ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

Published September 4, 2014.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 (submitted FY 2013)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Commissioner

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Commissioner

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryRaymond E. Hopkins

Title of SignatoryCommissioner

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/19/2013

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2014No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities (Option A was selected/Option B was not selected).

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) collaborate to develop the DBVI State plan and vocational rehabilitation (VR) policies and procedures. DBVI and the SRC also obtain input from individuals who are blind and vision impaired and other stakeholders through public comment, satisfaction surveys, and tri-annual needs assessments.

During the spring of 2013, the SRC State plan writing team assisted DBVI in preparing the 2014 State plan. The writing team reviewed State plan drafts and provided input to ensure the plan was consistent with the SRC and VR program goals, objectives, and policies. The full SRC discussed the State Plan draft at its June 8, 2013 quarterly meeting and determined that DBVI would submit the Plan pending a final review of the SRC by a member of the writing team.

In preparation for development of the 4.2 (c) the SRC reviewed the 2012 DBVI Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment which encompassed a three year review of internal and external data regarding individuals who are blind, vision impaired, and deafblind, Public Comment from 2012, and recommendations of the SRC throughout the year.

1. The SRC continues to recommend DBVI remain focused on the six goals and priorities contained in the 2013 State plan attachment 4.11 (c) (1). With a few exceptions, the issues and recommendations found in the 2013 State plan attachment 4.2 (c) relate directly to the six goals and priorities.

DBVI supports the SRC recommendation to remain focused on six of the six goals and priorities that exist in the 2013 State Plan Attachment 4.11 (c) (1) with two exceptions. In the 2014 State Plan Attachment 4.11 (c) (1) Goal 4 is revised ensure broader interpretation of the use of rehabilitation technology and now reads as “Provide rehabilitation technology to consumers to facilitate their success in training and employment.” The second exception is the deletion of Goal 6 pertaining to the development and implementation of a mentoring program which the agency has determined will be better accomplished as a strategy to Goals 1 and 5 pertaining to achievement of employment outcomes and services to transition aged students in the 2014 State Plan Attachment 4.11(c) (1).

2. Informed choice is an area of concern for the SRC and other stakeholders. SRC members, and individuals making public comment, indicated DBVI should ensure applicants and recipients of services are informed and guided by DBVI staff about their rights to make informed choices and given sufficient information about options available to them in order to facilitate informed choice regarding their vocational goals and the goods and services they are eligible to receive to accomplish those goals.

DBVI will continue to provide training to staff members regarding the philosophy and practice of informed choice and consumer choice.

3. The SRC feels it is necessary and appropriate to their work to participate in meetings of other Commonwealth councils dealing with aspects of vocational rehabilitation and regional and national networks of SRC members including the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and the National Council of State Administrators of the Blind (NCSAB). Therefore, the SRC requests budget provision for an Executive Committee member of the SRC to attend/participate in meetings approved by the SRC. Some of these organizations include the Virginia Department of Rehabilitative Services (or its newly named equivalent) SRC, the Virginia Assistive Technology System, the George Washington University Technical Assistance Center Region III SRC/VR Learning Community, National Council of State Rehabilitation Councils, Blindness SRC Network, etc.

DBVI supports this recommendation and will include participation of a member of the Executive Committee of the SRC to participate in other Commonwealth council meetings and state and national meeting in the development of the SRC Resource Plan which is included in the 2014 State Plan attachment 4.11 (d). SRC participation in out of state meetings is subject to approval by the Virginia Secretary of Health and Human Services and participation of SRC members in meetings internal and external to the Commonwealth are subject to availability of funds.

4. During 2012, the DBVI employee primarily responsible for data collection and analysis resigned and key data collected for the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CNSA) and Consumer Satisfaction was lost. For 2014, the SRC makes the following recommendations:

• That DBVI include mandated SRC partnership as the process

moves forward;

• That Consumer Satisfaction survey data be collected in as timely a fashion as feasible, and that DBVI re-establish the regular reporting cycle to the SRC as soon as possible;

• That DBVI consider outsourcing the Consumer Satisfaction Survey if the agency does not have internal resources to complete this task;

• That DBVI update data collection, storage, and security mechanisms and policies such that no one person has sole access to this data in the future.

SRC members stand ready to help DBVI in any appropriate way to keep this important function operational.

DBVI supports this recommendation and has filled the position that is responsible for conducting Consumer Satisfaction Surveys.

5. Since 2009, the SRC and VR staff have been providing new SRC members with an orientation. Since 2011, the SRC, with support from VR staff and TACE facilitators when needed, have held an annual Retreat to identify projects and form workgroups for their completion. Both of these activities have proven useful for the effective operation of the SRC. Therefore, the SRC recommends continued support from DBVI for these two activities.

DBVI supports this recommendation and will continue to collaborate with the SRC to provide an orientation to new SRC members and to facilitate the conduct of an annual Retreat based on available funding to sponsor such as event.

6. In 2012, DBVI hired a temporary Job Placement specialist for each Regional Office. Anecdotal evidence suggests that these employees are contributing to improvements in successful job placements for DBVI consumers and exposure of DBVI services and prepared consumers to Virginia employers. Therefore, the SRC recommends that these positions be continued in 2014.

DBVI cannot assure ongoing sponsorship of these temporary Job Placement/Job Placement positions will continue indefinitely, however, DBVI will fund these positions until such time as it has determined that the positions add value to job placement activities that lead to successful employment outcomes. However, DBVI will be ensuring that job development and training to vocational rehabilitation counselors will occur as a strategy under Goal 1 as articulated in State Plan attachment 4.11 (d).

7. The SRC recommends DBVI continue steps in 2014 to recruit and hire qualified individuals who are blind or vision impaired; make job position announcements available to consumer groups; and, develop other strategies to recruit qualified blind individuals.

DBVI supports this recommendation and includes agency efforts to recruit and hire qualified individuals who are blind or vision impaired as part of State Plan Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development. Additionally, DBVI currently sends position announcements to consumer groups, Newsline, and agency staff when those announcements are available to share.

8. The SRC recommends DBVI continue in FFY 2014 to conduct regional public meetings with regional or state meetings of consumer organizations. It is recommended that the public comments and agency responses from those meetings continue to be shared with the SRC. Also, it is recommended the information be posted on the DBVI website and the designated channel for Virginia on Newsline.

DBVI supports this recommendation and plans to conduct a minimum of four public meetings at least three of which will be conducted in conjunction with consumer group organization meetings. Additionally, DBVI will establish a procedure for sharing public comments and agency responses with the SRC and the general public including posting on the DBVI website.

9. The SRC recommends that DBVI make job development, job placement, job coaching training to counselors a very high priority for 2014, and include mentoring as one of the training strategies.

DBVI supports this recommendation and will include this recommendation as part of agency strategies to address Goal 1 in the 2014 State Plan Attachment 4.11 (d).

10. In order to facilitate better communication it is recommended that DBVI collaborate and partner more with other agencies and advisory boards that provide services to individuals with disabilities including but not limited to the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), the Department for theDeaf and Hard of Hearing (DDHH), the Department of Behavioral Health and Development Disabilities, and the Department (DBHDD).

DBVI actively supports this recommendation and is involved with workforce development activities at the state level in support of the Governor’s Executive Order 55 related to employment for people with disabilities, the DBDD Employment First Initiative, and other state wide efforts on behalf of individual with disabilities that include DARS, DDHH, and DBHDD as primary agency partners.

11. It is recommended that DBVI educate staff and others regarding the Assistive Technology Bill that specifies that technology follows the student to post-secondary education, training, and employment.

DBVI can and will implement training related to Commonwealth of Virginia legislation that facilitates receipt of assistive technology that follows eligible students as they transition from secondary education settings into post-secondary education and training to the VR staff as part of training associated with the In-Service Training Grant during the 2014 federal fiscal year.

12. The SRC recommends that DBVI establish transition caseloads in every office that can support a transition counselor and provide uniform guidance, training, and expand resources available to all counselors providing transition services.

DBVI currently has designated transition caseloads in three of the six regional offices and is reviewing the possibility of adding a transition caseload in one other office; the other two offices are too small to support a transition caseload. DBVI currently provides guidance, training and resources to all VR Counselors and will continue this practice in 2014. Goals and strategies to address transition services are detailed in State Plan attachment 4.11 (d).

13. It is recommended that DBVI strengthen partnerships with consumer groups including mentoring.

DBVI agrees with this recommendation and will request SRC assistance in strengthening these partnerships.

14. Several actions are being recommended to enhance DBVI’s outreach activities to the public with special emphasis on consumers and/or potential consumers. These activities include

• DBVI develop a "most frequently asked questions" on its Website;

• DBVI ensure that information is provided to consumers in a consistent way;

• DBVI establish opportunities to be present at functions pertaining to and conducted by Native Americans in Virginia - Pow Wows etc;

• DBVI expand marketing and outreach efforts, particularly through social media, to individuals who are members of minority groups (racial/ethnic populations such as Hispanics, American Indians, and others who may be non-English speakers); and,

• recommend that DBVI explore ways of communicating the availability of resources (internal and external) in more creative ways so the public will know that DBVI is a place to remove barriers to employment.

DBVI supports the notion of expanding outreach activities and has instituted a Marketing Team/Outreach coordinator who will be responsible for developing a marketing plan before or during FFY 2014. Additionally, DBVI has undergone efforts to improve the agency website to ensure it is user friendly and has expanded use of social media to include an agency facebook page. DBVI staff are active partners on workforce development activities at the local level and at the state level through participation on state agency workgroups. DBVI will review the 2012 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment recommendation to determine the feasibility of implementing more thorough outreach activities designed to target un- and underserved populations identified in the assessment. Strategies to address this concern are included in the 2014 State Plan attachment 4.11 (d)

15. The SRC is making several recommendations to improve services through staff training and development:

• the SRC believes the agency needs a fuller orientation for new VR staff to include how to provide VR service;

• recommends that DBVI expand staff training regarding the partnership between consumers and staff particularly in developing IPEs, effective communication skills, and informed choice; and

• recommend that DBVI develop best practices for provision of services in all program and services areas

DBVI concurs with this recommendation and has already begun to develop an overall agency orientation that will include all DBVI programs and services. Additionally, through the In-Service Training Grant, DBVI has already initiated a “back to basics” training that is conducted monthly via Video Teleconference. This training entitled “M.A.D. about….” (Making a Difference in People’s Lives) includes CRC credits and is mandatory for all VR staff. DBVI has detailed strategies related to this recommendation in the 2014 State Plan Attachment 4.11 (d).

This screen was last updated on Aug 12 2013 10:16AM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has not requested a waiver of statewideness.

This screen has never been updated.

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

The Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) improves customer service delivery through interagency cooperation with

various federal, state, and local agencies. This collaboration, which includes the use of services and facilities, is carried out with formal and informal agreements.

DBVI has formal agreements with the following agencies that are not in the Statewide Workforce Investment System:

• The Virginia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities

• The Office of Veterans Affairs

• The Virginia Office for Protection and Advocacy

• The Virginia Department for Deaf and Hard of Hearing

• The Virginia Department of Medical Assistance Services

• The Virginia Department of Education

• The Department of Social Services

The Commonwealth of Virginia (Section 2.2-1117 of the Code of Virginia) has a state use contracting program for services, articles and commodities performed or produced by persons, and in schools or workshops, under the supervision of the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI). This section of the code refers to the Virginia Industries for the Blind which is under the supervision of DBVI and includes items including but not limited to mattresses, uniforms, pens, pencils, and other goods.

In addition, Section 2.2-1118 of the Virginia Code allows for the purchase of items or services from Community Rehabilitation Providers (known as Employment Service Organizations in Virginia) without competitive procurement with certain requirements.

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2013 12:37PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

The Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) maintains a collaborative relationship with state and local education officials. Interagency partnering includes developing and implementing cooperative agreements with the Virginia Department of Education (DOE) and each local school division. These agreements establish collaboration and coordination efforts to help blind, visually impaired, and deafblind students fully participate in school. One of the primary goals of these agreements is to transition students from school to work, post-secondary education, and independent living.

The cooperative agreement between DBVI and DOE identifies each agency’s respective and joint responsibilities. DOE is the lead agency assuring eligible students with disabilities receive free appropriate public education.

DBVI prepares and delivers a program of special education services in addition to those provided in the public school system. DBVI works with students eligible for vocational rehabilitation (VR) services and school systems to plan and provide services to students.

