ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

Published September 4, 2014.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Oregon Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 (submitted FY 2013)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The Vocational Rehabilitation is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Department of Human Services [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Director, Vocational Rehabilitation

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Director, Vocational Rehabilitation

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryStephaine Parrish Taylor

Title of SignatoryDirector Vocational Rehabilitation

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/28/2013

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2014No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Vocational Rehabilitation

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

INPUT 1

The SRC agrees with VR’s decision to recruit for a second Field Service Manager position. This position provides leadership, coordination and direction of the vocational rehabilitation service delivery system through the administrative oversight of VR field offices and is a member of the VR Executive Team. The SRC requested and was invited to participate in the hiring process. The SRC considers this a positive indicator of the SRC/VR partnership.

VR RESPONSE

VR continues to be appreciative of the support that the SRC and their willingness to partner with the program. The Council’s active participation in the development of the State Plan and the Comprehensive Needs Assessment strengthens both of these activities.

INPUT 2

The SRC is encouraged to see communication such as the Motivational Interviewing and the Lean Management newsletters produced by field staff, as helpful information. MI (Motivational Interviewing) quarterly newsletter is available to staff and the public at

https://inside.dhsoha.state.or.us/dhs/vocational-rehabilitation/mi-a-met.html . This is a useful tool for helping counselors incorporate this technique into their practices. It is a venue to provide information, highlight best practices, and share successes. In the spirit of MI, a Contemplating Change Class is available for clients and is helpful in yielding positive outcomes.

The Lean newsletter is also produced quarterly and is available at https://inside.dhsoha.state.or.us/dhs/vocational-rehabilitation.htmlforms . This helps staff maintain awareness of continuous improvement opportunities and to track problems and solutions. Lean concept also incorporates an opportunity for all staff to provide a daily update in morning ”huddles”. This is an effective communication process that allows staff to share updates regarding attendance, current and pertinent events, client successes and anything relevant to the office.

VR RESPONSE

VR thanks the SRC for acknowledging these staff led efforts. We will continue to support these efforts and seek to identify other opportunities to share information about specific initiatives.

INPUT 3

An ongoing concern of the SRC is the lack of communication between VR Administration and field staff. The Council continues to hear from staff that they do not feel they are kept informed and that offices across the state receive different messages and reports from the monthly manager meetings. We recommend that all staff and the SRC receive the official meeting minutes from the branch manager meetings, which would include information such as; attendees, meeting topics, discussions, and decisions made. The SRC recommends that VR Administration send consistent and pertinent informational messages to all staff and the SRC on a regular basis.

VR RESPONSE

VR will move forward on these recommendations. The addition of a second field services manager who will maintain a regular visitation schedule with branch offices will increase communication with the field.

INPUT 4

The SRC continues to be very interested in the performance based Job Development process (development, placement, assessment and follow up) and results. The SRC feels it is important to have quality data to use to assist VR in making decisions related to performance based services. We are particularly interested in how this is working with people who are more difficult to place. How many are getting into an Individualized Employment Plan (IEP) and how long does it take to find a job developer to work with them? What is the timing between referrals to VR, meeting with a VR Counselor and actually getting Job Development Services? The SRC recommends that VR track this important data.

The SRC would like to receive the following information on a monthly basis: an update on the status of the job developer’s report card, comparison reports for expenditures, placements and regional results, so that the SRC can provide input into its’ content. This will assist us with analyzing results for consumers.

The SRC request that there be a common data collection matrix between VR, Developmental Disabilities Services, and the Department of Education in tracking transition age youth leaving school. We are interested in measuring improvements over the next few years to see if there are improvements in helping youth leave school with jobs. It has been a few years since the Employment First policy began and data needs to be collected to see if there is an increase in collaboration between agencies that serve these youth.

VR RESPONSE

VR will follow through with this request.

INPUT 5

The SRC continues to have concerns over the mandatory use of Motivational Interviewing. While it is a great tool for some consumers and helpful training for many counselors who may not have experience with this model, we believe it is not a good tool for all consumers and its use should not be utilized to create a screen for VR services. The SRC recommends that Motivational screening not be considered mandatory for all applicants.

VR RESPONSE

Motivational interviewing is not mandatory. Staff has been advised of this. It is a matter of their professional judgment whether or not to use the tool and consumer consent.

INPUT 6

We encourage VR to continue improvement on the ORCA case management system. Counselors report there are some functions in ORCA which are cumbersome and seem unnecessary, but we understand there is an ORCA work group who address such issues. Seems to be a work-in-progress. Since ORCA is part of the ALLIANCE system, which is multi-state computer program, we are aware that Oregon cannot change some functions without it impacting other states, but we support changes that would enhance counselor productivity.

VR RESPONSE

VR currently has a contract with Alliance to complete and deploy 20 enhancements to ORCA to make it more useable for staff. These enhancements are to be completed and the resulting changes deployed over the next year. Additionally, the Department of Human Services (DHS) is aware that the speed of its data lines (bandwidth) is at times insufficient resulting in delays for staff. DHS is actively addressing these issues.

INPUT 7

The SRC is interested in what VR will do if legislation does not come through with funding for the Work Incentive Networks (WIN). Currently only individuals who are in a VR plan can receive assistance with Benefit Planning, leaving out a large number of individuals that would benefit from this type of service. What steps will VR take to rectify this issue?

VR RESPONSE

VR has committed to supporting WIN through the 2013-15 biennium. VR will continue to work at the national and state level to secure continuing funding for benefits planning for VR and non-VR clients. Social Security Administration funding for the WIPA benefits planning programs (including the one operated by Disability Rights Oregon) has been extended for an additional year.

INPUT 8

Last year the SRC conducted site reviews of all VR offices, during which time staff expressed concern that their suggestions and requests for improvements were not being heard; since they continued to have the same issues.

The Council was encouraged to see that following the site reviews, VR administration developed a Continuous Improvement Chart that would track suggestions and implementation. Requests are monitored and a timeline established for resolving issues. The recent Lean Newsletter reports that 29 of the 53 Continuous Improvement items on their Statewide register have been completed.

VR RESPONSE

VR appreciates your acknowledgement of this effort.

SRC Comment:

Consumer Satisfaction Survey. The SRC plans to complete a consumer satisfaction survey over the coming year, after Vocational Rehabilitation and the SRC complete the 2013 Comprehensive Needs Assessment. Work on the Assessment was begun this past winter and it will be completed this September. The SRC, in consultation with VR, determined it would be confusing for participants if a consumer satisfaction survey and a needs assessment took place at the same time, so plans for completion of new consumer satisfaction survey were adjusted.

This screen was last updated on Jul 29 2013 11:02AM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

Waiver of Statewideness

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) requests a continuation of its waiver of statewideness for its Youth Transition Program. Through this program, transition age youth with disabilities are provided with enhanced activities and services that lead to employment or career-related post-secondary education or training.

Background

VR recognizes youth with disabilities as a priority service group. VR actively works in coordination with state and local education officials to assist students with disabilities, who are eligible or are applicants for VR services, in pursuit of their employment goals and to facilitate their transition from school to employment, higher education or vocational training. This occurs on regular and continuing basis as part of delivery of individualized vocational rehabilitation services to youth with disabilities.

In addition, VR assists youth with disabilities in pursuing their employment goals through YTP, an enhanced transition program that VR operates in partnership with school districts located throughout Oregon, the Department of Education and the University of Oregon. Every two years, VR solicits proposals and awards grants though cooperative agreements to school districts that wish to participate in YTP and are selected through a competitive process. The agreements provide districts with the funding needed for staffing and delivering YTP activities; and the districts providing matching funds to VR.

YTP has two distinct but interconnected goals. The first is to improve post school transition outcomes for youth with disabilities by preparing them for employment, post-secondary education or training, and independent living. The second is to increase capacity and foster positive systems change in schools and other agencies in assisting youth with disabilities in moving from school to work.

YTP’s enhanced transition activities, services and supports are initiated with youth while they are in high school and continue until one year after post-employment or until one year after youth exit YTP. (In order to participate in YTP, students must be applicants for VR services or have been determined eligible for VR). Services and activities are coordinated by a collaborative team comprised of a school transition specialist, a VR vocational rehabilitation counselor, and students and their families. “Core” YTP activities, services and supports have included:

• Individualized planning with a focus on post school goals and employment.

• Instruction on vocational, independent living and social skills.

• Career development activities.

• Exposure and connections to paid employment.

• Information and referral to VR and other sources of vocational assistance.

• Follow-up support for one year after leaving the program.

Over the Oregon 2013 – 2015 biennial budget cycle (July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2015), a new iteration of YTP will be delivered. It will be known as YTP 2.0. In addition to providing the

Core YTP activities, services and supports, school districts participating in YTP 2.0 will be responsible for:

• Utilizing “motivational interviewing” to assist students in understanding what motivates them and in making informed choices as they plan and engage in activities that are likely to affect their future employment and education. (Motivational interviewing is a collaborative, goal-oriented style of communication with particular attention to the language of change. It is designed to strengthen personal motivation for and commitment to a specific goal by eliciting and exploring the person’s own reasons for change within an atmosphere of acceptance and compassion.)

• Refining the processes that schools use to provide VR with information about students in order to determine their eligibility and assist VR in identifying and addressing students’ vocational goals and supports.

YTP 2.0 will be administered and overseen by VR’s YTP Coordinator. The University of Oregon, College of Education, under a separate agreement with VR, will operate a team that provides training and technical assistance to participating school staff and VR field staff. The Oregon Department of Education also provides support and advice through its Secondary Transition Specialist.

YTP 2.0 Cooperative Agreements for 2013 – 2015

Subject to approval of this waiver, 39 school and educational service districts (representing 85 school districts, consortia of districts, and educational service districts) have indicated their intent to enter into cooperative agreements with VR to operate local YTP 2.0s for the July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2015 period. (Hereafter, these cooperative agreements are referred to as the “YTP 2.0 Cooperative Agreements for 2013-2015”). In instances involving multiple districts, the districts involved will additionally be required to have agreements with each other in order to ensure that the YTP 2.0 program is appropriately and effectively carried out. A list of all districts that intend to participate in YTP 2.0 can be found at the bottom of this Attachment.

Under the terms of the 2013-2015 YTP 2.0 Cooperative Agreements, districts participating in YTP 2.0 will be responsible for providing the Core YTP and other activities, services and supports described above. Provision of these activities, services and supports will be subject to VR’s approval prior to implementation and any and all applicable requirements of VR’s State Plan. In addition, the 2013-2015 YTP 2.0 Cooperative Agreements will:

• Specify that participating districts are to provide matching funds equal to one-third (1/3) of the grant awarded by VR to a district for carrying out the agreement. Moreover, the match must be from a district’s cash funds; and, neither federal nor “in-kind” district resources, including donations or contributions of property or services, may be applied towards the match.

• Specify that districts may only use funds received under YTP 2.0 agreements to serve VR-eligible students and students who are applying VR services.

• Require that services provided pursuant to agreements will be provided in accord with the Order of Selection under which VR operates, as long as the Order remains in effect.

SCHOOL DISTRICTS, CONSORTIA AND EDUCATIONAL SERVICE DISTRICTS

THAT INTEND TO OPERATE YTP 2.0s IN 2013-2015

Greater Albany Public School District

718 7th Ave

Albany, OR 97321

Baker School District

Also representing: North Powder, Imbler, Union, Cove, and Elgin School Districts

2090 4th St.

Baker City, OR 97814

Bandon School District

455 9th St. SW

Bandon, OR \97411

Bethel School District

4640 Barger Drive

Eugene, OR 97402

Brookings Harbor School District

629 Easy St.

Brookings, OR 97415

Canby School District

1130 S Ivy Street

Canby, OR 97013

Central Linn School District

331 E. Blakely Ave.

Brownsville, OR 97327

Dallas School District

111 SW Ash St.

Dallas, OR 97338

Estacada School District

255 NE 6th

Estacada, OR 97023

Eugene School District

200 N. Monroe St.

Eugene, OR 97402

Gladstone School District

17789 Webster Rd.

Gladstone, OR 97027

Grant Union School District

401 N. Canyon City Blvd.

Canyon City, OR 97820

Harney School District

550 N. Court

Burns, Oregon 97720

Hillsboro School District

3083 NE 49th Place

Hillsboro, OR 97124

Hood River School District

1011 Eugene St.

Hood River, OR 97031

Jefferson School District

Also representing: Crook County School District and the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs

445 SE Bluff St

Madras, OR 97741

Lane Education Service District

Representing: Cottage Grove, Crow-Applegate-Lorane, Fern Ridge, Lowell, Marcola, McKenzie, Oakridge and Pleasant Hill School Districts.

1200 Highway 99 N.

Eugene, OR 97402

Linn Benton Lincoln Education Service District

Representing: Alsea, Harrisburg, Monroe, Santiam Canyon and Scio School Districts

905 SE 4th Ave,

Albany, OR 97321

Malheur Education Service District

Representing: Adrian, Harper, Huntington, Jordon Valley, Nyssa, Ontario and Vale School Districts

363 “A” Street West

Vale, OR 97918

North Clackamas School District

4444 SE Lake Rd

Milwaukie, OR 97222

North Wasco School District

3632 W 10th St,

The Dalles, OR 97058

Northwest Regional Education Service District

Representing: Astoria, Jewell, Knappa, Seaside and Warrenton-Hammond School Districts

3194 Marine Dr.

Astoria, OR 97103

Oregon City School District

14268 S Maple Ln Ct,

Oregon City, OR 97045

Philomath School District

535 S. 19th St.

Philomath, OR 97370

Rainier School District

28168 Old Rainier Rd.

Rainier, OR 97048

Reynolds School District

1204 NE 201st Ave

Fairview, OR 97024

Salem/Keizer School District

2450 Lancaster Dr NE 100,

Salem, OR 97305

Oregon Trail School District

36525 SE Industrial Way

P.O. Box 547

Sandy, OR 97055

Sherwood School District

23295 SW Main St,

Sherwood, OR

97140

South Coast Regional Education Service District

Representing: Coquille, Gold Beach, Marshfield, Myrtle Point, North Bend, and Pacific City School Districts

1350 Teakwood Avenue

Coos Bay, OR 97420

Southern Oregon Education Service District

Representing: Ashland, Armadillo Technical Institute, Butte Falls, Central Point, Eagle Point, Medford, Prospect and Rogue River School Districts

101 North Grape Street

Medford, OR 97501

Springfield School District

525 Mill Street

Springfield, OR 97477

St Helens School District

474 North 16th St.

St Helens, OR 97051

Tigard/Tualatin School District

6960 S.W. Sandburg St.

Tigard, OR 97223

Tillamook School District

Also Representing: Neah Kah Nie and Nestucca School Districts

2510 1st Street

Tillamook, OR 97141

Wallowa Education Service District

Representing: Enterprise, Joseph and Wallowa School Districts

107 S.W. First St.

Enterprise, OR 97828

West Linn/Wilsonville School District

22210 SW Stafford Rd

Tualatin, OR 97062 ?

Willamette Education Service District

Representing: Amity, Dayton, Sheridan, Willamina, and Yamhill Carlton School Districts

2611 Pringle Rd SE,

Salem, OR 97302

Footnote:Such third-party cooperative agreements are known as intergovernmental agreements in Oregon. The State of Oregon utilizes contractual terminology in a way that differs from RSA. As used throughout this Plan, the RSA term “cooperative agreement” can include a variety of terms that are used in Oregon Administrative Rules to describe arrangements that are substantively in conformance with RSA requirements, including the following arrangements. “Cooperative agreements”, as defined by Oregon rules, are used to memorialize roles and responsibilities agreed upon between two or more parties in carrying out a project or plan where there is no payment for services or goods. “Interagency agreements” are used to memorialize agreements solely between state officers, boards, commissions, departments, institutions, branches or agencies of the state. “Intergovernmental agreements” are used for agreements between an agency and a unit of local government (such as a school district), a United States governmental agency or an American Indian tribe or agency. “Contracts” are used in Oregon when there will be payment for specific services or goods upon delivery of distinct units of work (such as a contractor’s time, delivery of products and fee for services) or as reimbursement for expenditures tied to performance of work measured against benchmarks specified in the contract. Grants in Oregon provide funding to support or develop a program or activity. In Oregon, grants include expected outcomes or performance standards for the program, but disbursement of funds is not tied directly to delivery of distinct units of work.

This screen was last updated on Jul 31 2013 7:43PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

COOPERATION WITH AGENCIES THAT ARE NOT IN THE STATEWIDE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM AND OTHER ENTITIES

In addition to its partnerships with other members of Oregon’s workforce investment system, VR works in partnership and cooperation with other Department of Human Services (DHS) and Oregon Health Authority (OHA)programs , other state and local governmental agencies and programs, and numerous non-governmental organizations. Key among these are those outlined below.

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PARTNERS AND PROGRAMS

Oregon’s developmental disability system includes:

• Developmental Disability Services (DDS).( The Employed Persons with Disabilities Program, Oregon’s Medicaid ’buy-in’ program, is also a part of DHS/OHA.

• County operated and funded developmental disability and case management programs.

• Non-governmental developmental disability service brokerages and service providers.

• The Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities, which advises the governor and policymakers about serving persons with developmental disabilities.

VR continues to regularly interact with this system on case-by-case basis and administratively. VR field staff work closely with case managers, support brokerages and others in assisting clients with developmental disabilities in obtaining the developmental disability services and supports clients need to obtain, maintain and advance in employment. VR also works closely with Oregon’s developmental disabilities service system on a state-level:

• VR is represented on the Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities (OCDD).

• DDS is a partner in VR’s’ Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and represented on CEP’s Leadership Council. CEP is a VR-administered, Medicaid Infrastructure Grant initiative that since 2005 has addressed a number of systemic barriers to competitive employment of persons with disabilities. For more on CEP, see attachments 4.11.d, 4.11.e.2 and 6.3.

• VR/CEP is a member of the DDS work group responsible for implementing DDS’s Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN) strategic plan. VR/CEP underwrote DDS’s initial participation in SELN.

• CEP works with the Developmental Disabilities Task Force, an ad hoc group of advocates and service providers that promote supported employment for individuals with developmental disabilities on a systems level.

