ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Oregon Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services State Plan for Fiscal Year 2013 (submitted FY 2012)

1.1 The Oregon Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Oregon Department of Human Services [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Administrator Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Administrator Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Stephaine Parrish Taylor

Title of Signatory
OVRS Administrator

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/30/2012

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2013
Yes

Comments:

The following is how ILRC activities have been consistent with the SPIL:

1. Services are provided to counties listed in the SPIL. Efforts are made to reach unserved and underserved areas of the service area and underserved and unserved populations, including minority groups.

2. The core IL Services of information and referral, IL skills training, peer counseling (including cross-disability peer counseling), and individual and systems advocacy are provided. In addition, the ILRC makes available the other services listed in the SPIL and provides services that are requested.

3. Eligibility for Receipt of Services is maintained as per the SPIL. Services are provided to individuals with significant disabilities.

4. A consumer service record is maintained for each consumer of services, other than information and referral.

5. Services are provided to individuals with significant disabilities in accordance with an ILP mutually agreed upon by an appropriate staff member and the consumer unless the individual signs a waiver.

6. Consumers are given information about the availability of the Client Assistance Program (CAP).

7. ILRC receives all of the Title VII Part B funds directly as stated in the SPIL.

8. ILRC conducts annual consumer satisfaction surveys.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Stephaine Parrish Taylor

Title of Signatory
OVRS Administrator

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/30/2012

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

The SRC recognizes that the environment in which OVRS has operated in for the past year was not the most favorable for achieving results for their customers. The economy was not generating new employment opportunities; there were a number of significant structural and program changes made in response to the Secretary of State Audit; and a significant reorganization within DHS as a result of the separation of DHS and the Oregon Health Authority. In spite of these obstacles, OVRS met or exceeded RSA performance expectations. Specifically OVRS increased the rehabilitation rate by 10%, anticipates a 9% increase in employment outcomes and received national recognition for Project Access and Project Employ.

SRC INPUT 1:

This year the SRC conducted two surveys, one for Job Developers and the other for OVRS staff. The findings from these surveys showed there were many issues for both groups that needed to be addressed. December 13, 2011 an extensive written report on the staff survey was submitted to OVRS administration, with issues and concerns as well as recommendations and a request for response. OVRS administration did not respond to this report. Subsequently, a follow up letter from the SRC executive committee was sent to OVRS administration requesting a plan of action and a response to the original report. Three months later on March 7, 2012, OVRS responded with a draft response to the staff survey report. A big concern for the SRC this year is the lack of communication between OVRS administration, the field staff, contracted partners and the SRC. The evidence of poor communication prompted the SRC to communicate directly with the Director of Human Services regarding the alarming testimony from OVRS staff and contracted partners.

The SRC notes specifically the work of Joe Miller and Sandy Dalsing with their efforts to improve communications with field staff through newsletters and online reports about continuous improvement.

OVRS RESPONSE 1:

The majority of job developer responses to the “yes/no/not sure” questions, yielded either “no” or “not sure” responses. In response to “excellent to poor” questions, most responses were in the “excellent to average” range. However, a number of job developers expressed specific concerns. These fell into three areas:

  • The 90 day time limitation. Some developers asserted that it is unrealistic and impractical to place clients with intellectual disabilities and/or developmental disabilities (IDs/DDs) and individuals and with other significant disabilities within this time frame.

  • Allen Anderson employer engagement model. Some developers asserted that the Anderson model is problematic for clients with IDs/DDs.

  • Billing issues. Some developers expressed concerns that not all of the time spent on job development will be billable, such as time spent meeting with clients and stakeholders.

From our end, the 90 day timeframe was a checkpoint for reviewing the progress made by the job developer, and deciding upon future services and continued use of the developer. We set the review at 90 days because the majority of clients find work within that timeframe.

As we previously discussed with you, employer engagement, the focus of the EOP II training, has been described as the “front door” to customized employment by Dr. John Butterworth, a noted expert in the field of customized and supported employment for individuals with IDs/DDs. Outcome data, which we have reviewed with your Executive Committee as well as and the full Council, has not demonstrated a negative impact on outcomes for individuals with IDs/DDs.

We have made several changes to address the third concern. A referral fee has been added. Assessment has been removed from the contract and will be billed on an hourly basis. The nature and scope of assessment activities will be developed on an individualized basis. In addition, the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services (ODDS) and we are considering how else we might address this issue with individuals who have IDs/DDs.

Stephaine Parrish Taylor, in giving her Administrator’s report at your January 2012 meeting, shared that our response to the staff survey report would be delayed because of workload issues. Stephaine subsequently provided the Executive Committee with a draft response, detailing our activities to address a number of the communication issues that you had raised.

In response to issues about job development changes, Stephaine sent a letter to Jesse Kappel, SRC Chairperson, on February 10, 2012. In that letter, Stephaine wrote:

We are in an economic environment where controlling cost is important. It is particularly important for OVRS to avoid closing priority levels and reducing services to clients and business to vendors. Job developers took a much more significant financial hit when we entered an Order of Selection than they would potentially under the new rates. There is the reality that regardless of what method we use to pay for job development services OVRS doesn’t generate sufficient job placement business to keep every vendor we have on the rolls in business…

I believe delaying this process would be detrimental to the program. In reviewing the billing information and from comments from job developers, business viability is an issue that predates any change in rates. It should be noted that the Worker’s Compensation system has gone to performance based placement with a single $2,000 payment. The most significant impact would be financial. If we are to keep all priorities open through the biennium we must maintain strong control. Equally important is the collaborative work we are doing with the Office of Developmental Disability Services.

Further, we have acknowledged the communication issues you have raised and have taken steps to address them. With the support of Department of Human Services Communication’s staff, we developed a communications plan, although its implementation was delayed because of staffing issues. We revised the plan in response to your staff survey report and placed additional emphasis on developing an Intranet for OVRS, a dedicated website for staff containing news and information about OVRS, administrative and program developments and delivery of VR services, as well as resources, tools and links.

SRC INPUT 2:

The overwhelmingly consistent negative responses from the staff survey prompted the SRC to perform site visits. After visiting every OVRS office the SRC concluded that the lack of communication between the OVRS administration and the local field offices remains an outstanding problem. From the SRC’s Site Visit Salient Report:

  • Among many issues, staff stated that they do not feel that their concerns were being acknowledged.

  • They feel that branch managers were not being given the opportunity to share the concerns that they and their staff have over such issues as the changes to ORCA and its impact to the clients they serve during the intake process.

  • The relationship between the field and OVRS central office has suffered over the last few years. Field input is seldom sought and/or ignored when given. Staff most frequently cite "poor communication” as the major issue. They frequently find out from their community partners what is going on before they hear it from the "Salem administration office". They also reported inconsistency in the "messaging" provided from one training to the next, and indicated that there doesn’t appear to be a consistent way to keep the field informed and updated.

The SRC wishes to specifically note the improvements and responses by OVRS Administration in communicating with staff regarding continuous improvement ideas and suggestions. These significant efforts are having a positive effect with field staff.

OVRS RESPONSE 2:

We continue to work to improve communication between administration and the field, and seek and respond to staff concerns. In relation to your input, and input that you provided in last year’s 4.2.c Attachment, we would note:

  • A new ORCA coordinator was hired last fall. Upon assuming her position, the coordinator initiated and has continued to provide weekly updates and incident updates to staff. In November, the coordinator convened an ongoing staff workgroup to assist her in identifying and addressing ORCA issues and problems. In addition, staff have been invited to participate in an ORCA testing group.

  • Over the past two years, we have actively worked to implement DHS’ Continuous Improvement (CI) initiative, a strategy that promotes employee engagement and problem solving. As part of this initiative, any staff person may file a CI report (“sheet”) on any issue or process that the staffer believes can be improved. The sheets are reviewed by a CI Coordinator, who works with management and staff to identify valid issues and develop and implement improvements and solutions.

  • Ninety five CI sheets have been submitted by OVRS staff since 2011, resulting in 78 improvements. The OVRS CI Coordinator maintains a log of CI sheets, which is accessible to all staff; meets regularly with our Executive Team to review the CI sheets that she has received from staff, secure agreement on how to address issues, and update us on the progress made in developing and implementing solutions to issues. In addition, the Coordinator maintains a quarterly electronic newsletter to keep staff informed about our CI efforts. In implementing the CI initiative and other DHS “business transformation” processes, OVRS has often moved more quickly to implement processes than other programs.

  • In developing new and revised administrative rules, policies and technical assistance guides, field staff and branch managers have been represented and active in the work groups that have been tasked with this responsibility. Over the past year, as a new field services policy manual was developed, we sought to further involve the field and each branch office was given responsibility for reviewing a section of the manual and recommending where improvements or additions were needed. Upon completion of the manual, a team of managers and staff developed a two-day in-person training that was piloted with branch managers (in order to determine where it needed to be strengthened), and subsequently delivered the training to staff in eight locations around the state. Through these highly interactive trainings, additional staff input was sought, obtained and used to further refine the new manual. Work on rules, policies and TAGs continues and joint workgroups continue to be utilized.

  • Last fall and winter, DHS directed all of its programs to develop strategic plans. In fulfilling this task, we first sought input from the field and Central office staff. Subsequently, Stephaine assembled and utilized a work group of counselors, branch managers, program coordinators and Executive Team members to develop the plan’s key elements. (It should be noted that the strategic plan aligns with our State Plan.)

  • Recently, the Field Services Unit decided to restructure its monthly, all-day Branch Managers meetings to improve how it’s doing business. The first half of the day continues to be dedicated to information sharing, including an Administrator’s report from Stephaine; updates and briefings from other OVRS units and programs, the Office of Human Resources and others about current and anticipated activities, developments and issues; and discussion about these and other matters. This section of the meeting continues to be staffed by Executive Team members and Central Office program coordinators, analysts, field technicians and other admin staff who support the field. The second half of the day has been set aside as a dedicated period of time for the Field Services and Branch Managers to address field-specific issues and problems.

  • Within the program, we continue to utilize a variety of formal and informal processes and mechanisms to share information, elicit feedback, identify issues and concerns, and address problems. These range from:

    • Weekly Executive Team meetings

    • Monthly Unit and Branch staff meetings

    • Daily to weekly interaction between admin staff (including the Policy and Research Analysts, Field Technicians and Dispute Resolution, Employer Engagement, Job Development, ORCA, Project ACCESS, Workforce Services, Competitive Employment Project and Ticket to Work Coordinators) and field staff. Over the past year, many admin staff have traveled to field offices to provide technical assistance and training, and consult about and coordinate activities with the branches.

    • Needs assessments, including annual assessments of staff and manager training needs, and the triennial comprehensive needs assessment.

SRC INPUT 3:

The Job Developer contract was revised by OVRS this year to an outcome payment system. While the SRC does not oppose going that direction, we feel that once again the lack of communication and request for input by SRC members and job developers is disconcerting. The plan to roll out the new contract with little notice to job developers brought several job developers to attend the SRC meetings to give public testimony as well as written testimony, sharing their frustration and concerns about the lack of information, communication and their fears about not being able to continue business with the new payment system.

The SRC requested OVRS postpone the implementation of the contract change until a group of stakeholders, including SRC members and job developers, was brought together to resolve the issues. The SRC’s request for postponement and a gathering of stakeholders was not acknowledged and OVRS administration stated a new release date of March 1. Once again the SRC requested implementation not take place until stakeholders met and worked on the contract issues together. After the SRC’s request, OVRS invited a group together to share their concerns and work together to create a contract that will work for all. The implementation of the new contract is scheduled for June 1, 2012. As of this writing, the SRC continues to hear negative comments from job developers regarding the new contract.

OVRS RESPONSE 3:

We moved to a performance based job development system in order to improve and better demonstrate outcomes, increase accountability and control costs. In recent years, the Rehabilitation Services Administration, the legislature and the Department have become more focused on program outcomes and efficiencies. Job developers were first informed in 2010 that we were moving to a new model of job development. Implementation was set for 2011. We instituted a number of changes over the past year, but the real shift to a performance based model will occur in July with the onset of the state fiscal year and new contracts.

We have informed and discussed these changes with you, as well as provided SRC members with training on the new job development model and the fee changes. In October 2010, we assembled a job development advisory committee (of OVRS staff and administration, SRC members and job developers) to provide us with input. The committee continues to meet and make recommendations. OVRS managers and staff have been trained on the job development model as well.

We do not agree with some of the changes you have recommended be made to our new job development model. In a number of instances, we believe our unwillingness to make changes has been perceived as poor communication rather than disagreement.

SRC INPUT 4:

The SRC appreciates the efforts OVRS has put into giving field staff new tools in working with consumers, however the SRC is concerned with OVRS’ approach that one tool fits every consumer. Specifically the SRC does not think that MI (motivational interviewing) is an appropriate approach for all consumers, specifically individuals who experience cognitive impairments, such as brain injuries or intellectual/developmental disabilities, and that as a result these individuals may be underserved or poorly served.

Given the Rehabilitation Act identifies INDIVIDUALITY, and accommodating individual barriers to employment, we expect OVRS to maintain flexibility and diversity when working with consumers who use a variety of ways to communicate their wants, needs and desires. This effort should expand to OVRS partners and allow job developers to utilize various professional means of gathering information from and about the consumers they are paid to support. As noted in our report to OVRS, our recommendations include asking OVRS to change their mandated MI technique to the following: “Counselors can choose to apply MI when their clients are ambivalent about going to work or when they are resistant.

OVRS RESPONSE 4:

Motivational intervention is a very useful counseling tool in assisting clients in achieving their desired employment outcomes. This does not mean it is appropriate for every client and we do not require that it be used with all OVRS clients. However, we do not believe it is categorically inappropriate for certain groups of people with disabilities, including those you reference.

We agree that in explaining and training on motivational intervention, language and examples should be used that can be understood by everyone. A good example of this was the role play performed by staff at your quarterly meeting last fall, demonstrating the use of motivational intervention techniques with an individual an intellectual and developmental disability.

In regards motivational intervention, OVRS policy manual states:

Motivational Assessment: Determines participant’s motivational state regarding readiness to make changes needed to obtain an employment outcome and identifies appropriate strategies to enhance motivation. The VR counselor may use motivational strategies to enhance motivation. The VR counselor may use motivational assessments during pre-plan and whenever there is a lack of progress.

Current policy, reviewed and approved by you in 2011, is consistent with this recommendation.

Job development has been narrowly defined by the program as direct employer contact. Policy regarding job placement states:

Depend[ing] on the participant’s employment profile the counselor shall guide the job developer [in] implement[ing] appropriate job development strategies while performing the Employment Outcomes Professional II four-step process as best practice for job placement.

Current policy, which was reviewed and approved by the Council in 2011, is consistent with this recommendation.

Job developers are not prohibited from using other job development strategies by either OVRS policy or practice. Having identified the lack of employment engagement as a significant factor in the poor performance of job developers, the program moved forward with the training requirement and the use of performance based payments.

SRC INPUT 5:

While the SRC supports OVRS efforts to move to outcome based payments for job placement services, we believe it is crucial to continue to seek and use input from the job development community on the efficiency and effectiveness of the services around the state. Best practices in performance based contracting identifies that regular and timely feedback is essential to carving a model that will be successful. The SRC suggests an easy to use format on the OVRS web site as a means to gather job placement contractors’ feedback and comments.

OVRS RESPONSE 5:

We support this recommendation. In the February 10, 2011 letter that Stephaine wrote to Jesse, we made the following commitment:

Current data shows improvement in job development and job outcomes, including for individuals with [ID/DD]. That being said, in response to concerns regarding input into decision-making, OVRS remains committed to continuing work to address expressed concerns about services to this population.

To this end OVRS will:

  • In conjunction with the SRC, the Job Developer Advisory Group, and other stakeholders, continue to review the outcomes, based on mutually agreed benchmarks, for people with significant disabilities. Based on those reviews OVRS may make warranted adjustments to the contracting and payment systems. This may include adjustments to payment rates or conditions.

  • Work with stakeholders and agency such as the Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) to address the capacity needs for job developers and enhance training to job developers above the foundational training OVRS currently provides.

  • Work to coordinate the delivery of services with other agencies such as ODDS to align and complement services in such areas as “job discovery,” individual rate setting for long term supports, and maximizing available resources for to assure the best available financing of our services.

    • Include in the July 2012 pilot of the Vendor Report Card information specific to employment outcomes and services for individuals with [ID/DD].

SRC INPUT 6:

The Council is concerned about the potential effect House Bill 4131 will have on the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (OVRS) and its ability to provide supervision and coaching for staff. This bill relates to the ratio of state agency public employees to supervisory employees. A state agency that employs more than 100 employees must attain a ratio of 11 to 1 of employees of the state agency who are not supervisory employees to supervisory employees. This ratio will increase over the coming years. It appears how DHS interprets this does not follow the federal act that relates to the OVRS Administrator having direct control over OVRS staff.

OVRS RESPONSE 6:

We appreciate your concern about the challenges created by House Bill 4131.

This screen was last updated on Jul 2 2012 2:10PM by saorlincolns

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

Waiver of Statewideness

The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (OVRS) requests a continuation of its waiver of statewideness for its Youth Transition Program (YTP), through which it serves transition-aged youth with disabilities with enhanced services that lead to employment or career-related post-secondary education or training. For a complete description of YTP, see Attachment 4.8.b.2.

Although transition services are available through OVRS on a statewide basis, OVRS provides enhanced services through third-party cooperative agreements (FN – see end of attachment) with 39 public educational school districts and school consortia, representing 115 of Oregon’s 280 public high schools, resulting in these more intensive transition services being available in only some of the state’s political subdivisions.

Each third-party cooperative agreement sets forth the specific, enhanced transition services that are provided by our YTP. The relevant boilerplate from the current YTP agreements describes the enhanced services as follows:

Exhibit A, Part 2, Summary of Work, III, Services and Activities Comprising the Program

  1. b. DHS through OVRS shall provide the following services, in addition to the vocational rehabilitation services OVRS generally provides to transition-aged youth:

    1. OVRS Counselor(s), as assigned by OVRS will:

      1. Be a member(s) and participate on District’s YTP team;

      2. Participate in the screening and selection of students who will be served by District’s Transition Specialist;

      3. Evaluate and determine eligibility of students for OVRS services;

      4. Assist the District’s Transition Specialist and students in identifying and providing Informational & Referral sources that will assist students in making informed career choices and successfully achieving their IPE goals.

      5. Develop or accept developed IPEs for non-waitlisted YTP students.

      6. Provide or arrange for funding of necessary vocational rehabilitation client services that are not the responsibility of the District.

      7. After students are no longer eligible for transition services under IDEA, continue to provide IPE services as needed and as permitted under Order of Selection.

      8. Assist District in the selection and evaluation of District’s Transition Specialist(s).

    2. OVRS will also:

      1. Depending on the availability of funding, ensure that designated OVRS staff attend Oregon Department of Education (ODE)/University of Oregon (UofO)/OVRS YTP training.

      2. Make every reasonable effort to process all disbursement of Agreement funds within two weeks of the District’s fiscal (expenditure) report.

  2. c. District shall undertake the following actions and provide the following specific services, in addition to the transition services District generally provides to students with disabilities:

    1. Establish the qualifications and classification for the Transition Specialist and create a year-round position, using the typical duties outlined in section 3.d. of this Exhibit A, Part 2.

    2. Identify a direct contact within the District to assist in managing District’s YTP and supervising the Transition Specialist.

    3. When hiring new Transition Specialists, make every reasonable effort to include an OVRS representative in the interview process.

    4. Ensure coordination of activities between YTP students’ IEPs and IPEs.

    5. Ensure that the Transition Specialist has the support of the District’s special education director and the principal of the school or building in which the Transition Specialist serves in order to ensure that each YTP student’s transition goals are achieved, and that the District can meet its YTP performance benchmarks.

    6. Participate in the OVRS data collection system.

    7. Ensures that the Transition Specialist attends ODE/OVRS/UoO [sic] YTP training.

    8. Provide required matching funds by the dates specified in Exhibit A, Part 3, section 2 of this Agreement.

    9. Include District administrative staff (e.g., District’s business manager or other manager with comparable responsibilities) in administering the Agreement.

    10. Ensure that the Transition Specialist is fully informed of the services and limitations of services under this Agreement.

  3. d. District Transition Specialist is responsible for performing the following duties to carry out the objectives of this Agreement:

    1. Identify and refer students to OVRS and, as necessary or as requested by OVRS, assist OVRS in referring eligible students to other employment related sources of assistance.

    2. Secure school documentation of students’ disabilities and relevant anecdotal information to assist District’s YTP team in determining the eligibility of students for OVRS services;

    3. Assist students in application status with OVRS in acquiring the transportation needed to attend appointments necessary to assess students’ eligibility for OVRS’ services;

    4. For non-waitlisted YTP students, coordinate with the OVRS counselor and student to develop any needed additional disability assessment or career exploration activities required to develop the IPE.

    5. For non-waitlisted YTP students, identify transition and career-skill readiness deficits that need to be in students’ IPEs.

    6. For non-waitlisted YTP participants, coordinate IEP and IPE transition activities.

    7. For non-waitlisted YTP participants, in collaboration with the OVRS counselor, provide a variety of transition services, such as: development of work experiences, job shadows, and career exploration activities; provide job coaching; and develop paid employment consistent with the vocational goal of the student.

    8. For non-waitlisted YTP students, advocate for students to ensure that they have access to District training opportunities and resources that are needed in order for the student to achieve a successful school-to-career transition. For waitlisted students, ensure that referrals are to non-YTP or non-OVRS funded resources.

    9. For non-waitlisted YTP students, provide referral and access to individualized and group activities that are beyond the training or resources that are available to the general student body. Examples include job clubs, community-based work experiences, work skill development, job coaching, community-based work experiences, work skill development, job coaching, community mobility training, selection or enrollment in post-secondary training, arranging for long-term employment support, etc. For waitlisted YTP students, ensure that individualized Information & Referral is provided to non-YTP and non-OVRS funded resources.

    10. For non-waitlisted YTP students, provide individualized job development for both work experience and career related employment.

    11. For non-waitlisted YTP students, take lead responsibility in assisting the student to ensure that the activities of the IPE are carried out.

    12. For non-waitlisted YTP students, may take a lead with the student to develop the content of the IPE (including assisting the student in the identification of vocational goals).

    13. Provide intense and follow-along services for 12 months following the YTP student’s completion or termination of campus based secondary schooling activities, to ensure access to needed Information & Referral resources required for success in post-secondary training or employment;

    14. Collect and report data to OVRS and the YTP technical assistance provider (University of Oregon) to document student progress toward completion of activities related to IEPs and IPEs;

    15. Meet with OVRS counselor as requested to provide updated information on student progress and status for completion of secondary school, employment, or post secondary education activities;

    16. Report to OVRS counselor any changes in status of a student that may affect the successful completion of the student’s IEP or IPE or identification of appropriate Information & Referral resources; and

    17. Attend training and meetings provided by the OVRS-designated technical assistance provider for the school district YTPs statewide, which is the University of Oregon.

The services to be provided under OVRS’ YTP cooperative agreements are limited to those listed above and any proposed services will be subject to OVRS approval prior to implementation. In addition, all services provided under this waiver of statewideness will be subject to all State Plan requirements.

Each agreement additionally provides that the participating school district is to provide a one-third (1/3) match for federal funds. The relevant boilerplate of the agreement states:

Matching funds required from District must be cash derived from non-federal sources and other than OVRS, and cannot include in-kind donations or contributions of property and services.

The agreement also states that schools are not to use funds received under these agreements to serve non-YTP eligible youth (youth on the OOS waitlist who are in application status for OVRS services or are eligible for OVRS services).

Finally, each YTP cooperative agreement ensures the services provided under the agreement comport with the Order of Selection under which OVRS is operating. Additional relevant boilerplate sections from the YTP cooperative agreements follow.

EXHIBIT A, Part 3, Payment and Financial Reporting

  1. Grant. In accordance with the terms and conditions of this Agreement, DHS shall provide District with a maximum of $136,077.72 (the “Grant”) to support and assist the operation of the YTP described in Exhibit A, Part 2 of this Agreement. The Grant will be funded from the following sources:

    1. $136,077.72 from DHS/OVRS consisting of a combination of Federal grant funds received by DHS under the Rehabilitation Act of 9173, as amended in 1998 (78.7%) and non-Federal funds (21.3%) included in OVRS’ legislatively approved budget.

      1. The CFDA number for the Federal funds is 84.126A.

      2. For the purposes of District’s accounting to the ODE, the non-federal share of funds received from OVRS (21.3%) should be allocated as “Other” funds.

      3. $68,038.86 District matching funds, subject to the requirements in section 2 of this Exhibit A, Part 3, below.

  2. Matching Funds. Matching funds required and payment due dates an procedures.

    1. District shall provide to OVRS the required matching funds of:

      1. $34,019.43 for the 2011-12 Fiscal Year by September 1, 2012; and

      2. $34,019.43 for the 2012-13 Fiscal Year by September 1, 2013, except that the amount may be adjusted as specified in section 2.b, below.

      3. For purposes of this Agreement, “Fiscal Year” means the 12-month period beginning July 1, of a year and ending June 30 of the following year.

    2. Matching funds required from District must be cash derived from non-federal sources and other than OVRS, and cannot include in-kind donations or contributions of property and services.

    3. District shall send checks for payment of the required matching funds to:

            DHS Receiving and Trust

             P.O. Box 14006

            Salem, OR 97309-9899

    4. To help ensure proper crediting, District shall write “Agreement 136004 YTP” on checks for required matching funds.

Exhibit A, Part 2, Targeted Student Population

  1. Student eligibility for YTP services and Student Selection: All students selected for the enhanced services funded through this Agreement must be applicants or eligible for OVRS. Typically these Students will be entitled to FAPE services under IDEA, or to reasonable accommodations under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

    1. Specifically, the youth served under this Agreement must be individuals who are applicants for OVRS services, or

    2. Who have been found eligible for OVRS services, based on the following criteria as set forth in 34 C.F.R. § 361.42(a):

      1. The individual has a physical or mental impairment, and

      2. The physical or mental impairment constitutes or results in a substantial impediment to employment, and

      3. The individual needs OVRS services to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain employment consistent with the individual’s unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice, and

    3. Who intend to enter employment or additional employment related training immediately upon completion of their IPE.

  2. Order of Selection: In accordance with OVRS’ Order of Selection waitlist, which became effective on January 15, 2009, services under this Agreement will be provided as follows:

    1. District will refer students with disabilities to OVRS and students may apply for OVRS services. OVRS will determine a student’s eligibility based on the criteria set forth in 2.b. above and will assign the student to a priority level based on the severity of the student’s work related impairment, as set forth in OAR 582-100-0040, and place the student on the Order wait list in accordance with his/her priority level and when he/she applied for services.

    2. Students previously determined eligible for OVRS services and who had an authorized IPE as of January 15, 2009, including students served under a previous YTP agreement with OVRS, are not subject to the Order of Selection. District may provide these students with YTP services.

    3. Students who did not have an authorized IPE as of January 15, 2009 are subject to the Order of Selection. They may not be served (except to apply for OVRS services, have their eligibility determined, and be provided with information and referral services), unless or until they have been taken off the Order of Selection waitlist.

    4. Students released from the Order of Selection waitlist will receive services under this Agreement. Students on the Order waitlist will be released from the waitlist when OVRS has sufficient resources to serve them in the order of their priority level and when they applied for services.

    5. Students whose disabilities are so severe that they cannot reasonably be expected to successfully enter employment without the availability of long-term support services will only be, or remain eligible, for YTP services if the long-term support services are identified and ready to be implemented as soon as the youths complete their secondary school education.

    6. District will only serve students who are applicants or who are eligible for OVRS services under this Agreement. Should District wish to serve students who are not applying or who are ineligible for OVRS services, these services must be provided outside of this Agreement. District will not count money, time or resources spent on these students as part of the 1/3 non-federal contribution made under this Agreement. District will not count these students when reporting on District’s performance under this Agreement.

Footnote: Such third-party cooperative agreements are known as intergovernmental agreements in Oregon. The State of Oregon utilizes contractual terminology in a way that differs from RSA. As used throughout this Plan, the RSA term “cooperative agreement” can include a variety of terms that are used in Oregon Administrative Rules to describe arrangements that are substantively in conformance with RSA requirements, including the following arrangements. “Cooperative agreements”, as defined by Oregon rules, are used to memorialize roles and responsibilities agreed upon between two or more parties in carrying out a project or plan where there is no payment for services or goods. “Interagency agreements” are used to memorialize agreements solely between state officers, boards, commissions, departments, institutions, branches or agencies of the state. “Intergovernmental agreements” are used for agreements between an agency and a unit of local government (such as a school district), a United States governmental agency or an American Indian tribe or agency. “Contracts” are used in Oregon when there will be payment for specific services or goods upon delivery of distinct units of work (such as a contractor’s time, delivery of products and fee for services) or as reimbursement for expenditures tied to performance of work measured against benchmarks specified in the contract. Grants in Oregon provide funding to support or develop a program or activity. In Oregon, grants include expected outcomes or performance standards for the program, but disbursement of funds is not tied directly to delivery of distinct units of work.

This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2012 11:24AM by saorlincolns

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

COOPERATION WITH AGENCIES THAT ARE NOT IN THE STATEWIDE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM AND OTHER ENTITIES In addition to its partnerships with other members of Oregon’s workforce investment system, OVRS works in partnership and cooperation with other Department of Human Services (DHS) divisions and offices, other state and local governmental agencies and programs, and numerous non-governmental organizations. Key among these are those outlined below. DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES PARTNERS AND PROGRAMS Oregon’s developmental disability system includes:

  • The Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODD) of the Seniors and Persons with Disabilities Division (SPD) of DHS. The Employed Persons with Disabilities Program, Oregon’s Medicaid ’buy-in’ program, is also a part of SPD.
  • County operated and funded developmental disability and case management programs.
  • Non-governmental developmental disability service brokerages and service providers.
  • The Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities, which advises the governor and policymakers about serving persons with developmental disabilities.

OVRS continues to regularly interact with this system on case-by-case basis and administratively. OVRS field staff work closely with case managers, support brokerages and others in assisting clients with developmental disabilities in obtaining the developmental disability services and supports clients need to obtain, maintain and advance in employment. OVRS also works closely with Oregon’s developmental disabilities service system on a state-level;

  • OVRS is represented on the Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities (OCDD).
  • SPD is a partner in OVRS’ Oregon Competitive Employment Project (OCEP) and represented on OCEP’s Leadership Council. OCEP is an OVRS-administered, Medicaid Infrastructure Grant initiative that since 2005 has addressed a number of systemic barriers to competitive employment of persons with disabilities. (For more on OCEP, see attachments 4.11.d, 4.11.e.2 and 6.3)
  • OVRS/OCEP is a member of the SPD work group responsible for implementing SPD’s Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN) strategic plan. OVRS/OCEP underwrote SPD’s initial participation in SELN.
  • OCEP works with the Developmental Disabilities Task Force, an ad hoc group of advocates and service providers that promote supported employment for individuals with developmental disabilities on a systems level.

MENTAL HEALTH PARTNERS AND PROGRAMS OVRS works closely with Oregon’s mental health system in serving and supporting persons with psychiatric disabilities, making and accepting referrals for services, and addressing systemic concerns and issues related to employment of persons with psychiatric disabilities. The system includes the Addictions and Mental Health Division (AMH) and public and private community based mental health programs. (In Oregon counties are primarily responsible for delivering publicly-funded mental health services). In addition to interacting with the mental health system on behalf of individual clients, OVRS is working with the system on a number of supported employment related initiatives. Since 2000, OVRS has collaborated with AMH and over a dozen county mental health programs in seeking to develop and sustain supported employment services for persons with psychiatric disabilities. OVRS/OCEP efforts in this area have included:

  • Pooling funding resources with AMH to provide interim funding for existing evidence-based supported employment programs.
  • Contracting with community mental health programs to provide evidence-based supported employment services to OVRS clients.
  • Providing mini-grants and contracts with Medicaid Infrastructure Grant funds to county mental health systems for the infrastructure, technical assistance and training needed to implement evidence-based supported employment. These efforts led to the development and continued operation of the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE), a statewide resource center that provides training and technical assistance on provision of evidence based supported employment to community mental health programs and OVRS staff. OVRS/OCEP provided the initial funding for OSECE.

OVRS continues to work closely with AMH, OSECE and community mental health programs. As of 2011, community mental health programs in 17 counties were providing evidence-based supported employment services. AMH, public and private community-based mental health programs are represented on OCEP’s leadership council. For more, see Attachments 4.11.d, 4.11.e.2 and 6.3). SECONDARY AND HIGHER EDUCATION ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS OVRS partners, collaborates and interacts with secondary and higher education agencies, organizations and programs. For more, see Attachment 4.8.b.2, 4.11.d and 4.11.e.2 STATE INDEPENDENT LIVING COUNCIL, INDEPENDENT LIVING CENTERS, PUBLIC AND PRIVATE ADVOCACY PROGRAMS OVRS interacts with Oregon’s State Independent Living Council (SILC) and seven Centers for Independent Living (CILs) in a number of capacities and on both a systems and direct services level. For instance:

  • The OVRS Administrator is an ex-officio member of the SILC, while SILC’s Director is a member of the Leadership Council of the OVRS/OCEP, and a member of the SILC sits on the State Rehabilitation Council.
  • The SILC) coordinates development of the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) with OVRS and the Oregon Commission for the Blind. This entails conducting a needs assessment, developing goals/objectives for SPIL, approving the final plan and completing the annual federal report on SPIL progress. OVRS participates in annual statewide Independent Living program evaluation meetings and provides routine reports to the SILC on SPIL activities conducted by OVRS. In addition, OVRS and the SILC frequently collaborate and share information on relevant IL program issues.
  • OVRS field offices and CILs routinely interact with one another in making and accepting referrals of individuals needing employment or independent living services and supports and collaborate on other activities, including organizing job fairs, work incentives/benefits planning events and other employment-related events for individuals with disabilities and their families.

In FFY 2010, OVRS established a half-time position to manage the grants to CILs and conduct annual reviews of CIL compliance with RSA performance requirements. Staff traveled to VR offices to promote independent living services, promoted revision of policies guiding payment for IL employment related services, allocated funds for services and training and enhanced reporting. OVRS has a continuing and productive working relationship with Disability Rights Oregon (DRO), Oregon’s rights protection and advocacy system for persons with disabilities. (DRO was previously known as the Oregon Advocacy Center or OAC.) DRO administers Oregon’s Client Assistance Program (CAP) and the Work Incentives Planning and Assistance (WIPA) Program (formerly the Benefits Planning Assistance and Outreach Program). OVRS field and administrative staff interact regularly with CAP and other DRO staff in order to address and resolve client issues and concerns, and to respond to formal client disputes. OVRS staff routinely refer individuals in need of advocacy assistance to DRO, and OVRS’ administration and CAP staff meet quarterly to address systemic concerns. DRO is an active member of OCEP and is represented on OCEP’s Leadership Council. DRO’s WIPA Program partnered with OCEP in developing a plan for a comprehensive and sustainable benefits planning and work incentives system for Oregon, and the two programs are collaborating in implementing of OCEP’s Work Incentives Network (WIN). The two systems complement one another; WIN addresses many of the gaps and limitations on work incentives and benefits planning in Oregon. OVRS has working relationships with numerous other public and voluntary advocacy organizations and groups, including the Oregon Parent Training and Information Center, the Arc of Oregon, Easter Seals of Oregon, United Cerebral Palsy of Oregon, the People with Disabilities Advisory Committee and the Adult Services Advisory Committee. SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION TICKET TO WORK Over the past several years, OVRS has refined its capacity to identify and process Ticket/Cost Reimbursement claims under this Social Security Administration (SSA) program. OVRS has significantly increased its Ticket/Cost Reimbursement revenue. In FFY 2007, OVRS created and filled a Ticket coordinator position to coordinate the office’s Ticket-related functions and activities. The Department of Human Services (DHS), DHS’ divisions and OVRS continue to explore the possibility of DHS functioning as an ’employment network’ or ’EN’ under the Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program. As presently conceptualized, such a ’Partnership Plus’ arrangement might consist of:

  • An administrative unit responsible for submitting and tracking Ticket claims, collecting and disbursing Ticket payments, providing needed training and technical assistance, and promoting and monitoring Ticket utilization. In exchange for these and other Ticket administrative services, OVRS would serve as the administrative unit and assess and collect a small fee from participating EN satellites.
  • An employment network council. This council would be comprised of representatives from DHS divisions, offices and programs and be responsible for identifying needed program changes; facilitating strategic and long-term planning; and identifying and developing needed policy and recommended legislation, including policy on use of Ticket revenue by participating organizations and programs.
  • Satellite Employment Networks. EN satellites would be community-based organizations and programs eligible to serve as ENs and likely include community-based mental health, developmental disability service providers and other human service providers. Satellite ENs would be responsible for initiating and maintaining contact with Ticket holders, ensuring Tickets are available for assignment to DHS, submitting Ticket data needed for Ticket assignment and Ticket payment claims, and promoting employment of persons with disabilities.
  • EN contract compliance and quality assurance/quality enhancement. These functions would be the responsibility of DHS divisions and offices and include executing the necessary contracts with the community-based organizations that serve as satellite ENs.

In January 2010, OVRS and AMH started the DHS as an EN initiative with implementation of Ticket-related pilots with ten community mental health programs that provide evidence-based supported employment services. The agreements for the pilots were subsequently extended through June 2011. OVRS will continue the program thereafter on a biennial basis. OVRS is exploring similar arrangements with ODDS and developmental disability "brokerages" in an effort to foster and support supported employment with the individuals assisted by the brokerages. WORKERS’ COMPENSATION DIVISION The Workers’ Compensation Division (WCD) of the Department of Consumer and Business Services is the Oregon agency responsible for regulating the state’s workers’ compensation system and administering its Preferred Worker Program (PWP). Through WCD/PWP, the WCD provides benefits and incentives to employers and injured workers in order to facilitate re-employment of the workers. OVRS has an ongoing relationship with WCD. In July 2008, OVRS renewed a cooperative agreement it has with WCD to assist PWP cardholders in Clackamas, Columbia, Multnomah and Washington counties. Under OVRS’ PWP initiative, OVRS contacts WCD/PWP-eligible individuals and offers to fast-track them for vocational rehabilitation services and streamline their access to WCD/PWP benefits; while WCD provides funding to support the staffing and services associated with workers’/clients’ work-related injuries. Most recently the agreement between WCD and OVRS was expanded to encompass workers in Lance, Jackson and Josephine Counties; and discussion is underway about further expanding the program to Marion, Douglas and Deschutes Counties. RURAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS OVRS does not currently collaborate with Oregon programs carried out by the Undersecretary for Rural Development. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE, TRAINING AND CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS OVRS collaborates with and utilizes the services of Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center at the University of Washington, the designated Disability Business Technological Center (DBTAC) for Region 10. OVRS also collaborates with the Oregon DBTAC representative housed at the Lane Independent Living Center in Eugene. OREGON COMPETITIVE EMPLOYMENT PROJECT In 2005, OVRS was awarded a four-year Medicaid Infrastructure Grant by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid to develop a more comprehensive, inclusive and integrated system of employment-related services and supports for Oregonians with disabilities. The resulting effort, known as the Oregon Competitive Employment Project (OCEP), involves a multitude of partners on a number of initiatives. In FFY 2008, OVRS/OCEP allies and supporters included:

  • Addictions and Mental Health Division/Oregon Department of Human Services
  • Brain Injury Association of Oregon, Inc
  • Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development
  • Department of Transportation
  • Employment Department
  • Mid-Valley Behavioral Care Network
  • Oregon Advocacy Center
  • Oregon Business Leadership Council, Inc
  • Oregon Commission for the Blind
  • Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities
  • Oregon State Independent Living Council
  • Oregon Parent Training and Information Center
  • People with Disabilities Advisory Council
  • Seniors and People with Disabilities Division/Oregon Department of Human Services
  • Social Security Administration
  • Veterans Administration
  • Worksystems, Inc.

A comprehensive strategic plan, A Blueprint for Change, was developed in the first year of the grant and set out OCEP’s goals, objectives, strategies and outcomes. Calendar year 2011 is the last year of MIG funding but a no-cost grant exception for an additional year will likely be possible. In this event, OVRS may seek to carry over some funds in order to complete activities that help sustain continuing initiatives. For more on OCEP’s strategies and activities, see Attachments 4.8.b.2, 4.11.d and 4.11.e.2. COOPERATIVE RELATIONSHIPS WITH OTHER ORGANIZATIONS AND GROUPS OVRS has working relationships with many other organizations, programs and groups, including those with which OVRS contracts, utilizing innovation, expansion and other funds to provide services to OVRS clients. This attachment last updated June 29, 2009

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2012 8:02PM by saorlincolns

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

The Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (OVRS) recognizes youth as a priority service group and through a number of programs and processes actively works in coordination with state and local education officials to facilitate transition of students with disabilities.

Youth Transition Program

OVRS has operated the Youth Transition Program (YTP) since 1990. Through YTP, high school youth are provided with a comprehensive array of services to prepare them for employment or career-related post-secondary education or training.

YTP is a partnership between OVRS, public educational school districts and school consortia (hereafter referred to as school districts), the Department of Education and the University of Oregon. OVRS is responsible for:

  • Overseeing and coordinating YTP.

  • Entering into YTP cooperative agreements (referred to as intergovernmental agreements in Oregon) with school districts that wish to participate in YTP and which are selected through a competitive process.

  • Working with school district staff at the field and school level to provide YTP services and providing training and technical assistance.

Participating school districts provide specified YTP services, meet specified outcomes and provide OVRS with a one-third match in exchange for the funds the schools provide through the cooperative agreements. OVRS solicits the agreements through a "request for grant proposals" (RFGP) that is issued every two years, usually in the spring preceding the end of the current state budget cycle. Subsequently, OVRS and its YTP partners evaluate the proposals that are submitted and determine which meet the RFGP qualifications and merit funding. In turn, OVRS’ negotiates cooperative agreements with districts that submitted qualified and meritorious proposals. The cooperative agreements usually run for a two-year period that begins at the onset of the state’s budget cycle and ends at the cycle’s conclusion.

The Department of Education (DoE) and the University of Oregon provide training and technical assistance to the school districts and OVRS.

Students participating in YTP:

  • Are enrolled in a school district’s high school or alternative program, although eligible youth who have left school prior to graduation may be included;

  • Are or have been entitled to services under the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), or are receiving disability-related accommodations under Section 504 of the federal Rehabilitation Act; and

  • Are applicants or determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation services.

YTP services begin while students are in high school, generally when a student is in the 11th or 12th grade, and continue for at least one year after the student’s completion of secondary school requirements or departure from school for other reasons. In the 2011-13 cooperative agreement cycle, OVRS will continue to encourage school districts to engage youth earlier in their high school years. In order to facilitate this, OVRS will make available and work with interested schools in refining and utilizing a pre-vocational curriculum for engaging incoming freshman and 10th graders in the classroom. (The existing curriculum was developed as a part of Project ACCESS, through which OVRS and five participating schools have been working to initiate transition services with youth at an earlier age and grade. ACCESS is funded by a U.S. Department of Education grant awarded to OVRS for this purpose.) In addition, OVRS will work to enhance its transition services to students with more significant developmental disabilities through targeted efforts with a group of OVRS field offices and school districts.

The YTP cooperative agreements have provided funding for transition specialists - school district employees who work year round with OVRS counselors to provide:

  • Individualized career and transition planning, focused on post-school goals and self-determination, and help to coordinate plans with relevant adult agencies;

  • Paid job training while in the program and assistance to secure employment or enter post-secondary education upon leaving the program; and

  • Follow-up services after program completion to track progress and provide additional supports as needed.

As in previous years, when a student is selected to participate in YTP, he or she will work with an OVRS counselor to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that reflects the interests, strengths and abilities of the student, and which addresses the barriers to training or employment outcomes for the student. However, OVRS remains in an Order of Selection (effective January 15, 2009). At present, OVRS is serving all eligible individuals and is not utilizing an Order of Selection waitlist; and we anticipate this will be case for FFY 2013. But should it be necessary for OVRS to reinstitute an Order of Selection waitlist, the scope of OVRS services and expected employment outcomes for all individuals served by OVRS, including YTP students, will be modified to comply with OVRS’ Order of Selection waitlist requirements. For more on this, see “YTP and Order of Selection” (below) and Attachment 4.11.c.3 – Order of Selection.

Over the course of FFY 2011, YTP provided services and supports to 1,392 students with disabilities. Of these students:

  • 798 were in vocational rehabilitation application status and 501 had Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE).

  • 81.8 percent of those who exited YTP were either employed in a post-secondary educational or training program or a combination of the two.

  • 148, or 57.4 percent, of the 258 who exited the program were employed upon exit and were working an average of 27.9 hours per week at an average wage of $9.15 an hour.

  • 172 youth continued to be employed twelve months later and were working an average of 28.8hours a week at an average wage of $9.28 an hour.

  • At 12 months, 84 youth were in post-secondary training or education at an average of 18.7hours per week.

OVRS has a full-time YTP Coordinator. This position has existed since September 2002 and is responsible for leading and coordinating YTP and serving as OVRS’ liaison to the Department of Education (DoE), the Oregon university system and the state’s secondary education system and schools on transition issues. OVRS is represented on the State Advisory Council on Special Education and its Transition Advisory Committee. The coordinator and other OVRS staff work closely with Oregon’s community colleges and foster care, youth and workforce programs on transition and related service coordination issues. On a related basis, the DoE has a secondary transition specialist and this position is a member of the State Rehabilitation Council, OVRS’ policy-making partner.

The YTP Coordinator, DoE’s Secondary Transition Specialist and the University of Oregon’s Technical Assistance Advisors jointly provide training to secondary schools and OVRS staff on transition issues and how to collaborate with each other.

In addition, OVRS and its YTP partners:

  • Maintain a YTP website. The site (www.ytporegon.org) provides information on transition, YTP, special education and related services, research, training and links. The intended audience is school and VR personnel, youth and adults with disabilities, parents and other supporters of such individuals, and the public at large. The website is also used to transmit and report on YTP performance data.

  • Provide transition training on a regional basis throughout Oregon about IDEA, modified diploma standards, and the VR process.

  • Serve as liaison to the Oregon Association of Vocational and Special Needs Personnel’s Board of Directors; and UoO and DoE representatives serve on the State Rehabilitation Council, OVRS’ policy making partner.

  • Survey staff participants on YTP. School district sites and OVRS field offices responsible for carrying out YTP are periodically surveyed about their experiences and whether the program is meeting their expectations. The results are reviewed by the YTP Coordinator, YTP Technical Assistance Team and OVRS management and are useful in determining how YTP might be refined or adjusted. Past results have shown that YTP is considered a value added service.

YTP and Order of Selection

If it becomes necessary for OVRS to utilize an Order of Selection prioritized waitlist, OVRS will serve all other students in accordance with the Order of Selection waitlist as follows:

  • Students may apply for OVRS services. Students determined eligible for OVRS services will be assigned a priority level based on severity of disability, according to the priority levels set forth in OAR 582-100-0040. Students participating in YTP are to be provided with services consistent with their position on the waitlist.

  • While on the waitlist, students are to be provided with Information & Referral (I&R) services, including information about other state, federal, and local vocational and related programs. District Transition Specialists are responsible for providing these I&R services, although I&R activities may be carried out with the assistance of an OVRS’ Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor.

  • Students released from the Order of Selection waitlist will be eligible to receive Individualized Plan for Employment development services and will subsequently enter into an Individualized Plan for Employment. OVRS Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and District Transition Specialists will coordinate plan development, implementation and monitoring of YTP students.

University of Oregon

The University of Oregon, under a cooperative agreement (interagency agreement) with OVRS, provides training, technical assistance and evaluation activities to schools participating in YTP. This agreement is usually negotiated and runs for the same two year period as the other YTP cooperative agreements.

Other Transition Coordination Activities with Education Officials

OVRS and the Oregon Commission for the Blind (OCB) established a formal statewide cooperative agreement with all 17 of Oregon’s community colleges in 2005. The original agreement ran from July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2009, but it was subsequently extended to continue through June 30, 2014. The agreement promotes collaboration and linkages through regional teams comprised of community college, OCB and OVRS representatives. This framework provides an ongoing forum for the exchange of information about issues of common concern, policy issues and process improvements to further the goals of the agreement.

The goals of the cooperative agreement include a commitment to:

  • Work together to assure that qualified and eligible students with disabilities have full access to educational opportunities.

  • Understand, acknowledge, and respect the differing requirements and definitions among the partners for such terms as eligibility, documentation of disability, confidentiality (including protected documents within each of our systems), provision of services, and accommodations based on the differing missions of the partners.

In 2005, OVRS and OCB negotiated a cooperative agreement with the Oregon University System (OUS), similar in purpose and scope to the OVRS agreement with the 17 community colleges. That agreement ran from July 1, 2005 runs through June 30, 2009, but it also was subsequently extended to run through June 30, 2014. Under the terms of the agreement:

  • There is a systems cooperative workgroup that is responsible for facilitating implementation of the agreement, evaluating its effectiveness, recommending needed policy change and facilitating provision of related training.

  • Each university disability services office and OCB and OVRS field office has a designated liaison responsible for participating in regional meetings with the community college(s) in their area and exchanging information, fostering collaboration and addressing unique needs and issues.

  • OVRS, OCB and OUS are jointly responsible for:

    • Ensuring access to reasonable accommodations for OCB and OVRS clients enrolled in OUS institutions.

    • