -263,487
2. Number of Individuals Served 1,233 4,433 3,200
3. Number of Minority Individuals Served 155 741 586
4. Number of Community Awareness Activities 339 281 -58
5. Number of Collaborating agencies and organizations 537 1,211 674
6. Number of Sub-grantees 7 0

Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures

Provide the following data for each of the performance measures below. This will assist RSA in reporting results and outcomes related to the program.

Number of persons Percent of persons
A1. Number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training 720 100.00%
A2. Number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training who maintained or improved functional abilities that were previously lost or diminished as a result of vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only) 146 20.28%
A3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 412 57.22%
B1. Number of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services 123 100.00%
B2. Of those receiving orientation and mobility (O & M) services, the number of individuals who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their residence and/or community environment as a result of services. (closed/inactive cases only) 29 23.58%
B3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 77 62.60%
C1. Number of individuals who received communication skills training 219 100.00%
C2. Of those receiving communication skills training, the number of individuals who gained or maintained their functional abilities as a result of services they received. (Closed/inactive cases only) 169 77.17%
C3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 156 71.23%
D1. Number of individuals who received daily living skills training 1,131 100.00%
D2. Number of individuals that experienced functional gains or successfully restored or maintained their functional ability to engage in their customary daily life activities as a result of services or training in personal management and daily living skills. (closed/inactive cases only) 183 16.18%
D3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 310 27.41%
E1. Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 82 n/a
E2. Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 3 n/a
E3. Number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 17 n/a
E4. Number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only) 149 n/a
E5. Number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 45 n/a

Part VII: Training and Technical Assistance Needs

We are in year 2 of a 3 year cycle with our 8 vendors. At present, no Technical assistance nor training requests have been received.

Part VIII: Narrative

A. Briefly describe the agency's method of implementation for the Title VII-Chapter 2 program (i.e. in-house, through sub-grantees/contractors, or a combination) incorporating outreach efforts to reach underserved and/or unserved populations. Please list all sub-grantees/contractors.

Colorado uses a competitive RFP process to award OIB contracts. Currently, there are eight contracts which have been awarded to seven independent living centers and one vendor. Each contractor covers a multi-county area. Colorado’s OIB program has a large number of peer support groups; many are consumer-facilitated. All contractors provide some level of home visits to assist with removing barriers, marking appliances, and consulting about lighting. All OIB staff continue to have access to the on-line training modules of the American Federation of the Blind. Collaboration continues to be the key for the OIB contractors, particularly with their outreach efforts. Contractors in less rural-more urban areas of the state report that their most successful outreach efforts have involved collaborating with other organizations to present information at health fairs and vendor fairs. Contractors in rural and remote parts of the state report that their most successful outreach efforts continue to be word-of-mouth and support groups.

Current contractors include:

Center for Disabilities; Connections for IL; Center for People with Disabilities, Disabled Resource Services; Colorado Springs Independence Center dba The Independence Center; the Colorado Center for the Blind; the Center for Independence; and the Southwest Center for Independence.

B. Briefly describe any activities designed to expand or improve services including collaborative activities or community awareness; and efforts to incorporate new methods and approaches developed by the program into the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) under Section 704.

Center For Independence (CFI) reports increasing relationships and partnerships with the Regional ADRCs. CFI reports increasing computer access and smart phone and tablet technology classes. CFI sponsors a Western Slope Chapter of the National Federation of the Blind.

The South West Center for Independence (SWCI) held support groups; emailed newsletters; provided large print wall calendars; provide individual services through home visits; had Lunch Activity Groups at local restaurants and potluck meetings; helped to arrange loaners of magnifiers and CCTV from local providers and their own resources; assisted with AT such as computers, talking books, and service providers; consulted with home health nurses and professional eye doctors regarding assistive devices.

Colorado Springs Independence Center dba The Independence Center worked closely with area agencies and businesses to ensure access to the most up to date assistive technology. The continue to outreach to providers in rural areas of the counties they serve.

Disabled Resource Services (DRS) has had transportation issues as one of their main goals this year. Group meetings were held in various places to increase accessibility, socialization, and peer support. Monthly newsletters are distributed in a variety of formats. DRS also has a loan closet for adaptive equipment and assistive technology.