MENTAL HEALTH PARTNERS AND PROGRAMS

VR works closely with Oregon’s mental health system in serving and supporting persons with psychiatric disabilities, making and accepting referrals for services, and addressing systemic concerns and issues related to employment of persons with psychiatric disabilities. The system includes the OHA /Addictions and Mental Health Division (AMH) and public and private community based mental health programs. (In Oregon counties are primarily responsible for delivering publicly-funded mental health services). In addition to interacting with the mental health system on behalf of individual clients, VR is working with the system on a number of supported employment related initiatives. Since 2000, VR has collaborated with AMH and over a 20 communityy mental health programs in seeking to develop and sustain supported employment services for persons with psychiatric disabilities. VR/CEP efforts in this area have included:

• Pooling funding resources with AMH to provide interim funding for existing evidence-based supported employment programs.

• Contracting with community mental health programs to provide evidence-based supported employment services to VR clients.

• Providing mini-grants and contracts with Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funds to community mental health programs for the infrastructure, technical assistance and training needed to implement evidence-based supported employment. These efforts led to the development and continued operation of the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE), a statewide resource center that provides training and technical assistance on provision of evidence based supported employment to community mental health programs and VR staff. VR/CEP provided the initial funding for OSECE.

VR continues to work closely with AMH, OSECE and community mental health programs. As of 2013, community mental health programs in 20 communities were providing evidence-based supported employment services. AMH, public and private community-based mental health programs are represented on CEP’s leadership council. For more, see Attachments 4.11.d, 4.11.e.2 and 6.3.

SECONDARY AND HIGHER EDUCATION ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS

VR partners, collaborates and interacts with secondary and higher education agencies, organizations and programs. For more, see Attachment 4.8.b.2, 4.11.d and 4.11.e.2

STATE INDEPENDENT LIVING COUNCIL, INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTERS, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE ADVOCACY PROGRAMS

VR interacts with Oregon’s State Independent Living Council (SILC) and seven Centers for Independent Living (CILs) in a number of capacities and on both a systems and direct services level. For instance:

• The VR Administrator is an ex-officio member of the SILC, while SILC’s Director is a member of the Leadership Council of the VR/CEP, and a member of the SILC sits on the State Rehabilitation Council.

• The SILC coordinates development of the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) with VR and the Oregon Commission for the Blind. This entails conducting a needs assessment, developing goals/objectives for SPIL, approving the final plan and completing the annual federal report on SPIL progress. VR participates in annual statewide Independent Living program evaluation meetings and provides routine reports to the SILC on SPIL activities conducted by VR. In addition, VR and the SILC frequently collaborate and share information on relevant IL program issues.

• VR field offices and CILs routinely interact with one another in making and accepting referrals of individuals needing employment or independent living services and supports and collaborate on other activities, including organizing job fairs, work incentives/benefits planning events and other employment-related events for individuals with disabilities and their families.

In FFY 2010, VR established a half-time position to manage the grants to CILs and conduct annual reviews of CIL compliance with RSA performance requirements. Staff traveled to VR offices to promote independent living services, promoted revision of policies guiding payment for IL employment related services, allocated funds for services and training and enhanced reporting.

VR has a continuing and productive working relationship with Disability Rights Oregon (DRO), Oregon’s rights protection and advocacy system for persons with disabilities. DRO administers Oregon’s Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA) Program (formerly the Benefits Planning Assistance and Outreach Program). SSA funding for WIPA was suspended in June 2012 but recently SSA made the decision to resume funding of WIPA programs and DRO is planning to resume WIPA services shortly.

VR field and administrative staff interact regularly with CAP and other DRO staff in order to address and resolve client issues and concerns, and to respond to formal client disputes. VR staff routinely refer individuals in need of advocacy assistance to DRO, and VR’ administration and CAP staff meet regularly to address systemic concerns. DRO is an active member of CEP and is represented on CEP’s Leadership Council. DRO’s WIPA Program partnered with CEP in developing a plan for a comprehensive and sustainable benefits planning and work incentives system for Oregon, and the two programs collaborated in implementing of CEP’s Work Incentives Network (WIN). The network addresses many of the gaps and limitations on work incentives and benefits planning in Oregon but WIN’s services are limited to VR-eligible individuals.

VR has working relationships with numerous other public and voluntary advocacy organizations and groups, Family and Community Together, the Arc of Oregon, Easter Seals of Oregon, United Cerebral Palsy of Oregon, the People with Disabilities Advisory Committee and the Adult Services Advisory Committee.

SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION TICKET TO WORK

Over the past several years, VR has refined its capacity to identify and process Ticket/Cost Reimbursement claims under this Social Security Administration (SSA) program. VR has significantly increased its Ticket/Cost Reimbursement revenue. In FFY 2007, VR created and filled a Ticket coordinator position to coordinate the office’s Ticket-related functions and activities. The Department of Human Services (DHS), other DHS programs and VR continue to explore the possibility of DHS functioning as an ’employment network’ or ’EN’ under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. As presently conceptualized, such a ’Partnership Plus’ arrangement might consist of:

• An administrative unit responsible for submitting and tracking Ticket claims, collecting and disbursing Ticket payments, providing needed training and technical assistance, and promoting and monitoring Ticket utilization. In exchange for these and other Ticket administrative services, VR would serve as the administrative unit and assess and collect a small fee from participating EN satellites.

• An employment network council. This council would be comprised of representatives from DHS divisions, offices and programs and be responsible for identifying needed program changes; facilitating strategic and long-term planning; and identifying and developing needed policy and recommended legislation, including policy on use of Ticket revenue by participating organizations and programs.

• Satellite Employment Networks. EN satellites would be community-based organizations and programs eligible to serve as ENs and likely include community-based mental health, developmental disability service providers and other human service providers. Satellite ENs would be responsible for initiating and maintaining contact with Ticket holders, ensuring Tickets are available for assignment to DHS, submitting Ticket data needed for Ticket assignment and Ticket payment claims, and promoting employment of persons with disabilities.

• EN contract compliance and quality assurance/quality enhancement. These functions would be the responsibility of DHS divisions and offices and include executing the necessary contracts with the community-based organizations that serve as satellite EN’s.

In January 2010, VR and AMH started the DHS as an EN initiative with implementation of Ticket-related pilots with ten community mental health programs that provide evidence-based supported employment services. The agreements for the pilots were subsequently extended through June 2011. The agreements were converted into personal service contracts for the 2011-13 biennium for a total of twelve community mental health programs. VR continues to explore similar arrangements with DDS, and other parts of DHS/OHA in an effort to foster and support supported employment with the individuals assisted by these other programs and agencies.

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION DIVISION

The Workers’ Compensation Division (WCD) of the Department of Consumer and Business Services is the Oregon agency responsible for regulating the state’s workers’ compensation system and administering its Preferred Worker Program (PWP). Through WCD/PWP, the WCD provides benefits and incentives to employers and injured workers in order to facilitate re-employment of the workers. VR has an ongoing relationship with WCD. In July 2008, VR renewed a cooperative agreement it has with WCD to assist PWP cardholders in Clackamas, Columbia, Multnomah and Washington counties. Under VR’s PWP initiative, VR contacts WCD/PWP-eligible individuals and offers to fast-track them for vocational rehabilitation services and streamline their access to WCD/PWP benefits; while WCD provides funding to support the staffing and services associated with workers’/clients’ work-related injuries. Most recently the agreement between WCD and VR was expanded to encompass workers in Lance, Jackson and Josephine Counties; and plans are in place to further expand the program to Marion, Douglas and Deschutes Counties in 2013.

TRIBAL 121 PROGRAMS

Oregon currently has five 121 Tribal programs. VR partners with all of them to provide services for American Indians with disabilities residing on or near program reservations. In order to formalize our agreement for interagency referral, information sharing, sharing of resources, and provisions of joint planning, among other things, VR maintains cooperative agreements with all five 121 programs.

Currently, VR has agreements with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs, and the Confederated Tribes of the Grande Ronde Community of Oregon. In addition, updated agreements with the Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Indians of Oregon and the Klamath Tribes are under development.

RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

VR does not currently collaborate with Oregon programs carried out by the Undersecretary for Rural Development.

TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE, TRAINING AND CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS

VR collaborates with and utilizes the services of Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE) at the University of Washington, the designated Disability Business Technological Center (DBTAC) for Region 10. A significant staff training initiative is presently under development with TACE. VR also collaborates with the Oregon DBTAC representative housed at the Lane Independent Living Center in Eugene.

OREGON COMPETITIVE EMPLOYMENT PROJECT

In 2005, VR was awarded a four-year Medicaid Infrastructure Grant by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid to develop a more comprehensive, inclusive and integrated system of employment-related services and supports for Oregonians with disabilities. The resulting effort, known as the Competitive Employment Project (CEP), involves a multitude of partners on a numerous initiatives that have been carried out over the ensuing seven plus years. VR/CEP’s partners and supporters have included:

• Addictions and Mental Health Division/Oregon Health Authority

• Brain Injury Association of Oregon, Inc

• Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development

• Department of Transportation

• Developmental Disability Services/Oregon Department of Human Services

• Employment Department

• Family and Community Together

• Incight, Inc

• Mid-Valley Behavioral Care Network

• Disability Rights Oregon

• Oregon Commission for the Blind

• Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities

• Oregon State Independent Living Council

• People with Disabilities Advisory Council

• Social Security Administration

• Veterans Administration

• Worksystems, Inc.

A comprehensive strategic plan, A Blueprint for Change, was developed in the first year of the grant and set out CEP’s goals, objectives, strategies and outcomes. The Medicaid Infrastructure Grant has been extended several times, presently through a no-cost grant extension. But that extension ends on December 31, 2013 and no additional extensions are anticipated. For more on CEP’s strategies and activities, see Attachments 4.8.b.2, 4.11.d and 4.11.e.2.

COOPERATIVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS AND GROUPS

VR has working relationships with many other organizations, programs and groups, including those with which VR contracts, utilizing innovation, expansion and other funds to provide services to VR clients.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 4:20PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) recognizes youth as a priority service group. VR actively works in coordination with state and local education officials to assist eligible students in pursuit of their employment goals and to facilitate their transition from school to employment, higher education or vocational training. This occurs on regular and continuing basis as part of delivery of individualized vocational rehabilitation services to youth. It necessarily includes development and approval of individualized plans for employment as early as possible during the transition planning process, but at the latest by the time each student determined eligible for VR services leaves the school setting (or in the event VR is subject to an Order of Selection and a waitlist for services is being utilized, before each eligible student able to be served leaves the school setting).

In addition, VR works in coordination and collaboration with state and local education officials to assist youth in pursuing their employment goals through a number of enhanced VR programs and other processes, as outlined below.

Youth Transition Program

Since 1990, school districts located throughout Oregon, the Department of Education, the University of Oregon, College of Education and VR have partnered to develop, implement and evaluate the Youth Transition Program (YTP). During the 2011-13 biennial cycle, 39 Intergovernmental agreements were in place, serving 55 school districts, with 115 high schools operating local YTPs in conjunction with VR.

YTP’s enhanced transition activities, services and supports are initiated with youth while they are in high school and continue until one year after post-employment or until one year after youth exit YTP. Services and activities are coordinated by a collaborative team comprised of a school transition specialist, a VR vocational rehabilitation counselor, and youth and their families. “Core” YTP activities, services and supports presently include:

• Individualized planning with a focus on post school goals and employment.

• Instruction on vocational, independent living and social skills.

• Career development activities.

• Exposure and connections to paid employment.

• Information and referral to VR and other sources of vocational assistance.

• Follow-up support for one year after leaving the program.

YTP has two distinct but interconnected goals. The first is to improve post school transition outcomes for youth with disabilities by preparing them for employment, post-secondary education or training, and independent living. The second is to increase capacity and foster positive systems change in schools and other agencies for assisting youth with disabilities in moving from school to work.

Under YTP, VR is responsible for:

• Administering and coordinating YTP.

• Entering into YTP cooperative agreements (referred to as intergovernmental agreements in Oregon) with school districts that wish to participate in YTP and that are selected through a competitive process. The agreements provide districts with the funding needed for the staff that deliver a district’s YTP activities, services and supports.

• Working with school district staff at the VR field/school level to provide YTP activities and services, and providing needed technical assistance and support.

School districts participating in YTP are responsible for providing the activities, services and supports outlined below; meeting specified performance outcomes; and, providing VR with a one-third match in exchange for the VR funding provided through the cooperative agreements. School transition specialists are responsible for working with VR counselors to assist YTP students and their families with:

• Individualized career and transition planning, focused on post-school goals and self-determination, and help to coordinate plans with relevant adult agencies;

• Paid job training while in the program and assistance to secure employment or enter post-secondary education upon leaving the program; and

• Follow-up services after program completion to track progress and provide additional supports as needed.

Under a separate agreement that VR has with the University of Oregon, the university’s College of Education operates a Technical Assistance (T/A) Team that provides training, technical assistance and evaluative support to school district YTPs and VR field staff.

Students participating in YTP:

• Are enrolled in a school district’s high school or alternative program, although eligible youth who have left school prior to graduation may be included.

• Are or have been entitled to services under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), or are receiving disability-related accommodations under Section 504 of the federal Rehabilitation Act.

• Must be applicants or have been determined eligible for VR’s services.

Historically, YTP services have been initiated when a student is in the 11th or 12th grade. But in recent years, VR has encouraged participating schools to engage students at an earlier age and grade, in recognition of evidence indicating that the earlier youth are engaged the better the outcomes for them as adults; and, based on the lessons that VR has learned through Project ACCESS, another VR transition initiative. For more about Project ACCESS, see below.

YTP 2.0

In the 2013-15 cooperative agreement cycle, VR and our state level and local partners will develop and implement the next generation of the Youth Transition Program – YTP 2.0. In addition to delivering core YTP activities, services and supports, participating districts will be responsible for developing and implementing new and refined strategies and methods. At a minimum, these will include:

• Utilizing “Motivational Interviewing” to assist students in understanding what motivates them and in making informed choices as they plan and engage in activities that are likely to affect their future employment and education. (Motivational Interviewing is a collaborative, goal-oriented style of communication with particular attention to the language of change. It is designed to strengthen personal motivation for and commitment to a specific goal by eliciting and exploring the person’s own reasons for change within an atmosphere of acceptance and compassion.)

• Refining the processes that schools use to provide VR with information about students in order to determine their eligibility and assist VR in identifying and addressing students’ vocational goals and supports.

The University of Oregon YTP T/A Team will provide training and technical assistance to districts selected for YTP 2.0 grants throughout the two year cycle. This will include initial and focused training through “summer academies” (and possibly additional academies) for district and VR staff that will be responsible for implementing YTP 2.0.

In addition to these changes:

• VR will invite school districts that are awarded YTP 2.0 grants and are interested in further refining their YTP 2.0 programs to apply to become “YTP 2.0 ‘ACCESS’” sites. Utilizing the approach and curriculum developed for Project ACCESS, selected districts and VR field offices will work to increase VR’s presence in the school setting, in order to engage youth with disabilities in transition activities and planning at an earlier age and an earlier grade in their high school tenure. While VR does not anticipate providing additional funding to districts for participating in ACCESS, district transition staff will be provided with additional training and technical assistance. This likely will include participation in a summer academy on the ACCESS curriculum and methods.

• VR will explore how to increase participation of youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities and other youth with more significant disabilities in YTP 2.0 and YTP 2.0/ACCESS.

Plan Development

When a student is eligible to participate in YTP, he or she works with a school transition specialist and a vocational rehabilitation counselor to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that reflects the interests, strengths and abilities of the student, and which addresses the barriers to training or employment outcomes for the student. However, VR remains in an Order of Selection. At the present, VR is serving all eligible individuals and is not utilizing an Order of Selection waitlist. But should it be necessary for VR to reinstitute a waitlist, the scope of VR services and expected employment outcomes for all individuals served by VR, including YTP students, will be modified to comply with VR’s Order of Selection. For more on this, see “YTP and Order of Selection” below and Attachment 4.11.c.3, Order of Selection.

Recent YTP Outcomes

Over the course of FFY 2012, YTP provided services and supports to 1,355 students with disabilities. Of these students:

• 970 were in vocational rehabilitation application status and 677 had Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).

• 81% percent of those who exited YTP were either employed in a post-secondary educational or training program or a combination of the two.

• 191, or 55%, of the 347 who exited the program were employed upon exit and were working an average of 25 hours per week at an average wage of $9.00 an hour.

• 183, or 59%, of 308 youth continued to be employed twelve months after completing the program and were working an average of 28 hours a week at an average wage of $9.00 an hour.

• At 12 months, 88 of 308 youth were in post-secondary training or education at an average of 18 hours per week.

VR Transition Staff

VR has a full-time YTP/Transition Coordinator. This position has existed since September 2002 and is responsible for leading and coordinating YTP and more generally VR’s transition efforts, including serving as VR’s liaison to the Oregon Department of Education , the State Advisory Council on Special Education and its Transition Advisory Committee; the Oregon university system; and. the state’s secondary education system and schools on transition issues. The coordinator and other VR staff work closely with Oregon’s community colleges and foster care, youth and workforce programs on transition and related service coordination issues. On a related basis, the Department of Education has a secondary transition specialist and this position is a member of the State Rehabilitation Council, VR’s policy-making partner. The YTP Coordinator and Department of Education transition specialist and the University of Oregon YTP T/A Team together comprise cross-agency YTP administrative team.

In addition, VR and its YTP partners:

• Maintain a YTP website. The site (www.ytporegon.org) provides information on transition, YTP, special education and related services, research, training and links. The intended audience is school and VR personnel, youth and adults with disabilities, parents and other supporters of such individuals, and the public at large. The website is also used to transmit and report on YTP performance data.

• Jointly sponsor and organize two statewide transition conferences, provide training on a regional basis throughout Oregon about transition, IDEA, modified diploma standards, and the VR process.

• Serve as liaison to the Oregon Association of Vocational and Special Needs Personnel’s Board of Directors; and U of O and ODE representatives serve on the State Rehabilitation Council, VR’s policy making partner.

