RSA-227 - Annual Client Assistance Program (CAP) Report

Utah (DISABILITY LAW CENTER -- THE COMMUNITY LEGAL CENTER) - H161A140045 - FY2014

General Information

Designated Agency Identification

NameDisability Law Center
Address205 North 400 West
Address Line 2
CitySalt Lake City
StateUtah
Zip Code84103
E-mail Addressazahradnikova@disabilitylawcenter.org
Website Addresshttp://www.disabilitylawcenter.org
Phone801-363-1347
TTY
Toll-free Phone800-662-9080
Toll-free TTY
Fax801-363-1437

Operating Agency (if different from Designated Agency)

NameDisability Law Center
Address205 North 400 West
Address Line 2
CitySalt Lake City
Zip Code84103
E-mail Addressazahradnikova@disabilitylawcenter.org
Website Addresshttp://www.disabilitylawcenter.org
Phone801-363-1347
TTY
Toll-free Phone800-662-9080
Toll-free TTY
Fax801-363-1437

Additional Information

Name of CAP Director/CoordinatorLindsay Boerens
Person to contact regarding reportLindsay Boerens
Contact Person Phone801-363-1347

Part I. Agency Workload Data

A. Information and Referral Services (I&R)

Multiple responses are not permitted.

1. Information regarding the Rehabilitation Act17
2. Information regarding Title I of the ADA0
3. Other information provided46
4. Total I&R services provided (Lines A1+A2+A3)63
5. Individuals attending trainings by CAP staff (approximate)1,116

B. Individuals served

An individual is counted only once during a fiscal year. Multiple counts are not permitted for Lines B1-B3.

1. Individuals who are still being served as of October 1 (carryover from prior year)9
2. Additional individuals who were served during the year171
3. Total individuals served (Lines B1+B2)180
4. Individuals (from Line B3) who had multiple case files opened/closed this year. (In unusual situations, an individual may have more than one case file opened/closed during a fiscal year. This number is not added to the total in Line B3 above.)180

C. Individual still being served as of September 30

Carryover to next year. This total may not exceed Line I.B3. 13

D. Reasons for closing individuals' case files

Choose one primary reason for closing each case file. There may be more case files than the total number of individuals served to account for those unusual situations, referred to in Line I.B4, when an individual had multiple case files closed during the year.

1. All issues resolved in individual's favor90
2. Some issues resolved in individual's favor (when there are multiple issues)21
3. CAP determines VR agency position/decision was appropriate for the individual8
4. Individual's case lacks legal merit; (inappropriate for CAP intervention)9
5. Individual chose alternative representation1
6. Individual decided not to pursue resolution18
7. Appeals were unsuccessful0
8. CAP services not needed due to individual's death, relocation, etc.0
9. Individual refused to cooperate with CAP10
10. CAP unable to take case due to lack of resources0
11. Other (please explain)

We use "other" outcome for the following reasons: * Client took action on their own behalf * Client did not respond to DLC calls/attempts to contact * Client no longer desired CAP involvement to resolve issue

E. Results achieved for individuals

1. Controlling law/policy explained to individual61
2. Application for services completed.1
3. Eligibility determination expedited7
4. Individual participated in evaluation1
5. IPE developed/implemented8
6. Communication re-established between individual and other party18
7. Individual assigned to new counselor/office5
8. Alternative resources identified for individual4
9. ADA/504/EEO/OCR/ complaint made1
10. Other54
11. Other (please explain)

We use "other" outcome for the following reasons: * Client took action on their own behalf * Client did not respond to DLC calls/attempts to contact * Client no longer desired CAP involvement to resolve issue

Part II. Program Data

A. Age

As of the beginning of the fiscal year. Multiple responses are not permitted.

