Annual Report - Independent Living Services For Older Individuals Who Are Blind

RSA-7-OB for Colorado Division of Vocational Rehabilitation - H177B110006 report through September 30, 2011

Part I: Funding Sources And Expenditures

Title VII-Chapter 2 Federal grant award for reported fiscal year468,653
Other federal grant award for reported fiscal year0
Title VII-Chapter 2 carryover from previous year0
Other federal grant carryover from previous year198,930
A. Funding Sources for Expenditures in Reported FY
A1. Title VII-Chapter 2667,583
A2. Total other federal0
(a) Title VII-Chapter 1-Part B0
(b) SSA reimbursement0
(c) Title XX - Social Security Act0
(d) Older Americans Act0
(e) Other0
A3. State (excluding in-kind)74,176
A4. Third party0
A5. In-kind0
A6. Total Matching Funds74,176
A7. Total All Funds Expended741,759
B. Total expenditures and encumbrances allocated to administrative, support staff, and general overhead costs0
C. Total expenditures and encumbrances for direct program services741,759

Part II: Staffing

FTE (full time equivalent) is based upon a 40-hour workweek or 2080 hours per year.

A. Full-time Equivalent (FTE)

Program Staff a) Administrative and Support b) Direct Service c) Total
1. FTE State Agency 1.0000 0.0000 1.0000
2. FTE Contractors 2.0000 11.0000 13.0000
3. Total FTE 3.0000 11.0000 14.0000

B. Employed or advanced in employment

a) Number employed b) FTE
1. Employees with Disabilities 16 8.0000
2. Employees with Blindness Age 55 and Older 7 2.0000
3. Employees who are Racial/Ethnic Minorities 3 1.0000
4. Employees who are Women 19 8.0000
5. Employees Age 55 and Older 9 5.0000

C. Volunteers

2.00

Part III: Data on Individuals Served

Provide data in each of the categories below related to the number of individuals for whom one or more services were provided during the reported fiscal year.

A. Individuals Served

1. Number of individuals who began receiving services in the previous FY and continued to receive services in the reported FY758
2. Number of individuals who began receiving services in the reported FY385
3. Total individuals served during the reported fiscal year (A1 + A2) 1,143

B. Age

1. 55-5977
2. 60-6459
3. 65-69122
4. 70-7475
5. 75-79130
6. 80-84196
7. 85-89233
8. 90-94139
9. 95-9988
10. 100 & over24
11. Total (must agree with A3)1,143

C. Gender

1. Female821
2. Male322
3. Total (must agree with A3)1,143

D. Race/Ethnicity

For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race119
2. American Indian or Alaska Native4
3. Asian5
4. Black or African American8
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander2
6. White988
7. Two or more races0
8. Race and ethnicity unknown (only if consumer refuses to identify)17
9. Total (must agree with A3)1,143

E. Degree of Visual Impairment

1. Totally Blind (LP only or NLP)53
2. Legally Blind (excluding totally blind)386
3. Severe Visual Impairment704
4. Total (must agree with A3)1,143

F. Major Cause of Visual Impairment

1. Macular Degeneration705
2. Diabetic Retinopathy78
3. Glaucoma99
4. Cataracts91
5. Other170
6. Total (must agree with A3)1,143

G. Other Age-Related Impairments

1. Hearing Impairment396
2. Diabetes136
3. Cardiovascular Disease and Strokes207
4. Cancer92
5. Bone, Muscle, Skin, Joint, and Movement Disorders348
6. Alzheimer's Disease/Cognitive Impairment41
7. Depression/Mood Disorder55
8. Other Major Geriatric Concerns98

H. Type of Residence

1. Private residence (house or apartment)495
2. Senior Living/Retirement Community480
3. Assisted Living Facility133
4. Nursing Home/Long-term Care facility29
5. Homeless6
6. Total (must agree with A3)1,143

I. Source of Referral

1. Eye care provider (ophthalmologist, optometrist)37
2. Physician/medical provider34
3. State VR agency29
4. Government or Social Service Agency90
5. Veterans Administration146
6. Senior Center90
7. Assisted Living Facility97
8. Nursing Home/Long-term Care facility21
9. Faith-based organization46
10. Independent Living center169
11. Family member or friend228
12. Self-referral140
13. Other16
14. Total (must agree with A3)1,143

Part IV: Types of Services Provided and Resources Allocated

Provide data related to the number of older individuals who are blind receiving each type of service and resources committed to each type of service.

A. Clinical/functional vision assessments and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 50,000
1b. Total Cost from other funds 0
2. Vision screening / vision examination / low vision evaluation 63
3. Surgical or therapeutic treatment to prevent, correct, or modify disabling eye conditions 0

B. Assistive technology devices and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 138,224
1b. Total Cost from other funds 0
2. Provision of assistive technology devices and aids 925
3. Provision of assistive technology services 754

C. Independent living and adjustment training and services

Cost Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 459,936
1b. Total Cost from other funds 0
2. Orientation and Mobility training 177
3. Communication skills 328
4. Daily living skills 699
5. Supportive services (reader services, transportation, personal 488
6. Advocacy training and support networks 305
7. Counseling (peer, individual and group) 339
8. Information, referral and community integration 657
. Other IL services 130

D. Community Awareness: Events & Activities

Cost a. Events / Activities b. Persons Served
1a. Total Cost from VII-2 funds 93,599
1b. Total Cost from other funds 0
2. Information and Referral 808
3. Community Awareness: Events/Activities 215 3,627

Part V: Comparison of Prior Year Activities to Current Reported Year

A. Activity

a) Prior Year b) Reported FY c) Change ( + / - )
1. Program Cost (all sources) 841,449 741,759 -99,690
2. Number of Individuals Served 1,026 1,143 117
3. Number of Minority Individuals Served 123 155 32
4. Number of Community Awareness Activities 842 215 -627
5. Number of Collaborating agencies and organizations 142 37 -105
6. Number of Sub-grantees 7 7

Part VI: Program Outcomes/Performance Measures

Provide the following data for each of the performance measures below. This will assist RSA in reporting results and outcomes related to the program.