This state-level cooperative agreement specifies that DBVI:

• Assists DOE staff and other facilities with developing “child find” efforts to identify and locate students who are blind, visually impaired, and deafblind;

• Assists DOE staff to plan for the assistive technology needs of eligible students;

• Assists DOE staff in planning for Virginia’s statewide testing program;

• Invites DOE staff to DBVI meetings that address major issues affecting children who are blind, visually impaired, and deafblind; and

• Provides information and educational materials defining DBVI services and procedures.

The DBVI education services program director works directly with the DOE and is responsible for:

• Ensuring DBVI education services coordinators serve as liaisons to public schools and parents of children with visual disabilities;

• And, serving on DOE committees where expertise on visual disabilities is needed.

Local cooperative agreements, developed annually between DBVI and each public school division, ensure DBVI will:

• Assist school divisions in identifying children from birth through age 21 who have visual disabilities;

• Provide consultation and technical assistance to help school divisions determine students’ eligibility for services;

• Provide consultation and technical assistance to help students, their parents, and their school divisions develop the student’s Individual Education Plans (IEP); and

• Participate with students aged 14 and older, their parents, and their school division in planning vocational rehabilitation transition programs and services.

DBVI is a member of Virginia’s Intercommunity Transition Council (VITC). VITC provides opportunities to coordinate transition planning and services for youth who have disabilities with leaders in education, rehabilitation, and other adult service agencies. The VR director or other designated staff represent DBVI on the VITC.

DBVI also collaborates with DOE, the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DRS), and other stakeholders to develop and implement an annual Transition Forum.

DBVI has signed the Commonwealth of Virginia Plan of Coordinated Transitional Services for Youth and Young Adults with Disabilities, often referred to as Virginia’s Transition Plan. The plan serves to strengthen transition services for youth with disabilities across Virginia by ensuring individualized transition planning and service opportunities. The plan is based on the premise that coordination of services assists students in achieving productive adult lives.

DBVI conducts outreach aimed toward students and their families by using the agency case management system to identify students who are turning age 14. The parents of these students are contacted via mail and provided with general information regarding VR services and the name of a VR counselor from their locality. Within ten days of the date on the letter, the VR counselor makes contact with the student and their parents to discuss VR services. These students, along with eligible students referred to the VR program, may receive vocationally oriented services while in high school. Based on an individual student’s needs, these services may include, but not necessarily be limited to:

• Vocational guidance and counseling;

• Vocational exploration, evaluation, and assessments;

• Rehabilitation technology evaluation;

• Adjustment to blindness training;

• The Summer Adjustment Program at the Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired (VRCBVI);

• The College Preparatory Program at VRCBVI;

• A Transition Seminar; and

• A Summer Work Program.

The DBVI Education Services and Vocational Rehabilitation programs serve a much larger group of students with visual disabilities than are identified under Section 618 (b) (3) of the Education of the Handicapped Act Amendment of 1983. Some students, whose vision is their secondary disability, are identified by the local school divisions and DOE under other disability categories.

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2013 12:42PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Through an interagency agreement between the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) and the Department for Aging Rehabilitative Services (DARS), DBVI may purchase services from one or more of the Community Rehabilitation Services programs (CRPs) that have been approved by DARS. The CRPs are private non-profit organizations providing services, such as work evaluation, work adjustment, and/or sheltered employment for persons with significant disabilities. The majority of consumers for whom DBVI may purchase services from CRPs are individuals who have multiple disabling conditions and may require intensive one-on-one support and services. While some CRPs offer services and support to integrated work settings, most employment outcomes achieved through CRPs are in non-integrated settings with consumers receiving non-competitive wages. DBVI will not utilize funds under the establishment authority to establish, develop, or improve these private non-profit CRPs.

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2013 12:46PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

Evidence of Collaboration Regarding Supported Employment Services and Extended Services

DBVI and the Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) maintain an interagency agreement ensuring extended supported service for blind, deafblind, or visually impaired individuals with mental disabilities as long as funds are available. Services are provided through local community service boards (CSBs) receiving targeted funds for extended employment services. These CSBs sign individual agreements verifying available funds for ongoing support for blind, deafblind, or visually impaired individuals with mental disabilities.

Virginia continues to appropriate state funds for extended employment services to individuals with physical disabilities. Blind, deafblind, and visually impaired individuals, who also have a secondary physical or mental disability, will have supported employment available as an employment outcome in FY 2014.

Natural supports will be incorporated for extended services based on the individualized needs of the consumer. The use of natural supports and other extended support services assist blind, deafblind, and visually impaired individuals maintain employment. Currently, DBVI has two deafblind specialists providing extended support services to deafblind consumers. The salaries of these individuals are funded with state general funds.

DBVI requires a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with providers of extended employment support services. The MOU is required prior to the use of Title VI, Part B funds.

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2013 12:50PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

Qualified Personnel Needs

DBVI has assessed the number and type of personnel needed by the agency to provide VR services for 2011 through 2016. Personnel projections are based on an estimate of the number of DBVI personnel expected to retire or leave state service, assessment of personnel job functions, and the projected number of individuals to be served, including those with significant disabilities. Projections are based on the number of individuals served during FFY 2012.

Over the next five years, DBVI expects up to ten VR service personnel will retire. These retirements could include two vocational rehabilitation counselors, one vocational rehabilitation assistant, two professional staff at the VRCBVI, and up to five VR administrators, including program directors.

Incorporating a multi-disciplinary approach to providing VR Services, DBVI will maintain regional offices in Bristol, Roanoke, Staunton, Richmond, Fairfax, and Norfolk. DBVI headquarters and the Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired (VRCBVI) are located in Richmond.

DBVI projects approximately 137 full-time and 14 part-time staff will be needed to provide services to individuals receiving VR services in 2014. Staffing will include:

• One deafblind program director and one deafblind specialist;

• Five full-time and one part-time rehabilitation technology specialists;

• Six regional managers providing direct supervision to VR counselors and other field staff;

• Fourteen professional positions at headquarters consisting of two program evaluators and support team members, clerical positions, and administrators;

• Fifteen full-time clerical staff in the regional offices;

• Six job development assistants in the regional offices;

• Eighteen VR counselors; and

• Twenty-six classified full-time and thirteen part-time positions at the VRCBVI. The twenty-six classified positions include instructors, vocational rehabilitation counselors, orientation and mobility (O&M) specialists, rehabilitation technology specialists, nurses, work evaluators, clerical, and three administrators. The thirteen part-time positions include instructional staff, administrative support staff, drivers and six part-time dorm staff.

Additionally, 23 rehabilitation teachers, six education services coordinators, and 14 orientation and mobility instructors in the regional field offices are available to provide as needed ancillary services to VR customers.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Deafblind Specialists 2 0 0
2 Rehabilitation Technologist Specialists 5 0 1
3 Regional Managers 6 1 0
4 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors 18 0 2
5 Professional Positions in DBVI Headquarters 14 0 6
6 Rehabilitation Teachers 23 0 0
7 Education Specialists 6 0 0
8 Orientation and Mobility Instructors 14 0 0
9 Rehabilitation Center staff 26 0 2
10 Clerical support - field offices 15 0 5

 

Academic Preparation Programs in VR

Virginia is fortunate to have two accredited schools offering degree programs in vocational rehabilitation. The degree programs at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond and George Washington University (GWU) in Washington D.C. fulfill CSPD requirements. Annually, DBVI gathers data from VCU and GWU on the number of students enrolled in VR programs and the number of students graduating with VR certification or licensure. This information helps DBVI anticipate and plan for short-term and long-term personnel shortages.

In academic year 2012, VCU served 50 students whose education was funded through grants from the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) for Distance Learning Students. Six of those students graduated in December of 20011, seven graduated in May 2012, and three graduated in August 2012. During that same academic cycle, 108 students were enrolled in the Master of Science in counseling program and 31 were enrolled in the Post Master’s certificate program.

During the 2012 academic year total of 38 students graduated from VCU with a Master of Science degree that is accepted by the Board of Counseling as a “Counseling Masters; nine in December 2011, 22 in May 2012, and seven in August 2012. All of the Master of Science degree graduates were CRC eligible. In the Post-Master’s Certification program one student graduated in December 2011, four in May 2012, and two in August 2012; all of the Post-Master’s Certificate graduates were eligible for the Licensed Professional Counselor certification.

In the 2012 academic year, 53 students were enrolled in the Master of Arts in Rehabilitation Counseling from the GWU Graduate School of Education Counseling which included on-campus Human and Organizational Studies, distance CSPD programs and distance non-CSPD programs. Eight students participating in the online CSPD program graduated, seven from the online hybrid program, and eight from the on-campus program. Fourteen students were enrolled in the Master’s in Vocational Evaluation hybrid program that included online and off campus classes with seven individuals graduating.

Also at GWU, a total of 28 students were enrolled in the Certification in Job Development and Job Placement program, 12 in the online program and 16 in the on-campus program;19 students graduated. Five individuals were enrolled in the Certificate in Brain Injury program with one graduate. 26 students graduated from the Certificate in Transition Services Program which is conducted online. Twenty-six students were enrolled in the Master’s in Transition Services online program and four students graduated with that degree.

In FFY 2012, each of DBVI’s 18 counselors held a Master’s Degree in either VR Counseling or in a closely related field; all counselors met the educational requirements to be eligible for the CRC. This staffing resulted from DBVI’s close proximity to VCU and GWU and the agency’s successful national recruiting efforts. DBVI routinely collaborates with GWU and VCU on internship opportunities for students interested in VR counseling careers.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

Recruitment and Selection of Staff, Including Minorities

DBVI has adopted, as a minimum standard, the educational standards established by the Commission of Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) and supports counselors in becoming Certified Rehabilitation Counselors (CRC). For the past 11 years, all of DBVI’s VR Counselors and Regional Managers have met the CRCC education standards. Currently, 11 VR Counselors and four Regional Managers are Certified Rehabilitation Counselors.

DBVI’s hiring practice if there are no applicants meeting the educational standards adopted by DBVI for VR Counseling positions, is to re-advertise until qualified applicants are identified.

DBVI maintains a Personnel Policies Handbook containing procedures for recruiting, advertising, screening applications, interviewing, hiring decisions, and applicant notification. DBVI specifically emphasizes advertising geared to attract qualified minorities, females, and individuals with disabilities.

DBVI supports recruiting and hiring qualified blind people to provide rehabilitation services. DBVI provides job announcements directly to consumer groups, News line, the National Federation of the Blind, and the American Council of the Blind central offices.

To attract minorities to rehabilitation careers, DBVI collaborates with historically black colleges and universities for recruitment. DBVI maintains a cooperative agreement with Norfolk State University to allow students to complete internships with DBVI. Additionally, DBVI provides or sponsors VR staff training to improve cultural awareness and sensitivity.

DBVI sponsors eligible blind and vision impaired individuals attending one of the Commonwealth of Virginia’s five historically black colleges and universities: Hampton University in Hampton, Norfolk State University in Norfolk, St. Paul’s College in Lawrenceville, Virginia State University in Petersburg, and Virginia Union University in Richmond. DBVI maintains contact with these schools through VR consumers, counselors, the Human Resources office, and other agency staff. DBVI will continue to expand its outreach activities with these colleges and universities.

 

Professional Preparation Programs and Qualifications in Related Services

DBVI recognizes the importance of having well-trained personnel providing additional services to VR consumers.

DBVI supports VR staff in obtaining the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC). Within DBVI’s 18 member VR staff, some Counselors have the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) while others have either met the CRC course requirements or are eligible to take the CRCC exam. Four of the six regional managers have either their CRC or Certified Vocational Evaluator credential.

DBVI will reimburse VR counselors and O&M specialists for fees required to obtain certification. Although DBVI rehabilitation teachers are not required to obtain certification, DBVI provides financial assistance to rehabilitation teachers who become certified.

Within DBVI’s 18 member VR staff, some Counselors have the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) while others have either met the CRC course requirements or are eligible to take the CRCC exam. Four of the six regional managers have either their CRC or Certified Vocational Evaluator credential.

DBVI has 14 full time classified O&M instructor positions, one of which is vacant. All of the thirteen individuals now employed as O&M specialists hold a nationally recognized O&M certification.

 

DBVI maintains a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) to meet immediate and long-range training and staffing needs.