1. 21 and under13
2. 22 - 4074
3. 41 - 6491
4. 65 and over2
5. Total (Sum of Lines A1 through A4. Total must equal Line I.B3.)180

B. Gender

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Female65
2. Male115
3. Total (Sum of Lines B1 and B2. Total must equal Line I.B3.)180

C. Race/ethnicity

1. Hispanic/Latino of any race19
For individuals who are non-Hispanic/Latino only
2. American Indian or Alaskan Native1
3. Asian0
4. Black or African American4
5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander1
6. White154
7. Two or more races0
8. Race/ethnicity unknown1

D. Primary disabling condition of individuals served

Multiple responses not permitted.

1. Blindness (both eyes)5
2. Other visual impairments6
3. Deafness5
4. Hard of hearing3
5. Deaf-blind0
6. Orthopedic impairments42
7. Absense of extremities2
8. Mental illness66
9. Substance abuse (alcohol or drugs)9
10. Mental retardation5
11. Specific learning disabilities (SLD)21
12. Neurological disorders4
13. Respiratory disorders3
14. Heart and other circulatory conditions2
15. Digestive disorders0
16. Genitourinary conditions0
17. Speech Impairments0
18. AIDS/HIV positive0
19. Traumatic brain injury (TBI)7
20. All other disabilities0
21. Disabilities not known0
22. Total (Sum of Lines D1 through D21. Total must equal Line I. B3.)180

E. Types of individuals served

Multiple responses permitted.

1. Applicants of VR Program51
2. Clients of VR Program127
3. Applicants or clients of IL Program1
4. Applicants or clients of other programs and projects funded under the Act1

F. Source of individual's concern

Multiple responses permitted.

1. VR agency only174
2. Other Rehabilitation Act sources only2
3. Both VR agency and other Rehabilitation Act sources4
4. Employer0

G. Problem areas

Multiple responses permitted.

1. Individual requests information12
2. Communication problems between individual and counselor29
3. Conflict about services to be provided86
4. Related to application/eligibility process48
5. Related to IPE development/implementation10
6. Other Rehabilitation Act-related problems2
7. Non-Rehabilitation Act related0
8. Related to Title I of the ADA0

H. Types of CAP services provided

Choose one primary CAP service provided for each case file/service record.

1. Information/referral29
2. Advisory/interpretational15
3. Negotiation19
4. Administrative/informal review7
5. Alternative dispute resolution3
6. Formal appeal/fair hearing0
7. Legal remedy0
8. Transportation0

Part III. Narrative

Narrative

Narrative Part III. Narrative a. Type of agency used to administer CAP: 1) External - P&A

b. Sources of funds expended: Current Fiscal Year / Next Fiscal Year Federal funds - $116,783.49/$126,756.51 State funds - 0 All other funds — 0/$22,167.28 Total from other sources — 0/$22,167.28

c. Budget for current and following fiscal years Wages and salaries: $76,534.15/$100,640.07 Fringe Benefits: $21,401.64/$26,845.03 Material/Supplies: $793.62/$2,104.06 Postage: $2,141.99/$485.62 Telephone: $779.85/$1,460.54 Rent: $3,458.18/$4,098.87 Travel: $3,062.05/$3,432.13 Copying: $3,210.38/$1,722.17 Bonding/Insurance: $449.03/$538.87 Equipment Rental/Purchase: $1,309.77/$1,836.00 Legal Services: $122.03/$0 Indirect Costs: 0/0 Miscellaneous: $3,520.80/$4,926.91 Total Budget: $116,783.49/$148,090.25

d. Number of person-years Type of position/full-time equivalent/% of year/Persons - Y Professional Full time: 1.17 Part time: 0.02 Vacant: 0 Clerical Full time: 0.20 Part time: 0.08

e. Summary of Presentations Made

Basic Counselor Orientation Training (BCOT) — 50 USOR Staff trained Client Assistance Program (CAP) advocates presented information on the program to new Vocational Rehabilitation staff members during their Basic Counselor Orientation & Training (BCOT). BCOT is offered to new employees of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR). BCOT presentations were held in September, November, January, April, and July during the reporting period. The presentations reached 50 new counselors, vocational evaluators, vocational technicians, benefits planners, and support staff.

USOR/USOE Transition Training — 140 attendees The CAP team placed a high importance on reaching transition-aged youth during fiscal year 2014. In an effort to inform students with disabilities about Disability Law Center (DLC) services, we provided information and training on education/employment issues and discussed the services offered through the Client Assistance Program (CAP). Throughout the year, the CAP team presented to various student and parent groups and service providers. Presentations were conducted to the following groups:

Granite School District Transition Fair The DLC attended three transition fairs held by Granite School District. Each fair was well attended with 20-35 attendees at each event. Information on education, employment and voting was provided to attendees. Special educators throughout the district were provided with DLC general, CAP, and transition brochures at trainings provided by the district in conjunction with this event.

South Valley Transition Student Presentation CAP advocates provided training to 15 transition students with disabilities and 4 teaching aides at South Valley School. Training covered topics such as: voting, housing, employment (including social security and vocational rehabilitation), and housing.

Utah Parent Center (UPC) Davis Transition Conference Panel UPC hosted a transition conference for the Davis School District for parents of students with disabilities. The DLC had a representative on the panel with other service providers who work with students with disabilities. The DLC presented to 30 parents in attendance. We provided information on special education and employment rights. CAP, transition, and the DLC general brochures were distributed to each of the 30 attendees.

ASPIRE Outreach ASPIRE is a pilot program that will provide case management and transition services to students aged 14-19 with disabilities. The program is intended to increase employment outcomes for young people with disabilities. The DLC met with ASPIRE’s staff to discuss areas of collaboration and cross-over. We made plans to work together on future outreach efforts.

Juvenile Justice Facilities — 53 attendees DLC staff partnered together to monitor Juvenile Justice Facilities throughout the state. The purpose of these monitoring visits is to ensure that residents are free from abuse and neglect, receive appropriate educational services, and are aware of transitional services available through VR after their release. Presentations were conducted to the following groups: Mill Creek Youth Center — 13 attendees Decker Lake — 10 attendees Southwest Utah Youth Center — 10 attendees Genesis Work Camp - 10 attendees Wasatch Youth Center — 10 attendees

Utah Assistive Technology Program — 2,550 people reached In an effort to ensure that people with assistive technology needs are aware of our services, the CAP team partnered with the Utah Assistive Technology Program (UATP) to get the word out that we can help advocate for those eligible for AT services. In 2014, we conducted the following UATP activities:

Webinar CAP attorney, LauraLee Gillespie, presented a webinar to 50 attendees on access and eligibility requirements for assistive technology in Medicaid, Medicare, private insurance, Vocational Rehabilitation, and special education in public schools. The webinar is archived online and available for future viewing. A client contacted the DLC for further assistance following this webinar.

Blog Article The DLC was invited to write blog posts on a quarterly basis for the UATP newsletter. During the second quarter, we wrote a blog post titled “VR Logic When it comes to Funding AT”. The post discusses ways in which VR can fund assistive technology and discusses the role of the CAP program in this process. The article can be found at: http://utahatprogram.blogspot.com/. The blog has a readership of over 2,500 people.

Utah Rehabilitation Association (URA) The Utah Rehabilitation Association (URA) is a recognized chapter of the National Rehabilitation Association (NRA). NRA is a private, non-profit member organization that promotes ethical and state of the art practice in rehabilitation with the goal of the personal and economic independence of persons with disabilities. Annual Conference — October 2013

CAP Advocate, Tim Lewis, was awarded Advocate of the Year.

URA Governmental Affairs Conference — April 2014 CAP advocates attended the meeting and presented information on the program, employment rights and advocacy strategies.

CAP District Tour Presentations — 75 VR counselors The CAP team continues to meet with and present to Vocational Rehabilitation districts around the state. The team met with groups of VR counselors to build professional relationships and encourage them to view CAP as a resource for their clients. Additionally, we provided information about available programs to show VR we can be counted on as a referral for their clients needing legal assistance. CAP advocates visited with 16 VR counselors at the Cedar City and St. George Vocational Rehabilitation offices on January 15, 2014. In September 2014, we met with 34 counselors from the three-office Valley West District and advised the counselors of services the DLC can provide to clients. Finally, in April 2014, we conducted focus groups at the South Valley VR office to better understand how the DLC can serve the disability community. After meeting with 25 counselors, we left with a new perspective on issues facing VR clients in that area. The information was passed along to the entire agency to take into consideration as new goal plans were being written for the coming fiscal year.

Reasonable Accommodation Presentations — 80 attendees The employment team at the DLC has developed a very strong training tool to teach service providers and people with disabilities about the ADA, Title I, and how to request a reasonable accommodation from their employers. The presentation has been a hugely popular and we are frequently asked to give the information to various groups. This year, we presented to the following groups: • University of Utah Special Education Master’s Program — October 2013 - 10 attendees • Job Placement and Development Conference — December 2013 — 35 attendees in person and via satellite • Pioneer Adult Rehabilitation Center (PARC) Staff Training — July 2014 — 35 attendees

Disability Resource Centers — 7 DRC staff In an effort to provide employment rights information to students at institutions of higher learning, the CAP team conducted outreach events with the following Disability Resource Centers: Ogden Weber Applied Technology Center (OWATC) — August 2014 — 3 DRC staff in attendance Utah Valley University — September 2014 — 4 DRC staff in attendance

Mental Illness — 15 consumers According to a survey by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Utah has the highest rate of mental illness in the nation. So it should come as no surprise to find that CAP serves a large number of clients with mental illness as they face problems getting services from Vocational Rehabilitation. In an effort to provide information about our services to this population, CAP conducted the following outreach efforts in FY14:

Alliance House Outreach Alliance House, Inc. is a nonprofit “Clubhouse” psycho-social program that takes place in a setting that is neither an institution nor treatment center. The Alliance House serves members, not clients. CAP advocates visited Alliance House in an informal setting to provide information to club members on employment rights and CAP advocacy services on the following dates: January 2014 — 4 attendees February 2014 — 5 attendees March 2014 — 6 attendees

f. Involvement with Advisory Boards

State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) CAP, by rule, has a seat on the SRC council. The Utah SRC council meets ten times throughout the year to review policy changes and to conduct all activities as required by the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). In addition to attending the ten regularly scheduled full-council meetings throughout the year, CAP staff also attended quarterly Utah Center for Assistive Technology (UCAT) meetings.

Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR)/ (CAP) Quarterly Meetings The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) met quarterly with members of the Client Assistance Program (CAP) team to review emerging trends in client service issues, provide feedback on proposed rule changes, and discuss items of mutual interest to both programs. The meetings allow CAP and USOR staff to foster a positive relationship while addressing systemic issues. These meetings provide a forum for both agencies to talk openly about client needs and systemic barriers. In FY14, we met in November, February, and May.

Statewide Administrator’s Meetings (SAM) CAP staff attended the monthly Statewide Administrator’s Meeting (SAM) in November 2013. SAM is open to all USOR Field Service Directors, District Directors, and Supervising Counselors. The meetings include members of USOR administration. The purpose of the meeting is to share information that needs to be relayed to local field office counselors, rehabilitation technicians, vocational evaluators, and support staff. SAM also focuses on leadership development within USOR.

Outreach to unserved/underserved populations

Homeless Outreach — 15 attendees The DLC targeted outreach to the homeless community in an effort to share information on services related to employment, including the Client Assistance Program (CAP). This is an unserved/underserved population that the CAP team had not reached out to in some time. We focused our outreach efforts at Palmer Court located in Salt Lake City, UT. Palmer Court is a permanent supportive housing development. Residents at Palmer Court work closely with a team of case managers and volunteers to fully transition back into housing and the community. The CAP team recognizes that employment plays a huge part in the successful transition from homelessness to community integration. We participated in the following events related to homeless outreach: Palmer Court Presentation — November 2013 — 9 attendees Meet and greet with Palmer Court staff — December 2013 — 6 attendees

Pacific Islander Outreach — 140 attendees Utah has a thriving Pacific Islander community — with a higher than average population ratio compared to the rest of the country. In an effort to provide information about DLC services to this underserved group, we conducted the following outreach activities in FY14:

2nd Annual Pacific Islander Family Health Expo The DLC provided an information table at this event where 110 attendees from the Pacific Islander and Latino communities received general information and publications on the services that we provide to the disability community.