• Survey staff participants on YTP. School district sites and VR field offices responsible for carrying out YTP are periodically surveyed about their experiences and whether the program is meeting their expectations. The results are reviewed by the YTP Coordinator, YTP Technical Assistance Team and VR management and are useful in determining how YTP might be refined or adjusted. Past results have shown that YTP is considered a value added service.

YTP 2.0 and Order of Selection

VR continues to operate under an Order of Selection (effective January 15, 2009). Presently, VR is able to serve all individuals eligible for its services and there is no waitlist for services. But should VR have to resume use of an Order prioritized waitlist, YTP 2.0 will be comprised of the following activities:

• All YTP 2.0 students who have authorized IPEs at the time a waitlist is imposed may and should continue to be served in accordance with their plans. This group of students will include those determined eligible under prior YTP grants and who have authorized IPEs; and those who have IPEs and have exited YTP. Those exiting YTP will be eligible for post YTP-engagement monitoring services.

• All other students will be served in accordance with the waitslist as follows:

• Students may apply for VR services. Students determined eligible for VR services will be placed on the waitlist and assigned a priority level based on severity of disability, according to the priority levels set forth in OAR 582-100-0040. Students participating in YTP 2.0 are to be provided with services consistent with their position on the waitlist.

• While on the waitlist, students are to be provided with Information & Referral (I&R) services, including information about other state, federal, and local vocational and related programs. District Transition Specialists are responsible for providing these I&R services, although I&R activities may be carried out with the assistance of a VR Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor.

• Students released from the Order of Selection waitlist will be eligible to receive Individualized Plan for Employment development services and will subsequently enter into an Individualized Plan for Employment (as soon as possible thereafter but at the latest before they leave the school setting). VR Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and District Transition Specialists will coordinate plan development, implementation and monitoring of YTP 2.0 students.

Project ACCESS

Since 2007, VR has been partnering with five high schools in Lane County and the University of Oregon to develop and implement Project Accelerated Career Counseling and Employment Support Services (ACCESS). Through this U.S. Department of Education, grant-funded pilot, transition services are being provided to students, starting in the ninth grade. The pilot brings vocational rehabilitation counselors into the participating high schools where special education teachers and they jointly plan, engage and deliver transition services to students. Project ACCESS is built around a curriculum developed by the teachers, school administrators and VR staff participating in the project. The objective is to assist youth in achieving better employment and post-secondary education outcomes. ACCESS was prompted by research that indicated the earlier that youth are engaged in a meaningful transition program the better the outcomes they experience as adults.

The Department of Education grant that has underwritten Project ACCESS ends on September 30, 2013. It is not anticipated that the project will be continued thereafter. But as noted above, VR is endeavoring to incorporate the lessons learned from the project into its continuing transition initiatives and services.

Project ACCESS has a half-time coordinator. The position’s responsibilities are similar to that of YTP Coordinator in relation to YTP. As this position is grant-funded, it is not likely to exist beyond September 30, 2013.

Agreement with State Educational Agency

The Oregon Department of Education and VR have negotiated a new interagency agreement which is awaiting signature. It builds on a recently completed memorandum of understanding (MOU) between the Department of Education, Developmental Disability Services, Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities and VR. The MOU commits the partners to jointly assisting youth with intellectual and other developmental disabilities (I/DD) in transitioning from school into integrated, community employment or a post-secondary education. The MOU establishes a state-level Transition Agency Coordinating Team (TACT) to coordinate implementation of the agreement’s provisions and facilitate review of state policies and procedures to see where improvements can be made to strengthen and align roles, practices and funding mechanisms. TACT will also address training and communication activities needed to advance the overall goal of successful transition.

The MOU can be found at: http://www.dhs.state.or.us/dd/supp_emp/docs/mou.pdf

Other Transition Coordination Activities with Education Officials

Other noteworthy transition coordination activities are described below.

VR and the Oregon Commission for the Blind (OCB) established a formal statewide cooperative agreement with all 17 of Oregon’s community colleges in 2005. The original agreement ran from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2009, but it was subsequently extended to continue through June 30, 2014. The agreement promotes collaboration and linkages through regional teams comprised of community college, OCB and VR representatives. This framework provides an ongoing forum for the exchange of information about issues of common concern, policy issues and process improvements to further the goals of the agreement.

The goals of the cooperative agreement include a commitment to:

• Work together to assure that qualified and eligible students with disabilities have full access to educational opportunities.

• Understand, acknowledge, and respect the differing requirements and definitions among the partners for such terms as eligibility, documentation of disability, confidentiality (including protected documents within each of our systems), provision of services, and accommodations based on the differing missions of the partners.

In 2005, VR and OCB negotiated a cooperative agreement with the Oregon University System (OUS), similar in purpose and scope to the VR agreement with the 17 community colleges. That agreement ran from July 1, 2005 runs through June 30, 2009, but it also was subsequently extended to run through June 30, 2014. Under the terms of the agreement:

• There is a systems cooperative workgroup that is responsible for facilitating implementation of the agreement, evaluating its effectiveness, recommending needed policy change and facilitating provision of related training.

• Each university disability services office and OCB and VR field office has a designated liaison responsible for participating in regional meetings with the community college(s) in their area and exchanging information, fostering collaboration and addressing unique needs and issues.

• VR, OCB and OUS are jointly responsible for:

o Ensuring access to reasonable accommodations for OCB and VR clients enrolled in OUS institutions.

o Providing opportunities for counselors and institutional disability services representatives to interact and be informed about administrative and accommodative functions and issues.

In order to carry out VR’s responsibilities under the cooperative agreements with the community college system and OUS, a designated VR staff person serves as the state level liaison to these systems and organizes regional team meetings; documents regional and local needs and concerns, including those related to training; and presents information to the state-level workgroups.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 4:22PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH PRIVATE NON-PROFIT VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICE PROVIDERS

VR, in engaging in innovation and expansion activities, enters into cooperative agreements with non-profit organizations to provide a service or set of services to a specific group or groups of individuals. VR does this in two ways. To address the diversity of needs that local branches encounter in providing high quality services to consumers, VR branch managers have the ability to develop agreements at the local level. In addition, central office staff develop cooperative agreements to address identified needs and gaps. In recommending and selecting proposals, the following criteria are utilized:

• Addresses gaps in services identified by VR’s comprehensive needs assessment;

• Number and quality of competitive job placements;

• Wages earned by consumers;

• Number of small business/self-employment outcomes;

• Number of partnerships with state and local workforce investment boards, and private sector employers;

• Program capacity for people with disabilities through partnerships with employers, schools and community agencies;

• Number of employment partnerships with tribal entities, African-American, Hispanic and Asian populations;

• Diversity of people served, staff, and service providers.

• Quality of customer service; and

• Use of technological tools that enhance performance.

In February 2009, VR revised the Oregon Administrative Rules governing the selection of vendors. VR contracts with non-profit and for-profit vendors in order to ensure the availability of a full spectrum of vocational rehabilitation and related services tailored to the specific needs identified in clients’ IPEs, or necessitated by the client’s participation in a vocational rehabilitation program. These individually contracted-for services are arranged on a fee-for-service or performance-based/milestone payment contract basis. The new rule provides for performance standards and qualifications applicable to the specific service in question, rather than attempting to standardize the vendorization process across types and disciplines of vendors. Under the new rule and related procedures, approved vendors must first respond to the applicable Request for Qualified Applicants (RFQA) or otherwise demonstrate that they meet the standards VR establishes for the service in question before they will qualify for placement on the statewide approved vendor list. Standards for tutors and vehicle modification providers are under development. Standards governing selection of job development and related services and child care have been established. The new vendor selection rules also provide for a greater amount of flexibility so that clients in rural parts of the state, or where vendor resources are scarce, may still find qualified providers because the new rules make clear that variables such as client choice, cultural competency, vendor past performance, and accessibility/availability are additional criteria that will drive the selection process.

VR maintains a statewide list of vendors in the ORCA system that have been through the approval process. This process involves coordination between VR administrative staff, local field offices, and DHS’ contracts unit. Field staff may locate a client’s chosen provider on this list, and if the provider is not yet on the list, the provider is given information about the approval process. In order to qualify for payment, a vendor must be on the approved list, and the services must be pre-authorized through an Authorization for Purchase that describes the service to be provided, the relationship between the service and the individual’s employment goals, and the duration/frequency of the service. The vendor may also be subject to additional performance requirements or specific payment standards that are set forth in a separate contract. For example, for job placement services, VR has moved to a system of milestone payments that are outlined n a specific performance contract. These vendor selection criteria and contracting rules and procedures apply to both for-profit and non profit vendors working with VR. Contracts for this specific example where put in place July 1, 2012.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 4:22PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

VR continues to partner and collaborate with numerous organizations and programs in providing, refining and expanding the availability of supported employment services, including:

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PARTNERS AND PROGRAMS

Oregon’s developmental disability system includes:

• Developmental Disability Services (DDS).( The Employed Persons with Disabilities Program, Oregon’s Medicaid ’buy-in’ program, is also a part of DHS/OHA.

• County operated and funded developmental disability and case management programs.

• Non-governmental developmental disability service brokerages and service providers.

• The Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities, which advises the governor and policymakers about serving persons with developmental disabilities.

VR continues to regularly interact with this system on case-by-case basis and administratively. VR field staff work closely with case managers, support brokerages and others in assisting clients with developmental disabilities in obtaining the developmental disability services and supports clients need to obtain, maintain and advance in employment. VR also works closely with Oregon’s developmental disabilities service system on a state-level:

• VR is represented on the Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities (OCDD).

• DDS is a partner in VR’s’ Competitive Employment Project (CEP) and represented on CEP’s Leadership Council. CEP is a VR-administered, Medicaid Infrastructure Grant initiative that since 2005 has addressed a number of systemic barriers to competitive employment of persons with disabilities. For more on CEP, see attachments 4.11.d, 4.11.e.2 and 6.3.

• VR/CEP is a member of the DDS work group responsible for implementing DDS’s Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN) strategic plan. VR/CEP underwrote DDS’s initial participation in SELN.

• CEP works with the Developmental Disabilities Task Force, an ad hoc group of advocates and service providers that promote supported employment for individuals with developmental disabilities on a systems level.

MENTAL HEALTH PARTNERS AND PROGRAMS

VR works closely with Oregon’s mental health system in serving and supporting persons with psychiatric disabilities, making and accepting referrals for services, and addressing systemic concerns and issues related to employment of persons with psychiatric disabilities. The system includes the OHA /Addictions and Mental Health Division (AMH) and public and private community based mental health programs. (In Oregon counties are primarily responsible for delivering publicly-funded mental health services). In addition to interacting with the mental health system on behalf of individual clients, VR is working with the system on a number of supported employment related initiatives. Since 2000, VR has collaborated with AMH and over a 20 community mental health programs in seeking to develop and sustain supported employment services for persons with psychiatric disabilities. VR/CEP efforts in this area have included:

• Pooling funding resources with AMH to provide interim funding for existing evidence-based supported employment programs.

• Contracting with community mental health programs to provide evidence-based supported employment services to VR clients.

• Providing mini-grants and contracts with Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funds to community mental health programs for the infrastructure, technical assistance and training needed to implement evidence-based supported employment. These efforts led to the development and continued operation of the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE), a statewide resource center that provides training and technical assistance on provision of evidence based supported employment to community mental health programs and VR staff. VR/CEP provided the initial funding for OSECE.

VR continues to work closely with AMH, OSECE and community mental health programs. As of 2013, community mental health programs in 20 communities were providing evidence-based supported employment services. AMH, public and private community-based mental health programs are represented on CEP’s leadership council.

Addition information on Supported Employment can be found in attachment 6.3, which is copied below:

OVERVIEW

Supported employment (SE) is a major VR initiative. VR’s SE program provides opportunities for individuals with the most significant disabilities to achieve competitive employment in integrated settings with ongoing support provided by a variety of partners. These same individuals are those for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred. VR provides a continuum of SE services in partnership with other human services agencies and programs that persons with the most significant disabilities need to develop, maintain and advance in competitive employment. VR continues to work closely with other divisions and offices within the Department of Human Services, local governmental units, community-based organizations and groups to develop, refine and expand the availability of SE services throughout Oregon.

The coming year presents VR with a number of opportunities to expand the number of supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers. VR has long partnered with Addictions and Mental Health (AMH) in providing supported employment to adults. (AMH is the state program responsible for overseeing Oregon’s public mental health system.) Oregon’s early implementation of the Affordable Care Act has resulted in the inclusion of Individual Placement and Support (IPS), an evidenced based supported employment model, in the state’s recently established Coordinated Care Organizations (CCOs). (These organizations are responsible for overseeing and coordination delivery of health services provided as a part of the Oregon Health Plan.) The incorporation of IPS creates both an opportunity and a challenge for VR as it works on developing relationships with the 18 CCOs. In addition, VR continues to work with Mid-Valley Behavioral Health to build an employment service delivery model for youth enrolled in the Early Assessment, Screening and Treatment project, a evidence-based practice model for treating youth experiencing their first psychotic or depressive episode. For more on VR’s mental health supported employment activities, see below.

Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), the state agency that oversees and supports Oregon’s public system of services to individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, adopted an Employment First policy in 2008. Under this policy, first consideration is given to employment in developing services and supports for working age individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities. VR has been a critical partner in implementing this policy. Some of the outcomes of implementing Employment First have included identification of the need for more service providers with the skills to serve individuals with intellectual/ developmental disabilities who experienced more significant functional limitations; the need to align and streamline the transition process; the need to identify and implement best practices; the need for sustainable funding for benefits planning services; and the need for effective engagement strategies for youth and their families. In FFY 2013, DDS, the Oregon Department of Education and VR developed an MOU and work plan for carrying out activities in support of the Employment First policy. For more on the policy, see below.

In January 2012, Disability Rights Oregon (DRO), the state’s protection and advocacy system, filed suit in United States District Court alleging that the State is violating the ADA rights of a group of individuals working in sheltered workshops by not providing them with access to supported employment services. This suit followed an earlier finding by the Court that Olmstead decision extended to employment. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Justice joined the lawsuit against the State. On April 10, 2013, Governor John Kitzhaber issued an Executive Order 13-04, consistent with DDS’ Employment First policy. The Order calls for the following:

“Improving Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and state…the Department of Human Services and Oregon Department of Education shall work to further improve Oregon’s system of designing and delivering employment services to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and increase investment in employment services.”

The complete Executive Order can be read at: http://www.oregon.gov/gov/docs/executive_orders/eo_13-04.pdf

QUALITY OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

In general, the quality of a VR SE plan is evaluated to ensure that it complies with defining criteria of SE:

• Work is performed in an integrated setting that provides regular interactions with individuals who do not have disabilities, other than caregivers.

• The individual is receiving a wage commensurate with non-disabled workers doing the same work.

• The ongoing support needs and sources of support have been identified and secured.

• Supported employment services provided to clients are for the maximum number of hours possible, based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

• Clients and employer are satisfied with placements.

Historically, VR has aligned with AMH in promoting Individualized Placement and Support (IPS), an evidence-based SE model. Quality of these programs is assessed through compliance with a scale, which e measures the ’fidelity’ or the degree to which a program is being implemented in accordance with the program’s design. Some of the measures used in the IPS fidelity scales are the kinds of employment outcomes participants are obtaining; the degree of collaboration with vocational rehabilitation; availability of rapid job search and evidence of consumer choice. VR maintains quality SE outcomes through ongoing collaboration with mental health providers on the local level and AMH central office staff.

SCOPE OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES (AND EVIDENCE OF COLLABORATION)

In FFY 2012, VR provided SE services to 1,140 individuals with significant disabilities, including persons with psychiatric disabilities, intellectual and/or developmental disabilities or traumatic brain injuries. During this same period, 228 individuals who received SE services entered into competitive employment, and 360 individuals continued to participate in their SE IPEs.

Supported Employment for Persons with Psychiatric Disabilities

VR continues to work to make evidence-based mental health SE services available throughout Oregon.

Background

VR’s efforts in this area were initiated nearly thirteen years ago, when its field offices in the Portland metropolitan area and Grants Pass in southern Oregon began collaborating with AMH, local mental health programs and Portland State University to provide evidence-based SE services (IPS) to individuals with psychiatric disabilities served by VR.

In 2002, VR and AMH sought to expand the availability of evidence-based mental health SE services and initiated a project in Jackson, Douglas and Polk counties with Options of Southern Oregon, a community-based mental health provider. This project was aided by a three year grant from Dartmouth College/Johnson & Johnson Community Mental Health Project to implement IPS.

Although the Johnson & Johnson grant funding ended in 2005, VR and AMH continued to support the efforts of Options and Life Works. This same year began the Oregon Competitive Employment Project (CEP), funded by a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG). CEP subsequently identified expansion of SE services as one of its primary objectives (for more on CEP, see Attachment 4.11.e.2).

Recent to Current Activities

In 2006, VR, CEP and AMH continued their efforts to stimulate and perpetuate SE services though provision of MIG mini-grants to local mental health programs in seven counties. CEP also funded Options of Southern Oregon and Lifeworks Northwest to provide training and technical assistance on SE to local mental health providers. At the same time, VR, CEP and AMH continued to seek long-term funding for SE services.

In 2007 and 2008, VR and AMH continued to provide evidence-based SE services to persons with significant psychiatric disabilities through VR field offices and community-based mental health programs. In addition, VR, CEP and AMH continued their initiatives to expand and sustain SE services:

• Options for Southern Oregon and Lifeworks Northwest of metro Portland were provided with innovation and expansion funding to provide job placement and support services to VR clients living in their catchments.

• Additional CEP mini-grants were provided to local mental health programs.

• A leadership, technical assistance and training center on evidence-based SE mental supported employment - the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE), was established in December 2007. OSECE has since provided training and TA to over 40 job developers with 21 county mental health programs, utilizing the Dartmouth College/Johnson & Johnson evidence-based model.

In FFY 2010, VR counseling staff continued to provide supported employment services to individuals with psychiatric disabilities, in partnership with Oregon’s community mental health programs. A primary VR focus continues to be on expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR and CEP continued to support, partner with and utilize OSECE in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of September 2012, community mental health programs in 21 counties were providing such services. With the inclusion of IPS into Oregon’s Coordinating Care Organizations, VR looks forward to evidence-based supported employment services being available throughout Oregon in the foreseeable future.

VR continues to support and collaborate with the Project Early Assessment Screening and Treatment (Project EAST) in assisting young people with psychiatric disabilities by assisting them in obtaining or maintaining employment (an evidence-based practice, which is effective in reducing the onset and symptoms of mental illness). VR continues to provide Enhancing Employment Outcomes training to allied mental health providers. Through CEP, VR has begun to explore the benefits of peer support for individuals with psychiatric disabilities in the workplace.

Supported Employment for Persons with Developmental Disabilities

VR partners with the Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS) and others, including support services brokerages (DD brokerages), county case managers, rehabilitation service providers and advocates in providing SE services to persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities.

In 2003, VR and DDS began serving and supporting persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities affected by the Staley settlement. The agreement, prompted by a federal lawsuit, requires the state to provide qualified persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities with access to community services, including SE.

From 2004 to 2006, VR and DDS funded and developed local SE teams, comprised of DD brokerage and VR field staff. These teams meet and exchange information, solve problems and coordinate local activities, with the intent of increasing provision of SE services to persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities. In implementing this initiative, VR and DDS:

• Provided planning materials, training and ongoing technical assistance to the local teams.

• Developed, disseminated and utilized a ’Supported Employment Toolkit with Guidelines for VR Field and Support Services Brokerage Staff’ (Toolkit). The toolkit was updated in FFY 2007.

• Surveyed DD brokerages and VR branch offices in order to assist the teams in promoting quality services for DD brokerage/VR clients.

More recently, VR and DDS have sought to expand the availability of SE services to persons with developmental disabilities through staff participation with related groups, including:

• The Developmental Disabilities Supported Employment Task Force, which is comprised of advocates, community stakeholders and services providers and advises SPD, CEP and VR on SE issues.

• The SPD Employment Group, which is working to restructure rates for SE services provided under Oregon’s home and community-based services Medicaid waiver.

• Oregon Rehabilitation Association’s (ORA) Customized Employment Network (ORA represents Oregon’s rehabilitation service providers).

A significant and important development in this area in recent years has been DDS’s development, adoption and implementation of its Employment First policy. The Employment First policy was the result of a multi-year effort involving:

• The leadership and commitment of DDS

• The efforts of disability advocates, most notably Oregon’s Council on Development Disabilities, and

• The support and collaboration of VR and CEP, which were instrumental in bringing the issue to the table at the outset of VR’s receipt of the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant in 2005; and which underwrote DDS’ initial participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN), a state and national effort to renew and expand state SE services to persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and participated in development of the policy.

Since FFY 2010, VR and CEP continued to support and collaborate with DDS in implementing its Employment First policy. VR management participated in planning implementation of the policy and a subsequent two-day statewide summit and regional day-long forums to kick-off the policy. CEP helped underwrite these events, as well as DDS’ use of consultants from Washington Initiative for Supported Employment (WISE).

DDS, OCDD, and VR have worked with the Department of Education to develop an MOU and charter for serving youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities as they transition from high school to employment or higher education. Going forward, the MOUs and charters will be implemented, data gathered and tracked to monitor the progress made.

Supported Employment for Persons with Traumatic Brain Injuries

VR continues to provide SE services to persons with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Using the Center for Disease Control estimates, the Brain Injury Association of Oregon (BIAOR) calculates that there are over 72,000 individuals in Oregon living with a brain injury; that each year over 17,000 individuals in the state will sustain a brain injury; and that over 8,500 of these individuals will sustain a short-term disability or more.

In 2009, VR/CEP and BIAOR continued to work to establish a registry for accurately determining the number of individuals in Oregon who acquire or sustain a TBI, and develop a statewide SE service model for individuals with TBI and identify funding for these services. Legislation creating the registry has since been passed and the registry is being developed by the Division of Public Health.

VR continues to work with BIAOR to expand the availability of SE services to individual with TBI and related capacities and has supported or participated in BIAOR’s annual conferences in recent years.

Other Supported Employment Developments and Activities

VR continues to carry out other significant activities related to supported employment.

• CEP continued to operate and refined its statewide Work Incentives Network (WIN) and continued its efforts to sustain WIN on a long-term basis by obtaining continuing funding. WIN provides information, referral and planning services to persons with disabilities on the use of federal and state benefits and work incentives in order to assist them in achieving their employment goals. Work incentives/benefits planning is an important element for many individuals who are utilizing or intend to utilize supported employment and data on benefits planning programs, including WIN, indicates that benefits planning is useful in facilitating employment.

While the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant that has helped fund WIN (and has funded CEP) ends on December 31, 2013, VR is continuing to support WIN and seek state and other funding for WIN. (For more, see Attachment 4.11.e.2.)

• In FFY 2007, VR refined its capacity to identify and process Ticket Cost Reimbursement claims through the creation and filling of a Ticket coordinator position, and as a result significantly increased its Ticket Cost Reimbursement revenue.

• In 2010, VR and AMH initiated implementation of the DHS as an EN initiative, with initiation of 12 Ticket-related pilots with community mental health programs that provide evidence-based supported employment services. The agreements for the pilots were subsequently extended. VR anticipates continuing them. VR is exploring similar arrangements with DDS and developmental disability ‘brokerages’ in order to increase provision of supported employment services to individuals assisted by the brokerages.

• Under the EN initiative, VR serves as a Ticket administrative unit and submits and tracks Tickets and collects and disburses Ticket reimbursements; while TTW qualified local programs, such as the community mental health centers, initiate and maintain contact with clients who are Ticket holders, ensure Tickets are assigned to DHS/VR, submit Ticket reimbursement claims, and promote supported employment of persons with disabilities with some or all of their TTW proceeds.

For more on VR’s Ticket activities, see Attachments 4.8.b.1, and 4.11.d.2.

EXTENT OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

Supported employment is integrated into the array of services and programs available to Oregonians with disabilities, including Oregon’s mental health and developmental disability service systems. Success in SE requires a partnership among the responsible state and community programs, other service providers, consumers and families, advocacy organizations, employers and others. Long-term success continues to depend on the availability of funding for follow-along SE services.

VR utilizes Title VI, Part B and Title I funds for the time-limited services necessary for an individual to stabilize in a community-based job. Services that may be part of a SE IPE include:

• Person centered planning

• Community-based assessment

• Job development

• Job placement

• On-site training for worker and/or co workers

• Long-term support development

• Other services and goods

• Post employment services

The specific type, level and location of ongoing supports provided to an individual are based upon his or her needs and those of the employer. Ongoing support may be provided by a variety of public and/or private sector resources including:

• AMH and community mental health programs

• DDS community supports

• County developmental disability case managers and developmental disability service brokerages

• Social Security work incentives

• Employer-provided reasonable accommodations

• Natural supports

• Family or community sponsorship

TIMING OF THE TRANSITION TO EXTENDED SERVICES

Generally, VR will not exceed its 18-month in-plan status with an SE case. This 18-month time-line can be extended for exceptional circumstances, if the counselor and client jointly agree to the extension. Job coaching and/or on the job training supports are usually structured into a much shorter time-frame, with long-term extended services being built into the plan as quickly as possible to ensure ongoing success when VR involvement ends.

This screen was last updated on Jul 15 2013 2:50PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

VR is a program of the Department of Human Services (DHS). VR is the designated state unit within DHS. Human resources or personnel functions are a part of DHS’ consolidated Administrative Services Unit.

During this annual update period, DHS and VR, like other units of state government with significant number of retirements, continue to face changes and challenges that impact VR’s Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD). The current status of this system and related future plans follows.

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

The Oregon legislature has the sole authority to establish the type and number of state government positions, including VR positions. The chart below indicates the type and number of positions allocated by the legislature for the state 2011-13 biennium (7/1/11-6/30/13) and type and number of vacancies and projected vacancies over the next five years.

In the pool of 124 vocational rehabilitation counselor (VRC) positions, VR has fourteen VRC specialist positions. The staff in these specialist positions provide training, technical assistance and caseload support to other field staff on a given area of focus, in addition to carrying a general caseload. The areas of focus include: autism, deaf and hard of hearing services, developmental disabilities, mental health, motivational intervention, spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injury and workers’ compensation.

All VR field staff are provided with the supervision necessary to ensure that the position is providing the level of direct services or support services deemed necessary. Twenty hours of in-service training per VR employee per year has been established as a staff development performance benchmark. The in-service training grant provides VR with the resources to assist staff in achieving that benchmark. Managers meet annually with staff to address professional development needs for the upcoming year.

In FFY 2012, VR served 15,214 Oregonians with disabilities; in FFY 2011, VR served 15,407 Oregonians with disabilities. In FFY 2012, the ratio of VRCs to clients served was 1 to 123; in FFY 2010, the ratio was 1 to 130.

The present and projected staffing level and configuration meet currently identified needs.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor 124 5 43
2 Human Service Assistants/Office Assistants 66 9 26
3 Field Services Managers 14 1 5
4 0 0 0
5 0 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

Oregon has two institutions of higher education with graduate programs in Rehabilitation Counseling, Western Oregon University (WOU) and Portland State University (PSU).

Western Oregon University has two Rehabilitation Counseling degree options:

• The Rehabilitation Counselor for the Deaf (RCD), which was established in 1974 and is one of three deafness specialty programs in the United States. Students in this program plan to seek employment as counselors or consultants for culturally Deaf people, recently deafened individuals and persons who are hard-of-hearing. The RCD option is available to up to ten new students a year.

• The Rehabilitation Counselor (RC), which was authorized by the Oregon University system in 1991. Graduates of this option provide counseling and consultative services to the general population of persons who have disabilities. Entering students must be able to document two to three years of work experience and/or volunteer experiences with persons who have disabilities. The RC option is available up to ten new students a year.

Portland State University (PSU) offers a Master of Science in Rehabilitation Counseling, which consists of 77 credit hours. PSU’s Department of Counselor Education provides students with a balanced program of academic coursework and supervised clinical field experience in rehabilitation settings. Students specializing in rehabilitation counseling are provided with both the theoretical background and the practical skills that will enable them to function as rehabilitation counselors in a variety of settings. Students complete the course work in two and a half to three years of full-time enrollment. PSU accepts up to 13 new students a year.

Two other university rehabilitation programs exist in the northwest region.

Washington has one institution of higher education that offers graduate education in rehabilitation counseling, Western Washington University (WWU). The program consists of a combination of face-to-face and distance classes and takes two years to complete. For individuals who already have a master’s in counseling, WWU offers a Certificate in Rehabilitation Services, which allows a student to take the additional coursework needed to be able to apply for the CRC credentialing process.

Idaho also has a related graduate program. The University of Idaho, Counseling Program offers a program of study leading to either a Master of Education or a Master of Science in Counseling and Human Services, with an emphasis in Rehabilitation Counseling. The Rehabilitation Counseling emphasis is a blend of academic and field-based course work with an emphasis on supervised practicum and internship experiences in a variety of human service agencies.

In FFY 2012, eight VR VRCs earned Master’s degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling or related fields:

• Five in Rehabilitation Counseling: 3 from Western Oregon University, 1 from Assumption College, and 1 from Portland State University

• One in Rehabilitation Counseling for the Deaf from Western Oregon University

• Two in Social Work from Portland State University

Also in FFY 2012, 4 VR VRCs were hired:

• Two with a Master’s in Rehabilitation Counseling from Western Oregon University

• One VRC with a related Master’s degrees: Family Studies & Human Development from Pacific Oaks College,

• One VRC with a Bachelor’s degrees in a related field: American Sign Language from Western Oregon University

As of April 1, 2013, of VR’s 120 VRCs:

• Ninety have a Master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling or a related field;

• Twenty have Bachelor’s degrees in rehabilitation counseling or a related field;

• Ten have yet to complete an advanced degree in rehabilitation counseling or a related field; and

• Forty-five have current CRC status.

VR will continue to:

• Work with Portland State University, Western Oregon University, Western Washington University and other education programs that provide opportunities for staff to meet our CSPD requirements.

• Assist staff in obtaining CRC certification by paying for the registration fees for taking CRC exam preparation workshops.

• Utilize distance learning Rehabilitation Counseling Programs, such as University of West Virginia’s to assist VRCs without Master’s degrees in obtaining Master’s degrees in rehabilitation counseling.

• Encourage and assist VRCs who lack their undergraduate degrees to obtain those degrees and further advance.

For related information, see "Personnel Standards" below.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Western Oregon University 22 0 8 12
2 Portland State University 37 0 5 12
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

VR continues its commitment to increase the diversity of its workforce in conjunction with DHS’ long-term plan to ensure that diversity goals are identified, supported, and achieved. VR continued to actively participate and is continuing to participate in DHS’ Diversity Development Coordinating Council.

VR continues to work closely with the graduate rehabilitation counseling programs at WOU, PSU and elsewhere in order to increase recruitment of minority applicants.

VR continues to actively partner with PSU and WOU’s Rehabilitation Counseling Programs to create additional opportunities for graduate student internships. For the 2011-12 school year, VR hosted seven graduate interns, five of which also completed their graduate practicum in its field offices across the state.

Due to budgetary limitations, VR was unable to provide stipends to graduate school and other intern stipends in the 2011-12 school year. The VR Director’s Stipend Program has helped VR attract and support interns, as well as develop a richer and more diverse pool of applicants for its VRC positions. VR believes that the stipends will be reinstated this year. Cooperative agreements (referred to as interagency agreements in Oregon) between VR and universities offering graduate degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling are developed and implemented prior to disbursement of stipend funds.

VR staff members continue to serve on Rehabilitation Counselor Education Advisory Councils for programs in the region (WWU, PSU, and WOU). VR staff, managers, and VRCs participate in the mock interviews held for students. This event aids student in preparing for VRC job interviews.

VR continues to participate in the Regional Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program’s "Recruitment Project", which has been reviewing staffing needs of vocational rehabilitation systems in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Alaska. This collaborative effort developed regional recruitment information for state agencies, including information to disseminate via websites, and regional marketing strategies for different populations, including youth, members of Generation X and Y, and second career workers.

VR continues to work with DHS’ web content guidelines to keep internet information about VR and for job applicants, interns, consumers and the public current. VR continues to participate in CSAVR VR-NET and the RSA State Coordinators for the Deaf/Hard of Hearing/Deaf-Blind listserv.

In order to replace staff expected to retire or resign over the next three to five years, VR is projecting that it will need to hire approximately 43 additional VRCs, 26 additional Counselor Assistants/Human Services Assistants, and five additional Field Managers.

VR projects that it will be serving approximately 15,000 individuals annually at the end of five years and that approximately 12,450 or 83 percent will be individuals with significant disabilities. The projected retirements are based on the number of staff who will either reach age sixty-five or will have thirty years of service with the State of Oregon within the next five years.

 

VR continues to utilize an established set of standards to evaluate and select vocational rehabilitation counselors. These standards are based on a modified version of standards utilized by the Workers’ Compensation Division (WCD). The State of Oregon’s VRC classification is shared by WCD, the Oregon Commission for the Blind and VR. It requires that VRCs possess:

• A Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling; or be certified by either the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC), the Certified Insurance Rehabilitation Specialist (CIRS), or the Certification of Disability Management Specialists Commission as a Certified Disability Management Specialist D (CDMS), and six months full-time work experience providing vocational rehabilitation-related services; OR

• A Master’s degree in psychology, counseling, or a field related to Vocational Rehabilitation (such as one that promotes the physical, psychosocial, or vocational well-being of individuals with disabilities) and 12 months full-time work experience providing vocational rehabilitation-related services, OR

• A Bachelor’s degree in a related field, such as one that promotes the physical, psychosocial, or vocational well-being of individuals with disabilities, and three years of full-time work experience providing vocational rehabilitation-related services to individuals with disabilities. There is no direct experience substitute for a Bachelor’s degree.

VR continues to have a goal that all employees classified as VRCs hold a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or a closely related field. VR will continue to seek counseling staff with Master’s degrees, but VRC candidates with an appropriate Bachelor’s degrees and related work experience may be hired as an exception to VR’s policy of hiring counselors with Master’s degrees, with approval of VR’s Director.

A number of factors have made it difficult for VR to achieve its VRC standards and goal. These include:

• An insufficient number of graduates from the nation’s university rehabilitation programs.

• Financial disincentives for graduates interested in employment with VR are escalating. Over the past several years, staff have been required to take unpaid furloughs and salary increases have been delayed.

• Difficulty recruiting qualified staff in the rural areas of the state, where it is often a challenge to find candidates with Bachelor’s degrees, let alone candidates with graduate degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling.

VR presently has one VRC with a Master’s degree and six with Bachelor’s degrees in unrelated fields and three VRCs who lack a bachelor’s degree. As a result, VR did not attain its goal in this area in 2012. These individuals were hired or promoted into their positions prior to adoption of the current standard and goal or because of the lack of more qualified candidates. VR has encouraged these individuals to obtain their degrees, and has offered assistance for them to do so.

On a related basis, VR has been advised by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), which represents VR’s VRCs, of SEIU’s intent to litigate any personnel standards that would discharge, demote or displace any VRC with acceptable performance solely on the basis of a degree requirement.

These challenges notwithstanding, VR continues to support degree attainment by its counseling staff in order meet its VRC standards and goals, as well as to promote staff development and advancement, through flexible work scheduling that facilitates attending and completing a graduate degree in rehabilitation counseling with PSU, WOU or WWU, or through a distance learning program, such as the one at Assumption College. On a related note, VR’s annual In-service Conference included a session on completing a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling while continuing to work as a VRC.

VR continues to expect that all staff participate in appropriate professional development activities.

 

In 2010, VR received a five-year in-service training grant from the U.S. Department of Education. VR’s’ in-service training plan, developed as part of the proposal for that grant, is designed to:

• Address the recruitment and retention of qualified rehabilitation professionals;

• Provide succession planning;

• Develop leadership and build capacity; and

• Provide training on the Workforce Investment Act; the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as reauthorized in 1998, including its regulations and related policy.