Personnel Development

In 2013 and 2014, DBVI will continue several key workforce training activities focusing on improving services and developing and maintaining collaborative partnerships with individuals receiving services. DBVI workforce planning includes:

• Analyses of the changing workforce;

• Analyses of demographic information and agency staffing;

• Assessment of future needs;

• Determination of gaps between current and future staffing needs;

• Continuing to update the DBVI succession plan with the input of all staff to ensure DBVI can close staffing gaps and meet future staffing needs to best serve its consumers; and

• Providing oversight of implementation of the DBVI succession plan.

In April 2009, DBVI implemented the agency succession activities including a two-year leadership development program was entitled “Investing in Our Workforce” (IOW) was available to all DBVI classified staff. The program had two components. The first, "Managing Virginia’s Program,” was an 18-month, self-paced on-line program consisting of 54 one-hour training modules. Participants completed modules at their own pace. The second component, “Managing the DBVI Program,” was a two-year program of monthly one-hour classes conducted via videoconferencing. In 2013, members of the original cohort began work on three projects including the development and implementation of a Successful Outcomes Rescue Team, the development and implementation of an agency wide Staff Meeting to be conducted in December of 2013, and a plans to conduct a second IOW session during 2013 and 2014 .

During FFY 2012, DBVI initiated a 21 month VR “back to basics” training program. This Video Teleconferencing based program was developed by a team consisting of the VR Director, one Regional Manager, and two VR Counselors and is conducted on a monthly basis by trainers internal and external to the agency. Topics include a broad range of subjects including the VR process, cultural competence, caseload management and documentation, informed choice, quality customer service, developing quality partnerships between consumers and VR Counselors, transition, disability specific information, agency business practice, the Randolph-Sheppard Vending Stand Program, and best practices for service delivery. This program will continue through FFY 2013 and FFY 2014. During FFY 2014, a new planning team will be convened to discuss VR staff satisfaction with the overall program and to develop a continuation of the “back to basics” approach to providing VR services with a special focus on job development and job placement, marketing, and developing and continuing meaningful partnerships with consumers and consumer advocacy groups.

Training Needs Assessment and Individual Training Plans

DBVI annually conducts a comprehensive training needs assessment to assist VR staff and supervisors identify training areas provided with In-Service Training Grant Funds. Due to a vacancy in the position responsible for conducting the training needs assessment, no assessment was conducted in FFY 2012, however, the 2013 In-Service Training Needs Assessment Survey was conducted as part of the annual Vocational Rehabilitation Staff meeting; VR Counselors, Job Development and Job Placement Specialists, and counselors from VRCBVI participated.

The survey was conducted in a facilitated session by two Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors who hold the CRC credential. Training needs identified in FFY 2013 included developing greater understanding of Low Vision, SSDI/SSI, conducting market analysis for the purpose of developing IPEs, assessment tools used to diagnose and identify functional limitations of various disabilities including blindness and visual impairment, job development and placement, medical aspects of disability, deafblindness, traumatic brain injury, stroke, substance abuse, mental illness, avoiding and preparing for fair hearing, learning how and when to say “no” to consumers regarding VR services, Order of Selection, use of the AWARE case management system, avoiding burnout, and how to facilitate and conduct meetings and training.

DBVI Employee Work Plans (EWPs) are developed and reviewed annually by the employee and supervisor to identify individual training needs. Additionally, DBVI uses staff EWPs to identify statewide training needs, implement training recommendations, provide cost-efficient training programs, and obtain feedback on the quality of various staff training programs.

In-Service Training Grant

DBVI develops and submits a required In-Service Training Grant Application to the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA). All grant activities ensure VR program employees are properly trained to meet CSPD requirements. The grant’s major objective is to increase VR staff competencies in providing quality VR services to individuals with visual impairments. The current grant emphasizes training in the following areas:

• Enhancing recruitment and retention of qualified personnel, succession planning, and leadership development by updating VR core skills, and advancing leadership skills;

• Improving performance in the use and knowledge of technology, including low vision devices;

• Providing the most appropriate adaptive equipment to facilitate employment for blind and visually impaired individuals;

• Improving the recording, managing, and reporting of data to more effectively manage caseloads using the Integrated Case Management System;

• Enhancing knowledge, skill, and ability to work with targeted populations of individuals, including those who are deafblind, have multi-disabilities, and students transitioning from high school to post-secondary activities such as college, training, and work; and

• Enhancing understanding of the Workforce Investment Act, including Title IV (1998 Amendments and subsequent amendments to the Rehabilitation Act), the Americans with Disabilities Act, and SSDI/SSI legislation, including Ticket to Work.

During 2012, VR counselors, regional managers, administrative staff, management analysts, and rehabilitation engineers received training during the course of the grant cycle. During the 2012 and 2013 IST grant cycle, DBVI’s training goals continue to include 1) improving partnerships between staff and individuals seeking or receiving services leading to richer employment outcomes based on consumer choice; 2) expanding and enhancing services to underserved or unserved individuals, especially those with most significant disabilities and students in transition; 3) meeting the standards of DBVI’s Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) identified in the agency’s state plan and approved by the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA); and 4) providing core vocational rehabilitation skills training to seasoned and new staff.

Orientation and Training for New Staff

DBVI’s CSPD includes a required Orientation to Blindness training program for new agency employees. New employees are exposed to training with a blindfold and “skills of blindness” with a goal ensuring that new employees develop a positive attitude toward blindness and the capabilities of blind individuals.

DBVI is currently developing an agency and program wide orientation for new staff. This orientation will include developing an understanding of the VR and Independent Living program as well as education, orientation, low vision, rehabilitation technology, and deaf blind services. Employees will also be oriented to the Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired and the DBVI Library and Resource Center. The orientation will also employ a component conducted under sleep shade.

 

Interpreters

Deafblind individuals and persons who do not speak English are provided translators by DBVI during the application and receipt phases of VR services.

 

Collaboration with Education Services

VR Counselors routinely partner with students, their families, and teachers to ensure eligible students aged 14 to 21 receive vocational rehabilitation services. In response to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), DBVI’s education coordinators provide support and technical assistance at the local level to children, their parents, school division administrators, and itinerant teachers for the visually impaired. The goal is to further students’ involvement in academics and extracurricular school activities. Each of the six education coordinator positions is located in each of the agency’s regional offices. Education Coordinators have graduate level training and participate with VR staff in joint training initiatives per DBVI’s Personnel Development Plan.

Transition Services

DBVI maintains a cooperative agreement with the State Department of Education (DOE) that identifies each agency’s transition responsibilities. The vision of the cooperative agreement is consistent with the IDEA and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and ensures visually impaired students leaving public schools have the opportunity to participate in meaningful and productive post-secondary lives. DBVI’s education services coordinators and VR counselors, itinerant public school teachers for the visually impaired and other service providers participate in training opportunities at the annual Transition Forum and/or classes or workshops provided at the local level.

This screen was last updated on Aug 6 2013 2:03PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Results of Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of the Rehabilitation Needs of Individuals with Disabilities and Need to Establish, Develop, or Improve Community Rehabilitation Programs

During FFY 2010, 2011, and 2012, DBVI conducted a comprehensive statewide needs assessment (CSNA) of rehabilitation needs of individuals with who are blind, visually impaired, and deafblind.. In order to adequately plan for and implement the CSNA, DBVI referred to the RSA’s Model CSNA Guide for guidance and received technical assistance from the George Washington University Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE). DBVI also partnered with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and contracted with a private consultant and Mississippi State University (MSU) to conduct the CSNA and develop an assessment report.

The DBVI CSNA was a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the vocational rehabilitation needs of blind, deafblind, and visually impaired individuals age 14 and older with a focus on determining the needs of : 1) individuals with most significant disabilities, including their needs for supported employment services; 2) individuals who are minorities, including individuals who have been unserved or underserved; and 3) individuals who are served through other components of the Virginia’s statewide workforce development system. DBVI also attempted to assess the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs that potentially serve blind, deafblind, and visually impaired individuals.

The data gathered in the CSNA assisted DBVI and the SRC with developing the 2014 State Plan and will help inform plans of action DBVI will undertake to improve and expand upon existing services with the ultimate goal of increasing employment outcomes in the next three to five years.

CSNA Work Plan

DBVI and the SRC developed and implemented three-year work plan consisting of discrete assessment activities including: 1) identification of populations to be assessed; 2) development of data collection strategies; 3) determination of CSNA timeframes and action steps; and 4) identification of key staff and stakeholders who would assist with developing, implementing, and analyzing the CSNA and make recommendations. The needs assessment was completed in October 2012.

Year One - 2010

2010 activities included developing a State Profile using existing data sources. Data collection strategies included identification and analysis of internal DBVI data, external VR agency data obtained from the RSA MIS website (http://rsa.ed.gov/MIS/choose.cfm) and other external disability statistics from state and national sources.

Year Two - 2011

The focus in 2011 was to conduct consumer/staff/employer surveys and obtain stakeholder input to help define issues, goals, and strategies related to the needs of blind, deafblind, and vision impaired individuals. Due to change in DBVI personnel, data gathered in year two was lost and the agency decided to contract with MSU to assist with completing the CSNA in year three.

Year Three - 2012

In the final year (2012) of the CSNA, DBVI contracted MSU to complete the CSNA due to lack of available internal staff resources. In addition to analyzing findings from data and information obtained in year one, MSU consulted with DBVI to fill gaps in data left subsequent to the departure of a primary DBVI staff member who was responsible for conducting and analyzing consumer, staff, and other stakeholder surveys. The work included reviewing, revising, and resending surveys to stakeholders, conducting stakeholder interviews, and developing the CSNA final report. Key informant interviews were also conducted in 2012. The primary goals in writing the CSNA report were to incorporate the analysis of findings, developing and prioritizing recommendations with SRC assistance and using those priorities to inform the DBVI State plan goals, priorities, and strategies.

Findings:

A summary of key findings from the review of secondary data and analysis of survey data obtained from stakeholders including VR consumers, DBVI staff, employers, and others, in addition to key informant interviews and analysis of RSA 911 case data from fiscal years 2010 and 2011 provides information regarding identification of needs in five areas. These areas are 1) Service Needs, 2) Barriers to Employment Outcomes, 3) Underserved/Unserved Populations, 4) Employer Needs, and 5) Satisfaction with DBVI Services.

Service Needs

In the area of consumer service needs, job related services including job coaching, job readiness, and supported employment were identified by VR consumers, DBVI staff, and other interested stakeholders as service needs that had been “unmet” or “somewhat met.” Job readiness was ranked as the number one unmet need by consumers whose cases were closed not rehabilitated and by DBVI staff. Vocational guidance and counseling was identified by consumers whose cases were closed as rehabilitated and also by staff as an area of need.

Assistive technology and blindness skills services were identified by consumers whose cases were closed rehabilitated and not rehabilitated as services that were needed but not received. Transportation was also noted as a service need. Key informants concurred with consumers and DBVI staff that assistive technology, blindness skills, and transportation were major service needs.

Regarding the need to expand or improve services for community rehabilitation providers (CRSs), only 9% of consumers whose cases had been successfully closed as rehabilitated expressed that their service needs from CRPs were unmet while 35% of consumers whose cases were not closed successfully rehabilitated reported their service needs had been unmet by CRPs. The majority of staff and key informants indicated they were unsure whether improvement was needed from CRPs in order to meet

consumer service needs.

Barriers to Employment Outcomes

Consumers groups (rehabilitated and not rehabilitated) identified the top five barriers to obtaining and maintaining employment as being lack of transportation, lack of jobs, lack of qualified service providers, lack of disability resources, and lack of critical employability skills.

Underserved/Unserved Populations

Individuals with multiple disabilities and transition students were identified as potentially underserved or unserved by all data sources including staff survey, stakeholder survey, key informant interviews, secondary data, and RSA 911 analysis. Individuals who are homeless, have English as a second language, have criminal convictions, and/or have autism spectrum disorders were also identified by at least two data sources.

Hispanics, African Americans, and American Indians were identified as being potentially underserved.

In order to improve services to underserved/unserved individuals, recommendations included strengthening outreach and collaborative efforts targeting specific populations and undertaking general information activities to educate the general public. Recommendations also included DBVI hiring a public relations manager to lead agency efforts to systemically market and promote the DBVI VR program to the public and specific underserved/unserved populations and to strengthen relationships with consumers, business, and other stakeholders.