Annual Friendly Island Festival Similar to the Family Health Expo, the DLC operated an information booth and provided information to 30 attendees from the Pacific Islander and Latino communities.

Mexican Consulate — Hispanic Outreach — 309 attendees In Utah, the Latino population is our largest minority group with over 13% of the general population. However, the DLC has found that it is difficult to reach this minority group. We continue to brainstorm innovative ways to reach the group. In FY14, we conducted the following efforts to reach the Latino community: Information booths were operated at the Mexican Consulate and reached 309 members of the Hispanic/Latino communities. Information was shared with patrons about DLC services, housing, discrimination, etc. Booths were held weekly from June — September 2014.

Workability Job Fairs (Deaf community outreach) — 210 attendees Twice yearly, job fairs are held at the local community center for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Disability-friendly employers are recruited through VR’s Choose to Work program. The employers attend and provide information on available careers. The CAP team operates an information table to ensure that attendees are aware of their rights as they engage in the hiring process with potential employers. October 2013 — 100 attendees - FY14 (13-14) EM- Workability Job Fair April 2014 — 110 attendees - FY14 (13-14) EM- Workability Job Fair

Alternative Dispute Resolution CAP continues to uphold the mandate of the Rehabilitation Act to resolve issues at the lowest possible level. During FY 2014, CAP provided information and self-advocacy guidance to 63 clients. Additionally, CAP staff explained controlling law/policies and VR processes to 61 clients, enabling them to make requests and receive appropriate services in accordance with the Individual Plans for Employment (IPE). CAP represented 7 clients in informal reviews and engaged in 3 alternative dispute resolution procedures. We did not request any fair hearings during this reporting period.

Systemic Advocacy

Disability Law Center advocates undertook a project in FY14 to review the state of Utah’s approach to transition services for students with disabilities leaving high school to pursue higher education and/or employment opportunities. As part of our efforts, we toured 12 sheltered workshops and 19 transition programs around the state. We learned about the system and found programs that needed improvement, along with programs that deserved recognition for doing great transition work. Following the tours, we published a transition report highlighting our findings. The report provides state educators with recommendations on how to improve practices for transition-aged youth. We detailed our concerns with the lack of implementation of Employment First laws enacted in 2011 and 2012. We reviewed the roles and responsibilities of applicable state agencies, including the Utah State Office of Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, Department of Workforce Services, and Higher Education. In a companion letter, we challenged the agencies to take a hard look at their approach to transition work and to do a better job of helping youths with disabilities find integrated, competitive, and gainful employment. Over 700 copies were printed and sent to individuals in each agency as well as Utah legislators, the Utah Parent Center, and the press. The report was picked up nationally and shared by various news outlets. Efforts to monitor change will continue into FY15.

Media/Publications/Brochures

USOR Appeals Fact Sheet The CAP team developed a fact sheet to help clients who want to better understand the VR appeals process. We hope that the fact sheet will help clients move forward with appealing issues when CAP advocacy is not available. This would happen if CAP determines there is no legal merit to the case. Some clients insist on moving forward with the appeals process on their own and with this fact sheet, we hope that the process is clearly laid out and easy to understand each step.