Connections for Independent Living have increased their outreach efforts by increasing the frequency of their seminars.

Center For Disabilities (CFD) continues to collaborate with DVR, Social Services, Work Force Centers, AAA, Senior Services Centers, and Eye Care services in each of their service counties. Staff make monthly visits to dispense current events/activities notices and brochures. There is a support group supported by CFD in the county areas.

The Center for People With Disabilities (CPWD) attended a variety of community activities, held monthly peer groups, and held groups at a ’continuum of care’ retirement community. Home visits were also provided to individuals to work on independent living skills in addition to recreational group events.

C. Briefly summarize results from any of the most recent evaluations or satisfaction surveys conducted for your program and attach a copy of applicable reports.

CFI - We do not have this information at this time.

CPWD - The OIB department collected data from more than 100 CILSuite surveys, measuring consumer’s level of functioning and sense of control after receiving a service such as communication, mobility training, or assistive technology. A total of 17 individuals received assistive technology training. 100% reported an increase in skills as a result of training received. A total of 51 individuals received daily living skills. Of those surveyed, approximately 95% found the training to be successful. 28 individuals received communication skills. Approximately 85% of those surveyed gained benefit from the communication skills training. Out of 24 people surveyed on their feeling of control, 70% reported a greater sense of control after receiving services. As CILSuite provides surveys six months after a consumer is active or upon closing a consumer, it does not accurately capture data on active consumers. Active consumers did verbally self-report during the time a service was received or through satisfaction surveys conducted by phone. The satisfaction survey questions utilized a five-point Leikert scale to rate satisfaction with staff, knowledge of staff, and content covered at groups and in the home. Approximately 90% of those surveyed were satisfied with services received. Improvement is needed on topics of interest to the majority of consumers. Initially, large print anonymous surveys were given to consumers at the end of peer groups with five questions to determine consumer satisfaction. A five point rating scale was used and questions included satisfaction with staff, the overall program, group format, topics covered in groups, and individual services. Unfortunately the feedback from consumers was that they could not read the surveys in order to complete them. This lead to conducting phone surveys the results of which are detailed above.

CFD - This FY we received Survey responses from 17 OIB consumers. Of those responding, 1 reported no change in their life due to services received.; all others reported positive gains. Our surveys this FY have been completed in hard copy only, there were no surveys conducted by phone. It is difficult to get completed surveys from our consumers. We generally have to complete them in a group setting where we can read the survey to each of them and get their responses. We do plan to go back to conducting some of our surveys by phone in the upcoming year. Speaking with our consumers most are very positive and state that they enjoy our activities and services. We have however, been plagued by the difficulty of staff turnover in the OIB program. A couple of our consumers have commented that they do not like changes.

Connections - We used seminar evaluation and in-house "report cards". There was high satisfaction in all categories.

DRS - phone surveys were conducted and staff conducted phone interviews. Thank you notes were received from consumers and family members; many handwritten by consumers using adaptive tools from OIB-related skills training. They praised the staff, the services received and they express their gratitude and appreciation for the VMA55 program. Discussion and feedback with consumers following educational events revealed overall positive comments with suggestions to improve the sound systems in the larger venues and provide more time for questions and answers. Internal staff assessment showed less time delays in returning phone calls, timelines established for service delivery and timely referral follow-ups were made. Overall, there was a 97% consumer satisfaction and a self-evaluation average of 92% for quality service delivery and follow up with referring healthcare providers.

CSIC- Completed phone surveys, requested feedback about services at support groups and during home visits. Consumers report a high level of satisfaction with services and pleased with the qualify of services provided.

SWCI - The people served by our OIB program do not typically respond to satisfaction surveys. There were no responses this year that we could verify were from OIB Program participants. We do get a lot of good feedback from consumers, and we’ve received no complaints. We need to do a better job of capturing the satisfaction and progress of OIB consumers.

D. Briefly describe the impact of the Title VII-Chapter 2 program, citing examples from individual cases (without identifying information) in which services contributed significantly to increasing independence and quality of life for the individual(s).