The In-Service Training Program assists VR in carrying out the mission of the State/Federal rehabilitation service program of increasing employment outcomes for people with disabilities through informed choice and career development. VR uses a series of processes to identify training needs. These include two formal needs assessment processes and an informal, continuing process:

• A periodic training needs assessment. The most recent training needs assessment was completed in 2011.

• A three-year comprehensive statewide needs assessment of the rehabilitation needs of Oregonians with disabilities. In partnership with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), a comprehensive needs assessment was completed in September, 2010 and another one is being worked on for completion in September, 2013 (for more, see Attachment 4.11.a).

• Continuing assessment of training needs through informal processes, including feedback from VR managers and staff, SRC, and clients, and information obtained through case file reviews.

During FFY 2012, VR continued to expect that all staff participate in appropriate professional development activities.

A key staff development activity in FFY 2012 was VR’s annual statewide In-Service conference. Utilizing in-service training grant funds, VR uses this comprehensive staff training event to increase staff technical skills, as well as to showcase best practices. This past year’s in-service, “Thriving in a Climate of Change,” was held on August 14-15 in Salem. It included training for VRCs on counseling issues, case management processes and substantive and topical VR issues including:

• Traumatic brain injury and PTSD in returning veterans;

• Low Vision;

• Social media and emerging technologies for clients;

• Employer engagement;

• Preferred worker program;

• Partnering with Centers for Independent Living;

• Working with felons;

• Transferable skills;

• alcohol and drug issues;

• chronic pain;

• vehicle, home and worksite modifications;

• eligibility and plan development best practices;

• Individuals with developmental/intellectual disabilities – improving partnerships with brokerages, working with the Employment First Pilot Project, and examining natural vs. long-term supports;

• Working with clients after motivational enhancement training;

• The Oregon Deaf-Blind equipment distribution program;

• personality and obsessive/compulsive disorders;

• managing postsecondary training and financial aid;

• stress reduction;

• obstructive sleep apnea;

• encouraging and understanding cultural diversity;

• psychological aspects and evaluations for the Deaf;

• counselor ethics;

• Youth transition partnerships and outcomes, including those for individuals on the Autism spectrum; and

• SSDI & SSI benefits application process.

In addition, a dedicated track of training was provided for our human services assistants, the paraprofessional staff who assist and support our VRCs.

More than 325 persons attended the 2012 In-Service, including almost all of VR’s staff, as well as representatives of the many other agencies, vendors, providers and stakeholder groups that work with and support VR, including:

• Oregon State Rehabilitation Council

• Oregon Commission for the Blind

• Oregon Centers for Independent Living

• Oregon Developmental Disabilities Council

• 121 Vocational Rehabilitation programs from the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, Grand Ronde, and Klamath Tribes

• Advocacy organizations and groups, including the Brain Injury Association of Oregon (BIAOR), Oregon Technical Assistance Corporation (OTAC),

• Local school district YTP specialists and the University of Oregon YTP Technical Assistance Team

• Oregon Department of Veteran’s Affairs

• Social Security disability determination representatives

• Community rehabilitation providers, job developers, job coaching services and employers

• University of Washington, Center for Continuing Education in Rehabilitation

• Service brokerages for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

• County and nonprofit community mental health programs

• Oregon Department of Human Services/Oregon Health Authority service delivery area representatives

• Oregon Department of Human Services’ Developmental Disabilities Services representatives

• Oregon State Hospital, Supported Employment Program

• University of Oregon, Family & Human Services

• Western Oregon University, Rehabilitation Counselor Education Program (including counselor interns and students)

• Chemeketa Community College, Occupational Skills Training Program

• Rogue Valley Community College, Disability Services Office

• Local medical providers

• Over 20 local vendors providing information, assistive technology and resources for rehabilitation professionals & individuals with disabilities

We continue to provide our five-day counselor training to new and continuing VRCs. Two sessions were provided and attended by over 40 VR staff and interns and Tribal VR partners.

In addition to above described staff development and training events, a number of other staff development and training activities were provided. These included:

• Ethical issues for VR managers (one session)

• ORCA budget system for VR managers (one session)

• ORCA Service/Subcategory Revisions (six sessions)

• Employment Outcomes Professionals II Workshop (one two-day session) with Supported Employment Focus (four two-day sessions)

• Job Placement Services Contract Amendment Training for staff and contractors (20 sessions)

• Motivational Interviewing (three sessions)

• Motivational Enhancement Training Facilitation (one session)

• Quarterly Counselor Forum in the Metro area (four sessions)

• Youth Transition Issues (four regional conferences, one statewide conference, one summer academy)

• Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (seven sessions, one interstate summit)

• Mental Health Supported Employment (one session)

In the case of most of the above referenced trainings, VRCs who completed the training were awarded with continuing education credits.

VR five-year basic in-service training grant supports VR’s In-Service Training Program and in particular the VR annual In-service conference. As part of the Training Program, VR maintains a plan for its personnel development and training activities. Looking ahead, these activities will likely include training on:

• VR Policy Manual for Field Services

• Counselor Training, with modules and content on: intake, application and eligibility; order of selection; plan development; employment; supported employment; self-employment, counseling and case management; closure; and disability discrimination complaints

• Basic and advanced and motivation intervention training and continuing support through staff mentors

• Job development services and VR’s performance based JD model, processes and rates

• Ethics for Vocational Rehabilitation Professionals

• The most recent iteration of ORCA (VR’s automated case management system)

Other anticipated in-service training and personnel development activities include:

• Completion of a new training needs assessment

• Review and as needed updating of the in-service training plan so that it aligns with needs assessment findings and any changes made to the state plan

• A two-day annual in-service training conference for all staff and VR partners

• Participation in DHS leadership initiatives and events, including DHS’ Transformational/Lean Leaders initiative, DHS Leadership Academy, Portland Metro Leadership Cohort, and regional leadership academies

• Participation in the University of Washington TACE/CCER Emerging Leaders Series (depending on whether out of state travel limitations remain in effect)

• Utilization of DHS and Department of Administrative Services’ training opportunities on leadership

• Provision to staff of out-of-class work opportunities (when appropriate and feasible)

• Staff recruitment, including:

o Continued partnership with DHS, Office of Human Resources in recruiting new staff

o Recruitment of staff at conferences and events

o Support for career advancement within VR

 

VR employs a variety of approaches in communicating with persons who do not speak English or who have a limited proficiency in English.

VR continued to hire and retain staff capable of communicating with diverse populations including individuals whose first language is Spanish, Russian, Ukrainian and American Sign Language.

VR continued to develop and utilize training materials in alternate formats, including new counselor training materials, to meet the accommodation needs of VRCs who are blind. The training unit assisted staff and consumers who need accommodations for training events with assistive listening devices and qualified interpreters.

In specific geographic areas and for specific caseloads, VR engaged in targeted recruiting for job applicants with specific language skills.

VR staff who are not fluent in the native language of an applicant or a client have access to and training in the use of AT&T’s language service and access to qualified interpreters. In addition, the office has developed and utilizes outreach and application materials in alternate language formats, including Spanish and Russian.

Prior DHS Director Bruce Goldberg appointed a member of VR administrative unit to the Oregon Council on Healthcare Interpreters. DHS charged this council with creating and implementing minimum qualifications, evaluation and certification programs and renewal processes for contractors and staff providing spoken language interpretation services for DHS (now DHS/OHA) consumers across the state. The Council’s Bilingual Differential Pay Advisory Committee (to which a VR staff person is assigned) is working on similar standards and processes for DHS/OHA (including VR) staff who receive the 5% pay differential for bilingual skill use.

VR continues to contract and collaborate with the Latino Connection in reaching out to and providing specialized job placements services to native Spanish-speaking individuals with disabilities. The focus of these services has been in Portland, Salem and Woodburn, which have large Latino communities.

VR continued to implement its videophone pilot with DHS, as a means to provide accessible communication via Video Relay Services (VRS) and Video Remote Interpreting (VRI). The pilot’s progress has been slowed somewhat by bandwidth capacity limitations of the DHS/OHA network and changes in personnel at our VRS/VRI service provider. VR’s State Coordinator for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (SCD) has been an active member of the national group of VR SCDs for several years and is working closely with other VR SCDs who have already guided their programs through the videophone installation project.

VR presently maintains videophones for a number of staff who require ASL interpretation and to make it possible for VRC counselors with a predominantly Deaf caseloads to communicate directly with clients their native language. In addition, VR’s SCD utilizes a videophone in interacting with Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals, including Deaf staff members and student interns.

 

VR continues to work in partnership with the Department of Education as well as local school districts and high schools in support of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Highlights of recent and continuing activities include:

• VR, ODE, Developmental Disability Services and the Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities to developed a charter and memorandum of understanding to better coordinate services they jointly and discretely provide to youth with disabilities.

• The coordinator of VR’s Youth Transition Program (YTP) serves on ODE’s State Advisory Council for Special Education and its Transition Committee.

• ODE staff serve on the YTP Management Team and advise VR on IDEA developments and changes in ODE policy that may or do affect YTP.

• Continuing collaboration with ODE and high school staff on YTP and transition-related training, including that provided through VR’s In-service, annual conferences on transition and YTP, and site specific YTP technical assistance and training.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 4:27PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Vocational Rehabilitation, the State Rehabilitation Council and the Interwork Institute of San Diego State University are currently collaborating to complete the 2013 Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) of the vocational rehabilitation needs of persons with disabilities residing in the state of Oregon. The 2013 CNA will be completed September 2013 and transmitted to RSA. The results from this comprehensive needs assessment will be taken into account as VR moves forward with the next State Plan Update

In Federal Fiscal Year 2010, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services, the State Rehabilitation Council and the Interwork Institute of San Diego State University collaborated to develop a comprehensive assessment of the vocational rehabilitation needs of persons with disabilities residing in the state of Oregon. Interwork subsequently administered the assessment, gathered and analyzed the results and provided OVRS and SRC with written and in-person reports on its findings. The needs assessment process, results and findings are summarized below. The findings are being considered and addressed by OVRS and SRC in reviewing, updating and refining OVRS’ goals, priorities (objectives), strategies and activities.

The process that was developed for conducting the needs assessment involved:

  • Electronic and telephone surveys conducted with four stakeholder groups (individuals with disabilities, representatives of organizations that provide services to persons with disabilities, employers and OVRS staff);
  • Focus groups conducted with three stakeholder groups (individuals with disabilities, representatives of organizations that provide services to persons with disabilities, and OVRS staff)
  • Key informant interviews conducted with employers and with individuals identified as knowledgeable about the needs of individuals with disabilities in the state, and
  • Analysis of a variety of existing demographic and case service data relevant to individuals with disabilities.

The approach was designed to capture input from a variety of perspectives in order to acquire a sense of the multi-faceted needs of persons with disabilities in the state. Responses to the individual survey reflect the opinions of current and former clients of OVRS as well as individuals on the agency’s waiting list for services. Efforts were made to gather information pertinent to un-served and under-served populations through inquiries with individuals who serve a broad range of persons with disabilities in the state. Likewise, the OVRS staff that was surveyed serves clients representing a broad range of backgrounds and experiences. Efforts were made to solicit responses from businesses reflecting the opinions of employers representing a variety of industries.

Four hundred and eight survey responses were received from individuals with disabilities, 46 partner surveys were completed, 101 OVRS staff surveys were completed, and 129 business surveys were completed. A total of 90 persons participated in 12 focus groups conducted in Ontario, Bend, Medford, and Salem, while 18 individuals participated in the key informant interviews. The following summary highlights the most commonly cited needs associated with achieving employment goals and accessing OVRS services derived from the surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews.

Barriers to achieving employment goals

Individuals with disabilities, representatives of partner organizations, and OVRS staff all identified the lack of available jobs as a frequently-cited barrier to achieving employment goals. Similarly, employers’ perceptions about employing persons with disabilities were also among the most frequently-identified barriers for all three respondent groups. Both partners and OVRS staff frequently identified housing issues as a barrier to achieving employment goals. Key informants identified attitudinal barriers; accommodations, especially assistive technology; and lack of available jobs as the top three barriers.

Barriers to achieving employment goals for individuals with most significant disabilities

Partners and OVRS staff identified employers’ perceptions about employing persons with disabilities most frequently as a barrier to achieving employment goals for persons with the most significant disabilities. Both groups also identified not having job skills and the lack of available jobs as barriers to achieving employment goals for individuals with the most significant disabilities. In addition, most key informants agreed that the barriers to employment are greater for people whom OVRS classifies as having the most significant disabilities. In general, the sentiment was that employment barriers increased proportionately to an individual’s functional limitations.

Barriers achieving employment goals for youth in transition

There was noteworthy consistency between partners and OVRS staff with respect to the most frequently cited barriers to achieving employment goals for youth in transition. Both identified not having job skills, a lack of education or training, a lack of job search skills, and a lack of available jobs as among the top barriers for achieving employment goals for youth in transition. The general consensus among key informants was that the barriers to employment for youth with disabilities are unique. Many cited shortfalls in youth in transition programs. Others described youths’ resistance to a diagnosis and their struggle with the stigma of disability.

Barriers to achieving employment goals for consumers who are racial or ethnic minorities

There was remarkable consistency between partners and OVRS staff with respect to the top barriers to achieving employment goals for consumers who are racial or ethnic minorities, however the number of respondents to this question was low. Both identified the same four barriers – language barriers, not having education or training, not having job skills, and not enough jobs available – as among the top barriers to achieving employment goals for this group. Most informants agreed that minority status is an additional complicating factor when attempting to secure employment. Informants stated that the service systems are inadequately equipped to address the needs of diverse individuals. Furthermore, cultures have different perceptions of disabilities and may not seek services, especially from state or federal agencies. Thus, there is a need to direct outreach campaigns to minority groups.

Barriers to accessing OVRS services

Individuals with disabilities, partners, and OVRS staff identified two items - limited accessibility of OVRS via public transportation and difficulties completing the individualized plan for employment (IPE) - as among the top barriers to accessing OVRS services. Both partner and OVRS staff respondents identified difficulties accessing training or education programs as among the top barriers to accessing services.

Business needs, disability in the workplace

With respect to disability in the workplace, the top needs indicated by respondents to the business survey were associated with financial incentives and training for workers with disabilities:

  • Obtaining information on other incentives for employing workers with disabilities
  • Obtaining information on other training programs available for workers with disabilities
  • Obtaining information on tax credits for employing workers with disabilities

Responses to needs associated with the applicants with disabilities section of the survey generally reflected a lower percentage of respondents indicating a need. The top responses pertained to needs for assistance recruiting and assessing worker characteristics:

  • Assessing applicants’ skills
  • Recruiting applicants with good social/interpersonal skills
  • Recruiting applicants with good work habits

Focus groups Most unmet needs were captured in three categories: service systems, other (needs), and mobility. A service system is defined as all agencies or organizations (in addition to OVRS) that provide vocational or independent living services to individuals with disabilities. The predominant unmet needs in this category included:

  • Cooperation and information sharing amongst agencies/organizations,
  • Health care services, and
  • Employer outreach and education.

Next, a large proportion of unmet needs for people with disabilities were relegated to the "other" category. The needs expressed in this category do not succinctly fit into any one category yet are clearly related to unmet employment and independent living needs. The three unmet needs described most frequently included:

  • Job placement (including more job developers and better coordination of services),
  • Assistance navigating the various state and federal systems, and
  • More housing in general and affordable housing in particular.

Finally, several unmet needs related to mobility were expressed. This category encompasses a wide array of needs including everything from public transportation to accessible housing. The unmet mobility needs included:

  • Expanded public transportation routes,
  • Expanded hours of operation for the regional public transportation systems, and
  • Physically accessible buildings.

All of the needs described represent areas of high consensus within a region and across the state.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 6:43PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

The most recent U.S. Census/American Community Survey results on Oregon (2011) estimate that the state’s population between the ages of 18 and 64 is 2,428,380; and the number of individuals who reported having a disability was 279,001 or 11.5% of Oregon’s estimated total population of 3,871,859. During FFY 2012, VR served a total of 15,214 individuals with disabilities with Title I and Title VI, Part B funding. Of these individuals, VR provided 1,140 clients with supported employment services and a total of 228 obtained employment outcomes. In addition, of the 1,140, 416 of the 1,140 clients receiving supported employment services were assisted with Title VI, Part B funds.

Annual Estimates of Individuals to be served with funds provided under Part B of Title I and Part B of Title VI of the Act

VR projects that it will serve 15,300 persons in FFY 2014, including persons expected to apply for services, be determined eligible for services and/or receive services through Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs). In addition, VR estimates that it will provide supported employment services to 1,140 persons in this same time period and 398 of these persons will receive services funded by Title VI, Part B.

VR anticipates that it will cost and VR will expend approximately

$ 47,346,072 in federal and state funds to provide services at current service levels and with its existing program capacity. These service and expenditure projections are based on caseload projections, forecasted cost per case and anticipated revenue. The program has developed a five year fiscal plan to ensure that Match and Maintenance of Effort requirements are met and all federal dollars are expended in the required time frames.

VR intends to remain in the Order of Selection in 2014 so that, if it becomes necessary to reinstitute a mandatory wait list, the program is able to do so expeditiously and so minimize the challenges and problems for clients, staff and the program. While VR is currently able to serve all individuals in Order of Selection wait list priority levels, at least factors argue for the continuation of the Order.

VR served 7,038 individuals through IPEs in FFY 2012; VR projects this number will increase slightly to 7,605 in FFY 2014 because it is now serving all individuals found eligible for services. VR estimates that in FFY 2014 the number of eligible individuals receiving IPE services by priority level will be:

The estimated total cost of client services for individuals estimated to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services is $ 21,882,254. (This does not include the cost of staff, facilities, cost allocation and other non-client service costs.) For specifics, see the table below.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Priority 1 (3 or more limitations) Title I $11,866,747 4,069 $2,916
Priority 2 (2 limitations) Title I $6,409,312 2280 $2,811
Priority 3 (1 limitation) Title I $2,558,035 933 $2,741
Priority 4 (all other eligible) Title I $1,048,160 323 $3,245
Totals   $21,882,254 7,605 $2,877

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 4:34PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Attachment 4.11.c.1

State Goals and Priorities

The 2014 State Plan Update was developed jointly and agreed to by Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This was accomplished through a series of joint VR-SRC workgroup and other meetings in which successive drafts of the Update were developed, reviewed, and refined. The draft Update was reviewed by the full SRC at its quarterly spring meeting. Revisions were made from this meeting and the draft Update was made available for public review and comment (see summary below). Thereafter, the VR Executive Team and SRC Executive Committee reviewed public comment and made final refinements to the Update. Work was completed on the Update in mid-June with estimated revenue forecasts.

