ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Utah State Office of Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2013 (submitted FY 2012)

1.1 The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Utah State Office of Education (USOE) [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Executive Director of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Executive Director of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Don Uchida

Title of Signatory
Executive Director, USOR

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/30/2012

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2013
No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Utah State Office of Rehabilitation

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

ATTACHMENT 4.2 (c)

Summary of Input and Recommendations of the State Rehabilitation Council; Response of the Designated State Unit; and Explanations for Rejection of Input or Recommendations

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) maintains a State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17. The designated state unit jointly with the SRC develops, agrees to and reviews annually state goals and priorities and jointly submits to the commissioner annual reports of progress in accordance with the provisions of Section 101(a)(15) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.29 and subsection 4.11 of this State Plan. The SRC meets 10 times per year. USOR regularly consults with the State Rehabilitation Council regarding the development, implementation and revision of state policies and procedures of general applicability pertaining to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services. USOR includes in the State Plan and in any revision to the State Plan a summary of input provided by the State Rehabilitation Council, including recommendations from the annual report of the council described in Section 105(c)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(5) the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction described in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4), and other reports prepared by the council and the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations, including explanations for rejecting any input or recommendation; and transmits to the council: (A) all plans, reports and other information required under 34 CFR 361 to be submitted to the commissioner; (B) all policies and information on all practices and procedures of general applicability provided to or used by rehabilitation personnel in carrying out this State Plan and its supplement; and (C) copies of due process hearing decisions issued under 34 CFR 361.57, which are transmitted in such a manner as to ensure that the identity of the participants in the hearings is kept confidential.

The following is a summary of the SRC’s recommendations made from June 2011 until May 2012 and USOR’s response and actions taken in regards to these recommendations.

SRC RECOMMENDATION 1:

In August of 2011 the SRC received a presentation about a proposed small change in the way the USOR would compute eligibility for financial services. The SRC recommended that USOR move forward with the proposed changes.

USOR RESPONSE TO RECOMMENDATION 1:

USOR implemented the proposed changes to computing client eligibility for paid services from USOR.

SRC RECOMMENDATION 2:

In August of 2011 the SRC was given a presentation about proposed expansions to the types and division of services provided as Supported Employment (SE) and Job Coaching (SJBT) services. Specifically USOR proposed continuing the milestone payment pilot and dividing the billing of services into additional categories to provide options to counselors and more specialized services to clients. The SRC expressed their support of these improvements.

USOR RESPONSE TO RECOMMENDATION 2:

USOR moved forward with proposed revisions to the categories and billing of SE and SJBT services.

SRC RECOMMENDATION 3:

In January of 2012 the SRC was presented with a draft of the USOR building block funding proposal for the upcoming legislative session by the USOR Executive Director. The SRC expressed its support for the priorities chosen and ranking of those priorities.

USOR RESPONSE TO RECOMMENDATION 3:

The USOR Executive Director submitted the fiscal building block priorities proposal as presented to the SRC to the Utah State Legislature. On a side note all of the USOR building blocks were funded this year by the Utah State Legislature for the first time in several years.

SRC RECOMMENDATION 4:

In January of 2012 the SRC was presented with information about the Utah Defendant Offender Workforce Development Task Force (UDOWD). This is a new task force in Utah trying to improve outcomes (including employment) for individuals who have been incarcerated. Utah’s VR is a key player in this taskforce and USOR is working toward identifying VR counselors across the state that would be specialists in serving the offender population and coordinate with this task force to improve employment outcomes. The SRC expressed its support for this effort.

USOR RESPONSE TO RECOMMENDATION 4:

USOR has moved forward with assigning more VR counselors to this specialty effort. The current number statewide is 10 counselors.

SRC RECOMMENDATION 5:

In February of 2012 the SRC was presented with a policy clarification proposed by USOR to clarify to counselors what services could be provided in a pre-IPE status. This clarification makes it clear to counselors that it may be appropriate to ‘utilize and pay for restoration services, on a case by case basis to stabilize the client to participate in their assessments, evaluations, and career goals’. Such services could generally be provided for up to 6 months without an IPE in place. The SRC expressed their support for this policy clarification. As one council member summarized the new guidelines “Stabilize the situation then strengthen the situation.”

USOR RESPONSE TO RECOMMENDATION 5:

USOR has moved forward with issuing the policy clarification and guidance statement to all counselors.

SRC RECOMMENDATION 6:

In March the SRC was presented with a draft of a revised Case Service Manual chapter covering USOR’s initial efforts toward moving to a ‘paperless’ system. At this time the policy will be that anything held in the electronic file will not be printed but a paper file will still exist for those things that come to USOR in printed form and things that need to be printed by USOR because they need signatures etc. Eventually USOR hopes to build a system that will allow all documents to be scanned and signatures recorded electronically. The SRC expressed their support for this effort with the qualifying caution that the case management system be completely accessible before moving forward with each step.

USOR RESPONSE TO RECOMMENDATION 6:

USOR is moving forward with its initial proposal and continuing to assure that all electronic documents are fully accessible to all who need to review them.

SRC RECOMMENDATION 7:

The SRC has expressed concerns over several meetings about large caseloads and an apparent emphasis on production over a client-centered approach by USOR employees. Discussions have been held about supporting VR counselors with additional resources, considering options for streamlining and improving efficiency in an environment of changing to client-centered approach.

USOR RESPONSE TO RECOMMENDATION 7:

As part of a larger improvement effort USOR has begun an agency "transformation” with the goal of improving counselor skills and increasing the time counselors have to meet with clients in an effort to become more client centered. All aspects of the VR program are undergoing changes to support this effort. Manuals are being re-written, authority levels are being increased, job duties are being changed and language is being modified. This will be a multi-step process taking place over the next several years. The provision of professional quality, client-centered services will be the goal of all transformation activities and efforts.

This screen was last updated on Jun 12 2012 1:06PM by Stacey Cummings

This agency has not requested a waiver of statewideness.

This screen was last updated on May 26 2009 11:27AM by sautwalkerk

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

ATTACHMENT 4.8(b)(1)

Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) has developed and maintains cooperative agreements were necessary with federal and state agencies not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system. USOR maintains a cooperative agreement with “AgrAbility”, a program carried out under the authority of the Undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture which includes a fee for service arrangment. Additionally USOR maintains cooperative agreements with the Utah Department of Workforce Services (DWS), Utah State Office of Education (USOE), Utah System of Higher Education (USHE), Utah Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Utah Department of Community and Culture (UDCC), and the Utah Governor’s Office of Economic Development (GOED).

As required by recent Utah State legislation USOR is working on developing a MOU and coordinated plan with DWS and DSPD (Utah’s DD agency) to carry out services related to employment for persons with significant disabilities. A general agreement is in place and a more specific plan for services is being discussed.

Additionally, USOR maintains cooperative agreements with all local public education school districts, the Veterans Administration (VA), local mental health organizations, and other entities involved in workforce development services.

USOR also participates in the statewide workforce investment system through participation in statewide and local workforce investment boards.

As part of its strategic plan beginning in 2011 USOR is working to establish a liaison relationship with the Utah Office of Ethnic Affairs (UOEA) as well as individual minority groups including Asian, Hispanic, Pacific Islanders and others in an effort to educate the office staff about VR programs and services, and in an effort to establish referral sources within these communities. Details about these outreach activities can be found in attachment 4.11(c)(1).

This screen was last updated on Jun 12 2012 1:15PM by Stacey Cummings

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

ATTACHMENT 4.8(b)(2)

Coordination with Education Officials

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) has established plans, policies, and procedures for coordination between USOR and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation. USOR is structurally positioned within the Utah State Office Of Education (USOE) under the authority of the State Board of Education, as such functional relationships exist between administrative staff of both offices.

USOR maintains cooperative agreements with each of the 41 local school districts that include provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting. USOR has assigned transition liaisons with each local school district who serve on transition roundtables with special educators and administrators, provide outreach to students and parents, and provide VR orientations to students. Every high school in Utah has a transition counselor who is assigned to cover referrals and questions from that school.

USOR maintains a cooperative agreement with the USOE Special Education program that provides for consultation and technical assistance to assist USOE and local districts in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post school activities, including vocational rehabilitation services. The cooperative agreement also provides for joint transition planning coordination by USOR and USOE staff for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, and specifies the roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services. A representative of USOE Special Education sits on the State Rehabilitation Council, and a representative from USOR sits on the Utah Special Education Advisory Panel providing consultation and assistance.

Additionally, USOR is represented on local school district transition councils where they exist, the statewide transition council, and the Workforce, Education and Economic Development Alliance (WEEDA) committee which bridges collaborative efforts between the USOE, DWS, USOR, GOED, and Higher Education.

This screen was last updated on Jun 12 2012 1:16PM by Stacey Cummings

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

ATTACHMENT 4.8(b)(3)

Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

USOR has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by USOR that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

USOR has established fee-for-service agreements with private non-profit entities providing vocational rehabilitation services throughout Utah in accordance with the requirements of 5.10(b) of this state plan. Entities providing services include, but are not limited to, Deseret Industries, Turn Community Services, the Brain Injury Association of Utah, Homeless Veteran’s Fellowship and Columbus Community Center. USOR also maintains vendor relationships with other agencies providing supported job based employment services that include a fee for service agreement and participation in job coach training activities. As of January 2011 provision of Supported Employment services and Supported Job Based Training services are provided on an outcome payment system. USOR continues efforts to identify and make arrangements, where appropriate, to expand the availability of Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) offering supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of this state plan. In the past year USOR has signficantly increased the flexibility and design of job coaching services to allow counselors to design a specialized set of services unique for each individual. It is hoped that this increased flexibility encourages more CRPs to become vendors in order to increase choices available to USOR counselors.

Through a cooperative relationship between USOR and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), supported employment services was expanded to a targeted population through Utah House Bill 45 in 2009. This bill provided on going funding for extended supported employment services to a targeted number of individuals who had previously been on a waiting list for DSPD SE funding. Although discontinued at one time this funding has been restored and USOR continues to work with DSPD to identify eligible individuals based on the priorities set in the cooperative agreement to be served by these reserved funds.

This screen was last updated on Jun 12 2012 5:02PM by Stacey Cummings

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

ATTACHMENT 4.8(b)(4)

Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

USOR has established fee-for-service agreements with entities providing supported employment services throughout Utah in accordance with the requirements of the state plan. Last year USOR began paying all providers under an ’outcome’ payment method. These entities include Columbus Community Center, Turn Community Services, Oasis House, Miles Employment Service for the Deaf, DDI Vantage, RISE Inc., Danville Employment Services, Choices Supported Employment, Phoenix Services, Chrysalis Utah, Alliance House, Pioneer Adult Rehab Center, Enable Industries, Valley Services, Covenant Employment Services and other agencies providing supported job based employment services. Last year USOR revised their payment system to give more choices to counselors, allowing them to customize a set of services from a provider(s) unique to the needs a a particular client. USOR continues efforts to identify and make arrangements, where appropriate, with other supported employment entities. These efforts are coordinated by the USOR Employer Resource Center Rehabilitation Specialist who conducts efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

Through a cooperative relationship between USOR and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities (DSPD), supported employment services have been expanded to a targeted population through the provision of long term funding from the Utah State Legislature. Though once suspended these funds were once again allocated and it is expected that these funds could provide long term services for up to 175 individuals per year. These funds are designed to support individuals who have previously been on a waiting list for DSPD SE funding. The money is now designated as ongoing funding whereas in past years it had been designated at times as a one year allocation.

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2012 12:34PM by Stacey Cummings

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

Attachment 4.10

Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

This attachment describes the Utah State Office of Rehabilitations (USOR) policies, procedures, and activities which ensure an adequate supply of qualified professionals and paraprofessionals to provide vocational rehabilitation services statewide. These policies and procedures were developed in coordination with the State Rehabilitation Council.

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development. The USOR has developed and maintains a computerized record system for personnel needs, resources, and training. The computerized personnel needs data system is maintained by the USOR Training Coordinator and provides annual analysis of: (1) Qualified personnel needs. (A) The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category. At the writing of this document the system includes 98 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors (VRC) (increase of 4 from last year) and 29 Supervising Counselors (SC) within the Division of Rehabilitation Services (DRS), and 7 VRC within the Division of Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired (DSBVI). Both divisions combined to serve 30,170 individual during FY 2011 for a counselor/consumer ratio of 1:225. Also included in the database from DRS are 10 District Directors, 4 Field Service Directors (one more than last year), and 1 Case Service Director, 12 Vocational Evaluators (VE), 13 Rehabilitation Technicians (RT)(3 more than last year), 65 Office Specialists (OS)(down 3 from last year), 8 Choose to Work Employment Specialists (CTW)(one more than last year), and a DSBVI VR Case Service Director all of whom work in support of the VR program.

(b) The following is a breakdown of the number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category and a projection of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in 5 years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors (see projections below). In 2008 USOR adopted a plan to reduce turnover. Due in large part to that program turnover dropped significantly from 2008 to 2010. More recently however turnover has once again been on the rise. For example, USOR replaced 10 VR counselors/supervising counselors from January 2010 to June 2011. From January 2011 to June 2012 USOR replaced 19 counselors. An estimate of yearly turnover at this point would be about 15 counselors per year. If turnover stays steady and if two additional counselors are added per year for possible agency expansion and in order to maintain current service ratios (the USOR formula is one counselor and one-half time secretary for each 20,000 individuals in the general population and 4 counselors/caseloads were added each of the past 2 years) the USOR will need a total of 85 new counselors and 10 supervising counselors over the next 5 years. The USOR replaced 4 District Directors in the past year and 7 supervising counselors, however several of those were based on reassignment and agency reorganization. Based on past history it is estimated that there might be 10 supervisor openings and 5 district director openings over the next 5 years.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Counselor 105 7 85
2 Supervising Counselor 29 0 10
3 District Director 10 0 5
4 0 0 0
5 0 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

Utah only has one Master’s Program in the field of Vocational Rehabilitation within the state located at Utah State University. This program prepares MS degree, CRC eligible VR counselors. The program also contains a very small doctoral program. The Executive director of USOR and the USOR Human Resource Developer/Trainer sit on the USU advisory council. The program empahsizes degrees given through distance education and contains mostly individuals already employed by public VR agencies across the country. Due to this makeup of students only a small on-campus class, usually 5 or 6 students, are available each year to recruit as new hires for USOR vacancies.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Utah State University 86 13 15 38
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

Plan for Recruitment, Preparation and Retention of Qualified Personnel

During FFY 2008 USOR implemented a comprehensive recruitment program designed to make USOR more attractive as an employer, cut turnover by retaining current qualified staff, and increase the number of qualified applicants for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor vacancies. This effort, and subsequent efforts resulted in a significant drop in staff turnover through 2010. Unfortunately due to multiple circumstances the turnover rate has one again been increasing. USOR continues to offer flexible schedules, an incentive program which gives Administrative Leave for above average performance, generous educational assistance, and a competitive starting salary. In addition, in 2010 USOR was able to provide a one-time payment/bonus to those who obtained the new state licensure to help offset the costs of that licensure and reward those who obtained it. USOR is hopeful that additional payments or a step increase will eventually be approved related to licensure. Although increasing, turnover has not returned to the extremely high rate seen in 2008. As indicated in a previous attachment USOR replaced 11 counselors in an 18 month period (Jan 10 to June 11) and 19 counselors in the next 18 month period measured (Jan 11 to June 12, some overlap to last period. Although turnover is up within USOR, USOR has seen an increase in the skill and expertise level of those applying for vacant positions. USOR is hiring more individuals at a MS degree level that in prior years for example and it is believed those hired most recently will meet CSPD requirements sooner than past groups. USOR has also been increasing the number of counselors which also increases the number of openings. Eight caseloads have been added over the past 36 months plus additional positions in other areas such as Rehabilitation Technicians. There has been a lot of reorganization and assignment with USOR in the last 12 months which is unlikely to continue into the next year. It is believed that turnover rates will decrease significantly in the next 12 months but estimates for staff needed in the next 5 years were done with a ‘worst case scenario’ mentality. USOR actively recruits at all colleges and universities in Utah to attract both undergraduates and potential graduate students. The USOR is also building relationships with other out of state colleges. For example, approximately 7 current USOR staff are attending the CORE accredited program at Virginia Commonwealth University, and one staff member is attending Southern University in Louisiana.

USOR actively recruits to fill Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor positions throughout the year by participating in university and college career fairs and by presenting at on-campus classes at the Utah State University Rehabilitation Counselor Education (RCE) program. Additionally, USOR has developed and maintained a recruitment brochure that details the benefits of employment within the state agency and introduces potential applicants to careers in VR. USOR also works with the USOE Human Resources Office to increase the distribution of recruitment announcements nationwide. USOR staff serves on the Advisory Board for the USU RCE program, and work closely with the University of Northern Colorado Technical Assistance and Continuing Education program in efforts to attract graduates and increase the number of students engaged in these training programs. USOR staff is very active in the state chapter of the National Rehabilitation Association (NRA), so much so that the NRA selected Salt Lake City as the site for their Fall 2011 conference which was a very successful conference, and USOR uses that relationship to recruit qualified professionals and to further develop the qualifications of agency staff through additional training, support, and career development. For example, monthly ‘brown bag training seminars’ are presented through the USOR video training system and co-sponsored by NRA. These coordinated efforts are designed to recruit, prepare, and retain personnel who are qualified, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

 

Personnel Standards

USOR has established hiring preferences and personnel policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that USOR professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained. In January, 2010 the State of Utah began issuing a new State Licensure for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. This new State Licensure necessitated a change in our agency CSPD standard to make sure that Utah VR counselors adhere to the highest standard existing in Utah. As the Utah requirement gives 5 years from the date of hire for staff to meet CSPC It is anticipated that all current staff will meet the CSPD expectation by June 18, 2017. The policies and procedures related to CSPC are described below:

(1) CSPD Standard

The USOR has established the following policy to ensure that professionals providing services are appropriately and adequately trained consistent with or prepared to meet the Utah State Licensing Requirement that applies to the area in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services. The purpose of this policy is to ensure that all Rehabilitation Counselors, Supervising Counselors, Vocational Evaluators and District Directors employed by USOR meet the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) standard required in law, federal regulations, and the state plan. This standard is designed to guarantee that Rehabilitation Counselors are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained to provide quality effective vocational rehabilitation services. The USOR CSPD standard requires that those employees identified above meet one of the following criteria:

(1) Hold a Utah State Licensure in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling or

(2) Meet the criteria to obtain a Utah State Licensure in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling which includes holding a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or related field as outlined in the Utah State licensing regulations, obtaining 4000 hours of supervised experience under a Licensed Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor and having taken and passed the CRC exam (national certification exam) Employees who hold a Master’s degree in an approved counseling field will be considered to have met the CSPD if they have completed the required 4000 hours of supervised work under the supervision of an LVRC and have completed and passed the CRC national exam.

Plan for all staff to meet new CSPD standard:

Although the USOR standard is consistent with Utah state standards, the Utah state licensure is new, and the standard has been recently revised. The grandfathering clause which allowed an acceptance of a variety of degrees as well as experience in lieu of the CRC has expired and the list related degrees accepted is now smaller and the CRC is required. This, combined with the fact that USOR must sometimes underfill counseling positions due to a lack of applicants meeting the standard at hire means that not all USOR staff meet CSPD at this time.

CSPD status is tracked for counselors, supervising counselors, vocational evaluators, and district directors. In addition, the CSPD database contains information on various area directors, administrators and program specialists such as Choose to Work staff within DRS that are expected to meet and maintain the CSPD standard. As of this date the database contains information on 176 staff members, 144 of which meet the standard (either licensed or eligible to be licensed). 135 of those listed have the Utah State LVRC license. 32 staff are not considered to yet meet the standard and are working on their 5 year plans as described above to meet CSPD. Each of those 32 staff members has a plan in place to meet the standard within 5 years of hire (or 6 years in special cases where the standard changed mid plan, see below). As indicated earlier all current staff are expected to meet the CSPD requirement by June 18, 2017.

All counseling and vocational evaluation staff who were hired before January 1, 2010 and have a signed CSPD plan already on file using the prior CSPD standard will be expected to complete the terms of that initial agreement but have also been given an additional 12 months beyond the initial expected date of completion to complete the added requirements of the new CSPD standard which includes taking and passing the national certification exam (CRC).

Counselors and evaluators hired since January 1, 2010 wrote a CSPD plan based on the new CSPD standard and will have 5 years from their date of hire to complete the requirements as outlined above to meet the standard. Those counselors who do not meet CSPD upon hire and will require additional graduate level education are expected to successfully complete at least one graduate level class and to apply for admission into a graduate program during their probationary period with the agency (first 12 months of hire).

(3) Strategies, timelines, monitoring and qualifications.

(A) The USOR makes every effort to recruit and hire individuals who meet the USOR’s CSPD standard as outlined above, and supports the training of existing employees who do not meet the CSPD standard. The USOR offers ongoing educational assistance for those needing additional education to meet the CSPD standard. The USOR also offers a pay increase when counselors successfully obtain national certification (CRC).

For those employees hired without a Master’s degree in a counseling field, USOR will assist with funding for graduate level education. A graduate degree specific to Rehabilitation Counseling is preferred by the USOR and is considered to be directly related to the job requirements of a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor. For this reason employees who choose to attend a CORE accredited Master’s degree program will be eligible for 100% educational reimbursement of tuition and books. The CORE accredited program chosen must be eligible to grant an RSA scholarship to offset the costs of tuition, fees, and books. All employees attending these programs must apply for the RSA scholarship. In the rare instance where an approved graduate program may have exhausted all available scholarship monies for a given semester, employees will be eligible to request from the USOR 100% reimbursement of tuition, fees, and books. Reimbursement requests must be submitted prior to the beginning of each semester. These requests must be accompanied by a letter of scholarship denial which states that the reason for such denial was due to lack of available funding from the approved graduate program. Employees completing required internship and practicum experience from a CORE accredited program will be accommodated by the USOR at the employee’s request.

For those employee’s who choose to attend a Master’s degree program in a counseling field which meets the requirements for a related degree under the rules for obtaining a Utah State VRC license will be eligible for standard educational reimbursement of 50% of tuition, fees, and books, up to the rate of a comparable public program. Comparable public programs are considered to be those found at the University of Utah. All such coursework must be directly related to the employee’s job requirements. Employees must be accepted and matriculated into a graduate program in a related counseling discipline.

All requests for USOR educational benefits will be considered contingent upon available funding and employees will be notified of approval prior to enrollment for each semester. All related educational expenses and time required to complete any graduate program will be the responsibility of the employee.

In some cases employees who currently meet the CSPD standard may choose to pursue an additional advanced degree program. Educational benefits outlined in the Human Resources Guide will apply in these instances.

While it is the intention of the USOR to establish and maintain funding necessary to allow all employees to meet the CSPD requirements, exceptional and unforeseen circumstances may arise that prohibit such funding. Should funding become unavailable, the employee will be allowed an adjusted time frame to accomplish the standard when such funding becomes available. The USOR establishes priorities of funding for CSPD requirements as follows:

(1) Priority One: Employees in a supervisory position and employees hired under the expectation of meeting the standard as indicated in their letter of hire.

(2) Priority Two: All other employees.

Counseling staff who obtain the CRC certification will be refunded 50% of the test fee, and will receive a 5% selective salary increase to offset the costs of maintaining the certification (unless they are in longevity). Individuals in longevity who obtain certification will receive a one time bonus. Counselors must continue to maintain CRC certification or they will lose the salary increase.

The USOR has instituted a hiring preference in order to encourage the hiring of staff who already meets the CSPD standard.

Hiring preference is as follows:

(1) Individuals who hold the Utah State Licensure for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors.

(2) Individuals who meet the USOR CSPD standard but have not yet obtained State Licensure.

(3) Individuals enrolled in a Commission on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) accredited program to obtain a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling.

(4) Individuals who hold a Master’s degree in an approved counseling field as outlined in the state licensing law.

(5) Individuals who hold a Bachelor’s degree in a related social service field such as counseling, psychology, social work, etc. and who have three or more years of counseling employment experience.

(6) Individuals who hold a Bachelor’s degree in a related social service field with less than three years of counseling experience (are hired as a Rehabilitation Counselor Trainee).

All new counselors receive a notification attached to their letter of hire indicating their current CSPD standing and the requirements they must meet within their first year of hire, and subsequent 5 years of hire to meet the standard. The letter is signed by the USOR Executive Director and must be signed by the prospective employee prior to acceptance of the position. Direct supervisors are required to track the progress of the employee in meeting the CSPD standard and the requirement to meet CSPD is included in the counselor’s performance plan and evaluation.

All Rehabilitation Counselors who do not meet the standard as outlined above are required to meet the standard within five (5) years of their date of hire (6 years in some cases, see earlier explanation). Counselors who do not have a Master’s degree in an approved counseling field upon hire will be required to enter a Master’s program, and obtain the needed degree and national certification to meet the five (5) year deadline. Staff who do not make adequate progress within the timelines described may be terminated. It is anticipated that all current staff should meet the CSPD standard by June 18, 2017.

Progress of the USOR as a whole is monitored through the data system. Staff employed as Rehabilitation Counselors, Supervising Counselors, Vocational Evaluation and District Directors must meet the CSPD standards and are tracked through this system. New employees hired who do not meet the standard at hire will be monitored by both supervisory staff and training staff.

Each new counselor hired must complete a USOR Qualification of Personnel Standard form. For those staff who meet the standard at the time of their hire and for those who will meet the standard within five (5) years of hire with additional work experience and national certification (those hired with an a Master’s degrees in an approved counseling field), no additional documentation is required except verification of passing the CRC exam and/or verification of State licensure. For those counselors who need additional education in order to meet the standard, sections will be added to their performance plans with the heading of Professional Development. These sections must include a plan describing how the counselor will meet the standard, by obtaining the required Master’s degree and National Certification, within five (5) years of the date of hire. These plans shall be submitted to the USOR Training Coordinator with the USOR Qualification of Personnel Standard form within thirty (30) days of hire, and must be signed by the employee, the supervisor, and the District Director. Minimum requirements for the first year of the plan for those staff who do not hold a Master’s degree in an approved counseling field will include completing the application process for an approved graduate program and satisfactory completion of two (2) semester hours of coursework required in the approved program. Satisfactory completion means courses are completed in a timely manner at a performance level to meet the graduate school requirements. Progress sufficient to meet the CSPD plan requirements will be monitored in each subsequent year as set forth in the employee’s Performance Plan.

The Performance Plan will be reviewed as required by the supervisor. If an employee has not satisfactorily completed all activities outlined for the year of review, they will receive an unsatisfactory rating in the Professional Development section and be placed on corrective action. A corrective action plan will be written with short term goals established to remediate the lack of progress toward their CSPD plan. The corrective action plan will establish three (3) and six (6) month reviews. If the corrective action is not successful, disciplinary action will result which may include termination based upon non-compliance with USOR agency policy. Normal supervisory review procedures will apply and be available to the employee. New employees who do not make the outlined progress in the first year of probationary status will be terminated from the agency in probationary status with no recourse for the employee.

 

Staff Development

USOR has established policies, procedures, and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training in terms staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement, rehabilitation technology; and procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources. These training opportunities and activities include:

(1) The USOR Human Resource Development Program provides for attendance at workshops, conferences, formal course work at institutions of higher education, as well as agency developed and conducted training sessions. Training is offered in the areas of counseling; informed choice; medical, psychological, and vocational assessment; assistive technology; culturally sensitive practices; job placement and development; ethics; proposed reauthorization, as well as other topics relevant to Rehabilitation Counselors. Specialized topics from the last 6 months include counseling skills such as motivational interviewing techniques, SJBT and Se service provision, the history of the VR program, VA services, and July’s training will discuss prejudice and discrimination. Later this year trainings are scheduled about family systems, a review of the 911 system, and more specific training about counseling skills (an area of emphasis this year for USOR). The USOR provides these monthly in-service trainings via high definition video conferencing to offices throughout Utah, as well as by web-streaming training content. The USOR has consistently exceeded the required training hours required to maintain national certification and has also provided counselors with the training hours required to maintain state licensure this past year.

(2) The USOR has established procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources. These procedures include providing training opportunities, encouraging professional memberships in organizations which offer professional journals, as well as having a close relationship with the Utah State University Rehabilitation Counselor Education program, and the Region 8 TACE center. Additionally USOR has established a cooperative relationship with the National Clearinghouse On Rehabilitation Materials at Utah State University.

 

The USOR has worked to ensure the availability of personnel who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals. The USOR has established Spanish speaking caseloads that are staffed by professionals who are fluent in Spanish. Just in the past 12 months USOR added two additional individuals who speak Spanish to help with special populations. USOR also maintains a caseload where the counselor must speak Navajo and the director of that area must also speak Navajo. Most USOR materials including brochures and preprinted materials from the case management system are available in Spanish. Additionally USOR has established a number of deaf and hard of hearing caseloads statewide that are staffed by professionals fluent in American Sign Language. Applicants are tested prior to selection for these positions and receive a pay increase for these skills. In the last year USOR purchased some computers and software called Interpretype to help with situations where in interpreter may not be available and a customer who uses only ASL or speaks Spanish needs assistance. These machines are being testing in locations such as a receptionist desk. Individuals can type what they need instead of signing, and in the case of Spanish the typing is instantly translated to English. Additionally, the USOR operates under a state contract that provides additional interpretation services for written materials through a private company for all other languages.

 

The USOR has established procedures and activities to coordinate the comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. These include maintaining the cooperative agreement between the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation with the Utah State Office of Special Education for a project of systematic transition for Utah’s youth with disabilities.

This screen was last updated on Aug 1 2012 4:12PM by Stacey Cummings

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

ATTACHMENT 4.11(a)

Statewide Assessment

(a) Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of Rehabilitation Needs

The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR), in cooperation with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), conducts a comprehensive statewide needs assessment every three (3) years to identify the vocational rehabilitation needs Utahns with disabilities. The assessment was submitted in the State Plan for 2011 and 2012, and a copy can still be found on the USOR website under the ’publications’ heading. The next Assessment will take place later this year. USOR has contracted with the same organization that conducted the last assessment to repeat the assessment. Surveys have been developed in draft form and will be sent later this year. The final report is expected by April, 2013 and will be included in the state plan for 2014. The last Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of Rehabilitation Needs resulted in the identification of five (5) specific areas where program improvement efforts are targeted through the year 2013. The assessment found that the most important need of consumers of the VR program was a qualified, experienced, and fully engaged Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor who has the time and resources to respond to consumer needs, provide consumers with accurate information regarding the VR program, and provide consumers with informed choice in identifying their primary employment factors, selecting services and service providers, and vocational goal.

An update about the ongoing activities related to this Assessment including goals and strategies is contained in another attachment. Updates are included from the first and part of the second year plan. Below is the entire attachment as included in the last state plan.

Attachment 4.11(a) Originally Submitted 06/2010 and 6/2011

Statewide Assessment

(a) Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of Rehabilitation Needs The Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR), in cooperation with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), conducts a comprehensive statewide needs assessment every three (3) years to identify the vocational rehabilitation needs of Utahans with disabilities. USOR contracted with the Center for Public Policy and Administration to conduct this study. The Executive Summary from the report about this study appears at the end of this section. The entire report can be viewed on the USOR website www.usor.utah.gov. (1) Vocational Rehabilitation Service Needs The 2010 Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of Rehabilitation Needs surveyed counselors, clients and other providers about the needs of VR clients. Results from these three groups were very similar in the needs they identified. The survey then asked employees of USOR and other provider groups to identify the availability of resources to meet these needs. Six areas were identifies where USOR employees thought there was a significant gap between the need of their clients and the availability of resources. The USOR has chosen to focus on those six areas for the next two years, developing goals and strategies around them, in order to improve the skills and knowledge of counselors and the availability of appropriate and comprehensive services for VR clients. It is believed this will result in more confident and effective staff and more appropriate, successful employment outcomes for consumers. The six areas are listed in the Executive Summary below (in all caps) and on the Goals attachment included in this State Plan. The needs of those identified as having the most significant disabilities were not shown to be significantly different than those of other VR consumers. They did indicate a higher need for Job Coaching and related services, and the USOR has identified strategies to improve the availability and quality of these types of services. (ii) Individuals with disabilities who are minorities and traditionally unserved or underserved populations: Statistical data at the time of the assessment demonstrates that USOR is providing services at or above the rate of population instances of ethnic and disability types within the state of Utah. The 2010 Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of Rehabilitation Needs indicates that the needs of the minority populations are not different from the needs of the general population but that the needs are greater within the minority population. The USOR has included goals related to the outreach to these populations in its strategic plan. (iii) Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system: The 2010 Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of Rehabilitation Needs demonstrates that the needs of consumers served by others are not significantly different than those of the general population. Because employees of other components of the Workforce System did not identify some of the same gaps as the USOR counselors, the USOR is committed to increasing coordination with the Department of Workforce Services (DWS) and accessing the programs and trainings available to counselors and consumers within DWS. Some specific strategies describe this intent. Some of this coordination will involve joint programs already in place such as the Choose to Work (CTW) program which provides coordinated job placement services to clients of both agencies. The USOR recently developed computer screens which display information about shared clients that should help with this effort. (iv) Need to Establish, Develop, or Improve Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) USOR has established a process of assessing the effectiveness of community rehabilitation programs (CRPs) that provide services to people with disabilities in Utah. The Executive Director of USOR sits on the Utah Works council that selects and approves state government contracts being awarded to CRPs, which has greatly expanded the ability of CRPs to expand services and employment opportunities to people with disabilities. The following factors are used to determine the effectiveness, and need for improvement of existing CRPs. (i) USOR ensures the appropriate use of CRPs through a facilities review process which evaluates the facilities effectiveness, compliance to the ADA and Rehabilitation Act, and other relevant criteria. (ii) Prior to a CRP being used by a consumer, USOR establishes a written agreement with the facility and approves the facility for use. (iii) The manner in which agreements are established is through the USOR standardized facilities approval process. CRPs interested in serving vocational rehabilitation consumers must apply for USOR approval. Outreach to CRPs is also conducted through the USOR Facilities Specialist and Supported Employment Specialist. (iv) USOR keeps an ongoing record of assessments of CRPs that provide services to consumers. The USOR Facilities Specialist annually evaluates CRPs effectiveness utilizing the following criteria: (a) Consumer Satisfaction (b) Outcome and Placement Measures (c) Number Served (d) Number Completing Program In addition, USOR coordinates the training and certification of CRP job coaches and job placement specialist in cooperation with the University of Utah. The current comprehensive assessment did not identify any specific needs in regards to existing CRPs or the need to establish new CRPs however several strategies speak to the effort of the USOR to continually improve the availability and quality of services provided by CRPs. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY FOR REPORT REGARDING COMPREHENSIVE STATEWIDE NEEDS ASSESSMENT FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES IN UTAH, Prepared by the CENTER FOR PUBLIC POLICY & ADMINISTRATION, Cathy Chambless, PhD, MPA, Sara McCormick, MPA, and Jennifer Robinson, MPA June 1, 2010: The Center for Public Policy & Administration conducted a comprehensive assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities in Utah at the request of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation. The purpose of the study is to provide information for development of a three year vocational rehabilitation state plan. The needs assessment and state plan are requirements of the federal Rehabilitation Act. Seven research questions guided the study: 1. What are population estimates and characteristics of individuals with disabilities in Utah? 2. What are estimates and characteristics of individuals who receive Social Security disability benefits (SSDI and SSI)? 3. How do the processes and outcomes of Utah VR services compare with other peer states? What are the anomalies and are these of concern? 4. What do vocational rehabilitation clients perceive as their unmet needs and barriers to successful outcomes? 5. What do rehabilitation providers perceive as unmet needs and barriers to successful outcomes for their clients? How do provider perceptions of needs and barriers compare with the clients perceptions? 6. What groups appear to be unserved or underserved by VR services? What are the unmet service needs of these groups? 7. What are barriers and special service needs of racial and ethnic minority populations with disabilities? Population estimates and Social Security data Analysis of U.S. Census data shows Utah has a lower percentage (9%) than the nation as a whole (12%) of people who state they have a disability according to the 2008 American Community Survey. Utah mirrors the nation in the proportion of men and women with disabilities. According to Census data the employment rate of individuals with disabilities in Utah (46%) is significantly higher than in the U.S. (39%). This may be due to the fact that Utah’s economy has been performing better than the U.S. as a whole. According to USOR, the agency served 21,997 clients in 2008. This is 9% of Utah’s disabled population. 53% of USOR clients are male, 47% are female. A smaller percentage of Utah’s population receives SSDI and SSI benefits than nationally. In 2008 approximately 2.5% of Utahans received SSDI compared to 4.1% nationally, and 1.6% received SSI compared to 3.9% nationally. Vocational Rehabilitation program performance An analysis of vocational rehabilitation caseload data shows how Utah’s program compares with four peer states (Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, West Virginia). In terms of types of disability Utah has the highest percentage of psychosocial impairments and lowest percentage of cognitive impairments compared with the peer states. Utah had the highest successful employment rate in FY 2007 - 73% of all individuals whose cases were closed in FY 2007 after receiving services were employed. Utah also had the highest successful employment rate for transition age clients (18-24 years old) that same year compared to peer states. The Utah vocational rehabilitation program had the highest successful employment rate for clients with physical impairments (69%), communicative impairments (86%), cognitive impairments (79%), and psychosocial impairments (71%). However, Utah had the second lowest employment rate for clients with visual impairments (64%) compared to peer states. The Utah vocational rehabilitation program was able to accomplish this excellent performance despite having the smallest overall staff (225), the smallest administrative staff (24), and the second smallest counseling staff (110) compared with its peer states. Consumer Survey The purpose of the consumer survey was to assess what vocational rehabilitation clients perceive as their unmet needs and barriers to successful outcomes. In January 2010, surveys were sent to 4,349 individuals with disabilities who had been determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation services and were in Status 10. These individuals had been determined eligible for the program but had not begun receiving services under an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE). Completed surveys were received from 582 respondents which represented a 13.4% response rate. The surveys asked individuals to check whether they needed services from a list of 31 items. The survey then asked an open-ended question for individuals to list barriers they have experienced in becoming successfully employed. Administrative data obtained from USOR included age, gender, race, ethnicity, education level, significance of disability designation, SSDI and SSI, TANF and GA status at application, and primary disability /impairment type. Respondents represented for the most part the overall Status 10 group demographically with no significant differences between the respondent pool and the entire Status 10 group in terms of race, ethnicity, gender, and age. However, the respondents were slightly more educated than the overall Status 10 group, and individuals with mental health disabilities responded less than their proportion in the Status 10 group. Individuals identified as having most significant disability designation were more likely to have responded. Also, respondents were significantly more likely to be receiving SSI or SSDI at application than the overall Status 10 group.

Services Needed The following list of needs are the top ten services needed as identified by USOR clients. 1. Paying for a school or training program, including book or tools (81%) 2. Locating employers with suitable job openings (79%) 3. Learning what jobs are available (75%) 4. Choosing a suitable job (72%) 5. Learning what programs and/or benefits they are eligible for such as Social Security or health care benefits (69%) 6. Understanding how work will impact benefits (67%) 7. Writing a resume and preparing for job interview (62%) 8. Choosing a school or training program (62%) 9. Understanding health benefits and finding providers (61%) 10. Job coaching (short term on-the-job training, help with problems on the job) (60%) The need responses were disaggregated to see if subgroups of consumers with certain characteristics differed from the other consumer respondents. The subgroups were examined by most significant disability designation, transition age (18-24 years old), and type of disability/ impairment. Individuals with Most Significant Disability Individuals with Most Significant Disability (n=159) had the same top four needs as the rest of the consumer group, although in a different order, with job coaching as the 5th highest need (ranked 11th by the remaining respondents). individuals with most significant disability expressed significantly higher needs for job coaching; wheelchair, scooter or other mobility device; learning what benefits they are eligible for including Social Security and health benefits; understanding health benefits & finding providers; obtaining prescription drugs; and supported employment. Fewer needed Assistance with car maintenance, repairs and gas. Transition Age Consumers Transition age consumers (18-24 years old) (n=159) had the same top four needs as the list above, followed by: help in writing a resume and preparing for a job interview; and job coaching (5th and 6th ranks respectively). Disability / Impairment Respondents identified as having mental disability comprised 39.5% of the total, physical 30%, cognitive 25% and sensory 6% of the total number of respondents (n=582 ). Looking at service needs by primary disability/ impairment the services needs of each subgroup closely mirror each other in ranking with slightly different order from the list above. Barriers to Employment Consumers listed barriers to employment in response to an open-ended question: What are the top three factors that cause you the most difficulty in becoming successfully employed? Their responses were grouped into 25 different categories. The following categories represent the most common barriers expressed: " Lack of education or skills training (31% of respondents) " Medical condition or physical issue (30%) " Transportation (20%) " Mental health issues (20%) " Lack of soft skills including interpersonal skills, interview skills, money and time management (15%) " Needing assistance understanding services available, assessing interests and finding jobs (13%) Provider Surveys Three groups of service providers were surveyed to assess their perception of rehabilitation needs of the individuals they serve: Utah State Office of Rehabilitation employees (n=125), Department of Workforce Services (DWS) employees (n=128), and employees of other community agencies serving people with disabilities (n=118). The third group, referred to as All Other Providers, included employees of Veterans Administration Vocational Rehabilitation, Deseret Industries, Workers Compensation Fund of Utah, and other organizations identified from the 211 Information and Referral database. Also the Utah Association of Community Services, Utah Behavioral Health Network, and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities sent surveys to their members and contract providers. Surveys were conducted during December 2009 and January 2010; a total of 371 responses were received to the provider survey.

Services Identified by Providers The top ten needs identified by USOR employees of their clients were: 1. Learning what jobs are available 2. Finding a suitable job 3. Assessing client’s interests and abilities 4. Locating employers with suitable job openings 5. Writing a resume and preparing for a job interview 6. Improving self-advocacy skills 7. Learning what programs and/or benefits they are eligible for (such as Social Security and health care) 8. Understanding their health benefits and finding providers 9. Obtaining life skills training such as money and time management, or getting along with people. 10. Understanding how work will impact benefits The responses of DWS employees were compared with those of USOR. DWS had nine of the same top-ten list of service needs as USOR, although in a different priority order. DWS employees identified paying for school or a training program which was not on the USOR top-ten list. Similarly, All Other Providers had the same top-ten list of needs as USOR, although in slightly different priority order.

Availability of Services as Identified by Providers We assessed providers perceptions of the availability of the different service needs and compared these with the demand for the need. Services that have high demand and low availability may indicate a shortage of capacity, a need for staff training, or a service that is difficult for the counselor or client to access. USOR employees indicated high demand and relatively lower availability for six of the following service areas: LEARNING WHAT JOBS ARE AVAILABLE; FINDING A SUITABLE JOB; LOCATING EMPLOYERS WITH SUITABLE JOB OPENINGS; WRITING A RESUME AND PREPARING FOR A JOB INTERVIEW; IMPROVING SELF ADVOCACY SKILLS; AND OBTAINING LIFE SKILLS TRAINING SUCH AS MONEY AND TIME MANAGEMENT, OR GETTING ALONG WITH PEOPLE. In contrast to USOR employees, DWS employees showed a large gap between demand and availability for only one service: obtaining life skills training such as money and time management, or getting along with people. The All Other Providers group identified four services with a large gap between demand and availability; these were: Locating employers with suitable job openings, Improving self advocacy skills, Understanding health benefits and finding providers, and Obtaining life skills training such as money & time management and getting along with people.

Barriers Perceived by Providers The survey asked providers What are the top three barriers that prevent your clients from achieving successful outcomes? The barriers listed by providers were coded into the same 25 categories as the consumer barriers. Only two of the top ten barriers listed by providers were in the consumer top ten list (noted by *). The percentage of responses for each barrier below represents USOR employees responses. " Lack of family, social, or community support (28%) " Employer discrimination, stigma, negative social stereotypes; lack of awareness by general public (23%) " Lack of motivation, boredom; dependence on system; feel entitled (22%) " Transportation* (21%) " Economy and/or lack of jobs (20%) " Crime record/felon (17%) " Lack of education or skills training (17%) " Mental health issues* (14%) * These barriers were in Consumer top ten list. Unserved and Underserved Groups as Identified by Providers The providers were asked to identify groups that may be unserved or underserved by the rehabilitation system. Thirty-five percent (35%) listed a specific disabling condition. Mental illness (11%) was top among that list of conditions. Other unserved/underserved groups were: people who are not aware of services (8%), students transitioning from high school (8%), and minorities (7%). Sixteen percent (16%) indicated they were not aware of any unserved or underserved groups. Recommendations for meeting the needs of the unserved/underserved included more outreach, building capacity of programs, improving coordination between VR and other agencies and with employers, and changing public policies. Racial and Ethnic Minorities Both consumer and provider responses were used to understand the needs of racial and ethnic minorities with disabilities. One hundred ten (110) consumer respondents were in the racial and ethnic minority group. This group had similar needs to the non-minority group but the magnitude of need was greater for minorities in many areas. The differences were significantly higher for minorities in 11 of the 31 service areas. Eight organizations that target services to racial and ethnic minorities responded to the provider survey and the responses were too few to obtain meaningful results. Seven percent (7%) of the responses from the provider surveys indicated racial and ethnic minorities were an unserved or underserved group. Conclusion The purpose of this comprehensive needs assessment is to call attention to perceptions and concerns of individuals who are most involved in receiving and providing rehabilitation services. This attention can then be directed toward remediation of these concerns through the next three year vocational rehabilitation state plan.

This screen was last updated on Jun 14 2012 12:39PM by Stacey Cummings

* According to the 2010 American Community Survey, 1-Year Estimates there are approximately 119,959 individuals living in Utah who have a disability. Of those individuals, approximately 51,359 are thought to be employed. This leaves approximately 72,500 individuals either classified as unemployed or not in the labor force that potentially could be eligible for VR services in Utah.

Utah VR’s growth rate in number served stayed fairly steady from 2007 to 2009 at about 5%, however the growth rate doubled to 11% from 2009 to 2010. From 2010 to 2011 the growth rate in number served dropped to 6%. In order to figure growth for 2012 and 2013 USOR has decided to take an average of the last two years which would be an estimated 8.5% growth. If this projection holds true USOR would serve 32,734 consumers by the end of 2012 and 35,516 consumers in FY 2013.

* Using these same percentage increase estimates, of the 35,516 individuals served in 2013 it is expected that 35,294 will be served under Part B of Title 1 of the Act and 222 will be served under Part B of Title VI of the Act (Supported Employment Program). As USOR is not on an Order of Selection (OOS) there is no identification of eligible individuals receiving services under any such OOS priority category.

* Starting with actual expenses for 2011 and applying the same percentage increases listed earlier (8.5% per year) it is expected that USOR will spend $27,830,250 toward case service expenditures in FY 2012 and $30,195,821 in FY 2013.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
0
Totals   $0 0

This screen was last updated on Jun 15 2012 2:40PM by Stacey Cummings

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

ATTACHMENT 4.11 (c)(1)

Goals and Priorities

(1) Based on the results of the 2010 Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of Rehabilitation Needs and the performance of USOR in the past year, USOR met with the State Rehabilitation Council to jointly review the results, recommendations, and to jointly establish goals and priorities for program improvement. In collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Council, the following goals and priorities have been established:

RSA PERFORMANCE INDICATOR FFY11 Performance/ FFY12 GOAL

1.1 Change in Employment Outcomes 3587/3488

1.2 Percent of Employment Outcomes 61%/ 65%

1.3 Competitive Employment Outcomes 94%/ 94%

1.4 Significance of Disability 98.7% / 98%

1.5 Earnings Ratio .57/ .60

1.6 Self Support 67.5% 65%

In addition, USOR has identified the following goal related directly to the Statewide Comprehensive Needs Assessment and other internal agency evaluations in coordination with the SRC (Goals beginning in 1 were the focus in 2011, Goals beginning in 2 have been the focus in 2012, and Goals beginning in 3 will be the focus in 2013):

Goal 1.1: Assist clients and counselors in locating employers more employers with suitable job openings

Goal 1.2: Expand availability of and access to life skills training for clients by increasing capacity and removing any barriers to access

Goal 1.3: Increase knowledge of minority community about availability of VR services

Goal 1.4: Develop relationships with other agencies serving youth to increase the percentage of youth served by the vocational rehabilitation program

Goal 2.1: Increase client’s knowledge of their own interests, abilities and opportunities related to obtaining employment

Goal 2.2: Increase availability and success of specialized job placement services

Goal 2.3: Improve counselor knowledge about assisting clients in resume writing and interview skill building

Goal 2.4: Increase counselor knowledge of services outside DRS to assist clients in resume writing and interview skill building for client

Goal 2.5: Improve service coordination and access for those individuals with disabilities exiting the Utah State correctional system

Goal 3.1: Increase client and counselor knowledge about job market and availability of specific vocational positions

Goal 3.2: Increase counselor knowledge of tools to help them teach clients self-advocacy

Goal 3.3: Increase counselor knowledge of outside resources where clients can learn and develop self-advocacy skills

Goal 3.4: Increase knowledge about importance of Benefits Planning and its effect on vocational rehabilitation outcomes.

Strategies and activities related to these goals are listed in a later attachment. Specific activities related to these goals and progress on these activities is reported in another attachment.

The USOR has also identified goals related to training and CSPD which are included in the USOR plan for using basic training grant monies.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 5:49PM by Stacey Cummings

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on May 26 2009 11:28AM by sautwalkerk

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

ATTACHMENT 4.11 (c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds (4) The goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B funds are based on the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) comprehensive assessment which includes analysis of supported employment, providers, consumers and VR counselors who use supported employment. USOR, in conjunction with the Utah Division of Services for People with Disabilities and the Utah State Legislature successfully piloted a program designed under House Bill 31, the Supported Employment Pilot Program for the Provision of Services for People with Disabilities beginning in 2006. This pilot was successful and was funded long term only to be de-funded in the economic crisis. Funding has recently been restored and increased and beginning July 1, 2011 an additional 100 individuals were eligible to receive assistance with long term support through DSPD (175 - 200 total). Unfortunately due to the "suspension" of the project over several months placements were lost and the total number of individuals served dropped instead of increased. The number served in 2011 was 189 and the goal set for 2012 was set at 210 consumers in FFY 2012. If the increase of number served percentage hold true as an increase in number served with SE funds the number served in 2012 should be 205 and the number served in 2013 would climb to 222. The USOR has distributed and will continue to distribute FFY 2012 funding received under section 622 of the Act for supported employment services identified in the IPEs of individuals who have been determined eligible for services under the policies of Title VI, Part B regardless of their inclusion in the project mentioned above. As indicated above, USOR hopes to serve 210 individuals with supported employment funds during FFY 2012 and up to 222 individuals in FFY 2013. Despite lower numbers than expected served under SE last year USOR has been able to distribute all funds allocated under Title VI and has never returned unspent funds to RSA.

This screen was last updated on Jun 27 2012 6:10PM by Stacey Cummings

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

ATTACHMENT 4.11 (d)

Strategies for FFY 2012

As outlined in Attachment 4.11 (c) submitted previously, the USOR has chosen in its Strategic Plan for FY 2011 to FY 2013 to focus on 6 specific need vs. resources gaps identified in the last Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) (see 4.11 (a)). In addition, the USOR has chosen to add additional strategies related to increasing outreach to minority populations, improving services to youth in transition, improving services for those exiting the state correctional system, and evaluating and improving access to benefits planning services. Several activities are related to the innovation and expansion activities identified in 4.12. The entire Strategic Plan is outlined by year below and a report of progress on each activity has been added. Those updates which follow a single asterick were completed and submitted in last year’s update, updates which follow two stars were completed in the last year (since the last update submission.)

(1) Strategies were developed with the goals of increasing staff knowledge and skills, increasing capacity in relation to needed resources, and increasing access to and knowledge of existing programs and available resources. The USOR is committed to a cycle of continuous evaluation and improvement and will evaluate these strategies over the 3 years looking to expand, revise and improve this plan where appropriate.

(A) Methods to be used, including activity descriptions are included as part of each strategy listed below. Several of these activities will expand/have expanded and improve access to services for individuals with disabilities, including the provision of assistive technology to individuals at each stage of the process;

(B) Several activities focus on increasing procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities and minorities and those with the most significant disabilities including those who may have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

(C) Several activities are designed to increase the availability, success and scope of Supported Job Based Training (SJBT) and Supported Employment (SE) services, and community rehabilitation programs are often providers of those services;

(D) All strategies are designed with the intent of improving the performance of the USOR staff in terms of federal evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act. For example, the pilot project related to SJBT and the increases in the On the Job Training Program (see goal 2.2 and goal 1.1 below) are designed in part to help the USOR meet standard 1.1.

(E) Strategies include reference to collaboration and cooperation with other components of the workforce investment system in order to improve the service by all agencies in assisting individuals with disabilities.

(2) The USOR will use the developed strategies listed specifically below to:

(A) Address need/resource gaps identified by the CSNA (see 4.11 (a) ) and these strategies are designed to help the USOR reach the goals identified in Attachment 4.11

(B) Support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12 (a) (1) and (2), for example the pilot soft skills training evaluation described as Goal 1.2 below, and the On The Job Training Program evaluation described as Goal 1.1 are in support of activities listed in the innovation and expansion attachment for the past two years. Other goals have resulted in I and E activities detailed in this years report. As indicated last year, the Benefits Planning Study (listed as a third year goal but completed early) has already resulted in expansion of that program.

(C) Overcome any identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program (see (1) above).

YEAR ONE

Need 1.1: Locating employers with suitable job openings

Goal 1.1: Assist clients and counselors in locating employers

Strategy 1/Goal 1.1: Increase knowledge of staff and clients by improving system of access to known job announcement/opportunities

Activity A: Create web page for job announcements from the USOR Business Relations Specialist and others *This website has been developed and is in a testing phase. It is anticipated that this website will be brought online for counselor use within the next 30 to 60 days. **This site is now in use for all counselors. As an example of the volume of announcements on this site from November 21, 2011 to June 10, 2012 a total of 15,684 job openings were posted on this staff intranet site.

Activity B: Find way to make accessible to vendors providing job search assistance and interested clients * The web designer is creating a ‘backdoor’ access for those vendors who are thought to be appropriate to access the USOR page of job announcements. **For now all job listings are emailed to anyone (partners) who is interested but does not have access to the staff site as a group email.

Activity C: Improve the agency case management system (Integrated Rehabilitation Information System or IRIS) by creating a list of clients sorted by job goal to help counselors more easily match opportunities and openings with the job goals of clients * Completed. Counselors can now print a report that lists the job goal of each client with the client name and contact information. It is alphabetized and grouped by job title. **Report is being used by counselors and employer outreach specialists to target activities and efforts.

Activity D: Evaluate existing links to job websites in IRIS and determine which are most useful, including appropriate links to the Department of Workforce Services * The DRS within UOSR commissioned a group of staff members to identify the most useful weblinks for counselors to assist them in locating job opportunities for clients. This group, made up of counselors and an employment relations specialist, is in the process of surveying counselors and gathering responses. They will use results to create a list of recommended weblinks which will then be placed into the DRS case management system. It is anticipated that this list should be submitted in the next 3 to 6 months. **The list/report is finalized and the process of replacing links in IRIS with the recommended links should be done in the next 60 days.

Strategy 2/Goal 1.1: Evaluate new OJT outreach program and make improvements

Activity A: Survey counselors on impact of program and areas where improvement is needed * Counseling staff was surveyed at the beginning of the year about the OJT program and the performance of the OJT specialists. Most counselors felt that they had learned enough in the last year to pursue OJT placements themselves without the ongoing help of specialists. **USOR has created a single position with responsibility to help counselors statewide develop OJT opportunities. This individual provides ongoing training and consultation and develops materials that counselors can use to pursue OJT opportunities for their clients.

Activity B: Evaluate success after one year in terms of production and efficiency and make improvements * DRS has monitored and will continue to monitor the use of OJT opportunities for clients within the program. DRS has decided to eliminate the OJT specialist positions after the trial phase and hire a part time statewide trainer/educator to help counselors maintain their knowledge and use of these opportunities. **Hired as described above

Activity C: Increase collaboration w/ specialist and counselors to focus efforts on greatest areas of needs (based on survey results from A) * DRS is using survey results to realign positions and answer the needs of counselors in relationship to OJT opportunities.

Need 1.2: Obtaining life skills training such as money and time management and getting along with people

Goal 1.2: Expand availability of and access to life skills training for clients by increasing capacity and removing any barriers to access

Strategy 1/Goal 1.2: Evaluate results from current pilot teaching interpersonal skills and resolving work behavior issues (piloted in Downtown District with corrections population in group setting at this time) and determine transferability * This pilot was delayed several months while a formal agreement was signed due to some staff turnover. The agreement is now finalized and the pilot group began meeting the last week in June, 2011. Results from initial evaluation should be available in approximately 6 months. **Project was delayed, results from initial group being evaluated now.

Activity A: Evaluate outcomes and cost of pilot group *Pending

Activity B: Make decisions about improvement/expansion *Pending

Activity C: Identify additional vendors willing to provide similar services* Pending **USOR has recently approved a new vendor to provide life skills training related to helping clients manage their money and make smart financial decisions as well as planning for the future.

Strategy 2: Identify additional resources which offer life skills training

Activity A: Survey staff about anyone they use or know of to provide this training * DRS had a group discussion with counseling supervisors and other staff about the need for these services and possible resources. **Ongoing, one new vendor identified as described above.

Activity B: Survey partners such as DWS and DSPD about possible resources * DRS decided not to do a formal survey yet but did look at providers and what they are providing for others

Activity C: Evaluate existing programs and look for areas where successful programs might be duplicated * In process. Based on the information discovered through the activities described above DRS has developed a new service category entitled “Disability Adjustment and Life Skills Restoration Services” and established a fee and guidelines for this service. DRS is currently approving a handful of providers to make this service available to clients/counselors. DRS will evaluate the use of this service at the specific providers one year after the establishment of this service category (established September, 2010) ** Category now permanent part of SE/SJBT service options and additional providers added.

Activity D: Evaluate ability of counselors to access these services and remove any barriers discovered. * Will occur as part of evaluation in September 2011. **In place now

Activity E: Approve any additional vendors as appropriate *Ongoing **Numbers continue to increase as described above.

Need 1.3: Increased knowledge of minority community about availability of VR services

Goal 1.3: Increase knowledge of minority community about availability of VR services

Strategy 1/Goal 1.3: Improve relationships with minority advocacy groups and increase referrals from these groups

Activity A: Identify 2 groups with relationships to the Asian population in Utah including the Chamber of Commerce group representing the Asian population in Utah *Counselor has made contact with Salt Lake Office of Asian Association, still seeking second contact point **Liaison has been identified and has with several other staff members attended functions hosted by the Asian Association as well as touring their facilities in Salt Lake City.

Activity B: Assign a liaison to meet with and offer education to these two groups * Completed **has begun and is ongoing

Activity C: Assign a liaison to coordinate referrals from these groups if appropriate *Pending **Done, liaison is supervising counselor

Activity D: Assign liaison to work with contacts to develop training for counselors (to be presented through the video system) on serving individuals from the Asian population *Pending **Developing now, some activities on site completed

Need 1.4: Increased services to youth in transition and coordination with other agencies serving the youth population

Goal 1.4: Develop relationships with other agencies serving youth to increase the percentage of youth served by the vocational rehabilitation program

Strategy 1/Goal 1.4: Improve relationship with Job Corp organization to increase number of youth served *Done

Activity A: Meet with Job Corp leadership to assess need and develop goals *Done

Activity B: Design a streamlined referral process for individuals with disabilities served by Job Corp who may be appropriate for vocational rehabilitation services *Done

Activity C: Assign one or two caseloads/counselors to serve referrals from Job Corp *Done **Now have a full time counselor assigned to serve Job Corp at their offices several days a week.

YEAR TWO

Need 2.1 and 2.2: Finding a Suitable Job

Goal 2.1: Increase clients knowledge of their own interests, abilities and opportunities related to obtaining employment

Strategy 1/Goal 2.1: Increase availability of and knowledge about computerized assessment tools which measure interests and abilities

Activity A: Identify computer resources available to clients/counselors to measure interests and abilities *DRS Horizons group was formed to determine the most accessible and useful interest/ability tests available to all through the web

Activity B: Test resources to determine easiest and most reliable assessments *Done in part by Horizons group, will be evaluated by counselors once listed in case management system **have been reviewed and suggested, other activities ongoing

Activity C: Train counselors on these assessments and provide AT if needed to access *Pending **Some completed, rest ongoing

Activity D: Assure availability of these assessments to counselors and clients *Pending **Some completed, rest ongoing

Strategy 2/Goal 2.1: Increase efficiency between DRS Vocational Evaluation Unit and Case Service staff including improving collaboration and coordination between evaluation and counseling staff to improve access, efficiency and availability

Activity A: Assess current practices of Evaluation Unit and Case Service *Done through Horizons chartered group. Made recommendations in formal report.

Activity B: Develop recommendations to improve efficiency and availability *Done in report, discussed in regional and state meetings and with Vocational Evaluation staff

Activity C: Implement recommendations and evaluate * Many recommendations implemented, for example the assignment of specific evaluator liaisons to individual offices and a streamlined referral process. The Vocational Evaluation Unit plans to hold focus groups in the next year to get feedback on new procedures and look for additional ways to improve coordination. **Relationships continue to improve, good feedback on specific liasion assignments, recently used suggestions to improve referral process and vocational evaluators now sending information directly into client’s electronic file.

Goal 2.2: Increase availability and success of specialized job placement services

Strategy 1/Goal 2.2: Evaluate current pilot change to milestone payment for SE/SJBT providers after one year and expand milestone payment program if deemed appropriate

Activity A: Interview providers using new payment program *completed by Director of Case Service

Activity B: Interview providers using old system about interest in new program * completed by Director of Case Service

Activity C: Evaluate outcomes of 15 to 20 clients under new system compared to 15 to 20 clients under old system in terms of cost, placement quality indicators (wage, benefits and hours per week), and job retention) * study completed with approx.. 48 consumers, outcome summary available on request.

Activity D: Add additional providers to milestone program if found to be more successful, or end pilot if found not to be more successful. *As a result of the pilot’s success and at the request of multiple providers all providers are now being paid on a milestone/outcome system. The initial study of the differences in the outcomes of the two methods did not show any significant differences between the payment systems. DRS plans on repeating this study in a year after there have been more participants in order to make a more meaningful study. **Outcome payment method continues with some small adjustments recommended by providers and counselors after first several months of use, details available on request.

Need 2.3 and 2.4: Assistance in writing a resume and preparing for a job interview

Goal 2.3: Improve counselor knowledge about assisting clients in resume writing and interview skill building

Strategy 1/ Goal 2.3: Train counselors on helping clients to build successful resumes

Activity A: Identify web resources to help clients build resumes *ongoing **Recommendations of some sites through Horizons group which will be added to web site.

Activity B: Work with Choose to Work counselors (including those employed by DWS) to assess web resources and identify other resources *ongoing

Activity C: Train counselors, with assistance of Choose to Work staff, on availability and use of these websites and other resources *Counselors were trained with the assistance of a DWS staff member on helping clients write successful resumes and using web resources on in June 2011 **Assistance and training continues to be provided by CTW staff

Activity D: Train counselors, with assistance of Choose to Work staff, on what type of resume works best for which jobs, which employers, which method of application etc. *Counselors were trained with the assistance of a DWS staff member on helping clients write successful resumes and using web resources on in June 2011

Strategy 2/Goal 2.3: Train counselors on assisting clients in building interview skills

Activity A: Identify resources to help clients learn about successful interviewing (web, print etc) *in planning stage

Activity B: Survey staff to determine methods of teaching these skills to clients some counselors find successful (example job club group in Provo) *pending

Activity C: Share successful practices with all staff *pending

Goal 2.4: Increase counselor knowledge of services outside DRS to assist clients in resume writing and interview skill building for client

Strategy 1/Goal 2.4: Partner with DWS to expand knowledge of counselors about and access for all VR clients to these service offered by DWS

Activity A: Meet with DWS to determine all services available by area *pending **have met with DWS Administration, gathering input about barriers, gathering information about individual office plans about how to serve customers with disabilities

Activity B: Work with DWS and counselors to assess availability and barriers to access *pending **ongoing

Activity C: Work with DWS to expand availability and reduce any barriers to accessibility and create joint projects where possible *pending **ongoing

Need 1.3: Increased knowledge of minority community about availability of VR services

Goal 1.3: Increase knowledge of minority community about availability of VR services

Strategy 1/Goal 1.3: Improve relationships with minority advocacy groups and increase referrals from these groups

Activity A: Identify 2 groups with relationships to the Hispanic population in Utah including the Chamber of Commerce group representing the Hispanic population in Utah * Done **contacts included the Utah Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and The Hispanic/Latino Student Council (HLSC) at the Salt Lake Community College. Several presentations were made to related groups. Outreach continues, counselor attended luncheon sponsored by Hispanic C of C and gave presentation to employers, has also attended meetings of Hispanic/Latino Student Council to provide information about VR.

Activity B: Assign a liaison to meet with and offer education to these two groups *Done **Ongoing, see above

Activity C: Assign a liaison to coordinate referrals from these groups if appropriate *Done **Referrals have increased and are being made to a single counselor

Activity D: Assign liaison to work with contacts to develop training for counselors (to be presented through the video system) on serving individuals from the Hispanic population *Pending **being developed

Need 2.5: Improved services for those exiting the state correctional system

Goal 2.5: Improve service coordination and access for those individuals with disabilities exiting the Utah State correctional system

Strategy 1/Goal 2.5: Improve relationships with administrative personnel within corrections and develop more streamlined access to vocational rehabilitation services

Activity A: Meet with administrative staff of Utah State Prison and Salt Lake County Corrections to identify common goals and issues * Done, committee has met several times and attended specialized training together

Activity B: Assign liaison from the USOR administrative team to coordinate a task force group to address issues and develop new relationships *Done, attends coordination meetings regularly

Activity C: Develop new referral process with different systems to streamline education and referral of those exiting systems *Done, streamlined and implemented

Activity D: Assign staff liaisons to coordinate referrals from different systems within the corrections system *Done, correction specialists/counselors identified **Efforts continue, many specialists identified and attending ongoing meetings of a statewide group coodinated at a state and national level to improve outcomes for offender populations. Training ongoing, details available on request.

YEAR THREE

Need 3.1: Assistance in learning what jobs are available

Goal 3.1: Increase client and counselor knowledge about job market and availability of specific vocational positions

Strategy 1/Goal 3.1: Increase counselor knowledge of job market and labor market trends

Activity A: Identify web resources to learn about market **DRS Horizons group is studying through survey and other methods the best web resources for counselors **Report done, results being analyzed for best way to make available to counselors

Activity B: Train counselors to access these resources *Pending results of Horizons group **Training by Horizons in Statewide Administrative Meeting (SAM) to be passed on to counselors

Activity C: Identify other times/methods to share existing information (updates, staff meetings, newsletters, staff website etc) *Some partially developed including job listing site, others pending ** Improvements and additions to staff web page ongoing

Activity D: Find ways to better document counselor/client discussion of job market and labor trends *Pending

Strategy 2: Assist counselors to develop methods to deliver information about job market conditions and specific job availability to clients in understandable and appropriate manner *Pending

Activity A: Develop standardized newsletter type document that counselors can give to and talk about with clients that is updated automatically and easily understood which contains labor market information *Pending

Activity B: Study available websites containing this information and link the most user-friendly sites to the general USOR page and also to the counselor staff page *Pending recommendations from Horizons group

Strategy 3: Increase client knowledge about different levels of training and education, particularly those shorter term options which utilize transferable skills and match current job openings *Pending outcome of study of outcomes and further development of training **USOR has purchased a system for counselors to use called TORQ. This system helps counselors and clients analyze transferable skills, incorporate labor market information, and compare length of training and skills needed for jobs that clients are considering. Training has just begun and this new system should assist with several of the goals listed int this section

Activity A: Develop one summary about levels of training available through vocational rehabilitation for counselors to use as reference for clients *Pending

Activity B: Develop marketing brochure about new OJT focus within vocational rehabilitation that is designed to give information about option and available occupations to clients *Brochures have been developed which can be used for employers and clients, new specialist will develop materials with specific client focus **Ojt specific brochure done and distributed

Need 3.2 and 3.3: Assistance with client development of self-advocacy skills

Goal 3.2: Increase counselor knowledge of tools to help them teach clients self-advocacy

Strategy 1/Goal 3.2: Identify tools being used now by counselors and other agencies serving people with disabilities

Activity A: Contact Disability Law Center, Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities, Office of Education partners and others to identify tools and curricula being used by others. *Pending

Activity B: Survey counselors to find tools and techniques used successfully now within the USOR to develop client self-advocacy skills *Pending

Activity C: Contact regional TACE center to ask for training resources and technical assistance related to teaching clients self advocacy **Pending

Activity D: Evaluate tools identified and expand use and availability of those determined to be most useful

Goal 3.3: Increase counselor knowledge of outside resources where clients can learn and develop self-advocacy skills

Strategy 1/Goal 3.3: Locate programs within other agencies/organizations where clients of vocational rehabilitation may learn self-advocacy skills.

Activity A: Contact Independent Living Centers, Disability Law Center, Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities, Office of Education partners and CRPs to identify programs that might be appropriate for vocational rehabilitation client participation. *Pending

Activity B: Survey counselors to find programs being used currently by clients **Pending

Activity C: Disseminate information about available programs **Pending

Activity D: Evaluate opportunities to partner with other agencies to expand or adapt opportunities for vocational rehabilitation clients to **Pending

Need 1.3: Increased knowledge of minority community about availability of VR services

Goal 1.3: Increase knowledge of minority community about availability of VR services

Strategy 1/Goal 1.3: Improve relationships with minority advocacy groups and increase referrals from these groups

Activity A: Identify 2 groups with relationships to the Pacific Islander population in Utah including the Chamber of Commerce group representing the Pacific Islander population in Utah *Established contact with “Child and Family Services”, an agency which serves the Pacific Islander population (and other minority communities), currently contacting church groups and cultural centers to try and establish additional contacts. **Liaison has made several visits and contacted several people, unfortunately efforts so far have not met with great success. He continues to reach out and has made contact with an association for refugees that has been much more receptive to offers of training and assistance.

Activity B: Assign a liaison to meet with and offer education to these two groups *Completed **Ongoing

Activity C: Assign a liaison to coordinate referrals from these groups if appropriate *Completed **Ongoing

Activity D: Assign liaison to work with contacts to develop training for counselors (to be presented through the video system) on serving individuals from the Pacific Islander population *Pending **Being developed

Need 3.4: Increased evaluation of and availability of Benefits Planning and Assistance services

Goal 3.4: Increase knowledge about importance of Benefits Planning and its effect (if any) on vocational rehabilitation outcomes.

Strategy 1/Goal 3.4: Complete study of effect of Benefits Planning on rehabilitation outcomes Activity A: Contract with organization to study impact of Benefits Planning on VR outcomes *Completed, study available at usor.utah.gov under publications

Activity B: Evaluate and disseminate results of study *Presented at CSAVR and to staff and SRC, other presentations pending **Several other presentations made and information shared at a national level

Activity C: Use results if appropriate to request additional funding for expansion of capacity of unit doing Benefits Planning and Assistance. *Ongoing **One more specialist added

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Several of the goals/activities address this issue including improvements and expansion of computer systems and better coordination with other agencies who may provide assistance. In addition USOR continues to utilize our in house Center for Assistive Technology and has made several efforts in this past year to improve coordination and communication with those who work for that Center and counselors. A study is planned for the upcoming year to try and determine if counselors statewide are getting appropriate consultation and recommendations when they need guidance in obtaining AT for their clients.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

Several of the goals/activities above are specific to outreach and service to individuals who are minorities and who have been identified as unserved or underserved. Several activities are also targeted toward individuals with the most significant disabilities, in particular activities related to improving and expanding the provision of SE and SJBT services.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Several of the goals/activities described above are designed to develop and improve the CRPs within the state including expanding services, providing expanded choices for consumers and increasing the ability of counselors to customize services. Other attachments describe changes in more detail and additional information can be provided if desired.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

All strategies are related to improving the performance of the state related to standards and indicators. Expanding services, meeting needs, outreach, training and many others are related to improving performace on 1.1 as well as many others. Expanding counselor access to job openings for example should increase closure numbers and provide the best wage opportunities for clients which leads to an increase in client self sufficiency.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Many strategies above reach out to other agencies and partners to share information, provide training, combine resources and avoid duplication of services.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

There is a description above about how strategies are related to goals in previous attachments. Related to I & E, the addition of the Financial Fitness Program, the new counselor at Job Corp, and the purchase of the TORQ program are examples of how strategies and activities related to them support I & E activities. There are also specific strategies and supporting activities related to equitable access and multiple goals related to barriers identified in the comprehensive needs assessment.

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 5:49PM by Stacey Cummings

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

USOR believes it has made great progress toward meeting the goals set forth last year. As to the standards and indicators described there:

FFY11 Goals and FFY 11 actual performance

1.1 Change in Employment Outcomes Goal 3487 Actual performance 3587 exceeded goal

1.2 Percent of Employment Outcomes goal 65% Actual performance 61% did not reach goal

1.3 Competitive Employment Outcomes Goal 93% Actual performance 94% exceeded goal

1.4 Significance of Disability Goal 98% Actual performance 98.7 exceeded goal

1.5 Earnings Ratio Goal .62 Actual performance .57 did not meet goal

1.6 Self Support Goal 65% Actual 67.5% exceeded goal

Other goals reported are listed below, progress on specific activities under each goal was listed in previous attachment:

Goal 1.1: Assist clients and counselors in locating employers more employers with suitable job openings

Goal 1.2: Expand availability of and access to life skills training for clients by increasing capacity and removing any barriers to access

Goal 1.3: Increase knowledge of minority community about availability of VR services

Goal 1.4: Develop relationships with other agencies serving youth to increase the percentage of youth served by the vocational rehabilitation program

Goal 2.1: Increase client’s knowledge of their own interests, abilities and opportunities related to obtaining employment

Goal 2.2: Increase availability and success of specialized job placement services

Goal 2.3: Improve counselor knowledge about assisting clients in resume writing and interview skill building

Goal 2.4: Increase counselor knowledge of services outside DRS to assist clients in resume writing and interview skill building for client

Goal 2.5: Improve service coordination and access for those individuals with disabilities exiting the Utah State correctional system

Goal 3.1: Increase client and counselor knowledge about job market and availability of specific vocational positions

Goal 3.2: Increase counselor knowledge of tools to help them teach clients self-advocacy

Goal 3.3: Increase counselor knowledge of outside resources where clients can learn and develop self-advocacy skills

Goal 3.4: Increase knowledge about importance of Benefits Planning and its effect on vocational rehabilitation outcomes.

USOR believes that all activities and strategies listed elsewhere are contributing to USOR meeting its goals. USOR did not meet 2 goals related to standards and indicators, USOR believes this is due to the depressed economy with fewer jobs available, lower wages and more competition for all positions.

 

USOR hoped to serve up to 210 individuals in SE in 2012 and USOR believes it is on track to make that goal. USOR served 189 in 2011 and has increased efforts to improve system choices and options since that time. This in conjunction with more reliable long term funding in the past 12 months should make it possible for USOR to meet this goal.

 

Indicator 1.1 increased number by 101 met indicator

Indicator 1.2 percent 61.08 minimum 55.80 met indicator

Indicator 1.3 percent com. employment 94.26 minimum 72.60 met indicator

Indicator 1.4 percent SD 98.73 minimum 62.40 met indicator

Indicator 1.5 ratio wage to state wage .57 minimum .52 met indicator

Indicator 1.6 self supporting difference 67.73 minimum 53 met indicator

Indicator 2.1 Minority ratio .943 minimum .800 met indicator

USOR met all standards and indicators for FY 2011

 

USOR has completed many activities and projects in the 18 months related to I & E. Some of these activities have been mentioned elsewhere in this document. They include:

1. COURIER Program- Contracted outreach, referral, and VR program marketing to transition aged youth with 504 plans, special health care plans, and special ed IEP’s in order to increase transition services and numbers for this specific population.

2. Financial FITNESS Pilot- fee for service Financial Independence Training Necessary for Employment and Self-Sufficiency.Credit, personal finance, banking, life skills stuff. Pilot beginning now.

3. On campus full time VR Counselor pilot for Clearfield Utah Job Corp Program.

4. Easter Seals-Goodwill PEERS Program- targets high functioning autistic youth with pre-vocational peer mentor lead employment experiences and eventual job placement.

5. Micro-enterprise/Customized Employment expansion- building on current model to train more vendors to provide necessary consulation services.

6. Beginning of EBT card process for client purchases- RFP is done and in purchasing now to approve, will begin developing model and clarifying processes in next 12 months.

7. Purchased TORQ system to help counselors and clients analyze existing skills, compare to available jobs, identify gaps and develop expectations about time needed to train among other features

8. Redesigning orientation process including recently completed/purchased orientation videos

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 4:45PM by Stacey Cummings

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

ATTACHMENT 6.3

Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

This attachment describes the quality, scope, and extent of supported employment (SE) services provided to consumers of the Utah State Office of Rehabilitation (USOR) vocational rehabilitation program under Title VI, Part B of the Act.

(a) Quality of SE services

USOR maintains high quality SE services by:

(1) The establishment and application of SE program standards for USOR SE vendors. These standards prescribe minimum consumer outcomes and identify program procedures which must be followed in order for a provider to receive funds from USOR. These standards are in compliance with Title VI, Part B of the Act.

(2) USOR assisted in the establishment and provision of a Supported Job Base Training and Supported Employment Job Coach training and certification program. This program was moved in FY 2008 to the University of Utah. All job coaches must be certified within 6 months of hire at approved vendors providing SE services. Staff who are not approved after 6 months may not provide services to VR clients.

(3) The monitoring of SE services and service providers is conducted by the USOR Facilities Specialist, and the Coordinator of Case Service. This monitoring is conducted by assessing the application of USOR program standards and outcomes. It includes a review of any complaints received and the results of surveys completed by counselors using the program for clients. These surveys are compliled by the electronic case management system. The Case Service Coordinator provides ongoing technical assistance and monitoring to SE service providers through regularly scheduled contacts with approved service providers.

Due to restricted funding for extended services and waiting lists being utilized by extended services agencies, USOR has been unable to offer SE to all consumers who would qualify for such services at times in past years. those cases where the USOR has been unable to identify alternative funding sources, such as family supports or co-worker supports, USOR has provided similar services under the Supported Job Based Training program with Title I funds. As mentioned in Attachment 4.11 (c) (4), USOR was instrumental in obtaining funding for Utah House Bill 31, a pilot project that granted funding for 50 individuals in state fiscal year 2007, and an additional 50 individuals in state fiscal year 2008 to receive SE and extended services supports. That pilot was at one time unfunded, however funding has been restored and expanded for 2011 and 2012 which should help in making long term funding accessible to more clients. The program will offer long term funding support for 175 - 200 individuals in the upcoming State Fiscal year .

(b) Scope of SE services

The following services are provided with Title VI, Part B funds either through contract or on a fee-for-service basis (based on achievement of milestones) by SE service providers: functional assessment of clients to perform in supported employment (supplemental to the assessment conducted by the counselor for purposes of establishing eligibility with Title I funds); job development, job analysis and client job matching; training by a job coach in job skills and behavioral expectations at the job site; training and support away from the job to ensure work performance; family support; and support to the employer to ensure client job retention. The same scope of services is provided by the extended service agency. Target populations in supported employment include persons with the most severe disabilities who qualify for ongoing support from the Division of Services for Persons with Disabilities (DSPD), or the Division of Mental Health (DMH), or individuals who have ongoing support available from other sources, including Social Security and/or natural supports.

(c) Extent of SE services

Specific SE services are provided to eligible individuals according to their needs. Services are provided for a period not to exceed 18 months, unless under special circumstances a longer period to achieve job stabilization has been jointly agreed to by the individual and the VR Counselor and established in the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE).

(d) Timing of transition to extended services

A Status 26 closure for individual placement is allowable when the USOR VR Counselor places a case in Status 22 after the job trainer’s intervention time, (on or off job site as recorded on the monthly intervention time sheet), has stabilized at 20%*, or less, of total hours worked. As long as intervention hours are above 20%, the USOR counselor considers the individual still in training. The counselor also needs to notify both the consumer and the Division of Services for People with Disabilities or Mental Health program staff via Form 58 of the intention to close the case. For clients not involved with Division of Services for People with Disabilities or Mental Health, the counselor will, along with the job trainer, inform the clients, employer, or others providing natural supports, of their intention to close the case.

* 20% is defined as:

Hours Worked by Intervention Hours by

Client per Week Job Trainer per Week

20 hrs. 4 hrs. or less

25 hrs. 5 hrs. or less

30 hrs. 6 hrs. or less

35 hrs. 7 hrs. or less

Wthe intervention hours reach 20% of total work hours, or less, the counselor can transfer responsibility to the extended service provider agency or begin carrying out the plan for extended natural supports. The case must remain in Status 22 for 90 days from the day this transfer is initiated. The purpose of keeping the case open after the transfer is to insure the stability of the placement. A counselor will pay a milestone payment when the job trainer’s time reaches 20% of total consumer work hours or less. A consumer can still receive other types of paid services under Section 110 (e.g., bus pass, glasses, etc.) even though the job trainer services are no longer paid for by USOR. It is USOR policy to transition eligible individuals from SE to extended services based upon individual assessment and need. Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2012 11:48AM by Stacey Cummings

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on 08/01/2012 at 5:00 PM

Last updated by sautcummingss

Completed on 08/01/2012 at 5:00 PM

Completed by sautcummingss

Approved on 08/03/2012 at 1:06 PM

Approved by rsacavataioc

Published on 09/05/2012 at 11:41 AM

Published by kschelle

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