Employer Needs

Employers identified that the most important factor influencing a decision to hire consumers working with DBVI is whether the applicant meets the minimum job qualifications. Having a strong work ethic, meeting educational qualifications, and having a strong work history were also cited as considerations.

Almost half of the employers surveyed identified safety as their top concern with less than a quarter identifying cost of accommodations, use of excessive sick time, or health insurance as concerns.

Interestingly, 75% of employers identified assistive technology as a service that DBVI could provide in assisting them to hire or retrain consumers being served by DBVI. Additionally, half identified on-site training, support, and disability awareness as assistance from which they could benefit. Only a very small minority of employers suggested that financial incentives or information were important to them in hiring blind and visually impaired individuals.

Satisfaction with DBVI Services

Consumers whose cases were closed as rehabilitated were more satisfied with DBVI VR services than those whose cases were closed not rehabilitated. Both groups were more satisfied with the helpfulness, sensitivity, and knowledge of their counselors than with their partnerships with their counselors in developing their IPEs. Eighty percent of individuals whose cases were closed rehabilitated rated their experience as good or excellent; 50% of individuals whose cases were closed not rehabilitated rated their experiences good or excellent.

Stakeholders and employers identified their overall experience with DBVI as excellent or good and average respectively. Employers overall ratings were high.

CSNA Work Plan for 2013, 2014, and 2015

DBVI will conduct a full comprehensive statewide needs assessment (CSNA) of rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities. To identify needs, DBVI establishes, develops, or improves community rehabilitation programs as required by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. To fulfill these tasks, DBVI refers to the RSA’s Model CSNA Guide for guidance and receives technical assistance from the George Washington University Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) as needed.

DBVI and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) partner to conduct the CSNA.

During the last CSNA cycle, DBVI and the SRC developed a three-year work plan that addressed discrete assessment activities including: 1) identification of populations to be assessed; 2) development of data collection strategies; 3) determination of CSNA timeframes and action steps; and 4) identification of key staff and stakeholders who would assist with developing, implementing, and analyzing the CSNA and make recommendations. In the 2013, 2014, and 2015 cycle, the CSNA will be conducted in a similar manner though the order in which tasks are performed may differ depending on DBVI human resources.

The DBVI CSNA will be a quantitative and qualitative assessment of the vocational rehabilitation needs of blind, deafblind, and visually impaired individuals age 14 and older. Specifically, DBVI and the SRC will focus on determining the needs of : 1) individuals with most significant disabilities, including their needs for supported employment services; 2) individuals who are minorities, including individuals who have been unserved or underserved; and 3) individuals who are served through other components of the Virginia’s statewide workforce development system. DBVI also will assess the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs that potentially serve blind, deafblind, and visually impaired individuals.

Year One - 2013

2013 activities will include developing a plan which will include the timeline for accomplishing the four assessment activities described in the CSNA work plan section in this document. DBVI will create a State Profile using existing data sources. Data collection strategies will include identification and analysis of internal DBVI data, external VR agency data obtained from the RSA MIS website (http://rsa.ed.gov/MIS/choose.cfm) and other external disability statistics from state and national sources.

Review and analysis of internal data will include client-level data extracted from DBVI’s AWARE system, agency standards and indicators performance data, the 2010RSA Monitoring report, RSA-2 and RSA-911 data, public comment, the state plan, Virginia Registry of the Blind data, and the SRC annual report.

External data will be gathered by reviewing available information from state and national disability/advocacy organizations and national foundations and locating and compiling available information from state education and human service agencies. Sources of national-level disability statistics include, but are not be limited to, the American Community Survey (ACS), the Current Population Survey (CPS) , the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS), and other data from the U.S. Census Bureau. A targeted review of available research literature on rehabilitation needs will also be conducted.

Year Two - 2014

DBVI’s focus in 2014 will be obtaining stakeholder input to help define issues, goals, and strategies related to the needs of blind, deafblind, and vision impaired individuals.

DBVI will use focus groups, along with routine public meetings, to gather input from the SRC, business, service providers, consumer advocacy groups, VR staff, and other interested individuals. DBVI will also review and analyze existing consumer satisfaction surveys.

Another aspect of Year two activities will be key informant interviews designed to gather expert opinion of related agency and service leaders.

Conducted in person or via telephone, these interviews will gather information from vocational rehabilitation, the state development disabilities and mental health systems, community rehabilitation providers, business, and representatives from the workforce investment system.

Year Three – 2015

During 2015, DBVI will develop and implement one or more surveys to gather input from current and former consumers of services, DBVI VR staff, Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRP), representatives from Virginia’s workforce system, and representatives of unserved or underserved populations.

In this final year (2015) of the CSNA, DBVI will analyze findings from data and information obtained in years one, two, and three. The primary goal will be writing the CSNA report incorporating the analysis of findings, developing and prioritizing recommendations with the assistance of the SRC and using those priorities to form the DBVI State plan goals, priorities, and strategies.

Personnel Resources

DBVI will conduct the CSNA using internal staff including the Vocational Rehabilitation Director, the Vocational Rehabilitation Compliance and Customer Satisfaction Analyst, and the Agency’s Senior Management Analyst. The agency Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner will also provide guidance and support. Other internal staff resources will include representatives from IT, regional field offices, and administrative assistants.

External resources will include the SRC, the George Washington University TACE, and representatives from other state agencies, as needed. DBVI may employ a paid consultant if internal resources are not sufficient to meet personnel needs to conduct the CSNA in a timely manner.

This screen was last updated on Aug 6 2013 1:58PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

Annual Estimates of Individuals to be Served and Cost of Services

During FFY 2012, 1475 individuals received vocational rehabilitation (VR) services. Thirteen of those individuals received supported employment services provided under Part B of Title VI of the Act. During FFY 2014, an estimated 1480 individuals will be served by the DBVI VR program; 15 of those individuals are expected to receive supported employment services in some form.

During FFY 2012, DBVI expended $2,478,570 in case service funds for VR services to eligible individuals. Another $40,584 Title VI, Part B funds were spent on time-limited services for individuals in supported employment.

During FFY 2013, $3,200,000 in case service funds are budgeted to purchase VR services for eligible individuals. Additionally, $89,825 Title VI, Part B funds are scheduled to purchase time-limited services for individuals in supported employment.

During the last quarter of FFY 2004, DBVI initiated an order of selection (OOS) with three categories. At any given time, DBVI’s closing of OOS categories does not impact the number of individuals served under Part B of Title VI or the projected supported employment funds.

During FFY 2012, DBIV provided services to individuals in all three categories. DBVI has no plans to close categories in FY 2013 or 2014.

$3,300,000 is projected to be used to purchase case services in FFY 2014 with all OOS categories remaining open.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
VR Basic Grant Title I $3,300,000 1,480 $2,229
Supported Employment Title VI $89,825 15 $5,988
Totals   $3,389,825 1,495 $2,267

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2013 2:44PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Goals and Priorities

The Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) with assistance from the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) developed six goals and priorities for the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment programs for 2014. Collaboration and partnership to develop these goals and priorities included conduct and consideration of public meetings and public comments, recommendations from the 2012 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessments, and the Performance Standards and Indicators for FFY 20011 and 2012, and preliminary results from FFY 2013.

The six goals and priorities for FFY 2014 include:

1. Increasing competitive employment outcomes and ensuring high consumer wages in integrated work settings;

2. Passing the annual Standards and Performance Indicators evaluation;

3. Consistently achieving a high level of consumer satisfaction on choice, needs, and good service delivery;

4. Providing rehabilitation technology to consumers to facilitate their success in training and employment;

5. Expanding transition services for secondary school students seeking employment and/or post-secondary training; and

6. Increasing public awareness of services for the blind in Virginia.

The SRC assisted DBVI in developing the strategies in Attachment 4.11(d).

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2013 2:49PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

Order of Selection

Federal regulations require the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program to identify the order individuals will be served when all eligible individuals cannot receive services due to limited program funding. Individuals with the most significant disabilities are served first. DBVI operates an OOS with three service categories and has no plans to eliminate or discontinue operating under an OOS due to uncertain financial resources. DBVI will continue to set aside sufficient funds to purchase services necessary to determine vocational rehabilitation eligibility.

During 2014 the DBVI OOS requirements will include:

1. Closing categories if limited resources prevent DBVI from providing services to individuals who are eligible for VR services.

2. Providing written notification through the VR Program Director to regional offices regarding the date for closing or opening an OOS category.

3. Ensuring an OOS category closure does not apply to individuals who have an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) on the category closure date and that the individual’s VR services will be completed with all necessary amendments.

4. Accepting applications for VR services without restrictions and providing assessments for individuals to determine their eligibility for VR services.

5. With the exception of funds for eligibility assessment services, ensuring funds will not be expended for services to individuals who do not meet criteria of the OOS category being served. If an individual does not meet the OOS category being served, a "no cost" IPE cannot be written.

6. Maintaining a waiting list based upon the VR services application date when DBVI cannot serve all eligible individuals in a given category. Individuals eligible for VR services that do not meet the criteria for the OOS category being served and have not requested case closure from application will be placed on the waiting list. Individuals on the waiting will have a completed certificate of eligibility.

7. Ensuring individuals remain on the waiting list until they either meet the criteria of the OOS category being served, the category they are in is being served, or they request their DBVI case be closed.

8. Placing individuals in the most appropriate OOS category based on the individual’s level of vision, number of functional limitations, and duration of services.

9. Ensuring individuals know they may appeal OOS classification or reclassification decisions in accordance with the DBVI’s standard appeal procedures.

 

Description of Priority categories

DBVI’s OOS includes the following three categories.

Category 1 - Eligible Individual with the Most Significant Disabilities: The individual has no functional vision or is significantly visually impaired and has a secondary disability which, in terms of achieving an employment outcome, profoundly limits functioning in two or more major life activities (such as mobility, communication, self-care, interpersonal skills, self-direction, work tolerance or work skills).The individual’s vocational rehabilitation requires three or more VR services over an extended period of time (one year or more).

Category 2 - Eligible Individual with a Significant Disability: The individual has no functional vision or is significantly visually impaired and has a secondary disability which, in terms of achieving an employment outcome, profoundly limits functioning in two or more major life activities (such as mobility, communication, self-care, interpersonal skills, self-direction, work tolerance or work skills). The individual’s vocational rehabilitation requires two or more substantial VR services over an extended period of time (minimum of three months).

Category 3 – All Eligible Individuals: The individual meets basic eligibility criteria for services but is not identified as an individual with a most significant or significant disability as defined in OOS Category 1 or 2.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

Category 1 - Eligible Individual with the Most Significant Disabilities;

Category 2 - Eligible Individual with a Significant Disability; and

Category 3 - All Eligible Individuals.

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

Goals for individuals to be served in FFY 2014:

DBVI estimates serving over 1400 individuals in 2014 with all categories for services remaining open and projects $3,500,000 in case service expenditures for all categories, including supported employment federal and non federal funds.

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 0 0 0

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2013 3:00PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

The Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) uses funds received through Title VI, Part B of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, to purchase supported employment services (SE). DBVI purchases SE using a fee-for-services structure from a statewide network of about 70 approved SE vendors.

In FFY 2014, DBVI will use Title VI, Part B funds to purchase and provide SE support services for eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities who do not typically benefit from traditional VR services. These support services include job training, situational assessments and/or supplemental assessments that will be provided during the time-limited phase of SE. When necessary to meet an individual’s specific needs, DBVI also may purchase supplemental services.

On average, DBVI expects to spend about $70,000 annually providing time-limited services for eligible individuals.

During FFY 2012 , DBVI provided 13 individuals with SE services and fully expended SE grant funds. During FFY 2014, DBVI projects 15 individuals will be served. Most individuals participate in an individual placement model. Although some of those individuals may require services in enclaves, entrepreneurial settings, and mobile crews, DBVI expects most will receive SE through an individual placement model.

During FY 2013 and 2014, DBVI expects to expend all of its available SE funds. However, any unspent funds will be transferred to the Department of Rehabilitative Services (DRS) if they can be used to serve individuals with disabilities.

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2013 3:00PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Goal 1. Increasing competitive employment outcomes and ensuring high consumer wages in integrated work settings

Strategy 1. In 2014, one hundred ninety eight individuals will work in integrated settings; 20 of those individuals will work in self-owned businesses as independent homemakers, unpaid family workers, and in supported employment settings.

Measurement - To annually increase the number of cases closed in integrated work settings and reduce the number of cases closed as homemakers or unpaid family workers.