Transition Report Disability Law Center advocates undertook a project in FY14 to review the state of Utah’s approach to transition services for students with disabilities leaving high school to pursue higher education and/or employment opportunities. As part of our efforts, we toured 12 sheltered workshops and 19 transition programs around the state. We learned about the system and found programs that needed improvement, along with programs that deserved recognition for doing great transition work. Following the tours, we published a transition report highlighting our findings. The report provides state educators with recommendations on how to improve practices for transition-aged youth. We detailed our concerns with the lack of implementation of Employment First laws enacted in 2011 and 2012. We reviewed the roles and responsibilities of applicable state agencies, including the Utah State Office of Education, Vocational Rehabilitation, Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, Department of Workforce Services, and Higher Education. In a companion letter, we challenged the agencies to take a hard look at their approach to transition work and to do a better job of helping youths with disabilities find integrated, competitive, and gainful employment. Over 700 copies were printed and sent to individuals in each agency as well as Utah legislators, the Utah Parent Center, and the press. The report was picked up nationally and shared by various news outlets. Efforts to monitor change will continue into FY15.

CAP Advocacy Video The CAP team recorded a video that details the services that CAP provides to clients of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program. The video was posted on the DLC website, Facebook page, Youtube, and was sent out in our winter e-newsletter. The video can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWgcnmNNz4wt=11

Social Media — Facebook & Twitter The CAP team capitalized on the opportunity to share information on employment rights during October’s nationally recognized “Disability Employment Awareness Month”. To celebrate this event, we created social media posts relating to various employment topics for each week in October 2013. Topics included disability disclosure in the workplace, the presidential proclamation about DEAM, reasonable accommodations, and the “I Can” Public Service Announcement.

Radio Campaign in St. George - 5 radio channels — 3 month campaign A small percentage of CAP funds were used to conduct a radio campaign in rurally located Southern Utah. The script for the radio ad is as follows:

Voice 1: The Disability Law Center’s advocacy helped me get an accommodation at work so I could keep my job.

Voice 2: They protected my right to vote.

Voice 3: Making $2.50 an hour at the workshop wasn’t fair. They stood up for my rights.

Voice 4: When their attorney got involved, the landlord decided to rent to me and my service dog after all. Professional Narrator: The Disability Law Center provides free legal help and represents Utahn’s with issues related to their disability. call 1-800-662-9080 or go to disabilitylawcenter.org. .

Online information/outreach

The DLC is proud of our website, which features a section solely devoted to employment information and resources. DLC/CAP publications are available on the website at www.disabilitylawcenter.org. The Employment section on the website includes the CAP brochure in English and Spanish, the CAP-VR handbook, and other resources related to employment rights under the ADA. Number of website hits in FY14: 1,012,729

Interesting Cases

Eligibility Client is a 37-year-old female with mental illness and physical impairments. She contacted CAP because Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) had found her ineligible for services. VR stated that she had been able to maintain employment as an insurance agent despite the limitations of her disabilities. The client disagreed. She was not working at the time of her application and was adamant that she left her previous employment due to her disabilities. CAP argued on her behalf that VR should find her eligible for services. We cited medical and clinical records in her VR file that indicated that her disabilities prevent her from working. We also provided VR with records showing that she left her previous job due to her disabilities. Based on our advocacy efforts, VR overturned their decision and found the client eligible for services.

Client is a 19-year-old female with a specific learning disability. She contacted CAP when she was found ineligible for VR services. VR stated that they did not have sufficient documentation to show that she had a disability. CAP assisted the client by advocating for VR to conduct an evaluation and assessment to determine her disability. VR agreed. The evaluation clearly showed that the client has a disability and can benefit from VR services. VR overturned their decision and found the client eligible for services.

IPE Implementation Client is a 54-year-old male with mental illness and physical/orthopedic impairments. He contacted CAP when VR was not willing to support training for him to become a video producer — although that was the employment objective listed in his IPE. Additionally, VR would not provide the client with a video camera to allow him to work as a video producer. VR argued that the client had not made sufficient progress toward his goal and they would not provide him with training or equipment. CAP investigated the issue and found that previous training provided to the client had not been sufficient to allow him to be successfully employed as a video producer. After numerous discussions with the client’s VR counselor, VR agreed to provide him with additional training and a camera to use to work as a video producer. The client has since found employment working as a videographer for a local film in production.