During the planning process, VR and the SRC made numerous changes to VR’s priorities (“objectives”), strategies, and outcomes (including targets). The process included review of VR’s performance on the 2012 federal standards and indicators (of which VR met or exceeded all standards and indicators, an analysis followes in the next paragtraph), VR’s performance on the 2012 State Plan Update outcomes, anticipated challenges and opportunities and information from the 2010 Comprehensive Needs Assessment and anticipated results from the upcoming 2013 Comprehensive Needs Assessment, as well as staff, SRC, stakeholder, and public input.

STANDARDS AND INDICATORS In FFY 2012 VR successfully exceeded all of our federal standards and indicators. This is an accomplishment that VR and our partners are very proud to have achieved. However, like many states struggling with the effects of a changing economy, we were unable to achieve our State’s planned targets in wage and employer paid medical benefits for both youth and adults. The shortfall in these two areas highlights a somewhat troubling trend facing individuals entering and re-entering the workforce nationally, regardless of disability status. This is an ongoing issue that we continue to work on in the post recession economy.

See additional comments in Goal I.B.

Federal Indicator: 1.1 Change in employment outcomes

Federal Standard: 1,793

VR Performance: 2,032

Federal Indicator: 1.2 Percent of employment outcomes

Federal Standard: 55.80%

VR Performance: 58.69%

Federal Indicator: 1.3 Competitive employment

Federal Standard: 72.6%

VR Performance: 88.78%

Federal Indicator: 1.4 Significant disability

Federal Standard: 62.4%

VR Performance: 92.85%

Federal Indicator: 1.5 Earnings ratio

Federal Standard:.52

VR Performance: .56

Federal Indicator: 1.6 Self support

Federal Standard: 53

VR Performance: 74.058

Federal Indicator: 2.1 Access to services for minorities

Federal Standard: .80

VR Performance: .991

Public Input Process: The proposed Update was posted on VR’s public web-site for a 17 day period in May 2013 along with information about the public hearings, and how to submit oral and written comments. Notice of the Update, the public hearings schedule, and how to submit comments was also posted in all VR field offices and sent to over 100 allied and stakeholder organizations, groups, and individuals for posting. A press release about the public hearings also went out. Hearings were held in Bend, Medford, Portland, and Salem with interpreters on-site to allow for easy accommodation of anyone in need. Despite these efforts no input was provided at the hearings. One written comment was submitted. It pertained to the job placement vendor report card that has been developed and is scheduled for use later this year. The input focused on the need to take into account client choice and quality measures for Job Developer success rather than simply using measures such as wage, hours, and availability of medical insurance. The input was considered when making final revisions.

GOAL I. Increase the number and quality (as measured by wages, availability of benefits, number of hours worked, and client satisfaction) of employment Outcomes for all VR clients.

Priorities ("Objectives"):

A. Increase number of employment outcomes

B. Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and number of hours worked

(Includes the following strategies related to supported employment)

5. Update and continue to implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Developmental Disability Services (DDS) to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/

developmental disabilities

6. Continue to partner with DDS in implementing its Employment First policy and in utilizing U.S. Dept of Labor grant awarded DDS to carry out Employment First activities

7. Continue to work in partnership with Oregon Department of Education (ODE) and local education agencies throughout Oregon to address the needs of transition age adults and youth through the processes and activities outlined in VR’s interagency agreement with ODE. Update and implement related MOU work plan with ODE, DDS and Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities.

C. Increase percent of individuals with self-employment plans that result in positive outcomes

D. Increase the number of adults with significant disabilities who are employed

(Includes the following strategies related to supported employment)

1. Increase number of employment clients obtaining supported employment outcome.

2. Revisit developing a TTW Employment Network (EN) with DDS and community developmental disability service providers

3. Evaluate and refine EN operated in partnership with Addictions and Mental Health Division and community mental health providers

4. Continue to support and utilize Oregon Center for Excellence in Supported Employment in expanding evidence-based supported employment statewide and providing needed training and technical assistance.)

5. See B.5. above

6. See B.6. above

7. See B.7. above

E. Increase the participation of and outcomes for individuals from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities

F. Maintain and develop connections to programs and services that assist clients obtain and maintain employment outcomes

G. Refine, administer and sustain a state- wide work incentives planning system (WIN)

H. Provide assistive technology (AT) services and devices needed statewide by VR clients at each stage of the VR process

I. Improve access and quality of services for Deaf and hard of hearing persons

J. Enhance coordination with workforce partners and vocational rehabilitation programs so that people with disabilities have better access and are better prepared for employment

K. Increase the availability and quality of job development services:

(Includes the following strategies related to supported employment)

2. Continue job development training and coaching with added job carving training

6. Continue to review rollout of job development services to special populations, including individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, identify needed adjustments or refinements, and implement).

GOAL II. Increase the number of youth who seek VR services and the number and quality of employment outcomes for this population.

Priorities:

A. Increase the number of transition age youth (14-24) who obtain employment outcomes

(Including the following strategies related to supported employment)

4. Explore ways to adapt YTP 2.0 to serve youth with intellectual/

developmental disabilities

6. Continue collaboration with Early Assessment Screening and Treatment Project to provide needed services and supports to transition age youth with psychiatric disabilities.

7. Continue contract with ARC of Oregon to assist youth with I/DD and their families in learning about and utilizing services and resources in order to increase employment outcomes for these youth.

8. Continue to provide funding for Oregon Family and Community Together’ s annual statewide transition conference and MEGA Conference.)

10. See I.B.5

11. See I.B.6

12. See I.B.7

B. Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and hours worked

(Including the following strategies related to supported employment)

4. See I.B.5

5. See I.B.6

6. See I.B.7

C. Increase the number of youth with more significant disabilities who receive services

(Including the following strategies related to supported employment)

1. Continue to partner with Developmental Disability Services to provide training and technical assistance to community-based developmental disability programs

2. Arrange for training through internal resources and Technical Assistance and Continuing Education center to address training needs specific to this population

4. Continue collaboration with Early Assessment Screening Team and Alliance (EAST and EASA) to provide needed services and supports to transition age youth with psychiatric disabilities

5. Continue contract with Arc of Oregon for Project Employ, which assists youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities and their families in learning about and utilizing services and resources in order to increase employment outcomes for these youth

6. Continue to provide funding for FACT’s annual statewide transition conference)

8. See I.B.5

9. See I.B.6

10. See I.B.7

11. Continue to participate on Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities (OCDD)

D. Increase the awareness and understanding of transition among youth and their parents, teachers, school administrators, and disability advocates and professionals

(Including the following strategies related to supported employment)

2. Co-sponsor and participate in annual transition conferences

3. Participate in ODE/ DDS/ODDC/VR MOU work plan activities, including development of a transition manual and outreach and education activities focused on transition services

4. Explore supporting family-to-family training on transition, such as that provided by DDS and FACT

E. Increase the participation of and outcomes for youth from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities and Deaf and hard of hearing youth

GOAL III. Engage employers in order to increase the number and quality of employment outcomes for persons with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities.

Priorities:

A. Increase understanding awareness, and interest of Oregon’s businesses in employing people with disabilities

B. Improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

GOAL IV. Continually improve the management of the program while insuring compliance with appropriate laws, rules and policy.

Priorities:

A. Build upon current data analysis to conduct ongoing program evaluation

B. Develop and implement those systems and processes necessary to maximize utilization of Social Security’s Ticket to Work Program

(Including the following strategies related to supported employment)

3. Evaluate effectiveness of and refine TTW Employment Network with community mental health providers

4. Revisit developing TTW EN with DDS and community developmental disability service providers

C. Minimize risks and liabilities in administration of the program

D. Address key findings of 2013 Comprehensive Needs Assessment

GOAL V. Ensure a highly trained workforce at every level of the organization.

Priorities:

A. Ensure staff have the skills, knowledge and ability to perform their jobs at a high level of proficiency

(Including the following strategies related to supported employment)

4. Require all new staff to complete Enhancing Employment Outcomes’ job development ,motivational intervention training, and job carving training.

B. Increase staff knowledge in targeted areas

(Including the following strategies related to supported employment)

3. Staff participation in training relevant to brain injury; autism spectrum disorders; Deafness and hearing loss; working with individuals with intellectual/

developmental disabilities and psychiatric disabilities; person-centered planning; and/or other training to address needs identified through training needs assessment and training plan

C. Continue to recruit to meet the Rehabilitation Act’s requirements for a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development and VR specific skill needs

This screen was last updated on Jul 29 2013 7:37PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

It is the intent of Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) to serve any and all persons in Oregon who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. Though it is likely that VR will be able to serve all eligible persons in Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2014, it will continue to operate under the Order of Selection which was invoked on January 15, 2009. VR’s decision to invoke the Order was based on caseload and cost per case projections; its decision to remain in the Order because of uncertainty about the availability of state and federal funding.

Status of the Order of Selection

From January 15, 2009 through June 30, 2009, VR’s services were limited to individuals who had authorized individual plans for employment (IPEs). Beginning in July 2009, VR had sufficient resources to begin taking Priority One individuals off of the Order waitlist. Over the ensuing twelve months, VR was able to successively remove individuals from the waitlist, as prioritized. As of July 2010, VR had taken all individuals off the waitlist and there has been no waitlist since then.

This progress was achieved through use of a mix of ARRA funds, re-allocation dollars matched by state general funds over and above the amount required to match the state’s grant and Social Security reimbursement dollars. ARRA funds allowed VR to remove 2,654 individuals from the waitlist and 471 individuals to move directly into services. ARRA funds and re-allotment dollars are not available going forward.

Justification for Continuation of the Order of Selection

VR intends to remain in the Order of Selection in FFY 2014 so that, in the event that it becomes necessary to reinstitute a mandatory wait list, the program is able to do so expeditiously and in a manner that minimizes the challenges and problems for clients, staff and the program. While we are currently able to serve all individuals in all Order of Selection wait list priority levels, at least factors argue for the continuation of the Order.

Parameters of the Order of Selection

The Order of Selection was established to ensure that individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected first for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, those with significant disabilities second, and then all other eligible individuals. VR based the determination to invoke the Order on use of funds in the preceding year, projected funding, projected number and types of referrals, number of eligible individuals and counselor caseloads.

The Order of Selection is statewide and does not select one disabling condition over any other disabling condition. VR does not base the Order on age, sex, marital status, religion, race, color, national origin, political affiliation, or the vocational goal of the individual with a disability. Elements that relate to the significance of disability are the only elements used in the Order.

SRC and Public Input on Order of Selection

Prior to the Order of Selection invoked on January 15, 2009, VR:

• Met and consulted with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), the agency’s policy partner;

• Met and consulted with Disability Rights Oregon (DRO), the state’s protection and advocacy system and Client Assistance Program (CAP); and

• Informed the public - including clients and prospective clients and over 100 allied public and private agencies and stakeholder organizations and groups - about its proposed Order of Selection and the opportunity to obtain additional information and comment on the proposed Order at public hearings. VR subsequently held public hearings in three locations around the state - Portland, Roseburg and The Dalles.

VR continues to provide the SRC, DRO/CAP and other consumer, advocacy and allied organizations and groups with information and updates the status of its Order of Selection and related developments. In addition, should a waitlist be reinstituted, VR will provide quarterly updates to individuals on the waitlist about their status on the list.

 

Description of Priority categories

Priority One:

Eligible Persons who meet all three of the following criteria shall be served first, in the order of each individual’s date of application:

A. (A) The individual is classified with a Most Significant Disability consistent with OAR 582-001-0010 (22) (See FN1);

B. (B) The individual has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits three or more functional capacities (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and

C. (C) The individual is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome

Priority Two:

Eligible Persons not qualifying as Priority One who meet all three of the following criteria shall be served second, in the order of each individual’s date of application:

A. (A) The individual is classified with a Most Significant Disability consistent with OAR 582-001-0010 (22);

B. (B) The individual has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits two or more functional capacities (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and

C. (C) The individual is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome

Priority Three:

Eligible persons not qualifying as Priority One or Priority Two and classified with a significant disability consistent with OAR 582-001-0010 (23)(See FN2) shall be served third, in the order of each individual’s date of application.

Priority Four:

All other eligible persons shall be served fourth in the order of each individual’s date of application

FN1: OAR 582-001-0010(22) provides as follows: "Individual with a most significant disability" refers to an eligible individual who: (a) Has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits two or more functional capacities (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and (b) Is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome.

FN2: OAR 582-001-0010(23) provides as follows: "Individual with a significant disability" refers to an eligible individual who does not qualify as an individual with a most significant disability as defined at OAR 582-001-0010(22); and (a) The individual is currently receiving Social Security Income or Social Security Disability Insurance payments; or (b) The individual: (A) Has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits one’s functional capacity (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and (B) Is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

Order of Selection

VR is required by federal law to implement an Order of Selection establishing priority levels for services to ensure the agency’s resources are devoted to serving individuals with the most significant disabilities first when the agency’s resources are insufficient to serve all eligible individuals.

Under Oregon’s Order of Selection, VR assesses eligibility and assigns a priority level (based on the number of functional capacity limitations present, the number of vocational rehabilitation services required and the anticipated duration of service) for all individuals interested in obtaining vocational rehabilitation services. VR may reassess priority levels if an individual’s condition changes. Once VR assigns a priority level, the office places individuals on a statewide waitlist according to the individual’s priority level. When resources allow, VR removes individuals from the waitlist and provides service in the order their applications were received.

Individuals receiving service sunder an IPE authorized prior to January 15, 2009 are not affected by the Order of Selection and will continue to receive the services agreed to in their IPEs. Former clients returning to VR for post-employment services are also not affected by the Order of Selection and may be provided appropriate post-employment services without being subject to the wait list.

In accordance with the applicable federal regulations, the Oregon Administrative Rules setting forth the priority levels and related definitions were amended effective December 19, 2008 and provided as outlined here.

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

Notes:

• VR does not presently have an OOS waitlist for services. All eligible individuals in all priority levels are being served.

• The numbers in the “cost of services” column represent the estimated average cost of ‘client services’ per client. These costs do not include the cost of staff, facilities, cost allocation and other non-client service costs.

• The numbers immediately below represent the estimated total cost of ‘client services’ per priority category.

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 4,069 944 917 17.92 months $2,916
2 2,280 649 426 15.92 months $2,811
3 933 254 193 14.52 months $2,741
4 323 135 41 12.09 months $3,245

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 6:55PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

In FFY 2012, the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR):

• Served 1,140 individuals in supported employment, of which 416 individuals were served utilizing Title VI, Part B funds.

• Was allocated $266,375 in Title VI, Part B funds, of which it expended $266,375.

• Closed 254 Title VI, Part B funded cases, of which:

o 104 entered competitive employment in supported employment; and,

o 150 cases were closed without entering employment.

VR anticipates expending in FFY 2014 approximately $$262,500 in Title VI, Part B funds to provide plan services to clients needing supported employment services.

Goal

In FFY 2014, VR will seek to utilize Title VI, Part B funds to provide supported employment services to 398 individuals, and assist 110 individuals in obtaining competitive employment.

Plans

VR’s supported employment program is potentially available to any individual with a most significant disability who needs such services to be successfully and competitively employed. Title VI, Part B funds are utilized for the time-limited services necessary for an individual to stabilize in competitive employment in an integrated setting. The counselor and the individual agree on the services to be provided to the client on an individualized basis. Services that may be part of a supported employment individual plan for employment (IPE) include:

• Person-centered planning

• Community-based assessment

• Job development and job placement

• On-site training for worker and/or co-workers

• Long-term support development

• Other services and goods

• Post-employment services

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 4:39PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

GOAL I. Increase the number and quality (as measured by wages, availability of benefits, number of hours worked, and client satisfaction) of employment outcomes for all VR clients.

Objective I.A: Increase number of employment outcomes

I.A Strategies:

1. Evaluate and refine the Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative

2. Educate and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III (employer engagement) strategies)

3. Continue to work with Employment Department and University of Oregon Career Information System to provide labor market information to VR counseling staff

4. Continue to work with Department of Human Services (DHS) on breakthrough strategy to be a model employer of individuals with disabilities

5. Support the City of Portland in planning and implementing its resolution to be a model employer of individuals with disabilities

6. Continue to implement the Preferred Workers Program (PWP) in partnership with the Workers’ Compensation Division and complete expansion of PWP

I.A Outcomes:

Number of Employment Outcomes (Indicator 1.1):

2014 Target: 2,235

Increase % of Clients in Plan who Obtain an Employment Outcome (Indicator 1.2)

2014 Target: 56%

Objective I. B: Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and number of hours worked

I.B Strategies:

1. Evaluate and refine the Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative

2. Utilize job development vendor report card with a focus on quality outcomes as defined by measures such as living wage, health benefits, advancement, retention; and by consumer satisfaction

3. Continue to implement the Preferred Workers Program (PWP) in partnership with the Workers’ Compensation Division and complete expansion of PWP

4. Educate about and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies

5. Update and continue to implement the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Developmental Disability Services (DDS) to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

6. Continue to partner with DDS in implementing its Employment First policy and in utilizing U.S. Department of Labor grant awarded DDS to carry out Employment First activities

7. Continue to work in partnership with Oregon Department of Education (ODE) and local education agencies throughout Oregon to address the needs of transition age adults and youth through the processes and activities outlined in VR’s interagency agreement with ODE. Update and implement related MOU work plan with ODE, DDS and Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities.