Strategy 2. In FFY 2014,DBVI will strive to ensure that individuals who successfully obtain or maintain employment will earn an average hourly wage commensurate with the cost of living index. It is DBVI’s goal for those individuals to work at least an average of 32 hours per week at closure.

Measurement Annually increases in hourly earnings of individuals with successful employment outcomes will raise commensurate with the cost of living index.

Strategy 3. DBVI will continue emphasizing staff and consumer education on enhanced work incentives via the Social Security Reimbursement program. Each SSDI and/or SSI recipient will be provided information about work incentives and the Ticket-to-Work program.

Measurement –DBVI will strive to maintain the number of ticket assignments and Social Security reimbursements at the 2012 level during FFY 2013 and 2014.

Strategy 4. DBVI will continue collaborating with mandated partners in the Workforce Investment Act (WIA). To assist the One Stop Centers in meeting accessibility needs of blind and vision impaired customers, DBVI staff will serve on local workforce boards, and provide technical assistance and support to the Virginia Workforce Network.

Measurement - DBVI will respond to all local One Stop Career Center requests for technical assistance on making services accessible for individuals who are blind or vision impaired. DBVI Regional Managers will serve on at least one local Workforce Investment Board (LWIB).

Strategy 5. To help ensure individuals with disabilities are served by the One Stop system, DBVI will collaborate with the Workforce Development Council and mandated partnersto provide training and technical assistance to the Virginia One Stop system .

Measurement - DBVI will continue collaborating with mandated partners to ensure blind and vision impaired individuals have access to One Stop programs and services.

Strategy 6. DBVI will place a high priority on addressing needs associated with job placement and job development.

Measurement - Job development and placement training for VR counselors will continue be provided in FFY 2014. This will include “back-to-basics” training in job placement with a focus on employment outcomes and informed choice. DBVI will include the SRC, VR counselors, job development and job placement specialists and regional managers in developing other strategies to enhance job development, job placement, and job retention services.

Strategy 7. DBVI and the SRC will collaborate on strategies enhancing competitive employment outcomes, including eliminating barriers to full consumer participation in vocational training and supported employment.

Measurement – “Strategies to enhance competitive employment outcomes” will be included on the SRC quarterly agenda for further discussion and action.

Strategy 8. DBVI VR counselors will partner with and support individuals to develop realistic vocational goals in integrated settings offering maximum wages and benefits. VR counselors will ensure individuals are aware of employment options in the Randolph-Sheppard program or in integrated positions in the Virginia Industries for the Blind.

Measurement – DBVI will monitor the monthly case management report to ensure IPEs are developed by individuals and their VR counselors no later than 90 days after eligibility determination. The vocational rehabilitation director will continue working with regional managers and counselors to identify tools VR counselors can use to help consumers make realistic vocational choices. DBVI will continue to provide training to regional managers and VR counselors regarding informed choice.

Strategy 9. To support the Vocational Rehabilitation program focus on employment, DBVI will continue to ensure other agency programs provide services to individuals who want to acquire independent living skills. Consumers not interested in employment also will receive DBVI services from programs other than VR. This strategy will help reduce the need for vocational rehabilitation to serve independent homemakers and unpaid family workers.

Measurement – DBVI will use general funds to provide services such as orientation and mobility, low vision, and rehabilitation teaching instructions to individuals who require those services for independent living but not for an employment outcome.

Strategy 10. DBVI will ensure individuals who require supported employment to achieve competitive employment in an integrated setting have access to those services.

Measurement – During FFY 2014 VR staff will receive supported employment training.

Strategy 11. DBVI will expand and enhance comprehensive services to individuals who participate in evaluation and training at VRCBVI by renovating portions of the facility and ensuring that the cafeteria is ADA compliant .

Measurement – The restoration of the Recreation Building, which temporarily housed VRCBVI staff during the renovation of the VRCBVI Administrative Activities building, is scheduled to begin in State Fiscal Year 2014. The gymnasium, the weight room and the multi-purpose rooms will undergo construction to bring them back to their original functionality with improved finishes. The windows within the facility, which were a part of the original construction of the Recreation building in 1971, are also scheduled for replacement.

The Recreation Building is also scheduled, during the State Fiscal Year 2014, to receive a renovation to address outstanding ADAAG issues surrounding the accessibility of the locker rooms, restrooms, and entrances in the building. The facility, built in 1971, is currently outfitted with the original shower and restroom facilities.

The pool and the area surrounding the pool in the Recreation Building are scheduled for repairs. In addition, to meet the updated ADAAG requirements for public pools, there is a planned addition of a lift device for the pool.

The restrooms and entry way of the Cafeteria building will undergo renovation to address ADAAG requirements. The ceiling and lights, as well as the windows are also scheduled for replacement. The roof top units (RTU’s) for the HVAC system and miscellaneous piping and pumps are also scheduled for replacement.

The General Assembly approved a Capital Lease Financing Project to fund the addition of a generator to support the Headquarters building during state fiscal year 2014.

The Library Resource Center existing EPDM roof will be replaced with a new EPDM roof. As this is a state pooled project, with bond funding, approvals at each phase make scheduling difficult to project. A Design engineer proposal was selected in May 2013.

DBVI will also construct a new maintenance building on the Azalea Avenue Complex, scheduled for completion in September 2014. The renovation of the AA building converted space that was originally assigned to the buildings and grounds unit into class room and office space. Offices and equipment for the buildings and grounds unit will now be centralized in maintenance building and provide a space for storage of supplies, equipment, and open bay work areas for lawn and service equipment.

DBVI will also complete the installation of a security camera system for the interior and exterior areas of the Azalea Avenue campus in Fiscal Year 2014. The agency also has plans to install a new door control system for the Azalea Avenue campus, excluding the VRCBVI Administrative and Activities building. The AA building door control system was replaced as a part of the AA building renovation.

Strategy 12. VRCBVI will assure agency responsiveness to the needs of individuals served at VCBVI by conducting focus groups of graduates who are both successful and non-successful to determine how the agency can improve services at the Center.

Measurement – VRCBVI will conduct of focus groups consisting of center graduates.

Goal 3. Consistently achieving a high level of consumer satisfaction on choice, needs, and good service delivery

Strategy 1. Achieve a 50% response rate to the satisfaction survey feedback from individuals whose VR cases were closed after IPE development. Achieve a 50% response rate to the satisfaction survey feedback from individuals who attended VRCBVI.

Measurement – Individuals whose VR cases were closed after IPE development and individuals who have participated in evaluation, assessment, or training at VRCBVI will be given an opportunity to participate in a satisfaction survey by phone, e-mail, or paper survey. Individuals who participated in evaluation, assessment, or training at VRCBVI will be provided the opportunity to participate in a satisfaction survey at the end of their participation at VRCBVI. Response data will be reported to the Rehabilitation Council on a semi-annual basis in December and June.

Strategy 2. Based on satisfaction survey results, DBVI’s goal is to achieve an overall satisfaction rating for provided services.

Measurement – During FFY 2014 DBVI will review and revise as needed the DBVI score measuring consumer satisfaction ensuring that the methodology of assessing consumer satisfaction if reliable and valid. DBVI will provide an accounting of consumer satisfaction to the SRC on a semi-annual and annual basis.

Strategy 3. To ensure timely services and quality control, approximately ten percent of active VR cases will be reviewed annually by DBVI Headquarter staff in addition to case reviews that are conducted by regional managers.

Measurement – DBVI Headquarters staff will review ten percent of open VR cases in 2014.

Strategy 4. Annually, DBVI will hold at least four public meetings throughout the State to gather additional customer satisfaction feedback.

Measurement - At least four public meetings will be scheduled in fall 2013 and spring 2014. SRC members will participate in conducting public meetings.

Goal 5. Expanding transition services for secondary school students seeking employment.

Strategy 1. DBVI will continue to sponsor a Summer Work program for high school students.

Measurement – In FFY 2013 and 2014, DBVI will continue assisting high school students who want to participate in a Summer Work program. The number of participating students will be reported to the DBVI headquarters office.

Strategy 2. DBVI will identify potentially eligible students at an earlier age.

Measurement – DBVI case management system data will enable an automatic VR program referral within 30 days after a student reaches age 14. DBVI will send outreach letters to students and their families in order to provide information regarding DBVI services. In 2014, DBVI will initiate letters to special education directors and transition coordinators to educate local education authorities regarding the vocational rehabilitation services available to eligible blind and vision impaired students.

Strategy 3. DBVI will provide vocational rehabilitation staff with training opportunities on the topic of transition.

Measurement – During FFY 2013 and 2014, DBVI will provide VR staff at least two transition training opportunities. Training options will include the statewide transition conference

Strategy 4. Summer Transition programs for high school students will continue as a VRCBVI priority.

Measurement - VRCBVI will provide Summer Transition programs during the summer of 2014. These programs will include a four-week transition program entitled Living Independently Feeling Empowered (L.I.F.E) and a Summer College Assessment program.

Strategy 5. The DBVI education services and Vocational Rehabilitation programs will work together to ensure transition services are available to blind and vision impaired students in Virginia.

Measurement - During FFY 2013 and 2014, collaboration among the VR and education services program directors will be emphasized in policy directives and staff training.

SRC Resource Plan

Support for the Rehabilitation Council

Twenty-two thousand three hundred dollars ($22,300) will be budgeted for FY 2013 SRC activities.

Strategy 1. DBVI will budget $8,000 to provide administrative support for the Council.

Measurement - This will be measured by fully accounting for the hourly cost including benefits based on individual’s base salary and the percentage of time (15%) that is designated on the individuals Employee Work Profile to perform SRC administrative functions.

Strategy 2. DBVI will budget $5,500 to reimburse Council members for travel expenses incurred for attending quarterly Council meetings.

Measurement - This will be measured by the number of members attending SRC meetings and expense accounts submitted.

Strategy 3. DBVI will budget $2,500 to reimburse blind Council members for paid drivers.

Measurement - This activity is measured by the number of blind members who attend meetings and claim the compensation allowed for paying drivers.

Strategy 4. DBVI will budget $1,000 to provide group lunches for Council members.

Measurement - This expense is measured by the number of lunches purchased for members, staff and approved guests, such as drivers for blind members.

Strategy 5. DBVI will budget $200 to provide interpreter services during the Council meetings.

Measurement - This activity is measured by the cost for providing an interpreter for quarterly meetings when one is requested prior to the meeting.

Strategy 6. DBVI will budget $5,000 for individual and/or group training activities to assist the Council in carrying out its responsibilities, including sponsoring a representative to attend the spring and fall Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR), the National Council of State Administrators of the Blind conferences and National Council of State Rehabilitation Council activities.

Measurement - This activity is measured by the associated cost for providing support for the SRC to carry out its responsibilities.

Strategy 7. DBVI will budget $1,000 for new Council member orientation training.

Measurement - This activity is measured by the number of new SRC members and the cost of their travel and lodging.

Strategy 8. DBVI will budget $200 for SRC networking conference calls.

Measurement - This activity will be measured by the need for conference calls required by the SRC to conduct its business.

Strategy 9. DBVI will budget $1,000 to reimburse the DBVI SRC representative for travel expenses associated with attending the Department of Rehabilitative Services (DRS) SRC meetings.

Measurement - This activity is measured by the travel cost required for the representative to attend the meetings.

Strategy 10. DBVI will budget $3,000 to support the Rehabilitation Council with new initiatives. These may include assistive technology, public relations, transition, mentoring, and/or employment initiatives.

Measurement - This activity is measured by the projects proposed and costs approved by the agency for these special activities.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Goal 4. Provide rehabilitation technology to consumers to facilitate their success in training and employment.

Strategy 1. DBVI will continue to consider the need for and provision of rehabilitation technology services and devices to individuals at all stages of the rehabilitation process.

Measurement - Individual case records will reflect the need for and provision of rehabilitationtechnology services and devices considered and/or provided at all stages of the rehabilitation process. The DBVI VR Policies and Procedures Manual makes this a requirement. The Rehabilitation Technology Program Director will provide a report identifying the number of individuals receiving rehabilitation engineering services during 2014.

Strategy 2. DBVI will upgrade devices and computers as part of its efforts to provide rehabilitation technology services to individuals participating in evaluation and training at VRCBVI.

Measurement – DBVI will upgrade rehabilitation technology devices and computers as needed to provide those services to individuals participating in evaluation and training at VRCBVI.

Strategy 3. Rehabilitation technology services will be provided on a statewide basis.

Measurement – Individuals receiving services will have access to DBVI rehabilitation technology staff, and technology labs in the regional offices, central office, and VRCBVI. DBVI will continue budgeting financial resources to ensure equipment and software upgrades are available for assessments and training. DBVI will expend case service funds to provide the assistive technology services necessary for an individual’s participation in vocational training and/or employment.

Strategy 4 – In providing services to groups, DBVI will conduct regional rehabilitation technology seminars.

Measures – During FY 2014 DBVI and VRCBVI will conduct six regional rehabilitation technology seminars in the regional offices.

Strategy 5. DBVI will provide training opportunities on new and improved technology to rehabilitation technology specialists.

Measurement - During FFY 2013 and 2014, the chief rehabilitation engineer will conduct and/or arrange training on new and improved technology for the rehabilitation technology staff.

Strategy 6. DBVI will continue to commit resources to keep current technology labs at the VRCBVI, regional offices, and central office.

Measurement - During FFY 2013 and 2014, DBVI will identify funds included SSA reimbursement funds as needed to upgrade the technology labs.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

Goal 6. Increasing public awareness of services for the blind in Virginia

Strategy 1. Each regional office will be required to participate in outreach activities including, but not limited to, employer education, job fairs, job clubs, and education presentations to consumer organizations and communities.

Measurement - During every quarter of FFY 2014, DBVI regional office staff must participate in at least six outreach activities. These outreach activities may include, but are not limited to:

• VR counselors attending network meetings at the One Stop Centers;

• VR counselors conducting marketing activities, such as job development/placement with employers;

• Staff attending community job fairs;

• Regional managers and counselors attending quarterly Local Workforce Investment Board meetings;

• Providing sensitivity training and information for various employers as needed/requested;

• Attending Workforce Development meetings;

• Participating in site review compliance visits for One Stops;

• Attending consumer organization and support group meetings; and

• Contacting various community referral sources, such as physicians and service organizations.

Strategy 2. DBVI will continue enhancing its website to better promote services to blind individuals, employers, and service providers.

Measurement - This will be an ongoing activity involving at updates as needed.

Strategy 3. During FFY 2014, DBVI and the SRC will continue to work together in developing strategies for increasing public awareness about DBVI and VR services.

Measurement - This will be an ongoing activity involving the SRC and the agency and will include DBVI consideration of implementation of SRC recommendations identified in State Plan Attachment 4.2 (c)

Strategy 4. The DBVI brochure will be widely distributed to help increase public awareness about DBVI programs and services. The brochure is available in print, Braille, and electronic format.

Measurement - During FFY 2014, DBVI will provide staff with printed agency brochures for outreach and increasing public awareness. Braille and electronic copies of the brochure will be available.

Strategy 5. The DBVI Marketing Team/Outreach Coordinator will develop strategies and materials to enhance marketing and public relations.

Measurement -In 2014 the Marketing Team/Outreach Coordinator will develop and implement a marketing plan to address agency outreach to consumers of services including un- and underserved populations identified in the 2012 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment.

Strategy 6. DBVI will continue outreach activities to identify individuals with the most significant disabilities who may be unserved or underserved by the agency. The agency brochure will be widely distributed by DBVI staff to reach potentially unserved or underserved individuals. Consumer organizations of the blind, which include minorities and all age groups, will help DBVI reach underserved groups. To further reach underserved or unserved groups, DBVI will continue educating service organizations and other entities. DBVI also will closely monitor statistical reports to ensure minorities and all age groups are being served by vocational rehabilitation.

Measurement – Via strategies identified above, there will be an agency-wide effort during FFY 2012 and 2013 to identify individuals with significant disabilities who are underserved or who have not been served. By closely monitoring statistical reports, the agency expects an increase in services to minorities that may be underserved. DBVI will use Comprehensive Needs Assessment data acquired through surveys to consumers, employers/business, DBVI staff, and other interested stakeholders to identify and develop further strategies to reach unserved and unserved individuals and individuals with most significant disabilities.

Strategy 7 DBVI will expand and enhance outreach activities to individuals who are blind and vision impaired, their families, and other interested stakeholders. These activities will occur after the renovation of the VRCBVI administration building increases meeting spaces for small and larger groups of people.

Measurement – Increased use of VRCBVI facilities, including meeting rooms and recreational spaces, by individuals who are blind and vision impaired, their families, and other interested stakeholders.

Strategy 8. DBVI will utilize the designated channel for Virginia on Newsline as another resource to expand and enhance outreach activities to individuals who are blind and vision impaired. The SRC will assist DBVI in identifying the process and some of the information to be added and maintained.

Measurement - This will be an ongoing activity involving at least monthly updates.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Goal 2. Passing the annual Standards and Performance Indicators evaluation

Strategy 1. DBVI will produce quarterly Standards and Indicator Reports to enable staff to monitor progress in Standards 1 and 2. The report will reflect totals for the state, regional offices, and counselors.

Measurement – The Standards and Indicators will be online and available to staff at the beginning of each quarter.

Strategy 2. Elements from annual Standards and Indicator Reports will continue to be included in the employee performance standards for supervisors and counselors.

Measurement - Key elements from the annual Standards and Indicator Reports will be included in employee performance standards in 2014.

Strategy 3. The Rehabilitation Council will be provided quarterly updates on the Standards and Indicators Reports.

Measurement – DBVI will present a Standards and Indicator Report at quarterly SRC meetings.

Strategy 4. DBVI administration including the Deputy

Commissioner and the VR Director will review quarterly and annual Standards and Indicators for the agency and each region. Quarterly reports will reflect agency and regional office progress toward achieving the annual Standards and Indicators.

Measurement – DBVI administrators and regional managers will review all quarterly reports and recommend actions to improve performance when it is needed to pass performance indicators. Recommendations will be implemented consistently at the regional and state level.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

Innovation & Expansion Activities

DBVI will budget $57,550 to carry out innovation and expansion activities in FY 2013. The VR program director will monitor expenditure of these funds.

Goal 1. To enhance existing rehabilitation technology services available to persons with visual disabilities. These strategies will help address some barriers to assistive technology services that were identified by VR consumers in public meetings and the comprehensive needs assessment

Strategy 1. Two thousand dollars ($2,000) will be budgeted for adaptive technology training for community service providers to make training more accessible for individuals who are blind. Additional service providers will increase personal choice opportunities for consumers.

Measurement - Increased number of qualified assistive technology trainers/tutors.

Strategy 2. One thousand dollars ($1,000) will be budgeted in FFY 2014 to provide new training materials available for loan to VR consumers. This strategy does not meet the needs or choice of all VR consumers, but helps provide another option to enhance the availability of adaptive technology training in the regional field offices and the VRCBVI.

Measurement – In the beginning of FFY 2014, DBVI will conduct a survey to determine the most needed training materials. Those materials will be purchased prior to the end of 2014.

Strategy 3. Five thousand dollars ($5,000) will be budgeted for the provision of up to four technology training seminars for VR consumers. Funds for these seminars will be available to regional offices outside the Richmond area for computer users who would benefit from technology training. Training may involve an introduction to new or upgraded software to enable individuals to successfully participate in vocational training and/or employment.

Measurement - Up to four assistive technology training seminars will be planned and conducted to address unmet needs.

GOAL 2. To enhance transition and mentoring services for blind individuals in Virginia by providing blind and vision impaired students and adults with real-life experiences, interaction with positive role models and information to better equip them for self-advocacy and realistic informed choices regarding their post-secondary training and/or employment.

Strategy 1. DBVI will budget $6,875 to provide up to three local transition activities for students. In those activities, regional office staff will present blind and visually impaired people who are positive role models.

Measurement - Up to three regional transition programs will be supported utilizing these special innovation and activity funds.

Strategy 2. DBVI will budget $6,875 to provide a minimum of two regional career seminars.

Measurement - Regional office staff will plan and implement a minimum of two career seminars in FFY 2014.

Strategy 3. DBVI will budget $2,500 to support transition and mentoring activities at VRCBVI or in DBVI field offices.

Measurement – VRCBVI and DBVI field offices will identify activities and submit a budget request to access these funds for the special transition/mentoring programs at VRCBVI during FFY 2014.

Strategy 4. DBVI will budget $1,000 to provide training and other materials for students and/or adults to help them accomplish their objectives.

Measurement – DBVI will conduct a survey to identify training materials needed for transition/mentoring activities. The materials will be purchased during FFY 20114.

Goal_3 To develop a program designed to assist adults receiving VR services whose programs stalled or who have completed traditional rehabilitation services and have not made progress toward obtaining an employment outcome with short term intensive assessment and training to help motivate those individuals to progress toward competitive integrated employment.

Strategy 1 – DBVI will network with other VR agencies serving blind and vision impaired individuals to identify best practices for assisting individual to achieve employment when they are not making sufficient progress toward achieving an employment outcome.

Measure – DBVI will contact other agencies and request information pertaining to best practices during 2014.

Strategy 2. DBVI will develop an evaluation system including the review of “cold cases” by a team that will include VR Counselors, the VR Director, and the Deputy Commissioner

Measure – DBVI define the term “cold cases” and designate staff who conduct a review of these cases on a quarterly basis to make recommendations for next steps for the individuals receiving services and their VR Counselors to facilitate individuals’ movement toward an employment

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2013 4:14PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

Evaluation and Report of Progress in Achieving Identified Goals and Priorities and Use of Title I Funds for Innovation and Expansion Activities

The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI) evaluate and report on progress made by the DBVI Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program by:

1. Reviewing and monitoring progress toward achieving the goals and priorities established in Attachment 4.11(c) (1) at quarterly SRC meetings. DBVI reports progress annually in State plan Attachment 4.11(e) (2).

2. Monitoring the strategies to achieve goals and priorities and use of Title I funds for innovation and expansion activities identified in Attachment 4.11(d). DBVI reports progress annually in State plan Attachment 4.11(e) (2).

EVALUATION AND REPORT OF PROGRESS IN ACHIEVING GOALS AND PRIORITIES

I. Competitive employment outcome is the number one priority for the VR program

1. DBVI projected a goal of 180 successful rehabilitations for FFY 2012. 176 of those individuals would be employed in integrated work settings and four would be independent homemakers or unpaid family workers.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012 DBVI did not meets its projected goal, 158 individuals had successful employment outcomes: 128were employed in competitive jobs; 10 were employed in the Randolph-Sheppard Vending Stand Program; 10 were self-employed; 7 were independent homemakers; and 3were in a supported employment setting. DBVI did not close any individuals as unpaid family workers.

2. DBVI projected average hourly earnings of $16.14 for all individuals closed employed in FFY 2012.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012, the average hourly wage including all individuals whose cases were closed employed was $15.42.

3. DBVI’s goal in FFY 2012 was to have at least 70% of vocational rehabilitation consumers achieve their employment goals and work satisfactorily for at least 90 days upon completion of their programs.

Report of progress: In 2012, 30% of vocational rehabilitation consumers achieved their vocational goals.

4. DBVI will continue to emphasize staff and consumer education on enhanced work incentives from the Social Security Reimbursement program for SSDI and/or SSI recipients desiring to return to work.

Report of progress: During 2012, DBVI submitted 214 SSI/SSDI recipient names to Maximums and requested that individuals’ SSA ticket status be established as “in use” with DBVI. DBVI submitted claims totaling $340,772 and received $326,999 in SSA reimbursements for successfully rehabilitating SSDI and/or SSI recipients.

5. DBVI will continue to participate in Workforce Investment Act (WIA) activities to ensure accessibility for blind and vision impaired customers at the One Stop Centers. DBVI will continue serving on local workforce boards and providing technical assistance and support to the Virginia Workforce Network.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012, DBVI staff remained actively involved with Virginia’s WIA programs. The six DBVI regional managers served on approximately 12 Local Workforce Investment Boards (LWIBs) and Memorandums of Understanding have been developed with 17 LWIBs. DBVI has provided technical assistance to Virginia Employment Commission (VEC) offices on assistive technology for individuals who are blind, deafblind, or visually impaired. Several VEC offices are co-located One Stop Career Centers funded by the U.S. Department of Labor. DBVI VR Counselors participated on several committees advising One Stop Career Centers across the state.