Informed Choice Client is a 42-year-old male with mental illness. He contacted CAP when VR refused to support his desired employment objective of special education teacher. VR argued that the client’s disability would prevent him from working successfully in the teaching field. Further, they stated that his disability was an impediment to obtaining the Master’s degree required to work in the field. CAP advised the client to get a letter of support from his therapist stating that the client could become successfully employed in special education. The client had already began his Master’s program and had done well on his classes. CAP provided VR with the transcript showing that the client was doing well in his classes along with the therapist’s recommendation. CAP argued that VR should support the client’s informed choice to pursue a career in special education teaching. VR finally agreed to support the client in his goal. VR is now funding the remaining Master’s level classes required to become a special education teacher, as well as all books, fees, and other associated costs.

Self-Employment Client is a 61-year-old male with Physical/Orthopedic Impairments. He contacted CAP when VR kept delaying their support in his quest to pursue self-employment. VR would not formally approve the client’s business plan. CAP investigated his concerns and made legal arguments that VR was not following their own policies and procedures related to assisting clients with self-employment goals. We argued that VR was unreasonably delaying the start of the client’s business. CAP attended a meeting with the client, his VR counselor, and VR administration. VR agreed that they would promptly review the business plan and move forward with approvals. Within two months of CAP’s advocacy efforts, our client obtained approval for the equipment he needed to start his business and he is now moving forward in his self-employment goals.

Conflict about services to be provided Client is a 34-year-old male who is blind. He had been working with his counselor to receive the training necessary to become a welder. When the client began suffering from severe mouth pain due to neglected dental issues, he contacted VR. VR suggested that he have his teeth pulled and get dentures. The client, however, insisted on getting an evaluation to see if his current teeth could be saved. VR denied his request. The client contacted CAP for help. CAP advocated for the client to get a thorough dental exam. Following the evaluation, it was clear that the client’s teeth could be repaired. CAP advocated for VR to provide the dental treatment outlined by the dentist who conducted the evaluation. VR agreed and provided the client with the dental work he needed in order to move forward with his goal of becoming a welder.

Conflict about employment objective & services to be provided Client is a 20-year-old male with muscular and skeletal impairments. He contacted CAP when VR refused to support his desired employment objective of Meteorologist. Due to the client’s disabilities, he requires a personal assistant in order to attend school. VR argued that they could no longer fund his personal assistant because he had “reached the lifetime funding limit for his case.” Further, VR expressed concern that he would ever be able to work as a Meteorologist based on his disabilities. CAP argued that in accordance with the Rehab Act, VR could not place an arbitrary limit on a specific type of service. Further, CAP argued that VR’s stance that the client would not be able to work as a Meteorologist was purely speculative and not based on any real evidence. Based on CAP’s advocacy, VR agreed to fund the client’s Bachelor’s Degree in Atmospheric Science. They also agreed to support him with his personal assistant while he is attending school.

Delay in Services Client is 32-years-old and is deaf. He contacted CAP when VR would not make a decision on supporting his request for services, which included dental work, a vibrating watch and alarm clock, and an MRI to determine if he is eligible for a cochlear implant. The client had requested these items without any response from his VR counselor. When CAP contacted VR, we learned that the MRI had been approved, but the delay was due to confusion around getting the proper codes needed for billing. CAP made multiple calls to client’s counselor as well as her supervisor. CAP then made calls to medical providers about how to obtain the needed to codes. Ultimately, CAP wrote a letter to VR giving a deadline date to have the MRI scheduled or CAP would request an informal review. Two weeks later VR was successful in obtaining the codes and scheduled the MRI. The client is an appropriate candidate for a cochlear implant and is now in the process of scheduling the procedure. VR also agreed to provide him with the dental work, watch and alarm clock.

Certification

Approved

This Report is Complete and Correct.Yes
Date Signed:18-Dec-14
Name of Designated Agency Official:Adina Zahradnikova
Title of Designated Agency Official:Executive Director