I.B Outcomes:

Increase % of Clients Obtaining Employment who Receive Employer Paid Medical Benefits

2014 Target: 20

Increase Average Number of Hours Worked

2014 Target: 27

Increase Average Wage (Indicators 1.1 and 1.5)

2014 Target: $12.00

Percent of Clients Obtaining Post-Secondary Degree or Certificate who also Obtain Employment

2014 Target: 65%

Fulfillment of Interagency Agreement, MOU and work plan outcomesRecommend Policy and Legislative Changes

Objective C: Increase percent of individuals with self-employment plans that result in positive outcomes

I.C Strategies:

1. Evaluate and refine the process and protocol for self-employment business plans

2. Continue to utilize Business Plan Committee in reviewing and approving self-employment plans

I.C Outcomes:

Increased % of Self-Employment Outcomes

Establish a Baseline in 2014

Objective I.D: Increase the number of adults with significant disabilities who are employed

I.D Strategies:

1. Increase number employment clients obtaining supported employment outcomes

2. Revisit developing a TTW Employment Network (EN) with DDS and community developmental disability service providers

3. Evaluate and refine EN operated in partnership with Addictions and Mental Health Division and community mental health providers

4. Continue to support and utilize Oregon Center for Excellence in Supported Employment (for individuals with psychiatric disabilities) in expanding evidence-based supported employment statewide and providing needed training and technical assistance

5. See B.5. above

6. See B.6. above

7. See B.7. above

I.D Outcomes:

Increase Number of SSI/SSDI Recipients with Employment Outcome (Indicator 1.4)

2014 Target: 590

Increase Number of Employment Outcomes for Supported Employment Clients (Indicator 1.4)

2014 Target: 290

Increase Percent of Supported Employment Outcomes (Indicator 1.4)

2014 Target: 56%

Increased Employment Outcomes for Working Age Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

2014 Target: 500

Fulfillment of MOU and Workplan Outcomes

Recommended Policy and Legislative Changes

Objective I.E: Increase the participation of and outcomes for individuals from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities

I.E Strategies

1. Continue to contract with Latino Project in the Portland and Salem metro areas, Clackamas County and City of Woodburn

2. Continue to support, collaborate with and provide training and technical assistance to 121 programs of Confederated tribes of Grande Ronde and Warm Springs. Expand and refine support provided to the newer 121 programs of Klamath, Umatilla and Siletz tribes.

3. Recruit and hire bicultural and bilingual staff

4. Identify and implement targeted outreach, job placement and retention strategies for cultural, ethnic and linguistic minorities who are potential or current clients

5. Ensure linguistic access to VR services through use of interpreters, translators, bilingual materials, and targeted hiring.

6. Identify and address barriers to employment faced by individuals with disabilities who are cultural, ethnic or linguistic minorities.

7. Work with culturally specific community organizations to publicize VR services

8. Provide culturally competent services

9. Obtain cultural technical assistance from Tribal 121 Programs

I.E Outcome:

Increase Number of Minority Clients Served (Indicator 2.1)

2014 Target: 1400

Increase Percent of Minority Clients Obtaining Employment (Indicator 1.2)

2014 Target: 56%

Objective I.F: Maintain and develop connections to programs and services that assist clients obtain and maintain employment outcomes

I.F Strategies:

1. Continue to work with Centers for Independent Living to identify services that support and improve employment outcomes

2. Collaborate and coordinate with Veterans’ programs across state to address rehabilitation needs of returning veterans

I.F Outcomes:

Maintain Number of Contracts VR Branches Have with Independent Living Centers to Provide Services

2014 Target: 7

Objective I.G: Refine, administer and sustain a statewide work incentives planning system (WIN)

I.G Strategies:

1. Continue to operate Work Incentives Network (WIN) and provide work incentives/benefits planning services through certified coordinators housed in Centers for Independent Living located throughout state

2. Continue to pursue policy option package and other funding options for funding the Work Incentives Network (WIN) over short and long-term

3. Continue to pursue funding to support expansion of work incentives/benefits planning coordinators in high schools to targeted transition age youth

4. Continue to provide training to staff on WIN

5. Provide training to 121 tribal programs on work incentives planning system and new Ticket to Work regulations

6. Continue to provide training and outreach on work incentives to parents, caregivers of persons with significant disabilities

7. Continue to evaluate effectiveness of WIN in increasing employment outcomes and reducing dependency on public benefits, and utilize results in making case for WIN

8. Resume partnering with Disability Rights Oregon in providing work incentives/benefits planning services,

I.G Outcomes:

Obtain WIN Funding

Percent of SSI/SSDI Employments that Meet Substantial Gainful Activity at Closure (Indicator 1.6)

2014 Target: 27%

Number of WIN Referrals who Develop a Plan:

Develop Baseline

Objective I.H: Provide assistive technology (AT) services and devices needed statewide by VR clients at each stage of the VR process

I.H Strategies:

1. Continue to collaborate with Access Technologies, Inc. to provide assistive technology services and devices needed by clients at each stage of vocational rehabilitation process

2. Collaborate with Access Technologies’ loan program to increase availability of existing and emerging assistive technology tools that facilitate employment

I.H Outcomes:

Fulfillment of Contract Deliverables

Objective I.I: Improve access and quality of services for Deaf and hard of hearing persons

I.I Strategies:

1. In partnership with DHS, evaluate pilot for videophones/video relay interpreting

2. Increase number of staff with American Sign Language skills

3. Continue statewide coordination of rehabilitation services to Deaf and hard of hearing persons

4. Provide outreach to Deaf and hard of hearing persons

5. Explore how accessibility of job development services to Deaf and hard of hearing persons may be increased

I.I Outcomes:

Increase Number of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Impaired Persons with Employment Outcomes (Indicator 1.4)

2014 Target: 360

Increase Numbers of Transition Age (18-24) Deaf and Hard of Hearing Youth with Employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4)

2014 Target: 26

Expanded Availability and Use of Videophones and Video Relay Interpreting

Objective I.J: Enhance coordination with workforce partners and vocational rehabilitation programs so that people with disabilities have better access and are better prepared for employment

I.J Strategies:

1. Continue participation in Workforce Policy Cabinet

2. Continue to collaborate with workforce partners to provide training and technical assistance to Oregon’s workforce regions in developing, implementing and updating Resource Sharing Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding

3. Continue to assess training needs of workforce partners located in Employment Department offices and One-stops at local level and provide training as appropriate

4 Continue to co-staff cases with workforce partners when appropriate

5. Ensure staff are aware of workforce system resources including training resources

6. Work with workforce partners to educate staff and clients about and to carry out Work Ready Community and Sector Strategy approaches

7. Implement the Closing the Employment Gap initiative work plan.

8. Collaborate and coordinate with Veterans’ programs across state to address rehabilitation needs of returning veterans, in accordance with HB 2403 (2011)

I.J Outcomes:

Updated Resource Sharing Agreements and MOU

Trained Staff on Work Ready Community and Sector Strategy Initiatives

Increased Number of VR Clients Obtaining a National Career Readiness Certificate (NCRC).

Increased Number of VR Clients Obtaining Employment in Sectors Identified by Local Sector Strategies

Objective I.K: Increase the availability and quality of job development services

I.K Strategies:

1. Continue to implement and refine outcome based payment system for job development services

2. Continue job development training and coaching with added job carving training

3. Continue to utilize Job Development Advisory Group and SRC to review job placement outcomes and provide input about needed refinements

4. Continue to refine job development vendor report system

5. Utilize job development vendor report card, with a focus on quality outcomes defined by measures such as living wage, health benefits, advancement retention; and by consumer satisfaction

6. Continue to review rollout of job development services to special populations, including individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, identify needed adjustments or refinements, and implement

I.K Outcomes:

Job Development Report Card

Increased Quality Job Placement Outcomes

Complete baseline and targets

Standardized Job Development Reports

Analysis and Report on Outcome Based Payment for Job Development Services

GOAL II. Increase the number of youth who seek VR services and the number and quality of employment outcomes for this population.

Objective II.A: Increase the number of transition age youth (14-24) who obtain employment outcomes

II.A Strategies:

1. Continue transition job fairs in partnership with Oregon Commission for Blind, governmental units, business groups and others

2. Implement Youth Transition Program (YTP) 2.0 through development and implementation of biennial cooperative agreements with local school districts

3. Expand ACCESS to targeted YTP 2.0 sites

4. Explore ways to adapt YTP 2.0 to serve youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities

5. Use local Workforce Investment Board sector strategy to inform youth about and prepare them for in-demand occupations

6. Continue collaboration with Early Assessment Screening and Treatment Project to provide needed services and supports to transition age youth with psychiatric disabilities

7. Continue contract with Arc of Oregon for Project Employ to assist youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities and their families in learning about and utilizing services and resources in order to increase employment outcomes for these youth

8. Continue to provide funding for Oregon Family and Community Together’ s annual statewide transition conference and statewide MEGA Conference.

9. Continue local partnerships to enhance employment outcomes for all eligible transition age youth.

10. See I.B.5

11. See I.B.6

12. See I.B.7

II.A Outcomes:

Increase Number of Transition Age Youth Served

2014 Target: 1900

Increase Percent of transition Age Youth Obtaining an Employment Outcome (Indicator 1.1)

2014 Target: 56%

Increase Percent of Transition Age Youth who Obtain a Post-Secondary Degree or Certificate and Obtain a Successful Closure (Indicator 1.2)

2014 Target: 82%

Fulfillment of Interacency Agreement, MOU and Workplan Outcomes

Recommended Policy and Legislative Changes

Objective II.B: Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and hours worked

II.B Strategies:

1. Continue to implement, evaluate and refine Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative

2. Utilize job development vendor report card with a focus on quality outcomes as defined by measures such as living wage, health benefits, advancement and retention; and consumer satisfaction

3. Educate about and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies

4. See I.B.5

5. See I.B.6

6. See I.B.7

II.B Outcomes:

Increase Average Wage (Indicators1.3 and1.5)

2014 Target: $9.60

Increase Percent with Employer Paid Benefits:

2014 Target: 8%

Increase Number of Hours Worked

2014 Target: 25

Fulfillment of MOU and Workplan Outcomes

Recommended Policy and legislative Changes

Objective II.C: Increase the number of youth with more significant disabilities who receive services

II.C Strategies:

1. Continue to partner with Developmental Disability Services to provide training and technical assistance to community-based developmental disability programs

2. Arrange for training through internal resources and Technical Assistance and Continuing Education center to address training needs specific to this population

3. Revisit developing a TTW Employment Network (EN) with DDS and community developmental disability service providers

4. Continue collaboration with Early Assessment Screening Team and Alliance (EAST and EASA) to provide needed services and supports to transition age youth with psychiatric disabilities

5. Continue contract with Arc of Oregon for Project Employ, which assists youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities and their families in learning about and utilizing services and resources in order to increase employment outcomes for these youth

6. Continue to provide funding for FACT’s annual statewide transition conference

7. Continue VR representation on the Governor’s Task Force on Traumatic Brain Injury

8. See I.B.5

9. See I.B.6

10. See I.B.7

11. Continue to participate on Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities (OCDD)

II.C Outcomes:

Increase Number of Students who SSI/SSDI Recipients who Obtain Employment Outcome (Indicator 1.4)

2014 Target: 175

Increase the Number of Students in Supported Employment Outcomes (Indicator 1.4)

2014 Target: 160

Fulfillment of MOU and Workplan Outcomes

Recommended Policy and legislative Changes

Objective II.D: Increase the awareness and understanding of transition among youth and their parents, teachers, school administrators, and disability advocates and professionals

II.D Strategies:

1. Work with local and state level advisory boards to Project Access to identify opportunities to increase awareness and understanding of transition issues

2. Co-sponsor and participate in annual transition conferences

3. Participate in ODE/ DDS/ODDC/VR MOU work plan activities, including development of a transition manual and outreach and education activities focused on transition services

4. Explore supporting family-to-family training on transition, such as that provided by DDS and FACT

II.D Outcomes:

Increase Number of Transition Age Youth Served

2014 Target: 1900

Objective II.E: Increase the participation of and outcomes for youth from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities and Deaf and hard of hearing youth

II.E Strategies:

1. Ensure linguistic access through use of bilingual staff, interpreters and translated materials

2. Engage in outreach to potentially eligible cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minority youth with disabilities

3. Provide culturally competent services

4. Develop a strategy for increasing participation and positive outcomes for Deaf and hard of hearing youth

II.E Outcomes:

Interpreters Available 100% of the Time When Requested

2014 Target: 100%

Increase Number of Minority Youth Served

Increase Percent of Minority Youth Outcomes (Indicator 1.2)

GOAL III. Engage employers in order to increase the number and quality of employment outcomes for persons with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities.

Objective III.A: Increase understanding awareness, and interest of Oregon’s businesses in employing people with disabilities

III.A Strategies:

1. Continue to promote employment of persons with disabilities on a business to business basis through dedicated business partnerships, including publically acknowledging businesses that are dedicated and innovative partners in providing employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities

2. Continue to partner with Oregon Commission for Blind, Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation and others in implementing and coordinating employer engagement strategies

3. Continue to work with Employment Department and University of Oregon Career Information System to provide labor market information to VR counseling staff

4. Continue implementation of the Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative

5. Inform and educate employers about benefits of employing persons with disabilities

6. Provide disability awareness education and training to businesses and employers as "value added service"

7. Implement the Closing the Employment Gap work plan

III.A Outcomes:

Increase Numbers of Job Referrals from Business and Employer Related Sources

2014 Target: 60

Increase Number of Employers who have Participated in Business Outreach and Engagement Activities

Objective III.B: Improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

III.B Strategies:

1. Continue to participate in Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation’s national employment network – “VR Net”

2. Expand partnerships with businesses and employers to gain and increase access of VR clients to business and employer job application pools and maintain existing partnerships

3. Create a job ready data base that is used to inform staff-to- business outreach activities

4. See I.A.5

III.B Outcomes:

Increase Number of Employment Outcomes from Job Referrals and Employer Engagement Activities

Goal IV. Continually improve the management of the program while ensuring compliance with appropriate laws, rules and policy.

Object IV.A: Build upon current data analysis to conduct ongoing program evaluation

IV.A Strategies:

1. Obtain technical assistance from Rehabilitation Services Administration as needed

2. Use Caseload Status Indicator reports and file reviews to identify and target training and technical assistance provided to field

3. Use Caseload Status Indicator reports, file reviews and performance metrics to target management focus for field staff supervision

4. Continue implement Lean Daily Management tools, including but not limited to huddles, continuous improvement registry, visual boards, and project management

IV.A Outcomes:

Decrease Number of Errors Cited by RSA in Yearly 911 Reports

2014 Target: 0

Objective IV.B: Develop and implement those systems and processes necessary to maximize utilization of Social Security’s Ticket to Work Program (TTW)

IV.B Strategies:

1. Update TTW manual as needed

2. Train VR field staff and stakeholders on TTW processes and procedures as needed

3. Evaluate effectiveness of and refine TTW Employment Network with community mental health providers

4. Revisit developing TTW EN with DDS and community developmental disability service providers

IV.B Outcomes:

Increased TTW Reimbursements

2014 Target: $1,200,000

Objective IV.C: Minimize risks and liabilities in administration of the program

IV.C Strategies:

1. Continue to implement feedback loop for client file reviews that strengthens accountability and supports corrective action

2. Continue to review and revise rules, policies, and procedures as needed

3. As needed, obtain technical assistance from Rehabilitation Services Administration on management, contracting and performance based contracting for VR and DHS staff who support VR

4. Build revenue plan for 2013-15 biennium

5. Revise Business Review protocol to align with DHS protocol

IV.C Outcomes:

No Compliance Audit Findings

Accurate Fiscal Reports

Objective IV.D: Address key findings of 2013 Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)

IV.D Strategy:

1. In partnership with the SRC, further explore CNA findings about access to services, including barriers to OVRS services; and where needed develop and implement strategies to address problems, issues or barriers

IV.D Outcome:

Resolution of Identified Problems, Issues or Barriers

GOAL V. Ensure a highly trained workforce at every level of the organization.

Objective V.A: Ensure staff have the skills, knowledge and ability to perform their jobs at a high level of proficiency

V.A Strategies:

1. Train all staff on new iterations of ORCA (VR’s automated case management system) as the iterations are developed and installed online.

Provide timely training on other staff ORCA needs as identified by the ORCA workgroup.

2. Require all new counseling staff to complete Counselor Training 3. Require all staff to complete Values and Ethics Training

4. Require all new staff to complete Enhancing Employment Outcomes’ job development, motivational intervention training, and job carving training.

5. Train all staff on cultural competency and diversity

6. Develop and implement agency and branch diversity plans

7. Provide training to new and existing staff on VR policy manual and new and revised rules, policies and technical assistance guides as developed and implemented

V.A Outcomes:

Reduction in the Number of Negative RSA Review Findings

2014 Target: 0

Objective V.B: Increase staff knowledge in targeted areas

V.B Strategies:

1. Complete Training Needs Assessment

2. Refine training plan based on findings of Training Needs Assessments and Comprehensive Needs Assessments

3. Staff participation in training relevant to brain injury; autism spectrum disorders; Deafness and hearing loss; working with individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities and psychiatric disabilities; person-centered planning; and/or other training to address needs identified through training needs assessment and training plan

4. VR’s In-Service Training Conference

5. Collaborate with relevant stakeholders to maximize training opportunities and resources

V.B Outcomes:

Completed Training Needs Assessment and Training Plan

Internal and External Training Opportunities to Address Identified Training Needs

Objective V.C: Continue to recruit to meet the Rehabilitation Act’s requirements for a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development and VR specific skill needs

V.C Strategies:

1. Continue to work with DHS’ Office of Human Resources in recruiting staff

2. Recruit, as possible, at conferences, local colleges and universities and higher education events

3. Support career advancement within program

4. Continue to participate in Northwest Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Leadership Academy

5. Continue to participate with TACE advisory meetings

6. Continue to utilize DHS and Department of Administrative Services’ leadership trainings

7. Provide, as appropriate and feasible, out-of-class work opportunities for staff at every level of organization

8. Continue succession planning and retention activities

9. Increased use of distance learning and development of internal capacity to provide distance learning including the use of on-line, module based trainings

10. Increased development and acquisition of model materials and practices

11. Mentoring of managers and staff

V.C Outcomes:

Applicant Pools Whose Skills, Education, and Experience Align with CSPD Goals and Specific Skill Needs

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

See Goal I, Objective H, Strategies 1, 2 in Text Box 1.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

See Text Box 1: Goal I.D, Strategies 1-7 Goal I.E, Strategies 1-9 Goal II.C, Strategies 1-11 Goal II.E, Strategies 1-4

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Not applicable

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

See Goals I, II, and III including all corresponding Objectives and Strategies in Text Box 1.