Number of persons Percent of persons
A1. Number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training 754 100.00%
A2. Number of individuals receiving AT (assistive technology) services and training who maintained or improved functional abilities that were previously lost or diminished as a result of vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only) 147 19.50%
A3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 267 35.41%
B1. Number of individuals who received orientation and mobility (O & M) services 177 100.00%
B2. Of those receiving orientation and mobility (O & M) services, the number of individuals who experienced functional gains or maintained their ability to travel safely and independently in their residence and/or community environment as a result of services. (closed/inactive cases only) 182 102.82%
B3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 68 38.42%
C1. Number of individuals who received communication skills training 328 100.00%
C2. Of those receiving communication skills training, the number of individuals who gained or maintained their functional abilities as a result of services they received. (Closed/inactive cases only) 210 64.02%
C3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 175 53.35%
D1. Number of individuals who received daily living skills training 699 100.00%
D2. Number of individuals that experienced functional gains or successfully restored or maintained their functional ability to engage in their customary daily life activities as a result of services or training in personal management and daily living skills. (closed/inactive cases only) 526 75.25%
D3. Number of individuals for whom functional gains have not yet been determined at the close of the reporting period. 321 45.92%
E1. Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they are in greater control and are more confident in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 53 n/a
E2. Number of individuals served who reported feeling that they have less control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 0 n/a
E3. Number of individuals served who reported no change in their feelings of control and confidence in their ability to maintain their current living situation as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 0 n/a
E4. Number of individuals served who experienced changes in lifestyle for reasons unrelated to vision loss. (closed/inactive cases only) 79 n/a
E5. Number of individuals served who died before achieving functional gain or experiencing changes in lifestyle as a result of services they received. (closed/inactive cases only) 42 n/a

Part VII: Narrative

A. Briefly describe the agency's method of implementation for the Title VII-Chapter 2 program (i.e. in-house, through sub-grantees/contractors, or a combination) incorporating outreach efforts to reach underserved and/or unserved populations. Please list all sub-grantees/contractors.

Colorado uses a competitive RFP process to award OIB contracts. Currently there are seven contracts, of which all seven are with centers for independent living. Each contractor covers a multi-county area, often partnering with senior centers or other facilities in rural or remote communities. Colorado’s OIB program has a large number of peer support groups. Many of them are consumer-facilitated. All contractors provide home visits to assist with removing barriers, marking appliances, and consulting about lighting. All OIB staff has access to the on-line training modules of the American Federation of the Blind. Collaboration is key for the OIB contractors, especially in their outreach efforts. Contractors report that their most successful outreach efforts have involved collaborating with other organizations to present information at health fairs and vendor fairs.

B. Briefly describe any activities designed to expand or improve services including collaborative activities or community awareness; and efforts to incorporate new methods and approaches developed by the program into the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) under Section 704.

OIB staff across the state joined with other low vision providers to create their own information-sharing organization. They meet in person and by skyping. This has led to referrals from low vision vendors or providers who were unfamiliar with the OIB program. Expansion of the program tends to be more toward expanding staff skills and knowledge base. The amount of traveling necessary to get to the most unserved and underserved OIB consumers means that the program is operating at capacity until more funding becomes available.

C. Briefly summarize results from any of the most recent evaluations or satisfaction surveys conducted for your program and attach a copy of applicable reports.

During the last four months of the reporting year, DVR conducted monitoring reviews of all ten centers for independent living. During these site visits, the monitoring team was able to review OIB records as well as typical IL CSRs. A number of the consumers interviewed at the seven centers that hold OIB contracts, were OIB consumers. These people spoke of how the program had changed their lives, moving them from giving up to giving back.

D. Briefly describe the impact of the Title VII-Chapter 2 program, citing examples from individual cases (without identifying information) in which services contributed significantly to increasing independence and quality of life for the individual(s).

From the Independence Center in Colorado Springs: One consumer was feeling like there was no reason to continue living as she had lost so much sight. After hearing the experience of someone who had been totally blind almost his entire life, she became excited at what she could do and she is currently helping organize the support groups as well as expanding her social activities.   From CPWD in Boulder: One consumer reported to have struggled for a couple of years before seeking services from our program. Through peer support group meetings, he says he learned more in just a couple of months than he had the two years prior. Without the OIB program, he would have given up his career as a music teacher. Itwas the perfect CCTV that provided him access to reading music in addition to performing other tasks independently.   From Connections in Greeley: We were able to combine our efforts with our nursing home transition program and get a person over 55 and with vision loss out of a nursing home and back into the community.

E. Finally, note any problematic areas or concerns related to implementing the Title VII-Chapter 2 program in your state.

The lack of access to public transportation in our rural areas continues to be an issue. It is difficult for consumers to get to peer groups and OIB events, and it is time-consuming and expensive for OIB staff to drive to where the consumers are.

Part VIII: Signature

As the authorized signatory, I will sign, date and retain in the state agency's files a copy of this 7-OB Report and the separate Certification of Lobbying form ED-80-0013 (available in MS Word and PDF formats.

Signed byNancy Smith
TitleDirector of Division of Vocational Rehabilitation
Telephone303-866-4816
Date signed12/28/2011