DBVI Rehabilitation Engineers continued to support the One Stop Centers through assessment of accessibility at the facilities as needed. While the majority of accessibility assessments took place between FY 2004 and FY 2008, support continued as needed during FY 2012.

6. DBVI will collaborate with the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DRS) in providing training and technical assistance to the network of Disability Program Navigators (DPN) and the Virginia One Stop staff to help ensure individuals with disabilities are served by the One Stop system.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012, the Deputy Commissioner for Services for DBVI served on the DPN executive committee to provide input regarding DPN training. In this capacity, DBVI effectively advocated for program accessibility to One Stop programs and services for individuals who are blind or vision impaired. DBVI Rehabilitation Engineers conducted three accessibility surveys in FFY 2012.

7. DBVI will place a high priority on addressing needs associated with job placement and job development identified in the 2006 and 2007 comprehensive needs assessments shown in Attachment 4.11(a).

Report of progress: In an attempt to facilitate an increase in successful employment outcomes for blind, deafblind, and visually impaired consumers, DBVI created six part-time Job Placement positions during FFY 2011. These non-federally funded positions continued to be sponsored through SFY 2012. Though the number of employment outcomes do not appear to be directly impacted by these positions, Regional Offices benefitted from the increased networking with business and consumers of VR services benefited by the additional resources in developing resumes, performing mock interviews, and conducting job searches.

In FFY 2012 DBVI local field office staff continued to participate in their local networks specific to potential employment opportunities. In the Northern Virginia area, Fairfax office staff routinely participates in hiring events with representatives from the federal government and business sector.

DBVI continued to share job leads with the VR staff and the DBVI State Rehabilitation Council. The job leads are generated by the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation, the Department of the Navy, and other public and private agencies and organizations.

8. The Rehabilitation Council will be consulted on strategies to enhance competitive employment outcomes, including eliminating barriers to full consumer participation in vocational training and supported employment.

Report of progress: In FFY 2012, DBVI continued to report competitive employment outcomes to the SRC on a quarterly basis and as requested.

9. With an emphasis on vocational evaluation and career guidance and counseling, VR counselors will partner with and support consumers to develop realistic vocational goals in integrated settings offering maximum wages and benefits. The vocational goal for some consumers may include employment in the Randolph-Sheppard program or many of the integrated positions in the Virginia Industries for the Blind.

Report of progress: At the local office level, VR counselors use career planning tools, including web-based interest inventories and self-directed search tools, to assist individuals in making educated career goals leading to maximum wages and benefits. DBVI also partners with The NET (CSAVR employment network) and the Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services to learn of job leads. DBVI continued to conduct job clubs in regional offices.

10. To support the Vocational Rehabilitation program focus on employment, DBVI will continue to ensure other agency programs provide services to individuals who want to acquire independent living skills. Consumers who are not interested in employment but may be interested in other DBVI services will receive those services dependent on eligibility criteria and availability of funds.

Report of progress: During 2012, DBVI continued to provide orientation and mobility, low vision services, and rehabilitation teaching instructions to individuals requiring those services to function independently, but who may not be interested in an employment outcome. Additionally, seven individuals achieved successful employment outcomes as homemakers in 2012 and it is highly likely that those individuals received other agency services in addition to VR.

11. DBVI will work to ensure supported employment as an employment option is used by individuals who need support on the job to “achieve competitive employment in an integrated setting.”

Report of progress: During 2012, DBVI continued to provide supported employment services to individuals who required support to obtain or maintain employment. These services included job development, placement, and training and included non-federally funded supported employment follow-along services at case closure.

12. DBVI projected that 15 individuals in FFY 2012 would receive supported employment services.

Report of progress: Thirteen individuals received supported employment services during FFY 2012.

13. DBVI will expand and enhance comprehensive services to individuals who participate in evaluation and training at the Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired (VRCBVI) by renovating the administration building where vocational rehabilitation services are provided.

Report of Progress: Renovation of the VRCBVI Administrative Activities (AA) building began in February 2011. This $3,550,531 project included renovation of the physical plant, fixtures, and equipment and was fully completed in April, 2012. The project was fully funded by Virginia Public Bonds.

The renovation of the VRCBVI also included wireless equipment in the amount of $8,404 which was funded with Social Security Reimbursement funds.

III. Achieving a high level of consumer satisfaction regarding choice, needs, and good service delivery is a high priority for the VR program

1. DBVI’s goal is a 50% response rate to the satisfaction survey from customers with closed VR cases.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012, DBVI did not conduct consumer satisfaction surveys due to lack of sufficient human resources.

2. DBVI’s goal is to achieve an overall satisfaction rate of 90 for vocational rehabilitation services provided by DBVI.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012, DBVI did not conduct consumer satisfaction surveys due to lack of sufficient human resources. Any report of progress is incomplete.

3. Approximately ten percent of active VR cases will be reviewed annually by the central office staff to ensure timely services and quality control.

Report of progress: Due to the vacancy of the DBVI VR Compliance and Satisfaction Analyst position during all of 2012 and lack of sufficient human resources to accomplish this task. However, DBVI Managers at each of the six regional offices conducted routine case file reviews quarterly, randomly, and as needed for the purpose of ensuring compliance with federal regulations, state policy, and maintaining high quality provision of vocational rehabilitation services. Case file reviews included review of file documentation in the AWARE system and in a paper file maintained in the field office.

4. A minimum of four public meetings will be conducted throughout the State during fall and spring 2011.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012, DBVI conducted a total of five public meetings. One meeting was conducted in a DBVI regional office. Three meetings were held in conjunction with a consumer advocacy group state or monthly meetings. One meeting was held at the Virginia Rehabilitation Center for the Blind and Vision Impaired.

5. In FFY 2012, the satisfaction survey will include a component to measure consumer satisfaction on information provided in accessible formats.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012 DBVI did not conduct consumer satisfaction surveys, however, the survey instrument continued to include a component regarding accessible formats.

IV. Assistive Technology Services

1. DBVI will continue to consider the need for and provide assistive technology services and devices to individuals at all stages of the rehabilitation process.

Report of progress: Rehabilitation engineers provided services and devices statewide to almost 421 individuals at all stages of the rehabilitation process in 2012.

2. DBVI will enhance and expand assistive technology services to individuals participating in evaluation and training at VRCBVI. This effort will include upgrades to devices and computers.

Report of Progress: When VRCBVI occupied the new AA Building in April 2012, the computer and keyboarding classrooms were outfitted with 17 brand new computers equipped with JAWS 14, ZOOMTEXT 10, Office 2010, and Windows 7. The agency purchased an iPod touch, an iPAD 2, an iMac, a RefreshaBraille 18 cell Braille display, and a Victor Reader Stream for instructional use with students at the Center. All students who attend training at the Center receive technology training. Any student who has Apple devices received training in the use of the device.

3. Assistive technology services will be provided on a statewide basis.

Report of Progress: Regional rehabilitation engineering labs continued to be operational statewide for customer use and evaluations. During FFY 2012, Rehabilitation Engineering received assistive technology software and hardware technology. The software and hardware were provided for lab use to conduct demonstrations of the technology and evaluation purposes and to enhance the expertise of the rehab technology staff on the newest technologies. Hardware devices and software included JAWS, Magic, and Duxbury upgrades; iPod and iPad Touch products with accessories; Magnifier Mouse; Talking Typer; Viewsonic 24” wide screen display, Apple iMac computer; and various internal hardware components and peripherals needed to keep equipment operational.

4. The Rehabilitation Council will continue to work with the agency to identify and implement new strategies to help meet the technology needs of blind and vision impaired individuals.

Report of progress: No progress was made during 2012. DBVI will reassess this strategy to determine what steps the SRC should take to ensure progress is made in 2013.

5. DBVI will provide training opportunities for rehabilitation technology specialists on new and improved technology.

Report of progress: During 2012, the Rehabilitation Engineering technology staff was exposed to new assistive technology software and devices. This exposure occurred through demonstrations and hands-on activities arranged with local vendors in each region on a continuous on-call basis. Major assistive technology vendors, such as Freedom Scientific, Humanware, Wintech, and Advanced Vision are available to call upon to visit DBVI and the regional offices in order to provide demonstrations and training on emerging hardware and software devices.

6. DBVI will commit resources to update technology labs at VRCBVI, in regional offices, and at the DBVI Headquarters.

Report of progress: In FFY 2012, DBVI spent approximately $4760.57 to update technology labs at regional offices, and the central office. Additionally, the agency spend $4999 to update JAWS software in the regional offices and headquarters.

V. Transition Services for Students

1. DBVI will continue to sponsor a Summer Work program for high school students.

Report of progress: During summer 2012, 66 students participated in the DBVI Summer Work program. Five of six regional offices had summer jobs through this program. The majority of students came from the Richmond regional office where DBVI has a dedicated transition caseload.

2. DBVI will identify potentially VR eligible students at an earlier age.

Report of progress: DBVI continued to identify potentially eligible transition-aged youth through the DBVI case management system during 2012. This system identifies students who reach age 14. Such students and their parents are contacted by DBVI via letter to provide information about vocational rehabilitation and transition services.

3. DBVI will provide more transition training opportunities to vocational rehabilitation staff.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012, DBVI VR counselors were provided with one major transition training opportunity through the 2012 Virginia Transition Forum. Sixteen DBVI staff, including vocational rehabilitation counselors, regional managers, the Commissioner, and three program directors attended the 2012 Transition Forum.

4. VRCBVI will continue to make Summer Transition programs for high school students a priority.

Report of progress: In 2012, six students attended the VRCBVI College Assessment program. Twenty students participated in the Learning Independence, Feeling Empowered (L.I.F.E.) program.

5. The DBVI Education Services and the Vocational Rehabilitation programs will collaborate to ensure transition services are available to blind and vision impaired students in Virginia.

Report of progress: Collaboration between vocational rehabilitation and education services staff occurs at both the central office and regional office levels.

VI. Mentoring Services for Adults and Students

A mentoring program will be developed to allow interactions with positive blind role models, is an important component of rehabilitation for blind youth and adults.

Report of progress: No progress to report.

VII. Public Relations and Outreach

1. Each regional office will be required to participate in outreach activities including, but not limited to: employer education, job fairs, job clubs, and education presentations to consumer organizations and communities.

Report of progress: In FFY 2012, regional office staff continued to participate in numerous outreach activities throughout the state. Outreach included, but was not limited to:

• VR counselors and Regional Managers attending network meetings at the One Stop Centers and serving on local One Stop committees;

• VR counselors facilitating job clubs and support groups related to employment;

• Collaborating with local colleges and universities to educate rising freshman about college life;

• VR counselors conducting marketing activities with employers, such as job development and placement;

• Conducting and/or participating in regional disability awareness activities, including those events specifically designed to focus on assistive technology;

• Marketing DBVI services to local eye care physicians;

• Staff attending job fairs in the community;

• Regional managers and counselors attending quarterly LWIB meetings;

• Providing sensitivity training and information for various employers as needed/requested;

• Attending Workforce Development meetings;

• Participating in site review compliance visits for One Stops;

• Presentations to Veterans or Veteran’s Services Organizations to educate regarding VR services;

• Attending consumer organization and support group meetings; and

• Contacting various community referral sources, such as physicians and service organizations.

2. DBVI will continue to enhance its website to better promote services to blind individuals, employers, and service providers.

Report of progress: During FY 2012, DBVI went live with a new website which was designed to be more easily accessible and easily navigated by consumers and other stakeholders. This website includes information regarding DBVI VR services and other agency programs and services in addition to resource links to other organizations.

3. During FFY 2012, the SRC will work with the agency to develop strategies for increasing public awareness about DBVI and VR services.

Report of progress: During this reporting cycle, the SRC continued to discuss the need for community outreach to increase public awareness. Recommendations for FFY 2013 will continue to include identification of outlets for wider distribution of the Annual Report. Additionally, the SRC recommendations for 2013 continue to include notifying the media of personal interest stories, using public TV and radio, and public service announcements, though no progress has been made in this area to date. This area continued to be of great interest during 2012.

4. The agency brochure will be widely distributed to increase public awareness about DBVI programs and services. The brochure is available in print, Braille, and electronic format.

Report of progress: DBVI staff continued to distribute the agency brochure to business partners, potential customers, colleges, universities, post-secondary educators, and other stakeholders. In 2012, the brochure distribution occurred during outreach activities at state and local conferences, meetings, and disability awareness activities. Braille and electronic copies of the brochure were available.