In FFY 2012, VR exceeded all standards and indicators.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

See Goal I.J, Strategies 1-8 in text Box 1.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

For VR’s Strategies to achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11 (c) (1) see all of Text Box 1.

For VR’s Strategies to support innovation and expansion activities see the following in Text Box 1:

Goal I.A, Strategies 1,2

Goal I.B, Strategies 1, 2, 4

Goal I.D, Strategies 2,3,4 Goal I.E, Strategies 1,2,

Goal I.F, Strategy 2

Goal I.G, Strategies 1,5,6

Goal II.A, Strategies 1-8,

Goal II.B, Strategies 1,3

Goal II.C, Strategies 2,4,5,6,7

Goal II.D, Strategies 1,2,4

Goal II.E, Strategy 1

Goal III.A, Strategies 4,7

Goal III.B, Strategy 1,3

For VR’s Strategies to be used to overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the VR program ad SE services see the following in Text Box 1:

Goal I.D, Strategies 1-7

Goal I.E, Strategies 1-9

Goal II.C, Strategies 1-11

Goal II.E, Strategies 1-4

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 6:05PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

 

For details on VR’s supported employment goals, objectives, strategies, and outcomes and factors that impeded achievement of these see the following in Text Box 1:

Goal I.D, Strategies, Outcomes, and Outcome Comments.

Goal II.C, Strategies, Outcomes, and Outcome Comments.

See also Attachment 6.3

 

STANDARDS AND INDICATORS In FFY 2012 VR successfully exceeded all of our federal standards and indicators. This is an accomplishment that VR and our partners are very proud to have achieved. However, like many states struggling with the effects of a changing economy, we were unable to achieve our State’s planned targets in wage and employer paid medical benefits for both youth and adults. The shortfall in these two areas highlights a somewhat troubling trend facing individuals entering and re-entering the workforce nationally, regardless of disability status. This is an ongoing issue that we continue to work on in the post recession economy.

See additional comments in Goal I.B.

Federal Indicator: 1.1 Change in employment outcomes

Federal Standard: 1,793

VR Performance: 2,032

Federal Indicator: 1.2 Percent of employment outcomes

Federal Standard: 55.80%

VR Performance: 58.69%

Federal Indicator: 1.3 Competitive employment

Federal Standard: 72.6%

VR Performance: 88.78%

Federal Indicator: 1.4 Significant disability

Federal Standard: 62.4%

VR Performance: 92.85%

Federal Indicator: 1.5 Earnings ratio

Federal Standard:.52

VR Performance: .56

Federal Indicator: 1.6 Self support

Federal Standard: 53

VR Performance: 74.058

Federal Indicator: 2.1 Access to services for minorities

Federal Standard: .80

VR Performance: .991

 

See the following, including outcomes, in Text Box 1:

Goal I.A, Strategies 1,2

Goal I.B, Strategies 1, 2, 4

Goal I.D, Strategies 2,3,4

Goal I.E, Strategies 1,2,

Goal I.F, Strategy 2

Goal I.G, Strategies 1,6,7

Goal II.A, Strategies 1,5,6,7

Goal II.C, Strategies 2,4,5,6

Goal II.D, Strategies 1

Goal II.E, Strategy 1

Goal III.A, Strategies 4,

Goal III.B, Strategy 1

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 5:52PM by Daniel Haun

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

OVERVIEW

Supported employment (SE) is a major VR initiative. VR’s SE program provides opportunities for individuals with the most significant disabilities to achieve competitive employment in integrated settings with ongoing support provided by a variety of partners. These same individuals are those for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred. VR provides a continuum of SE services in partnership with other human services agencies and programs that persons with the most significant disabilities need to develop, maintain and advance in competitive employment. VR continues to work closely with other divisions and offices within the Department of Human Services, local governmental units, community-based organizations and groups to develop, refine and expand the availability of SE services throughout Oregon.

The coming year presents VR with a number of opportunities to expand the number of supported employment outcomes, the quality of the outcomes, the skills of employment service providers and the capacity of community rehabilitation programs and providers. VR has long partnered with Addictions and Mental Health (AMH) in providing supported employment to adults. (AMH is the state program responsible for overseeing Oregon’s public mental health system.) Oregon’s early implementation of the Affordable Care Act has resulted in the inclusion of Individual Placement and Support (IPS), an evidenced based supported employment model, in the state’s recently established Coordinated Care Organizations (CCOs). (These organizations are responsible for overseeing and coordination delivery of health services provided as a part of the Oregon Health Plan.) The incorporation of IPS creates both an opportunity and a challenge for VR as it works on developing relationships with the 18 CCOs. In addition, VR continues to work with Mid-Valley Behavioral Health to build an employment service delivery model for youth enrolled in the Early Assessment, Screening and Treatment project, a evidence-based practice model for treating youth experiencing their first psychotic or depressive episode. For more on VR’s mental health supported employment activities, see below.

Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), the state agency that oversees and supports Oregon’s public system of services to individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, adopted an Employment First policy in 2008. Under this policy, first consideration is given to employment in developing services and supports for working age individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities. VR has been a critical partner in implementing this policy. Some of the outcomes of implementing Employment First have included identification of the need for more service providers with the skills to serve individuals with intellectual/ developmental disabilities who experienced more significant functional limitations; the need to align and streamline the transition process; the need to identify and implement best practices; the need for sustainable funding for benefits planning services; and the need for effective engagement strategies for youth and their families. In FFY 2013, DDS, the Oregon Department of Education and VR developed an MOU and work plan for carrying out activities in support of the Employment First policy. For more on the policy, see below.

In January 2012, Disability Rights Oregon (DRO), the state’s protection and advocacy system, filed suit in United States District Court alleging that the State is violating the ADA rights of a group of individuals working in sheltered workshops by not providing them with access to supported employment services. This suit followed an earlier finding by the Court that Olmstead decision extended to employment. Subsequently, the U.S. Department of Justice joined the lawsuit against the State. On April 10, 2013, Governor John Kitzhaber issued an Executive Order 13-04, consistent with DDS’ Employment First policy. The Order calls for the following:

“Improving Oregon’s delivery of employment services, with the goal of achieving integrated employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities, consistent with their abilities and choices, will benefit individuals with disabilities, their families, our communities, the economy, and state…the Department of Human Services and Oregon Department of Education shall work to further improve Oregon’s system of designing and delivering employment services to those with intellectual and developmental disabilities toward fulfillment of Oregon’s Employment First policy, including a significant reduction over time of state support of sheltered work and increase investment in employment services.”

The complete Executive Order can be read at: http://www.oregon.gov/gov/docs/executive_orders/eo_13-04.pdf

QUALITY OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

In general, the quality of a VR SE plan is evaluated to ensure that it complies with defining criteria of SE:

• Work is performed in an integrated setting that provides regular interactions with individuals who do not have disabilities, other than caregivers.

• The individual is receiving a wage commensurate with non-disabled workers doing the same work.

• The ongoing support needs and sources of support have been identified and secured.

• Supported employment services provided to clients are for the maximum number of hours possible, based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

• Clients and employer are satisfied with placements.

Historically, VR has aligned with AMH in promoting Individualized Placement and Support (IPS), an evidence-based SE model. Quality of these programs is assessed through compliance with a scale, which e measures the ’fidelity’ or the degree to which a program is being implemented in accordance with the program’s design. Some of the measures used in the IPS fidelity scales are the kinds of employment outcomes participants are obtaining; the degree of collaboration with vocational rehabilitation; availability of rapid job search and evidence of consumer choice. VR maintains quality SE outcomes through ongoing collaboration with mental health providers on the local level and AMH central office staff.

SCOPE OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES (AND EVIDENCE OF COLLABORATION)

In FFY 2012, VR provided SE services to 1,140 individuals with significant disabilities, including persons with psychiatric disabilities, intellectual and/or developmental disabilities or traumatic brain injuries. During this same period, 228 individuals who received SE services entered into competitive employment, and 360 individuals continued to participate in their SE IPEs.

Supported Employment for Persons with Psychiatric Disabilities

VR continues to work to make evidence-based mental health SE services available throughout Oregon.

Background

VR’s efforts in this area were initiated nearly thirteen years ago, when its field offices in the Portland metropolitan area and Grants Pass in southern Oregon began collaborating with AMH, local mental health programs and Portland State University to provide evidence-based SE services (IPS) to individuals with psychiatric disabilities served by VR.

In 2002, VR and AMH sought to expand the availability of evidence-based mental health SE services and initiated a project in Jackson, Douglas and Polk counties with Options of Southern Oregon, a community-based mental health provider. This project was aided by a three year grant from Dartmouth College/Johnson & Johnson Community Mental Health Project to implement IPS.

Although the Johnson & Johnson grant funding ended in 2005, VR and AMH continued to support the efforts of Options and Life Works. This same year began the Oregon Competitive Employment Project (CEP), funded by a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG). CEP subsequently identified expansion of SE services as one of its primary objectives (for more on CEP, see Attachment 4.11.e.2).

Recent to Current Activities

In 2006, VR, CEP and AMH continued their efforts to stimulate and perpetuate SE services though provision of MIG mini-grants to local mental health programs in seven counties. CEP also funded Options of Southern Oregon and Lifeworks Northwest to provide training and technical assistance on SE to local mental health providers. At the same time, VR, CEP and AMH continued to seek long-term funding for SE services.

In 2007 and 2008, VR and AMH continued to provide evidence-based SE services to persons with significant psychiatric disabilities through VR field offices and community-based mental health programs. In addition, VR, CEP and AMH continued their initiatives to expand and sustain SE services:

• Options for Southern Oregon and Lifeworks Northwest of metro Portland were provided with innovation and expansion funding to provide job placement and support services to VR clients living in their catchments.

• Additional CEP mini-grants were provided to local mental health programs.

• A leadership, technical assistance and training center on evidence-based SE mental supported employment - the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE), was established in December 2007. OSECE has since provided training and TA to over 40 job developers with 21 county mental health programs, utilizing the Dartmouth College/Johnson & Johnson evidence-based model.

In FFY 2010, VR counseling staff continued to provide supported employment services to individuals with psychiatric disabilities, in partnership with Oregon’s community mental health programs. A primary VR focus continues to be on expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. VR and CEP continued to support, partner with and utilize OSECE in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of September 2012, community mental health programs in 21 counties were providing such services. With the inclusion of IPS into Oregon’s Coordinating Care Organizations, VR looks forward to evidence-based supported employment services being available throughout Oregon in the foreseeable future.

VR continues to support and collaborate with the Project Early Assessment Screening and Treatment (Project EAST) in assisting young people with psychiatric disabilities by assisting them in obtaining or maintaining employment (an evidence-based practice, which is effective in reducing the onset and symptoms of mental illness). VR continues to provide Enhancing Employment Outcomes training to allied mental health providers. Through CEP, VR has begun to explore the benefits of peer support for individuals with psychiatric disabilities in the workplace.

Supported Employment for Persons with Developmental Disabilities

VR partners with the Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS) and others, including support services brokerages (DD brokerages), county case managers, rehabilitation service providers and advocates in providing SE services to persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities.

In 2003, VR and DDS began serving and supporting persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities affected by the Staley settlement. The agreement, prompted by a federal lawsuit, requires the state to provide qualified persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities with access to community services, including SE.

From 2004 to 2006, VR and DDS funded and developed local SE teams, comprised of DD brokerage and VR field staff. These teams meet and exchange information, solve problems and coordinate local activities, with the intent of increasing provision of SE services to persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities. In implementing this initiative, VR and DDS:

• Provided planning materials, training and ongoing technical assistance to the local teams.

• Developed, disseminated and utilized a ’Supported Employment Toolkit with Guidelines for VR Field and Support Services Brokerage Staff’ (Toolkit). The toolkit was updated in FFY 2007.

• Surveyed DD brokerages and VR branch offices in order to assist the teams in promoting quality services for DD brokerage/VR clients.

More recently, VR and DDS have sought to expand the availability of SE services to persons with developmental disabilities through staff participation with related groups, including:

• The Developmental Disabilities Supported Employment Task Force, which is comprised of advocates, community stakeholders and services providers and advises SPD, CEP and VR on SE issues.

• The SPD Employment Group, which is working to restructure rates for SE services provided under Oregon’s home and community-based services Medicaid waiver.

• Oregon Rehabilitation Association’s (ORA) Customized Employment Network (ORA represents Oregon’s rehabilitation service providers).

A significant and important development in this area in recent years has been DDS’s development, adoption and implementation of its Employment First policy. The Employment First policy was the result of a multi-year effort involving:

• The leadership and commitment of DDS

• The efforts of disability advocates, most notably Oregon’s Council on Development Disabilities, and

• The support and collaboration of VR and CEP, which were instrumental in bringing the issue to the table at the outset of VR’s receipt of the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant in 2005; and which underwrote DDS’ initial participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN), a state and national effort to renew and expand state SE services to persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and participated in development of the policy.

Since FFY 2010, VR and CEP continued to support and collaborate with DDS in implementing its Employment First policy. VR management participated in planning implementation of the policy and a subsequent two-day statewide summit and regional day-long forums to kick-off the policy. CEP helped underwrite these events, as well as DDS’ use of consultants from Washington Initiative for Supported Employment (WISE).

DDS, OCDD, and VR have worked with the Department of Education to develop an MOU and charter for serving youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities as they transition from high school to employment or higher education. Going forward, the MOUs and charters will be implemented, data gathered and tracked to monitor the progress made.

Supported Employment for Persons with Traumatic Brain Injuries

VR continues to provide SE services to persons with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Using the Center for Disease Control estimates, the Brain Injury Association of Oregon (BIAOR) calculates that there are over 72,000 individuals in Oregon living with a brain injury; that each year over 17,000 individuals in the state will sustain a brain injury; and that over 8,500 of these individuals will sustain a short-term disability or more.

In 2009, VR/CEP and BIAOR continued to work to establish a registry for accurately determining the number of individuals in Oregon who acquire or sustain a TBI, and develop a statewide SE service model for individuals with TBI and identify funding for these services. Legislation creating the registry has since been passed and the registry is being developed by the Division of Public Health.

VR continues to work with BIAOR to expand the availability of SE services to individual with TBI and related capacities and has supported or participated in BIAOR’s annual conferences in recent years.

Other Supported Employment Developments and Activities

VR continues to carry out other significant activities related to supported employment.

• CEP continued to operate and refined its statewide Work Incentives Network (WIN) and continued its efforts to sustain WIN on a long-term basis by obtaining continuing funding. WIN provides information, referral and planning services to persons with disabilities on the use of federal and state benefits and work incentives in order to assist them in achieving their employment goals. Work incentives/benefits planning is an important element for many individuals who are utilizing or intend to utilize supported employment and data on benefits planning programs, including WIN, indicates that benefits planning is useful in facilitating employment.

While the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant that has helped fund WIN (and has funded CEP) ends on December 31, 2013, VR is continuing to support WIN and seek state and other funding for WIN. (For more, see Attachment 4.11.e.2.)

• In FFY 2007, VR refined its capacity to identify and process Ticket Cost Reimbursement claims through the creation and filling of a Ticket coordinator position, and as a result significantly increased its Ticket Cost Reimbursement revenue.

• In 2010, VR and AMH initiated implementation of the DHS as an EN initiative, with initiation of 12 Ticket-related pilots with community mental health programs that provide evidence-based supported employment services. The agreements for the pilots were subsequently extended. VR anticipates continuing them. VR is exploring similar arrangements with DDS and developmental disability ‘brokerages’ in order to increase provision of supported employment services to individuals assisted by the brokerages.

• Under the EN initiative, VR serves as a Ticket administrative unit and submits and tracks Tickets and collects and disburses Ticket reimbursements; while TTW qualified local programs, such as the community mental health centers, initiate and maintain contact with clients who are Ticket holders, ensure Tickets are assigned to DHS/VR, submit Ticket reimbursement claims, and promote supported employment of persons with disabilities with some or all of their TTW proceeds.

For more on VR’s Ticket activities, see Attachments 4.8.b.1, and 4.11.d.2.

EXTENT OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

Supported employment is integrated into the array of services and programs available to Oregonians with disabilities, including Oregon’s mental health and developmental disability service systems. Success in SE requires a partnership among the responsible state and community programs, other service providers, consumers and families, advocacy organizations, employers and others. Long-term success continues to depend on the availability of funding for follow-along SE services.

VR utilizes Title VI, Part B and Title I funds for the time-limited services necessary for an individual to stabilize in a community-based job. Services that may be part of a SE IPE include:

• Person centered planning

• Community-based assessment

• Job development

• Job placement

• On-site training for worker and/or co workers

• Long-term support development

• Other services and goods

• Post employment services

The specific type, level and location of ongoing supports provided to an individual are based upon his or her needs and those of the employer. Ongoing support may be provided by a variety of public and/or private sector resources including:

• AMH and community mental health programs

• DDS community supports

• County developmental disability case managers and developmental disability service brokerages

• Social Security work incentives

• Employer-provided reasonable accommodations

• Natural supports

• Family or community sponsorship

TIMING OF THE TRANSITION TO EXTENDED SERVICES

Generally, VR will not exceed its 18-month in-plan status with an SE case. This 18-month time-line can be extended for exceptional circumstances, if the counselor and client jointly agree to the extension. Job coaching and/or on the job training supports are usually structured into a much shorter time-frame, with long-term extended services being built into the plan as quickly as possible to ensure ongoing success when VR involvement ends.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2013 4:17PM by Daniel Haun

System Information

System information

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on:07/31/2013 7:44 PM

Last updated by:saorhaund

Completed on: 07/31/2013 7:47 PM

Completed by: saorhaund

Approved on: 08/01/2013 7:09 AM

Approved by: rscoisbisterf