CFD - Impacts of the OIB program are many. We had one new OIB consumer in a previously unserved community who is recently retired from her professional life due to her vision loss from Macular Degeneration. She called because she wanted help in her home and with a CCTV she had been given. She was deeply distressed that she could not see to read or use her computer. We made a home visit to her. Made adjustments to her CCTV, marked the controls and gave her instruction in using it. We provided Low Vision paper, 20/20 markers, signature cards, a large print calendar and appointment book and tactile marking materials. We provided a demo version of Zoom Text and the resource for a free computer loaded with this software. We provided instruction in the use of bump dots and tactile marking paint and introduced her to handheld video magnifier. We provided resources for her to obtain other adaptive equipment and assistive technology. Upon completion of this visit the consumer stated that it had "made all the difference in the world." Our individual, group and community services nurture independence and quality of life for our consumers. On the group level, we arranged a guest speaker in each of our OIB support groups to talk about various age related eye diseases and to show and demonstrate various assistive technologies to help consumers remain independent and maintain or improve their quality of life. These events were very well attended and all participants remarked that this service had helped them a great deal. The OIB Good Life Expo and Artisans’ Market has a great impact upon participants, particularly in their quality of life. They are encouraged and excited about creating works they can show and sell at this event. It fosters their interests in creativity and constructive leisure activities.

CFI - Our CilSuite data base does not track outcomes from the weekly updates. While we were able to customize the fields for the demographic information, housing arrangements and such, we have yet to customize the program to track satisfaction data, functional gains, improved independence, assistive technology gains and the lick as needed for Parts IV and Part VI. We will need to create a manual system for tracking these outcomes.

CPWD - Clients maintain or gain independence through a combination of home visits and educational peer support groups. Without these services clients would be dependent on others to help them with independent living tasks such as cooking, communicating, and reading. Over the past year a number of clients have requested assistance to be able to utilize their iPhones, computers, and CCTVs so they may continue to live independently in their homes. After multiple iPhone training lessons, a woman remarked “I have never been able to figure out how to use this thing, now I can make and receive calls and check my e-mail and the weather.” She had felt out of touch with the outside world and wanted a way to stay active when not out with friends. She now has the freedom and independence to communicate with others and keep up with local politics which was a large part of her life. Another client told a similar story. She had always been in control of her finances and loved to read. She feared she would no longer be able to do so with vision loss. After providing her with a donated CCTV, she ecstatically stated she would now be able to read books she had not read in years, and how wonderful it was to see to write checks and pay her bills again. For her, this meant a gain of independence, as she was no longer reliant on her daughter for this type of assistance. A third client wished to use her iPhone while on a trip without her sighted husband. She wanted to be able to learn her surroundings, keep in touch with her husband and grandchildren while away, and keep track of the weather in multiple states. She was shown how to use SIRI on her iPhone as well as utilize her remaining sight to navigate the screen while using Voiceover for assistance. During the course of several visits she stated “I had not thought of that,” “good idea,” and “I think I can do this. I am learning!” The use of her iPhone gave her renewed confidence and a greater sense of independence as she prepared for her trip. Yet another client wished to read his mail again. He was given a donated CCTV, and was able to maintain independence. Before the donation and instruction on how to use his CCTV, he was relying on the office staff at his apartment complex to help him read his mail. The use of a CCTV allowed him independence and privacy as he did not like “strangers reading my personal mail.”

SWCI - Audio information receivers for at least 11 people. Provided encouragement and supports for people to get involved in activities and volunteering. Helped people develop non-paid natural support networks. Helping OIB consumers get Home & Community Based Services and avoid nursing homes. Set people up with Talking Books, white canes, CCTVs, Computers of the Blind, WOW Computers, magnifiers, reader/scanners, Meals on Wheels, catalogs of AT & teach them to use tools to access information and recreations. Helping people who have never needed assistance before with their Old Age Pensions, food stamps, Medicaid, etc. Provide IL skills training to help people continue to live at home after blindness occurs or spouse passes.

CONNECITONS - Travel training and orientation and mobility are two services that have really increased the independence of participants. They have much more freedom and independence than when depending on paratransit transportation and the volunteer driver program.