5. The DBVI will continue to develop strategies and materials to enhance marketing and public relations.

Report of progress: No significant progress was made due to lack of adequate budget and personnel to focus on this strategy.

6. DBVI will conduct outreach activities to identify individuals with the most significant disabilities who may be unserved or underserved by the agency.

Report of progress: During 2012, DBVI staff continued to distribute agency brochures to business partners, potential customers, colleges, universities, post-secondary educators, and other stakeholders during outreach activities at state and local conferences, meetings, and disability awareness activities. Additionally, DBVI began development of an informational letter that can be mailed to the local eye doctors by each regional office.

 

EVALUATION AND REPORT OF PROGRESS IN ACHIEVING GOALS AND PRIORITIES

Goal 1. Competitive employment outcome is the number one priority for the VR program

11. DBVI will work to ensure supported employment as an employment option is used by individuals who need support on the job to “achieve competitive employment in an integrated setting.”

Report of progress: During 2012, DBVI continued to provide supported employment services to individuals who required support to obtain or maintain employment. These services included job development, placement, and training and included non-federally funded supported employment follow-along services at case closure.

12. DBVI projected that 15 individuals in FFY 2012 would receive supported employment services.

Report of progress: Thirteen individuals received supported employment services during FFY 2012.

 

II. Standards and Indicators

1. DBVI will continue to produce quarterly reports showing progress toward achieving the Standards and Indicators. The Standards and Indicators Report will reflect totals for the state, regional offices, and by counselor.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012, DBVI continued to produce the quarterly reports and made them available to counselors and managers.

2. Elements from Standards and Indicators will continue to be included in the employee performance standards for supervisors and counselors.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012, DBVI continued to include key elements from the Standards and Indicators in the job performance standards for counselors and managers.

3. The Rehabilitation Council will be provided quarterly updates regarding the Standards and Indicators Reports.

Report of progress: The Deputy Commissioner for Services or VR Director provided the SRC quarterly updates regarding DBVI accomplishment of Standards and Indicators elements.

4. Passing the Annual Standards and Indicators is DBVI’s goal for the agency and each region. Quarterly reports will reflect agency and regional office progress toward achieving the annual Standards and Indicators.

Report of progress: DBVI’s internal tracking report for Standards and Indicators reflect all six regions and the agency as a whole passed RSA standards and indicators in 2012.

5. It is DBVI’s goal to pass all the RSA Standards and Performance Indicators. For agencies serving blind and vision impaired individuals, these performance measures reflect services provided over a two-year period.

Report of progress: DBVI did not pass the all federally required Standards and Indicators for the two period of October 2010 through September 2012. In FFY 2011 DBVI passed the evaluation standards pertaining to employment outcomes but failed the evaluation standard pertaining to equal access to services. In FFY 2012, DBVI passed the evaluation standards pertaining to both employment outcomes and equal access to services

 

Innovation & Expansion Activities

I. Expand Rehabilitation Technology Services to Persons with Visual Disabilities, Employers, Other Agencies, and Organizations

1. DBVI will continue to seek assistance from the Rehabilitation Council to develop strategies to address technology needs of VR consumers.

Report of progress: During FFY2012, the SRC chairperson participated as a voting member of the Virginia Assistive Technology System Council (VATS). Serving in this capacity, the SRC maintains it active role in assuring Virginia considers the assistive technology needs of blind, deafblind, and vision impaired individuals. The SRC will continue to be represented on the VATS Council in 2013 and 2014.

2. Ten thousand dollars ($10,000) was budgeted for regional offices to purchase computers, adaptive equipment and/or software to make community training centers and technology labs in regional offices more accessible.

Report of progress: In FFY 2012, $4875.57 was spent to purchase adaptive equipment and software. The DBVI chief rehabilitation engineer inventoried the computer systems, operating systems, application programs, and assistive technology hardware/software in each regional lab. This effort assured technology is current and consumers utilizing the facilities have the most accessible, up-to-date systems at their disposal.

3. Five thousand dollars ($5,000) was budgeted for regional offices to assist with adaptive technology training in the community to help service providers make training more accessible for individuals who are blind. Additional service providers will increase opportunities for consumers to make choices.

Report of progress: Throughout FFY 2012, rehabilitation engineers trained five individuals to become technology tutors in order to make services more fully accessible to individuals who are blind or vision impaired. Additionally, DBVI ensured tutors on the DBVI Technology Tutor Network had access to the rehabilitation engineering regional labs to enhance their skills and/or learn new programs and devices. Technology tutors also have been trained by Rehab Engineering staff in assistive technology. There were no additional funds spent in this area.

4. Two thousand dollars ($2,000) was budgeted to provide new training materials on loan to VR consumers. The materials included tutorials for regional offices and VRCBVI. This technology training method is one of many strategies to enhance the availability of adaptive technology training.

Report of progress: In FFY 2012, no funds were spent for this activity.

5. DBVI staff will be available to provide technical assistance to One Stop Centers and required partners of One Stop Centers to make their services and information accessible to individuals who are blind or visually impaired.

Report of progress: In FFY 2012, the chief rehabilitation engineer, other rehabilitation technology staff, counselors, and other DBVI staff provided technical assistance to One Stop Center staff throughout the Commonwealth.

6. Five thousand dollars ($5,000) is budgeted to provide technology training seminars for VR consumers. The seminar funds will be available to regional offices outside the Richmond area and will target those individuals who are already computer users and who would benefit from technology training. The training may involve introductions to new or upgraded software that may enable an individual more successful participation in vocational training and/or employment.

Report of progress: In FFY 2012, no funds were spent in this area.

II. Enhance transition and mentoring services for blind individuals in Virginia

1. Six thousand eight hundred seventy-two dollars ($6,872) will be budgeted for regional offices to provide local transition activities for students. Regional office staff will be strongly encouraged to include blind people who are positive role models.

Report of progress: No progress made in this area.

2. Six thousand eight hundred seventy-two dollars ($6,872) was budgeted in FFY 2008 to provide a minimum of two regional career seminars.

Report of progress: In FFY 2012, funds were not used for this activity.

3. Two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500) will be budgeted to support special transition and mentoring activities at VRCBVI.

Report of progress: In Summer 2012, twenty (20) students participated in the LIFE (“Learning Independence, Feeling Empowered”) program at VRCBVI. LIFE is a four-week residential transition program for blind and vision impaired high school students who want to have fun and make new friends while gaining nonvisual skills and work experience to assist in the transition from high school to the rest of their lives. Funding for the program in the amount of $13,169 came from DBVI’s VR budget, and also from VRCBVI’s operating budget. Students participated in skills of blindness classes, including Orientation and Mobility, Braille, Keyboarding, Access Technology, Personal and Home Management, Physical Fitness, Issues of Blindness, and Job Readiness. Students participated in part-time community based work experiences during the last two weeks of the program, as well. LIFE also afforded students opportunities to network, build communication skills, and participate in evening and weekend confidence building challenge activities, including rock climbing, rope courses, movies, amusement parks, drivers education, swimming, a semi-formal dinner dance, and a talent show. An additional $1,075 was expended to produce a driver’s education video featuring students who attended the 2012 LIFE program. This video will be used to market the 2013 LIFE program.

4. One thousand dollars ($1,000) will be budgeted to provide training and other materials for students and/or adults participating in the Gain Independence, Opportunity Explorations (GOAL) program.

Report of progress: The GOAL program was not conducted in 2012.

III. Support for the Rehabilitation Council.

Twenty-two thousand three hundred dollars ($22,300) was budgeted for FY 2011 SRC activities.

During 2012, eight thousand dollars ($8,000) will be budgeted to provide clerical support for the Council.

Report of progress: During 2012, $7,701 was spent to provide clerical support for the SRC.

Compensation of Council members for expenses required to attend meetings

1. Five thousand five hundred ($5,500) will be budgeted to reimburse Council members for travel expenses incurred to attend Council meetings.

Report of progress: During 2012, $7,486.90 was spent to compensate members to attend meetings.

2. In 2013, DBVI will not compensate Rehabilitation Council members for attending Council meetings.

Report of progress: No compensation provided to SRC members.

3. Two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500) will be budgeted to reimburse blind Council members for paid drivers.

Report of progress: During 2012, $494.74 was spent to reimburse blind members for paid drivers.

Identify all other expenses related to the operation of the Council

1. One thousand ($1,000) will be budgeted to provide group working lunches for Council members.

Report of progress: During 2012, $1,040.36 was spent on group working lunches.

2. Two hundred dollars ($200) will be budgeted to provide interpreter services during the Council meetings.

Report of progress: During 2012, no funds were spent to provide interpreter services.

3. Four thousand dollars ($4,000) will be budgeted for individual and/or group training activities to assist the Council in carrying out its responsibilities, including sponsoring a representative to attend the Spring and Fall CSAVR conference.

Report of progress: During FFY 2012, $2,901.97 was expended to facilitate the SRC Chair’s participation in the CSAVR meetings and Department of Rehabilitation Services SRC activities. 2012 Annual Retreat costs are included meals and lodging accounted for in other sections of this report.

4. One thousand ($1,000) will be budgeted for new Council member orientation training.

Report of progress: During 2012, DBVI expended $988.85 to conduct new member orientation to include travel expenses, lodging, and meals.

5. Three thousand dollars ($3,000) will be budgeted to support the Rehabilitation Council with transition, mentoring and/or employment initiatives.

Report of progress: During 2012 no funds were spent for these initiatives.

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2013 4:14PM by Susan Payne

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

Supported employment (SE) services provided under Title VI, Part B of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, will be available to consumers served by the Virginia Department for the Blind and Vision Impaired (DBVI).

The time limited services provided under supported employment include:

1. Job coaching for blind , deafblind, and visually impaired individuals with other disabilities who previously have not been eligible for VR services, have been limited to sheltered employment or activity centers, or have had interrupted or intermittent employment due to severe disabilities.

2. Support services such as adaptive equipment/assistive technology devices, transportation, interpreter service for persons with dual-sensory impairments, etc. needed to sustain the individual in a time limited phase of supported employment.

DBVI uses the services of a statewide network of vendors for supported employment. Those vendors meet the Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services’ (DARS) facilities standards for supported employment.

DBVI purchases SE from vendors on a fee-for-service basis during the time limited phase. DBVI provides training to job coaches when needed to increase their understanding of visual impairments and ability to provide quality services to the blind, deafblind, and visually impaired individuals. Generally, the time limited phase of supported employment is not authorized until the extended services funding has been identified. An exception can be made when there is a reasonable expectation that extended services funding will be identified at the point time-limited services are ready to end. Normally, the time limited services will not exceed 18 months.

Extended services funding is available for some blind, deafblind, or visually impaired individuals who have intellectual disabilities confirmed through the local Community Services Boards (CSBs). A special state appropriation provides extended services funds for individuals with physical disabilities who are not eligible for CSB funding or the use of natural supports. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is required when costs are associated with either SE services or the use of natural supports which could be provided free. The VR counselor authorizes the services for the time limited support phase from Title VI, Part B and receives monthly progress reports from the vendor to ensure quality services are provided.

Sponsorship termination for time limited DBVI services occurs when the consumer has stable employment and their VR case has been closed. Specific indicators of job stability are: 1) consumer satisfaction; 2) employer satisfaction; 3) job coach completion of training, adjustment, and fading activities; and 4) when the job coach’s intervention time is less than 20 percent of the consumer’s working hours over a 30-to-60-day period.

An individual’s case is closed when the following two criteria are met: 1) competitive employment is performed for the established hours per week for a period of 90 days after the transition from the time-limited phase to the extended services phase, as specified on the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE); and 2) the individual’s work is performed in an integrated work setting where the individual has regular contact with persons without disabilities.

The transition from time limited to extended services will be provided without any service interruption due to the aforementioned commitment by third-party funding for extended services.

Following the time-limited phase, discrete post-employment services are available when limited intervention is needed to help the individual maintain the job placement and the necessary services are not available from the extended service provider.

In most instances, the job coach providing time-limited services continues face-to-face extended services at least twice monthly, on-site or off-site. During this extended services phase, the job coach must contact an employer at least once per month.

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2013 4:17PM by Susan Payne

System Information

System information

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on:08/12/2013 10:16 AM

Last updated by:savapaynes

Completed on: 08/12/2013 10:16 AM

Completed by: savapaynes

Approved on: 08/19/2013 12:39 PM

Approved by: rscomartint