ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department State Plan for Fiscal Year 2012 (submitted FY 2011)

1.1 The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Commissioner

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Commissioner

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Barbara G. Hollis

Title of Signatory
Commissioner

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/23/2011

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2012
Yes

Comments:

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Barbara G. Hollis

Title of Signatory
Commissioner

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/23/2011

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities (Option A was selected/Option B was not selected).

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option A was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

This agency is an independent commission.

This screen was last updated on Jun 23 2009 9:55AM by sascclieserl

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(No waivers requested)

This screen was last updated on Jun 23 2009 9:55AM by sascclieserl

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

(This attachment was last updated for FY 2008 submission - no changes)

In its efforts to enable eligible individuals to achieve competitive employment, the South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD) readily seeks referrals and comparable services and benefits. In doing so, the Department has established formal and informal partnerships with other providers of facilities and services. For the purpose of referral, service collaboration, facility allocation, and staff designation, cooperative agreements have been established with the Medical University of South Carolina, the South Carolina Department of Mental Health, the South Carolina Department of Corrections, and the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice. Referral, employment, and earnings information are the focus of the agreement between SCVRD and the South Carolina Employment Security Commission. A detailed agreement between SCVRD and the South Carolina Department of Education describes the coordination of transition. With regard to the SC Independent Living Council, the Department acts in an advisory and technical support capacity.

The SCVRD State Plan assures that an interagency agreement or similar document for interagency coordination between any appropriate public entities becomes operative. Such entities include the South Carolina entity responsible for administering the South Carolina Medicaid program. The Department has entered into collaborative arrangements with institutions of higher education as well. This is to ensure the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, described in subparagraph (A) (other than those services specified in paragraph (5)(D), and in paragraphs (1) through (4) and (14) of Section 103(a)of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended through 1998, are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual. This includes the provision of vocational rehabilitation services during pending disputes as described in the interagency agreement or similar document.

SCVRD will provide input to the US Department of Agriculture-Office of Rural Development as it endeavors to support the development activities that empower and build capacity of local communities. The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department will seek to assure the participation of individuals with physical and mental impairments in training and employment opportunities, as appropriate.

With the exception of services specified in paragraph (5)(D) and paragraphs (1) through (4) and (14) of section 103 (a) of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended through 1998, information shall specify policies and procedures for public entities to identify and determine interagency coordination responsibilities of each public entity in order to promote coordination and timely delivery of vocational rehabilitation services.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2009 4:12PM by sascclieserl

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD) considers service provision to high school students with disabilities a significant priority. In collaboration with local education agencies, SCVRD identifies students pursuing high school diplomas, local district occupational diplomas/credentials, and those who will receive certificates of attendance and will require services to successfully enter employment. These collaborative efforts are coordinated at both the state and local levels.

Coordination with Educational Officials:

SCVRD, the South Carolina Department of Education (SDE), Office of Exceptional Children and the Office of Career and Technology Education are signatories and partners in a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) which expresses a basic commitment on behalf of both agencies to provide comprehensive vocational and educational services to individuals with disabilities. The agreement details each entity’s roles and responsibilities in identifying and serving students with disabilities. Items covered in the agreement include student identification and exchange of information, methods for dispute resolution, the process to request and provide technical assistance, and the requirements for regular monitoring of the agreement. Timing of student referrals is individualized based on need but should occur no later than the second semester of the year prior to the student’s exit from school.

The State Board of Education statute, 43-243, requires the mandatory participation of representatives of state agencies involved in the financing or delivery of related services to children with disabilities in the State Advisory Panel to the Office of Exceptional Children. The Advisory panel’s purpose is to provide policy guidance on special education and related services for students with disabilities.

Local Agreements:

Using the SCVRD-SDE Memorandum of Agreement as a model, the SCVRD has developed agreements with all 86 local education agencies in the state. These local MOA’s clarify roles and responsibilities at the local level. There is an SCVRD counselor assigned to each of the 200+ High schools in the state whose purpose is to be a resource for career development, participate in school-based meetings as appropriate, and to seek referrals of students who can benefit from SCVRD services. SCVRD also maintains an agreement with the South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind.

SCVRD Transition Specialist

SCVRD maintains a Transition Specialist position whose duties include: a. Coordinate all transition-related activities and projects including those that involve other agencies, community organizations and local SCVRD field offices; b. Develop, monitor and update all transition documents and cooperative agreements; c. Provide technical assistance, professional development and training on transition related issues to field office staff, education personnel, community organizations, families, and students; d. Review and update client service policy to ensure policies and procedures are reflective of the SCVRD mission and focus on quality in serving youth in transition; e. Coordinate the RSA Transition Demonstration Grant Program-“Youth Employment Services” Program; f. Chair the interagency South Carolina Youth Leadership Forum, a summer youth development and leadership program g. Participate in the South Carolina State Transition Planning Team, an interagency initiative to create system change and a quality focus for students with disabilities.

Innovative Practices

SCVRD continues to facilitate the development of innovative transition services to improve the successful outcomes of transition aged youth. In this effort, SCVRD has integrated evidence-based guideposts for successful transition into the general program. In addition, SCVRD has several additional programs to offer enhanced transition services: a. High School High Tech(HSHT)- an initiative of the Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor whose mission is to reduce the dropout rate of youth with disabilities, increase their enrollment in post-secondary education and training, and improve their participation in employment related activities. b. Transition Services Specialist(TSS)- a cooperative funding initiative that enhances the general transition services offered to a school by engaging a school employee, designated as the Transition Services Specialist, who will provide and coordinate with the assigned SCVRD counselor, career assessments, occupational exploration, and participation in meaningful work experience for students with disabilities that will result in higher rates of successful secondary school completion, enrollment in post-secondary training, and subsequent entry and maintenance of competitive employment. c. Youth Employment Services (YES) - a program supported by a RSA Transition Demonstration Grant awarded in 2007, the YES program supports four sites with designated Transition Assessment Specialists (TAS) who are permanently located in their respective schools. The TAS identifies referrals, coordinates assessment and focuses on delivering guidepost directed services to transition aged students with disabilities with a focus on paid work experiences within both the school and community settings. The YES program combines elements of HSHT and the TSS programs to provide innovative and high quality transition services to students.

SCVRD continues to explore and develop new initiatives that promote successful post-school outcomes for students with disabilities. These outcomes include employment, independent living, and community participation and post-secondary education.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2010 3:51PM by sascclieserl

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department in cooperation with private, non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers supports the achievement of successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities for the purpose of information, referrals, and staff development.

SCVRD has memorandums of agreements or collaborative agreements with the following:

• Certified Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Programs

• South Carolina Association of the Deaf

• South Carolina Heart Association

• South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind

• South Carolina Association of the Deaf, Inc.

• South Carolina Multiple Sclerosis Society

• American Diabetes Association

• South Carolina Arthritis Foundation

• National Multiple Sclerosis Society

• South Carolina Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Association

• South Carolina Brain Injury Alliance

• South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Association (SCSCIA)

• South Carolina Autism Society

• Work in Progress

SCVRD provides public information materials, shared website links, and financial sponsorship for the annual South Carolina Autism Conference and the Brain Injury Alliance Conference.

Additional cooperative agreements with other private, non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers will be developed as needed in order to promote growth in the area of employment for individuals with disabilities.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2010 3:53PM by sascclieserl

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD) continues to be active in collaborating with other sources, both public and private, regarding Supported Employment service delivery. Team effort and staffing have resulted in more effective and efficient service delivery. Furthermore, Title VI, Part B funds have allowed SCVRD to support eight employment coaches, and traditional 110 funds have been used to provide the remaining statewide coverage.

SCVRD is currently working closely with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health (SCDMH) in the area of providing supported employment services to those individuals with a severe and persistent mental illness served by the Individual Placement and Support (IPS) programs within SCDMH. This effort is taking place in Columbia, Sumter, Greenville, Anderson, Charleston, Conway, Florence, Berkeley, Aiken, and Marlboro. The collaboration in the Columbia location also involves a private, non-profit organization, Work In Progress.

Representatives from the SCDMH, South Carolina DDSN local boards, and other community resources are sought to provide long term, extended support services. Pending the availability and willingness to participate in providing extended support services, natural support service providers have also been used to include family members, work-site supervisors or co-workers. SCVRD uses a “Letter of Agreement” for clients receiving supported employment services when the extended service provider is not identified at time of IPE or supported employment amendment. The agreement is in affect prior to successful employment outcome. The individual agreeing to provide extended support services must commit to monitoring job stability twice a month. This commitment must be documented in the case record by having the Extended Service Provider initial the item. The Extended Services Provider and client must be notified by letter of the transition to extended services two weeks prior to successful case closure.

SCVRD collaborates with the South Carolina Commission for the Blind (SCCB) to assist in the provision of successful supported employment outcomes. While each agency has expertise related to the disabilities they primarily serve, many individuals have multiple disabilities and can benefit from being served by both agencies in a complementary manner. Five SCCB counselors will be joining SCVRD job coaches and other staff for supported employment training in September 2010. In turn, SCVRD staff will attend SCCB sponsored training about eye physiology.

Due to budget constraints and travel restrictions the Interagency Transition and Supported Employment Training Committee which provided two basic and one advanced supported employment training workshops is currently on hold. This committee provided training throughout the state each year in addition to an annual statewide conference. The members of the committee are:

• South Carolina Department of Disability and Special Needs (DDSN)

• South Carolina Department of Mental Health

• Work in Progress

• Greenville County School District

• South Carolina Department of Education

• Charleston County Disabilities and Special Needs Board

• Continuum of Care

• Burton Center- of the Greenwood County DSN Board

• Center for Disability Resources

• South Carolina Assistive Technology Program

SCVRD and SCDDSN are currently engaged in meetings to develop initiatives to ensure greater collaboration and to discover ways to complement services. A counterpart meeting between the two agencies is planned for the second quarter of FY 2010.

This screen was last updated on Aug 11 2010 12:40PM by sascclieserl

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

Staffing patterns are set through a joint effort of the SCVRD commissioner, director of human resources, executive staff, and local supervisors. Employee turnover data is reviewed in an effort to determine trends and to identify staffing concerns.

In addition, succession planning for critical need positions is being managed via the department’s Professional Development and Leadership Program (PDLP). Below is a chart which provides details, by personnel category, on the number of personnel needed and currently employed in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services at SCVRD. The ratio of clients served to staff members is as follows: counselors - 213 clients per staff member, area client services managers - 2461 clients per staff member, vocational assessment and career exploration specialists (evaluators) -1107 clients per staff member, job-readiness staff - 547 clients per staff member, area supervisors - 2331 clients per staff member, center managers - 1846 clients per staff member, employment (job) coaches - 963 clients per staff member, administrative and team support specialists - 575 clients per staff member, and addictions counselors, 5537 clients per staff member.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Counselors 208 26 125
2 Area Client Services Managers 18 2 11
3 Vocational Evaluators and Job Prep. Instructors 40 2 24
4 Job-Readiness Staff 81 3 49
5 Area Supervisors 19 0 11
6 Training Center Managers 24 0 14
7 Employment / Job Coaches 46 1 28
8 Administrative & Team Support Specialists 77 1 46
9 Addictions Counselors 8 0 5
10 0 0 0

 

SCVRD has a close relationship with the University of South Carolina and South Carolina State University, both of which produce graduates who have their Master of Rehabilitation Counseling degree. SCVRD has opted to use a state CSPD standard and can recruit not only from candidates with a master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling, but also with a master’s degree in the field of counseling. These strategies assure staffing needs are met.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 SC State University Rehab. Counseling Program 100 37 31 64
2 USC Rehab. Counseling Program 63 23 7 10
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

In addition to the New Employee Orientation program, to retain qualified staff, SCVRD uses a system for staff evaluation that is a modification of a system that is available to all state employees. The system focuses on the individual employee’s job duties compared to stated goals and objectives. These goals and objectives are identified and discussed with the employee at the beginning of the rating period. Ongoing communication between the employee and supervisor clarifies the employee’s understanding of how to meet the performance standards and enhances service delivery to the client.

At the conclusion of the rating period an evaluation is performed, rating the employee on each duty in relation to performance objectives. The system provides for employee input into the development of the goals and objectives in order to support successful performance.

Another feature of the system allows objectives to be amended throughout the review period. This system also provides a mechanism for helping a substandard performer improve and a means of removing an employee from a position should performance not improve to an acceptable level. It is as follows:

A covered employee is entitled to adequate notice of substandard performance and the opportunity to improve the substandard performance before receiving a below performance requirements” rating and being removed from the position. If during the performance period an employee is considered “below performance requirements” in any essential job function or objective which significantly impacts performance, the employee may be provided with a written “Warning Notice of Substandard Performance.” The warning notice shall provide for an improvement period of no less than 30 days and no more than 120 days. The warning notice may be issued at any time during the review period. An employee who receives more than two warning notices within a 365-day period shall be removed from the position. A warning notice is not required on the third occurrence.

The department has developed career path matrices for staff to encourage retention of qualified staff and promotion to higher level positions. These career paths are keyed to requirements in the areas of education, experience, production, quality, and training. The matrices include elements related to the department’s Program Integrity Model which emphasizes a balance among customer service, compliance assurance, quality, and productivity. Counselors are required to meet the state’s CSPD standard within the required time frame in order to maintain status as a counselor and to advance to a higher level. A counselor who does not achieve the state CSPD standard within the required timeframes will be removed from his/her position. The career path matrices are published on the SCVRD intranet site.

The department takes an active role in employee/employer relations. Through strong leadership and the assistance of all staff, the department provides a healthy and safe work environment. Employee behavior and performance problems are dealt with appropriately and in a timely manner, with an emphasis on assisting the employee to improve. The department promotes internal and external customer service and has made teamwork an integral part of day-to-day operations. The department’s Celebration of Success program (reward and recognition system) allows employees to recognize coworkers for customer service, productivity, program excellence, as well as individual accomplishments.

 

Section 101(a)(7) of the Act; 34 CFR 361.18 indicates that the state VR agency is to establish and maintain standards to ensure that all professional personnel are prepared and trained and that the standards are consistent with national or state approved requirements. Given this option of selecting federal or state standards in order to achieve stability regarding standards and to develop a diverse staff, SCVRD has opted to use state standards to manage its Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD), which are consistent with the initial guidelines. In 2006, a bill was passed by the South Carolina General Assembly which established a state standard for the minimum educational and training requirements for counselors of the public vocational rehabilitation agency. This bill was signed by the governor on March 15, 2006. Under this state law the department can continue its practice of hiring individuals with rehabilitation-related master’s degrees while mandating that they complete master’s level rehabilitation courses commensurate with their degree. The law reads as follows:

A State Agency of Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor must meet the following standards: a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling, or a master’s degree in the field of counseling with a graduate course in Theories and Techniques of Counseling, or a master’s degree in any discipline. In addition to the master’s degree, the individual shall be required to document at least 18 credit hours of coursework at the master’s level or above, within thirty months of date of hire, in the core areas that follow: One graduate course with a primary focus on the Theories and Techniques of Counseling and three graduate courses, each with a primary focus on one of the following areas: Occupational Information, Job Development and Placement, Medical Aspects of Disabilities, Foundations of Rehabilitation, Psychological Aspects of Disabilities, and Personal and Vocational Adjustment; and two graduate courses, each with a primary focus on one of the following areas: Assessment, Research Methodology, Vocational and Career Development, Community Resources, Case Management, and Delivery of Rehabilitation Services, or a current Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) certification, regardless of degree.

Of the 182 counselors who are currently employed by SCVRD, 174 meet the State’s CSPD standard for a Rehabilitation Counselor. Eight counselors have master’s degrees in a related field and are currently under a plan to complete requirements.

Funding support for the implementation of a retraining plan to assist VR counselors to meet the state educational requirement of CSPD is being provided by the department’s In-Service Training Grant. Other funding options may be provided by RSA grants, if available. Evaluation of the plan to ensure that VR counselors meet the CSPD requirements is conducted through an analysis of transcripts and the department’s electronic training records.

 

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department conducts needs assessments in order to plan for a balanced Human Resources Development (HRD) program for all staff. The assessments take into account skill development, as well as long-range career opportunities directed toward developing and strengthening the role of qualified rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals. Needs assessments are conducted and evaluated by supervisors and HRD. The information is collected from multiple sources and formulated into a comprehensive HRD program. Institutions of higher education and appropriate professional associations are used to facilitate the recruitment, preparation, and retention of qualified personnel.

In addition to these efforts, the department provides, when appropriate and subject to the availability of funds, tuition assistance to employees who are taking work-related courses.

HRD conducts systematic needs analyses which include input via public hearings, the findings of internally conducted program reviews, responses to customer service surveys, identified skills deficits from individual staff performance reviews, individual requests from staff for specific skills development, training needs assessment surveys, focus groups, and meetings with management and service delivery staff.

The department has developed a retention and succession plan that includes its Professional Development and Leadership Program (PDLP). The plan provides career development opportunities for staff via career paths, individual development plans, and targeted training opportunities. The Human Resources Development and Training Plan includes training provided by TACE, training on the Baldrige Criteria, management/supervision courses offered by the South Carolina Office of Human Resources and in-house training. In 2009 the PDLP had 143 participants. Of the 143 participants, 46 graduated from the third and final level (Supervision and Management) of the program. The remaining 96 participants completed the first level of the program (Professional Development), and 67 of those completed the second level (Leadership Development). Of those 67, 61 completed level three and graduated in May, 2011. During the 2010-2011 year, 72 participants also completed level one of the newly revised program. The program now consists of two levels, professional Development and Leadership Development.

The third level, Supervision and Management now exists as a separate program and focuses on meeting the training needs of new and existing supervisors. Trainings in this program began in October 2010.

Applications for level two of the revised PDLP program will be accepted beginning June 2011. Classes will begin in the fall. The program continues to be cited as an innovative program by TACE and other agencies.

HRD has provided/sponsored training on brain injury, alcohol/drug addictions, mental illness, autism, and deafness and hard of hearing. These programs focused on the medical, psychosocial, and vocational aspects of these impairments and featured the application of assistive technology as appropriate. General workshops/online training modules on medical aspects and terminology of specific disabilities, disability awareness, transition from school to work, High school/High tech, post-secondary training, vocational assessment, employer relationships, supported employment, rehabilitation technology, job placement, compliance assurance, and motivational interviewing were also staff development training topics. Other subject areas of staff training and development include: customer service, coaching, ethics, client services training, coaching, presentation skills, time management, business etiquette and protocol, building and facilitating teams, leadership development, True Colors (personality assessment), computer skills training, safety, business development, ADA, role specific training, and new employee orientation.

Over the course of the next three to nine months, training is planned on the subjects of job placement, transition, motivational interviewing, High School/High Tech, brain injury, deafness and hard of hearing, the development of relationships with employers, assistive technology, leadership development, leading and maintaining a culture of quality, conflict resolution, safety, serving the Hispanic/Latino population, the aging population, career development and selected physical/mental impairments. Progress continues in building an online library of disability specific modules which are available upon demand. As always, the impact of these training efforts on staff performance will be assessed and the recommendations considered for the improvement of future training programs. The current training grant includes objectives that focus on training on the 1998 Amendments to the Rehabilitation Act, The Workforce Investment Act, Informed Choice, and transition.

SCVRD staff participates in numerous national and local conferences. These conferences offer current information on disabilities and initiatives in vocational rehabilitation. Numerous local trainings take place and extensive research is conducted when planning these sessions in order to provide the most up-to-date information that will assist our staff in providing quality services to clients. When conducting disability-related trainings, SCVRD uses physicians and other experts who are current with the latest research in their field. For designated staff, the department sponsors attendance at graduate courses that provide information on cutting-edge initiatives in the field.

Executive staff and managers are active members in the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation and the South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Association. Staff also subscribe to numerous professional and research journals.

 

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department has current personnel recruitment and training policies that are reflective of the findings in the 2010 South Carolina Statistical Abstract. The abstract shows that 33.8% of the state’s population is minority. Of this population, 82.5% is African American, with the remaining 17.5% distributed among Native Americans, Latin Americans, Asians, and all other races. The Hispanic and Latin American population in South Carolina is growing at a rapid rate (currently at 15% of the minority population according to the abstract) and the department sponsors Spanish classes for staff to facilitate communication with this minority group.

In addition, the department continues to place emphasis on Deaf services that ensures that a counselor in each area can communicate with clients who are Deaf. The department takes advantage of the training offered by Western Oregon University, and web-based trainings. Training for counselors serving this population is planned for the coming year and includes training on Deaf culture, vocational assessment for the Deaf, employment issues, outreach, and transition services.

Certified interpreters are used contingent upon availability and client needs. However, qualified interpreters who are recommended by certified interpreters are used if accessing a certified interpreter would delay service provision.

 

The department continues to coordinate the development of designated staff with emerging initiatives by the state Department of Education and the 86 school districts (LEA) under IDEA and state transition efforts. Transition training efforts this year focused on the creation of disability-specific modules on Learning Disabilities, Intellectual Disabilities and Autism Spectrum disorders. These modules will be available for all staff via LOTIS, the agency’s online training site. In addition to the disability specific training modules, a module on Transition Basics, with a focus on evidence-based practices and quality service delivery, has been developed and delivered in person to all SCVRD Transition personnel. This has become the standard training for all new staff working with Transition students. SCVRD personnel have participated in Global Career Development Facilitator instructor training in preparation to begin training our staff as Career Development Facilitators. The agency is also working collaboratively with the SC State Department of Education Office of Exceptional Children to provide training as a component of their State Personnel Development Grant-Project Gateway.

The Transition Services Specialist collaborative approach to the provision of transition services was continued this year in 8 schools. This approach designates a transition services specialist - who is a school district employee - to act as a liaison to refer students to the department and assist these students in participating in work-based experiences in the community. This effort has resulted in a significant increase in transition referrals in the areas in which the program is operating and has increased our collaborative efforts with the local school district.

The department continues to designate a liaison counselor to each public secondary school throughout the state. During this past year State Office and local staff have provided in-service training to school staff, parents, and students regarding service availability. The department continues to work on the Transition Demonstration Grant awarded by the US Department of Education in 2007. The initiative, Youth Employment Services (YES), has now been fully implemented in all four of the planned South Carolina high schools. The YES program combines proven methods for serving students along with evidence-based best practices to create a comprehensive approach to serving youth in transition from school to adult life. The department has met its year four outcome measures.

This screen was last updated on Jun 23 2011 11:40AM by sascclieserl

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Needs Assessment Introduction

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department designs new initiatives, enhances existing programs and refines policies and procedures based on many factors, including continuous program assessment and evaluation, by analyzing statistical trends and with input from constituency groups. In keeping with SCVRD’s strategic plan and, as specified by the Rehabilitation Act, this feedback loop begins with the triennial statewide assessment.

South Carolina has 2.77 million persons of working age (16 – 64). Of these, 14.8% have at least one disability. Overall, South Carolina ranks 11th in the nation in the number of 16-64 year-olds with a disability, an drop from 10th the previous year. The employment for persons with disabilities is approximately 23% with a relatively higher employment rate for men than women (RRTCDDS, 2008).

Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

SSI/SSDI Recipients:

A study to compare trends of the number of SSI/SSDI beneficiaries in the state to the number of SSI/SSDI beneficiaries applying for SCVRD service was conducted. Congressional statistics through December 2007, prepared by the Social Security Administration indicate that 233,614 South Carolinians are receiving SSI/SSDI. This is 6.86% South Carolinians over the age of 16. The number of SSI/SSDI beneficiaries applying for services has increased from 1,848 during 2005 to 2,707 during 2008. This reflects an increase of 46% and represents 13% of the individuals with disabilities who applied for services at SCVRD.

Table 1 - Vocational Rehabilitation SSI/SSDI Beneficiaries

2005 2006 2007 2008

Other 90% 88.45% 87% 87.17%

Pop.

SSI 4.98% 5.59% 6.90% 5.50%

SSDI 4.10% 4.93% 4.84% 5.80%

Both 0.93% 1.05% 1.24% 1.54%

SSI/SSDI

A major factor in improving employment options for SSI/SSDI recipients is to ensure a speedy provision of return-to-work services. A briefing paper developed by David Wittenburg and Pamela Loprest entitled “Ability or Inability to Work, Challenges in Moving Towards a More Work-Focused Disability Definition of Social Security Administration Disability Program” found that the provision of accommodations immediately following disability onset among workers in the U.S. increased the likelihood of return-to-work. Similarly, the lessons from the private sector indicate that early intervention is a major factor in improving employment outcomes following disability onset.

The provision of early intervention services is a major issue given the long application process associated in making eligibility determinations for both the SSI and SSDI programs. There will be a need for increased supported employment services at SCVRD to improve the employment outcomes of SSI/SSDI recipients.

The increased need for services for individuals from identified emerging disabilities was identified in this needs assessment. Based on research from FightAutism.org, there has been a 1557% cumulative growth rate of autism spectrum disorder in South Carolina from 1992 to 2007 which compares to the 1558% growth nationwide. Persons who are diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder required a stable and predictable work environment which can be accomplished with a strong supported employment services.

Another area of identified need is the increase of traumatic brain injuries in veterans as a result of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. The prevalence of traumatic brain injuries in this population created a shift in the mission of the Defense and Veteran Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) in 2007. DVBIC’s efforts were focused on prevention, evaluation, and treatment. In South Carolina, a task force has been developed to address the needs of veterans with disabilities and the service needs to ensure their inclusion back into the workforce. SCVRD has been a key member since its inception.

Individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

Individuals with disabilities who are minorities:

South Carolina is a state with a large minority population as indicated by the census conducted in 2007 by the United States Census Bureau. A comparison to FFY 2008 RSA Standards and Indicators, indicator 2.1, Access to Services for Minorities, shows the ratio for minorities to non-minorities is .961 and indicates this population is well served.

According to the American Community Survey (ACS) and U.S. Census data, of the persons living in South Carolina, 68.1% are white and 28.9% are African American. This makes up 95% of South Carolinians with the remaining 2.9% Native American (Catawba Tribe), Asian or dual race.

Table 2 – Prevalence of disabilities by race compared to census, 2007 Disability Status Report, and SCVRD RSA 911 data.

1 2 3 4 5

SC Pop. 68.10% 28.90% 1.20% 0.30% 1.40%

SC Pop w/disab 13.80% 19.10% 5.19% 28.10% 11.00%

SCVRD pop. 45.71% 51.40% 0.23% 0.37% 2.30%

1=White

2=African Americans

3=Asians

4=Native Americans

5=Other Races/Multi-Races

African American Population

Of the 1.3 million African Americans living in South Carolina, 19.1% of persons aged 16 – 64 have a disability. This is a higher percentage than in the population at large where 14.3% (2007 Disability Status Report, Cornell University) of persons have a disability. During FFY 2008, SCVRD provided services to approximately 11,000 African Americans. This represents 51.4% of the total SCVRD population who applied for services during this period.

Native American Populations

According to the 2005-2007 ACS, 12,981 South Carolinians identified themselves as being “American Indian and Alaska Native.” This population has the highest incident of disability among demographic groups in South Carolina (28.1% between the ages of 21 to 64). This is comparatively higher than the national average of 22.5% of Native Americans age 21 to 64 with disabilities.

In federal fiscal year (FFY) 2008, .37% of SCVRD applicants identified themselves as Native Americans.

This may be due to social factors. The American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Services (AVIRS) grant is not awarded in South Carolina. American Indians experience the highest rate of disability of any group in the United States. Efforts to improve the number of Native Americans who receive vocational rehabilitation services will continue through outreach in communities represented by a large numbers of Native Americans.

Latino/Hispanic Populations

Of the total population living in South Carolina, 3.6% selected Latino or Hispanic as descriptive of their heritage. The number of Latinos or Hispanics living in South Carolina has increased by 63.33% since the last needs assessment. With the rapid growth of this population comes the rapid growth of individuals in our state with disabilities who are Hispanic and Latino. This represents an opportunity to develop strategies to ensure this population is well served.

Older South Carolinians

Older South Carolinians are defined as those 65 and over. In the document developed by a recent RSA Institute on Rehabilitation Issues publication, Entitled “The Aging Workforce: A Perfect Storm...Or Perfect Opportunity?” it is noted that this population is one of the fastest-growing age cohorts in the United States. Several factors have contributed to the rise of the older population. One is the increased life expectancy; another is the large number of aging baby boomers.

The Cornell University 2007 study showed the prevalence of people with a disability ages 65 to 74 is 29.7% nationally; however, in South Carolina the prevalence of disabilities in this age group is 33.5%. Using the RSA 911 data, 1.94% of the applications taken in FFY 2008 were persons age 65 and greater. As the aging population faces the challenges of the economic downturn, many will continue pursuing employment.

Veterans

In the 2009 34th IRI “When Johnny (or Jeannie) Comes Marching Home … and Back to Work,” Dr. Ira Katz stated that 95,000 service members returning from Iraq and Afghanistan received at least a preliminary mental health diagnosis. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was the most common diagnosis and experienced by more than 45,000 individuals. The Department of Defense task force on Mental Health (2007) reported that in June 2007, nearly 33,000 of these veterans have been treated for nondependent substance abuse issues and 27,000 for depressive disorders.

FFY 2008 data reveal that 6.32% of applicants to SCVRD identified themselves as veterans. This number is expected to rise. In the 2006 ACS, 27.4% of veterans identify themselves as having a disability which is higher than the national average of 26.8%.

Transition Age Youth

South Carolina has one of the highest dropout and lowest graduation rates in the nation(NCES, 2006; Diplomas Count, 2007). With only 54% graduating from high school in 2004 (Ibid, 2007), South Carolina is risking its economic future. Only 69% of those graduating from high school enter post-secondary education and another 20% enter gainful employment (South Carolina Statistical Abstract, 2006). In this state, there are 82,446 individuals with disabilities ages 5-20, constituting 9% of the total population with disabilities in South Carolina (Census, 2000). The educational attainment and potential employability of students with disabilities are of particular concern. More than 100,000 children in South Carolina were served under IDEA in 2006. South Carolina ranks 53rd of 57 states and territories in the graduation rates of students with disabilities, according to a report prepared by the National Center for Special Education Accountability and Monitoring (2005).

SCVRD received applications on 3,051 young adults with disabilities between the ages of 16 and 21 during 2008. With 46% of students with disabilities dropping out before graduation and 30% completing high school with only a certificate of attendance/completion, it is essential the SCVRD continues to aggressively seek innovative methods to build strong partnerships among community stakeholders.

Rural

SCVRD has long established the maximum distance a client should have to travel to obtain V.R. services is 50 miles. The existing field offices satisfy this requirement with ample coverage statewide to all individuals with disabilities who wish to apply for services. However, according a publication of the South Carolina Office of Research and Statistics, “Urban and Rural Population in South Carolina,” 39.5% of the population lives in rural areas which ranks South Carolina 13th in the nation for the highest percentage of population living in rural areas. The rural nature of the state lends itself to minimal transit services. Seven out of the 46 counties do not have any type of public transportation. The lack of transportation makes it difficult for individuals to participate in vocational rehabilitation services and enter the work force. An aggressive approach to deliver vocational rehabilitation services to rural and remote areas will be needed to improve employment outcomes for this population.

Disability Types

• An analysis of clients by disability was conducted to determine whether SCVRD was equally successful serving all groups and to determine which disability categories required more emphasis. An analysis compared three years of SCVRD employment outcomes by disabilities to the national V.R. average.

Table 3 – Employment outcomes by disability

FFY2005 FFY2006 FFY2007

SCVRD Nat'l. SCVRD Nat'l. SCVRD Nat'l.

Physical 32.02% 29.16% 29.99% 28.07% 29.83% 27.00%

Communicative 6.86% 11.86% 6.33% 12.79% 6.45% 13.53%

Cognitive 10.07% 27.28% 12.14% 27.97% 13.82% 27.83%

Mental 50.66% 27.54% 51.18% 27.22% 49.64% 27.62%

The results reveal that SCVRD employment outcomes for persons with communicative and cognitive impairments are half the national average. For this reason, targeted outreach and enhanced service provision will be a focus for these disability groups.

Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

SCVRD actively participates in the Workforce Investment system throughout the state. The Department of Commerce’s Workforce Investment Board, the One Stop employment system, and numerous cooperative arrangements with other state entities and programs enhance vocational rehabilitation efforts and improve employment outcomes throughout the state.

The South Carolina Department of Commerce is the central point of contact responsible for implementing the Workforce Investment Act and heads up the State Workforce Investment Board. The board oversees the state’s efforts to develop a skilled, highly qualified work force to enable citizens to succeed in today’s global economy. The board includes representatives from the Department of Education, Employment Security Commission, Department of Social Services, Department of Commerce as well as business owners and private citizens. It acts as a forum for collaboration, ensuring that vocational rehabilitation requirements are articulated as part of the statewide plan.

In addition to the board, the One Stop system has been set up in 12 regions throughout the state with multiple offices in each region. The One Stop system provides assistance to job seekers or students looking for the right job and helps employers looking for the best candidates.

Each of SCVRD’s 19 area offices has cooperative agreements with each region to participate in the One-Stop offices. These agreements include staffing requirements, equipment, and referral procedures for individuals seeking employment. During the last year, 428 referrals were made from One Stop offices to SCVRD. The partnership is expected to strengthen since the Ticket to Work legislation pre-qualified One-Stop Centers to be employment networks.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2009 4:12PM by sascclieserl

The annual estimates of individuals to be served and costs of services featured below are conservative and are based on RSA-113 report for Federal Fiscal Year 2010, the RSA-2 for Federal Fiscal Year 2010, and the South Carolina Vocational Department’s history of modest growth.

(A) Number of individuals in the state eligible for services:

36,638

(B) Number of eligible individuals who will receive services under:

Title I, Part B 36,389

Title VI, Part B 249

Each priority category within an order of selection, if the agency is using an order of selection N/A

(C) Costs of services for the estimate in (A) $39,172,250.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
N/A 0
Totals   $0 0

This screen was last updated on Jun 3 2011 11:28AM by sascclieserl

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD), in developing the goals and priorities for FFY 2010 has taken into consideration two factors:

1. The goals and priorities approved by the department’s independent commission (Section 101(a)(21)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998);

2. These goals and priorities are developed consistent with the findings of the department’s Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. (State Plan Attachment 4.11(a) conducted in 2009 for FFY 2010.)

Goal 1 – SCVRD will achieve program improvement as demonstrated by improved quantifiable outcomes on standards and indicators.

Goal 2 - SCVRD will improve the quality of employment outcomes for eligible individuals with disabilities.

Goal 3 –SCVRD will increase collaboration with other state agencies.

Goal 4 – SCVRD will place a priority on collaborative efforts to address transition services for students with disabilities.

Goal 5 – SCVRD will expand outreach efforts to unserved and underserved individuals with disabilities in South Carolina.

Goal 6 – SCVRD will strengthen relationships with employers.