CSIC - Our program also continued its practice of accepting donated technology which we give back to our consumers so that they have affordable access to the technology they need. OIB was able to give away two CCTVS through this program and one through The Independence Centers home modifications grant. The Braille classes also started and have three members attending weekly. We have participated in and hosted meetings in the community so that consumers could practice the skills they learned either in home visits or in groups regarding using public transportation and a confidence is built and established. We are able to give out large print calendars to all OIB which empowers individuals to see their appointments and track them. 20/20 pens are also a tool that we are able to provide and show OIB consumers the benefit of contrast to use writing skills as long as possible.

DRS - Two long-time consumers, age 101 and 96 (and recently deceased) lived in their own homes until their deaths using OIB skills training and adaptive tools, i.e, CTBL, talking clocks and watches for time orientation, white support canes, tactile dotes on over and microwave settings, etc. Long-term case management assistance allowed family and friends after utilizing OIB training, services, and resources, to facilitate and advocate for appropriate in-home service. By adapting OIB related ADL skills, they were able to safely and effectively facilitate independent living in the home, continue consumer’s socialization in peer support group and other VMA55 event and consult with our staff on longing, non-vision, health issue. OIB consumers with CSR’s have multiple needs involving healthcare, transportation, housing and DL management. As these needs evolved family and friends, rehab and social services, another provides become more involve din the consumer’s life They look to and relied on the expertise of our staff to help facilitate services and resources. The working relationship with providers and our staff is building a new referral base for them. They see firsthand the breadth of what VMA55 provide via services/support, volunteer assistance, financial help and adaptive equipment loan in order to help sustain people’s independence and quality of life. Two married couples, bother partners are blind and long-term consumers, are now transportation advocates for accessible accommodations and services. One is acting Present of a local chapter of a state bling organization. They all are speakers at VMA55 support groups and one is a regular volunteer at a local low-vision center with interest in re-entering the workforce. Transportation provided by VMA55 has made attendance at state and national blind organization conferences possible for consumers. The information learned at these events has generated articles for our monthly newsletter. Program development activities engage staff and consumer to plan for better implementation. Interested consumers serve as ambassadors to promote VMA55 and tell how the program’s services and support have helped them remain independent.

E. Finally, note any problematic areas or concerns related to implementing the Title VII-Chapter 2 program in your state.

CFD - Implementation of our OIB program has been hindered by staff turnover. OIB Program Assistants have tended to stay only a few months and to quit without notice. This creates a disruption in service delivery to our consumers and communities. Transportation is a perennial issue. We have altered our policy such that OIB staff provide transportation to consumers in our outreach communities. It is good to note there is now public transport available for our consumers in Lamar. Though we acquired several new OIB consumers this FY, many have not been interested in participating in a group. They wanted only the service requested. Finding ways to increase group participation will be a focus for us in the upcoming year.

CFI - Colorado experienced a very slow rollout of the OIB grant with awards delayed until November 2013 and contracts delayed until December. We did not hire support staff until January as we experienced cash flow issues from the State SILS contract which limited the amount available for payroll. We had to inflate the budget due to the shortened year of 9 months instead of 12 months. This skewed some of our activities. For the second year, we had to make adjustments to budgets again with a cutback in the 2014-15 budget from a clerical error at the state which overstated the available money for the first year. We have been forewarned that cuts are expected in the third year of funding too. As this is a capped grant, such swings in funding impacts staff who expect to be able to keep the same FTE they were hired under. We have had to insert them into other programs to keep their FTE at the same level. We are also limited in giving raises to these staff out of grant funds and have to secure funds from unrestricted sources. We will eliminate our part-time AmeriCorps position in July 2015 then the present contract ends to keep the staff positions at the same FTE.

CPWD - During the past year we lost one half-time staff member who resigned unexpectedly. Due to cuts in funding this position was not replaced. Thus one full-time staff member with vision loss and one half-time member maintained services in the OIB program. 10 Additionally due to a decrease in funding, the number of community outreach events were reduced. Focus was given to events where the greatest number of individuals could be reached, but we still saw a decrease in group attendance over the past year. A strategic plan has been developed to increase group attendance over the next reporting period. This plan includes target outreach, new marketing materials and conscious evaluation of group locations. Near the end of the report period it was determined a full-time staff member could be added to the program due to other funding sources and interviews began. Between the 1st and 2nd rounds of interviews, the one full-time staff member with vision loss submitted her resignation. Thus a new program manager and additional staff member will be hired bringing the total number of staff in the program to approximately 2.5.

SWCI - RFPs for the 2013-14 OIB program were due out in January 2013 for a July start date. In late June it was announced that the state would change the OIB program to the Federal fiscal year and that proposals were due immediately. We had to submit a budget for 1/4 of our contract amount for July, August, and September 2013, and received a contract amendment for 07/2013-09/2013 on 8/1/13. For 10-1-13 - 11/14/13 we had to bill oru OIB services ot our IL contract. On 10-4/13 we were told that the 70B covering 7/12 - 6/13 du on 10/15 was now due on 10/18/13 for 10/12 - 09/13, requiring us to re-write the 70B. On 10/30/13 we received notice that we were an "apparent successful offeror". We received our contract for 11/15/13-9/30/14 on 2/14/14. We requested technical assistance several times on how to comply with the new OIB statement of Work and have not received it. We have stated several times that the reporting requirements are onerous. On 8/29/14 we were told that our contract for FFY2015 would be reduced by $6,821.23, so we had to submit another budget, and we received a "contract amendment" for 10/14-9/15 on 9/23/14. We still do not have clarification on the Statement of Work.

CONNECTIONS - As always the large geographic areas of our Center presents challenges.

CSIC - We again remain pleased with the way the OIB program has operated in our areas, and we are looking forward to the future plans of the program! One of our OIB specialists does not drive. This made finding ways to continue services challenging, however we were able to find and hire a driver to meet staff needs to facilitate rural support groups and home visits consistently where public transportation is not an options. We had Second Site leave our areas which has historically been a consumer referral source and provided travel training. Second Site was our only local travel training provider other than DVR. With DVR wait list we see more phone call inquires, mostly for travel training.

DRS - The delayed funding notification this year resulted in two staff layoffs and the sever reduction of our Coordinator’s hours/salary. After this 6-week period, we were able to return the Coordinator to her standard hours and rehire one of the people laid off. The third employee found another job and her position remained unfilled most of the ensuing year. Endeavors to find a qualified Program and Community Advocate proved arduous and resulted in limited outreach activities and program development Overall the number of consumer served remained consistent to the past year due to the tireless effort of the Coordinator. Knowing that there is decreased funding in the remaining two fiscal years of the program’s funding cycle present extreme challenges to meet program goals let alone provide adequate services to consumers. At-risk are retaining three part-time employees, continuing the same level of service delivery, diminishing staffing hours, and steeply reducing program maintenance. Most problematic is whether the current volume of consumers can continue to be served with the same level of service delivery . Finding supplemental funding will be a lengthy pursuit with no guarantee of a successful outcome. This fiscal year, Colorado senior demographics showed a slight decrease in the age 70 range. By year 3 of the OIB grant cycle, however, there will be an increase in "Boomer", new OIB workforce consumers requesting more dynamic services that focus on technology and more public education needed to address these emerging trends. Meanwhile VMA55 will be striving to deliver quality services with less funding. Effort to maintain/increase Federal funding for the OIB program will likely be supported by activist "Boomer" who will lobby and increasingly be proactive to sustain these services and supports. Their outcry will be; equal access to un-served and underserved populations, accessible public transportation, services for blind people with multiple disabilities, affordable housing, support to maintaining their ADL skills and services to keep them out of nursing facilities and living in their own homes. They will demand living in their communities with dignity and independence. And, it’ll surely be a new and exciting era.

DVR - the 1/2 time OIB Program Coordinator left the position in January 2014. This position remained unfilled until October 10, 2014. Support of the most basic of function for the program was provided by DVR staff.

Part IX: Signature

Please sign and print the name, title and telephone number of the IL-OIB Program Director below.

I certify that the data herein reported are statistically accurate to the best of my knowledge.

Signed bySteve Anton
TitleAuthorized Certifying Official
TelephoneOn file
Date signed01/06/2015