Goal 7 – SCVRD will continue to examine and improve its key processes.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2009 4:13PM by sascclieserl

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2009 4:13PM by sascclieserl

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI Part B Funds

Specify the state’s goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department’s (SCVRD) supported employment goals and plans for FY 2012 regarding the Title VI, Part B program are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and the department’s performance on the Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators. The priorities are as follows:

• Strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s 110 traditional program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs;

• Providing services to people with most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, in order to successfully achieve and maintain competitive employment in integrated work settings; and

• SCVRD has intensified its efforts to jointly serve individuals who are seeking services through the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (SCDDSN) who wish to pursue competitive employment. Careful monitoring and tracking of DDSN referrals by the DDSN and SCVRD liaison ensures a continuum of service provision. Quarterly meetings with the liaisons, director of DDSN/MR and the Assistant Commissioner of Client Services take place to discuss progress of the referrals and ways to better work together to compliment and streamline service delivery. These clients are provided intense job coach services in order to obtain and maintain competitive employment. Extra attention is focused at not only serving individuals who are served under their TBI program but also their MR programs.

• Continuing to utilize resources and special programs offered through the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs (SCDDSN) involving individuals with traumatic brain injury.

• Providing ongoing training to SCVRD staff in the provision of supported employment services.

The number of people served may vary in accordance with the disability composition and the portion receiving SSI and/or SSDI benefits. It is expected in SFY 2012 that the supported employment services of a job coach will generate an average of 15-20 direct placements, and 10 - 15 successful employment outcome closures with emphasis on individuals allowed SSI and/or SSDI - each having earnings equal to or greater than the $1,640 per month Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA), 2011.

Individual placement in competitive employment at or above minimum wage remains the primary supported employment model used. SCVRD’s performance for FFY 2010 on indicator 1.4 was 96.22%, 33.82% higher than the required performance level of 62.4%.Transitional employment for individuals with mental illness is also used when appropriate. A team approach is employed in order to collaborate with clients and other community service providers to achieve successful employment outcomes through the use of supported employment services.

The SCVRD coordinator of supported employment services at the state level conducts a yearly training for all job coaches and works with new job coaches in their local office shortly after they are hired. Additional training planned for the coming year focuses on job and task analysis, job development, and follow along services. Training is an area of significant attention including correct RSA 911 coding.

SCVRD, through the vocational assessment process, has developed a method to identify individuals early in the rehabilitation process who may need the supported employment services of a job coach. It is anticipated this will result in identifying more individuals who will benefit from comprehensive supported employment services. This most recent update to the case management system will be deployed statewide in July of 2011.

At this time, SCVRD uses designated Title VI, Part B funds for six supported employment coach positions. This annual grant award complements SCVRD’s use of its traditional 110 program service funds to provide statewide supported employment job coach coverage. SCVRD’s traditional 110 program service funds, in turn, provide for additional supported employment job coaches—either directly hired or through an agreement with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health. Generally speaking, the job coaches have been and continue to be a valued resource to extend SCVRD’s service delivery to more individuals who have the most significant disabilities and need additional supports to maintain competitive employment.

This screen was last updated on Jun 23 2011 11:40AM by sascclieserl

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

GOAL 1 – The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD) will achieve program improvement as demonstrated by improved quantifiable outcomes on standards and indicators.

STRATEGY 1:

SCVRD will identify areas within South Carolina where specific indicators can be improved based on the unique characteristics and demographics of that area.

GOAL 2 - SCVRD will improve the quality of employment outcomes for eligible individuals with disabilities. (Innovation and expansion activities made possible through ARRA funds)

STRATEGY 1:

SCVRD will expand the Skilled Workforce Apprenticeship Program (SWAT). This program creates apprenticeship opportunities with local businesses with the inducements of reduced recruitment costs, higher productivity, and a more diverse workforce.

STRATEGY 2:

Expand the availability of comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services to the upstate of South Carolina. The completion of the center under construction in Lyman, South Carolina is scheduled for late 2009.The center staff will provide vocational rehabilitation services including occupational and physical therapy, job readiness training, counseling and guidance services, vocational assessment, job placement, supported employment, information technology training, and rehabilitation technology.

STRATEGY 3:

SCVRD will improve the quality of employment outcomes by providing internship opportunities for clients approaching the end of their post-secondary training programs.

STRATEGY 4:

SCVRD will improve the quality of employment outcomes by providing intensive training for staff who are responsible for vocational assessments.

STRATEGY 5:

SCVRD will expand counselor internship opportunities to enhance the recruitment of qualified rehabilitation counselors.

STRATEGY 6:

SCVRD will enhance staff understanding of the vocational implications of a wide range of disabilities to be made available on demand through online learning modules.

GOAL 3 - SCVRD will increase collaboration with other state agencies and entities.

STRATEGY: 1:

SCVRD will work in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health and the South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services through the Co-Occurring State Infrastructure Grant to expand local area staff training and service provision for consumers with co-occurring disorders.

STRATEGY 2:

SCVRD and the South Carolina Department of Education, Adult Education Division, will work together to expand referral development and the availability of WorkKeys instruction and testing in all SCVRD Area Offices, as well as the substance abuse treatment facilities Palmetto Center and Holmesview Center and the future Lyman center.

STRATEGY 3:

Counterpart meetings will continue in SFY 2010 and will include: South Carolina Department of Probation, Pardon, and Parole, South Carolina Department of Corrections, South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services, and local county health departments.

GOAL 4 – SCVRD will place a priority on collaborative efforts to address transition services for students with disabilities.

STRATEGY 1:

SCVRD will expand the use of collaborative efforts as a mechanism for delivering transition services through joint funding with school districts for transition services specialist positions.

STRATEGY 2:

SCVRD will continue efforts with the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice through the joint funding of a counselor position to increase referrals and services for students with disabilities at the Broad River Road Complex.

STRATEGY 3:

Through the Youth Employment Services Grant, transition assessment specialists will be placed in additional schools to provide work preparation, experiences and employment outcomes for students with disabilities.

STRATEGY 4:

SCVRD will partner with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health to co-fund school-based mental health counselor positions to expand outreach and services for students with mental illness.

STRATEGY 5:

SCVRD will expand the partnership with the Wil Lou Gray Opportunity School through the joint funding of a guidance counselor/transition assessment specialist position to provide vocational assessment, work preparation and experiences, and employment outcomes for students with disabilities.

GOAL 5 – SCVRD will expand outreach efforts to unserved and underserved individuals with disabilities in South Carolina.

STRATEGY 1:

SCVRD will seek greater involvement with disability organizations serving individuals with significant disabilities. Formal agreements will be implemented to include referral source requirements, SCVRD participation in support groups, and other outreach activities.

STRATEGY 2:

In order to expand services to the Deaf and hard of hearing population, rehabilitation counselors for the Deaf will be required to develop three new referral sources in their local office area in the coming SFY.

STRATEGY 3:

SCVRD staff will initiate outreach activities to the American Indians Advisory Board to better identify individuals in this population who would benefit from vocational rehabilitation services to enter competitive employment.

STRATEGY 4:

Outreach activities will continue to address the vocational rehabilitation needs of the Hispanic community. Results of a Hispanic focus group to be conducted in SFY 2010 will determine additional strategies required to increase referrals as well as staff training needs.

STRATEGY 5:

In SFY 2010, SCVRD will conduct demonstration projects in three diverse areas of South Carolina to assess the benefit of rural rehabilitation specialists. The project will be designed to take vocational rehabilitation services to rural and remote areas that are underserved. The three projects will be designed to test a variety of service delivery methods.

STRATEGY 6:

In order to reach the growing number of OIF/OEF veterans, SCVRD will work with veterans’ groups as well as other agencies and organizations to identify those veterans and their family members who would benefit from vocational rehabilitation services.

STRATEGY 7:

SCVRD will dedicate a staff position to improve the employment outcomes of individuals who are SSI/SSDI beneficiaries.

STRATEGY 8:

In order to prepare for the increasing need for vocational rehabilitation services for the aging population, SCVRD will identify issues related to this population and conduct training activities in SFY 2010.

STRATEGY 9:

SCVRD will enhance its identification and evaluation process to ensure individuals who require supported employment services will be identified early.

GOAL 6 – SCVRD will strengthen relationships with employers.

STRATEGY 1:

The Vocational Rehabilitation Business Partnership Network will be restructured to develop and strengthen employer partnerships at the local level as well as determine current needs in the workforce and provide education regarding VR services and supports.

STRATEGY 2:

SCVRD will continue collaboration with the South Carolina Employment Security Commission, the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs, the University of South Carolina’s Center for Disability Resources, and others to plan and conduct a conference for South Carolina businesses to provide education regarding the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities as well as available services and supports.

GOAL 7 – SCVRD will continue to examine and improve its key processes.

STRATEGY 1:

SCVRD will continue internal focus groups to determine the effectiveness of staff duties, processes and programs.

STRATEGY 2:

Service delivery and the timely exchange of information will be improved by the completion of the electronic case file which is anticipated for SFY 2010. This includes IPE through closure.

STRATEGY 3:

Time management for staff will be improved by upgrading to web-based email and calendar software using MS Outlook.

STRATEGY 4:

SCVRD will enhance data reporting capabilities by upgrading its SQL database to the 2008 version.

STRATEGY 5:

SCVRD will improve quality and compliance by expanding the review capabilities of the centralized compliance unit and by taking advantage of an electronic case file environment.

STRATEGY 6: Improve the cost-effectiveness of procurement, budgets, finance, human resources, and payroll activities through the implementation of the South Carolina Enterprise Information System (SCEIS).

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2009 4:13PM by sascclieserl

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

GOAL 1 – The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD) will achieve program improvement as demonstrated by improved quantifiable outcomes on standards and indicators. This goal will continue.

STRATEGY 1:

SCVRD will identify areas within South Carolina where specific indicators can be improved based on the unique characteristics and demographics of that area. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

Over the past year, special attention has been given to improving the wages and hours of all clients, in particular, those receiving SSI/SSDI benefits. New program improvement measures were introduced in July 2010. Goals were established to improve gross wages based on the average of the top three VR agencies in Region IV. A “weekly hours worked” goal was also established using the average of the top three VR agencies in Region IV.

In the coming year, based on these measures, specific geographical areas of South Carolina can be assessed and new strategies developed to improve the quality of employment outcomes.

GOAL 2 - SCVRD will improve the quality of employment outcomes for eligible individuals with disabilities. This goal will continue.

STRATEGY 1:

SCVRD will continue with the expansion of the Skilled Workforce Apprentice Program (SWAT). This program creates apprenticeship opportunities with local businesses with the inducements of reduced recruitment costs, higher productivity, and a more diverse workforce. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

Over the past year the Skilled Workforce Apprentice Training (SWAT) program has continued to offer training opportunities in skilled position for SCVRD clients statewide. During this reporting period, more than 92 clients were trained and placed in skilled career positions through the SWAT program and 24 are currently in training. Examples of these positions include carpenters, HVAC technicians, and lab technicians.

STRATEGY 2:

Expand the availability of comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services to the upstate of South Carolina. This strategy is complete.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

The Bryant Center in Lyman, South Carolina, was completed in December 2009 and service delivery began in early 2010. Staff provide vocational rehabilitation services to eligible clients in the Upstate. Services include counseling and guidance, vocational assessment, career planning, job placement assistance, supported employment, rehabilitation engineering, brain injury services, pain management, a prosthetics and orthotics clinic, and occupational and physical therapy. Information technology training sessions began with a small group in June 2010 and a second session is currently under way.

STRATEGY 3:

SCVRD will improve the quality of employment outcomes by providing internship opportunities for clients approaching the end of their post-secondary training programs. This strategy is complete.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

SCVRD clients were able to take advantage of internship opportunities and were provided needed exposure to their chosen career fields. This service was especially important during a period of high unemployment in South Carolina and gave these individuals an advantage with job placement.

STRATEGY 4:

SCVRD will improve the quality of employment outcomes by providing intensive training for staff who are responsible for vocational assessments. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

During this reporting period the following trainings have been provided to all Vocational Assessment and Career Exploration Specialists:

The Role of Assessment in the Rehabilitation Process

• Result of formal assessment.

• Understanding Standardized Testing

• Predicting Vocational Outcomes

• Analyzing Jobs

• Assessing Transferable Skills

• Occupational Classification Resources

• Using Assessment Information to write a Vocational Objective

• Job Analysis to Assess Accommodations and Modification Needs.

Job Preparedness Instruction: A Prescription for Client Success

• Active Training Techniques

• Curriculum Development

STRATEGY 5:

SCVRD will expand counselor internship opportunities to enhance the recruitment of qualified rehabilitation counselors. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department is committed to the recruitment of qualified rehabilitation counselors by continuing to offer opportunities for eligible graduate students to apply their academic knowledge in a real work environment.

As a result of this initiative, SCVRD developed ongoing relationships with the directors and field site coordinators at the graduate level of various universities including: Clemson University, Francis Marion University, South Carolina State University, South University, Winthrop University, University of South Carolina, The Citadel, The University of North Carolina, Winston-Salem State University in North Carolina, East Carolina University in North Carolina, the University of Tennessee, Auburn University in Alabama, and the University of Maryland.

These graduate programs provide students who meet the CSPD requirement for employment as a Vocational Rehabilitation counselor and require students to finish an internship as a pre-requisite for successful completion of the Master’s Degree program.

SCVRD continues to receive applications for internships with the agency. To date in 2011, 84 applications have been received and there has been a steady increase over the past several years. Applications for internships are attributed to the following coordinated efforts:

1) Marketing through the development of an internship brochure and additional information provided on the agency website about internship opportunities.

2) The development and maintenance of on-going relationships with key individuals at the various universities who are responsible for coordinating internships.

3) Appropriate university staff were invited to tour the local area offices and work training centers in order to understand the type of internship experience the student can expect while working with SCVRD.

4) During these tours, information was provided to share with students to include the Graduate Internship Program brochure as well as a DVD of the most recent Client Achievement Award recipient.

5) The graduate program director is provided a copy of the agency vacancy listing on a regular basis.

6) Invitations were accepted to speak with students on campus and at various other forums to discuss VR services as well as internship opportunities.

7) SCVRD staff attended career fairs, annual field site placement expositions, job fair expositions, military career fairs, connections internship and employment fairs, and other venues in order to educate the public about Vocational Rehabilitation as well as employment and internship opportunities within our agency.

During the past year, the oversight of the SCVRD internship program was centralized to ensure that every office could accommodate an intern by eliminating the need to have a staff member in every office with the appropriate credentials/ certification to oversee the training requirements of the intern. By centralizing this function, the requirements of every Memorandum of Agreement will be met, and every intern will receive the training which will meet the requirements established by the University. This creates consistency with the internship experience/training statewide.

SCVRD is now reaping the benefits of our internship program as there is now a ready pool of applicants who excelled in their internships and became a valuable asset to SCVRD on the first day of their employment.

STRATEGY 6:

SCVRD will enhance staff understanding of the vocational implications of a wide range of disabilities to be made available on demand through online learning modules. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

The Human Resource Development staff was successful in launching LOTIS – Learner Online Training and Information Site, a learning management system, this past year. One of the initial goals was to develop a series of online disability-specific training modules which would be available on demand to all staff. This past year, the following modules were developed: Addictions, Anxiety Disorders, Bipolar Disorder, Brain Injury, Conduct Disorders, and a general Disability Awareness module. Since that time seven additional modules have been completed: Attention Deficit & Hyperactivity Disorder, Autism Spectrum, Depression, Diabetes, Learning Disabilities, Schizophrenia and Spinal Cord Injury. Epilepsy, Musculoskeletal Disabilities, and Neuromuscular Disorders are in the final phase of being converted to the online format and will be available within the next few weeks. Content for the following modules is under development and will be available within the next 4-5 months: Chronic Pain and Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Additional topics are identified and will be developed in the future. All direct service delivery staff are required to watch the modules and complete a basic knowledge check. Selected staff are required to complete additional off-line activities focusing on service delivery.

GOAL 3 - SCVRD will increase collaboration with other state agencies and entities. This goal will continue.

STRATEGY 1:

SCVRD will work in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health and the South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services through the Co-Occurring State Infrastructure Grant to expand local area staff training and service provision for consumers with co-occurring disorders. A no-cost extension through March 2012 has been awarded to the COSIG project. During this period, technical assistance as well as training will be provided. This strategy will be complete in March 2012.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

SCVRD has continued participation in the Co-occurring State Infrastructure Grant in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health and the South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services. A new screening tool instrument was implemented in all three agencies to better identify individuals with co-occurring disorders. Training continues to be provided in existing locations and assessments/evaluations are ongoing to ensure program effectiveness.

STRATEGY 2:

SCVRD and the South Carolina Department of Education, Adult Education Division, will work together to expand referral development and the availability of WorkKeys instruction and testing in all SCVRD area offices, as well as the substance abuse treatment facilities Palmetto Center and Holmesview Center. This strategy is complete.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

SCVRD and the South Carolina Department of Education, Adult Education Division, continue to provide staff training regarding program services and referral development to ensure that consumers are aware of and have access to services offered by each of the partners. The availability of WorkKeys has been expanded to include the Georgetown satellite office. Each location began offering WorkKeys assessments in electronic format in August 2010, which has provided clients and staff with real-time results regarding performance.

STRATEGY 3:

Counterpart meetings will continue in SFY 2011 and will include: South Carolina Department of Probation, Pardon, and Parole, South Carolina Department of Corrections, South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services, and local county health departments. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

Twenty counterpart meetings were conducted early in the year with transition services programs in various school districts across the state. The meetings were well attended and served to bring a greater understanding to all parties and provide opportunities to further strengthen partnerships. Counterpart meetings for SFY 2011 are currently underway with the Department of Mental Health and various disability support groups.

GOAL 4 – SCVRD will place a priority on collaborative efforts to address transition services for students with disabilities. This goal will continue.

STRATEGY 1:

SCVRD will expand the use of collaborative efforts as a mechanism for delivering transition services through joint funding with school districts for transition services specialist positions. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

SCVRD expanded the Transition Services Specialist Program to include a total of eight school districts. Through this jointly funded arrangement, eligible students receive vocational preparation and work experiences during the school day, which keeps them engaged in school and prepares them for post-secondary training opportunities or employment upon their exit from school.

STRATEGY 2:

SCVRD will continue efforts with the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice through the joint funding of a counselor position to increase referrals and services for students with disabilities at the Broad River Road complex. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

SCVRD and the South Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice continue to co-fund a counselor position to provide services to eligible youth with disabilities housed at the Broad River Road Complex. Students receive counseling and guidance, vocational assessment, and work preparation to assist them in transitioning back to their local communities.

STRATEGY 3:

Through the Youth Employment Services Grant, transition assessment specialists will be placed in additional schools to provide work preparation, experiences and employment outcomes for students with disabilities. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

The Youth Employment Services Grant was fully implemented in four sites: Beaufort, Lancaster, Spartanburg and Edgefield. All sites have staff in place and are providing work preparation and experiences for eligible youth in the respective schools. To date, the sites have exceeded their target enrollment totals.

STRATEGY 4:

SCVRD will partner with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health to co-fund school-based mental health counselor positions to expand outreach and services for students with mental illness. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

Discussions have been held with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health and while there is interest in pursuing this endeavor, it is yet to be implemented due to funding limitations. A draft memorandum of agreement has been developed and potential sites have been identified pending the approval of the MOA, and contingent on funding availability.

STRATEGY 5:

SCVRD will expand the partnership with the Wil Lou Gray Opportunity School through the joint funding of a guidance counselor/transition assessment specialist position to provide vocational assessment, work preparation and experiences, and employment outcomes for students with disabilities. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

SCVRD and the Wil Lou Gray Opportunity School have partnered together to co-fund a guidance counselor/transition assessment specialist position to provide vocational assessment, work preparation and experiences and job placement for eligible students with disabilities. Students receive intense instruction regarding employment preparation and participate in community-based work experiences.

GOAL 5 – SCVRD will expand outreach efforts to unserved and underserved individuals with disabilities in South Carolina. This goal will continue.

STRATEGY 1:

SCVRD will seek greater involvement with disability organizations serving individuals with significant disabilities. Formal agreements will be implemented to include referral source requirements, SCVRD participation in support groups, and other outreach activities. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

SCVRD remains actively involved with the Spinal Cord Injury Association,

South Carolina Independent Living Council and Centers for Independent Living, Mental Health and the Individual Placement and Support Program, Work In Progress, Diabetes Council, and the Brain Injury Alliance. Counselors attend support group meetings and conferences. SCVRD staff assist with training and evaluations of the above mentioned entities.

STRATEGY 2:

SCVRD’s Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf (RCD) will be active participants in the Deaf community and will continue to strengthen their partnership with the SC School for the Deaf and the Blind in Spartanburg. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

Training has been provided on issues affecting the Deaf-Blind as well as challenges associated with providing drug abuse treatment options for Deaf clients. This training was provided at the South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind in Spartanburg, SC in May 2011. Some RCDs have also developed local mentors to work on their sign language skills to improve their communication abilities. Future training will be provided to include outreach efforts, how to develop resources in their local service areas, and effective communication. SCVRD actively supports the training provided by Western Oregon University which focuses on professionals who are new to serving individuals who are Deaf, Hard of Hearing, or Deaf-Blind. This nine credit orientation program offers four weeks of intensive American Sign Language instruction as well as information on such topics as the range of assistive technology, working with individuals with cochlear implants, and what practitioners need to know to better serve Deaf, Hard of Hearing, and Deaf-Blind consumers. The knowledge and skills these professionals learn in this interactive setting are immediately applied to their jobs once they return.

STRATEGY 3:

SCVRD staff will initiate outreach activities to the American Indians Advisory Board to better identify individuals in this population who would benefit from vocational rehabilitation services to enter competitive employment. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

In May 2011, VR services were presented to Native Americans (Santee Indian Organization) in Holly Hill, South Carolina with the Native American Affairs Coordinator, representatives from the South Carolina Commission for Minority Affairs and Center for Disability Resources, University of South Carolina. Future presentations are planned to present VR services to Native American organizations. A focus group is planned in the future and there are plans to share community resources.

STRATEGY 4:

Outreach activities will continue to address the vocational rehabilitation needs of the Hispanic community. Results of a Hispanic focus group to be conducted in SFY 2010 will determine additional strategies required to increase referrals as well as staff training needs. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

A planning committee is preparing training for staff for working with Spanish and Latino populations. This training will occur in the September 2011 and will target counselors and other service delivery staff. The focus group has been rescheduled for SFY 2012.

STRATEGY 5:

In SFY 2010, SCVRD will conduct demonstration projects in three diverse areas of South Carolina to assess the benefit of rural rehabilitation specialists. The project will be designed to take vocational rehabilitation services to rural and remote areas that are underserved. The three projects will be designed to test a variety of service delivery methods. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

The counselor assigned to Pageland, South Carolina continues with rural outreach to this community. Although other areas were not added due to funding limitations, the intent remains to expand this program.

STRATEGY 6:

In order to reach the growing number of OIF/OEF veterans, SCVRD will work with veterans’ groups as well as other agencies and organizations to identify those veterans and their family members who would benefit from vocational rehabilitation services. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

SCVRD continues to be an active participant in the South Carolina Returning Veteran’s Policy Academy, a team comprised of multiple state agencies and organizations dedicated to serving veterans and their families. This group meets quarterly to discuss available services for veterans and their families as well as to identify additional resources and funding opportunities. SCVRD has also been closely involved with the Warriors in Transition program at Fort Jackson in Columbia, South Carolina, which strives to ensure that returning veterans are able to integrate back into society successfully. SCVRD has counselors assigned to each of the VA facilities in the state to reach out to those veterans and family members in need of VR services. In September 2010 SCVRD conducted a Veterans Institute. The presenters on the agenda included the South Carolina Veterans Policy Academy chairman, representatives from the National Guard, a staff psychologist from Fort Jackson, a VA program coordinator, and staff from the Federal VR program.

STRATEGY 7:

SCVRD will dedicate a staff position to improve the employment outcomes of individuals who are SSI/SSDI beneficiaries. This strategy is complete

STRATEGY 8:

In order to prepare for the increasing need for vocational rehabilitation services for the aging population, SCVRD will identify issues related to this population and conduct training activities in SFY 2010. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

Although this is an emerging issue, SCVRD has had difficulty locating qualified experts in this field. An initial meeting was held this past year to discuss this issue. Plans were discussed regarding the development of a workshop to address this need. Agency staff met with a local presenter who was identified as an expert in this area; however upon reviewing materials and pursuing additional information from the presenter, it was determined that this particular presenter and information she produced did not meet the Agency’s training needs. This topic will be pursued again this year, with efforts to secure an expert who will be able to work with Agency staff to address this strategy.

STRATEGY 9:

SCVRD will enhance its identification and evaluation process to ensure individuals who require supported employment services will be identified early. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

A mechanism has been put in place in the vocational evaluation process which requires a “placement plan” for each client based on their level of need. This provides the early identification of clients requiring supported employment services who will be identified in status 10 and will assist in IPE development. The placement plan can be amended as necessary.

Placement plan types: a. Client can obtain or maintain employment as a result of their own effort. b. Client will need limited assistance with locating an appropriate job. c. Client will need assistance with direct placement. - Client would be unable to obtain employment without the direct intervention of SVRD staff. d. Client will need supported employment. Client has not been able to get or keep competitive employment because of a most significant disability (MSD). Most significant disabilities are defined as an intellectual disability, learning disabilities, traumatic brain injury/stroke, mental illness (severe), autism and other spectrum disorders, and other disabilities.

Criteria:

* Client has problems with learning and understanding specific job tasks due to a cognitive impairment.

* Client has problems associated with adjusting positively to co-workers, supervisors, and the actual job because of an emotional, mental or cognitive impairment.

* Client has problems associated with using good judgment in completing tasks, making decisions, or interacting with others.

* Client has problems with effective communication that may hinder the ability to understand job tasks and interact positively with peers and supervisors.

* Client requires intensive ongoing support services to include on-the-job training in order to learn job tasks.

A client who requires supported employment as a part of their placement plan will be referred to a SCVRD job coach for on-the-job services.

To date, only one office is using the Case Management System (CMS) vocational assessment program which will collect placement plan data. As the rest of the state begins using the program in July 2011, the data will be collected and reports developed. This will allow management and local supervisors to plan and develop staffing strategies.

GOAL 6 – SCVRD will strengthen relationships with employers. This goal will continue.

STRATEGY 1:

The Vocational Rehabilitation Business Partnership Network will be restructured to develop and strengthen employer partnerships at the local level as well as determine current needs in the workforce and provide education regarding VR services and supports. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

During the past year, the Vocational Rehabilitation Partnership Network (VRBPN) has continued to build and strengthen the newly structured local chapters throughout the state. These local chapters have increased memberships and local employer involvement within the VRBPN. Many of the local chapters have very active business partners that have allowed for a greater education to other businesses in the communities regarding hiring individuals with disabilities and VR services and support.

STRATEGY 2:

SCVRD will continue collaboration with the South Carolina Department of Employment and Workforce, the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs, the University of South Carolina’s Center for Disability Resources, and others to plan and conduct a conference for South Carolina businesses to provide education regarding the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities as well as available services and supports. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

SCVRD is currently working with the South Carolina Department of Disabilities and Special Needs, the University of South Carolina’s Center for Disability Resources, South Carolina Developmental Disabilities Council, and others to hold a half-day conference to educate employers across the state on the benefits of hiring individuals with disabilities. The event is currently in the planning stages and is tentatively scheduled for late summer.

GOAL 7 – SCVRD will continue to examine and improve its key processes. This goal will continue.

STRATEGY 1:

SCVRD will continue internal focus groups to determine the effectiveness of staff duties, processes and programs. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

Focus groups have been conducted with job readiness training staff during the year. Information obtained from these focus groups has been used to update and enhance duties, processes, and programs.

STRATEGY 2:

Service delivery and the timely exchange of information will be improved by the completion of the electronic case file which is anticipated for SFY 2010. This includes IPE through closure. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

SCVRD continues to be impacted by the implementation of the South Carolina Enterprise Information System (SCEIS) which was a legislative mandate. Programming efforts have been diverted to create an interface which will enable SCVRD to have access to information which was previously available in the legacy system. This has delayed CMS development. However, vocational assessment will be deployed statewide in July 2011 and the IPE design phase is well under way.

STRATEGY 3:

Time management for staff will be improved by upgrading to web-based email and calendar software using MS Outlook. This strategy is complete. This strategy is complete.

STRATEGY 4:

SCVRD will enhance data reporting capabilities by upgrading its SQL database to the 2008 version. This strategy is complete.

STRATEGY 5:

SCVRD will improve quality and compliance by expanding the review capabilities of the Quality Assurance unit and by taking advantage of an electronic case file environment. This strategy will continue.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES:

The Quality Assurance Unit currently reviews all requests to move a case from applicant status to eligibility, to complete a Trial Work Experience Plan, or to close the case unsuccessfully prior to eligibility. In July 2011, vocational assessments will become available in the electronic case file for Quality Assurance review. In the coming year, a new method will be used to review a random sample instead of each case.

State Office and field staff have access to real-time management reports to assess the number and types of errors. An accuracy rate is calculated and can be determined for each counselor, caseload, and area office as well as statewide. This information is used to help determine local training needs which will improve counselor decisions and expedite case movement. Trends are identified and addressed during quarterly meetings conducted in Columbia with staff from Client Services, Quality Assurance, and field staff.

STRATEGY 6:

Improve the cost-effectiveness of procurement, budgets, finance, human resources, and payroll activities through the implementation of the South Carolina Enterprise Information System (SCEIS). This strategy continues.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES: SCVRD continues to anticipate the benefits that SCEIS is intended to deliver. Plans are underway to develop in house budget reporting capabilities and a streamlined client services procurement process.

 

SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT GOALS: Goals for past year continue to be centered on strengthening service delivery afforded to individuals whose disabilities and vocational needs are so significant that SCVRD’s traditional 110 program services would not be sufficient to meet their employment needs.

STRATEGY: Identify individuals who would best be served in a supported employment setting. Allocate resources to supplement existing supported employment services. Train staff in effective and successful supported employment strategies.

PERFORMANCE MEASURES: Through outreach efforts, referrals from South Carolina Department of Disability and Special Needs have doubled this past year and these numbers are expected to increase in the coming year. Most of these individuals will need the supported employment services of a job coach.

 

RPL FFY 2010

1.1 >=0 -706

1.2 >=55.8% 54.39%

1.3 >=72.6% 99.72%

1.4 >=62.4% 96.22%

1.5 >.52 0.581

1.6 >=53.0 65.51

2.1 >=.80 .965

Number of indicators in standard 1 that were passed: 4

Number of primary indicators in standard 1 that were passed: 3

 

SCVRD reserved funds allotted under Section 110 to support Innovation and Expansion activities as follows:

- Innovative services for Transition clients, including those participating in High School/High Tech activities

- Youth Employment Service activities and job readiness training activities

- The SCVRD rehabilitation engineering department identifies and purchases innovative assistive technology devices to stay current with the latest advancements in the field.

- Support of the SCVRD Independent Commission

- Support of the Statewide Independent Living Council

This screen was last updated on Jun 23 2011 1:43PM by sascclieserl

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

The South Carolina Vocational Rehabilitation Department (SCVRD) employs 45 full-time employment coaches having a high school diploma or a bachelor’s degree in a related field. This includes 7 employment coaches who provide individual placement and support (IPS) services to South Carolina Department of Mental Health (SCDMH) consumers through a Memorandum of Agreement with SCDMH.

This year all employment coaches attended supported employment training conducted by the SCVRD coordinator of supported employment services. Follow-up webinars were conducted to discuss best practices. In addition, the IPS employment coaches received specialized training to:

• Increase knowledge in IPS philosophy and principles;

• Increase knowledge in supervisors’ role;

• Increase knowledge in employment specialist roles;

• Increase knowledge in supported employment components;

• Increase knowledge in motivating clients to work.

Employment coaches work as part of a team along with other SCVRD staff and extended support representatives. Through the efforts of these employment coaches, supported employment services are available statewide to individuals with the most significant disabilities.

Initial diagnostic evaluation services are conducted while in the traditional 110 program. If needed, a supplemental evaluation may be performed with the use of an employment coach. At the time of acceptance for supported employment services, an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is developed outlining the employment coach services to be provided. Such services include job development, job placement, on-the-job training, observation or supervision at or away from the job site, and support services with the employer, client, or family.

SCVRD's on-going support services are limited to 18 months unless extended by an amendment to the IPE. Transition to extended services starts after an individual is stabilized in his/her job setting and has met the individualized work goal. The client’s employment stability is determined by the achievement of adequate job performance without a need for ongoing, intensive shadowing/mentoring from the employment coach. The client, employer, employment coach, and SCVRD counselor need to agree that this has occurred before transition to extended services takes place.

Contingent upon the significance of the client’s supported employment needs; there could be an initial training period of two to six weeks, which would be followed by ongoing employment coach involvement of least 90 or more days prior to determining whether the client is ready for extended services. In addition, SCVRD may provide post-employment services following transition if needed to maintain the placement.

The overall objective for each individual receiving supported employment services is successful competitive employment in an integrated work setting. For this to occur, the supported employment team works to assure client and employer satisfaction in terms of both production and fulfillment of the individual’s needs.

The individual placement model for competitive employment remains the primary supported employment model being used by SCVRD. Emphasis is placed upon providing services to people with most significant disabilities, especially SSI and/or SSDI recipients, whose employment needs are so significant that traditional 110 program services would not be sufficient to meet them. The SCVRD coordinator of supported employment services also assists area office staff to identify and serve all eligible clients with the most significant disabilities.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2009 4:13PM by sascclieserl

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on 06/24/2011 at 10:32 AM

Last updated by sascclieserl

Completed on 06/24/2011 at 10:32 AM

Completed by sascclieserl

Approved on 09/26/2011 at 1:06 PM

Approved by rsamitchells

Published on 09/27/2011 at 10:52 AM

Published by jack

The following documents have been identified as being related to the information you are viewing.

  • Monitoring Report for South Carolina - General — as of June 28, 2011
    DOC (680KB) | PDF (472KB)

  • "A Better Bottom Line: Employing People with Disabilities" — A blueprint for Governors has been issued by the National Governors Association (NGA).
    PDF (4.13M)

  • TAC-14-02 — Submission of the FY 2015 State Plan for the Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and Supplement for the Supported Employment Services Program. (May 28, 2014)
    DOC (247KB) | PDF (233KB)

  • ED-80-0013 - Certification Regarding Lobbying — 34 CFR 82.110(b) requires each State VR agency to submit for approval a signed certification regarding lobbying for each program for which federal funds are requested. In other words, one certification must be submitted for the VR program and another for the Supported Employment program.
    MS Word (24KB)

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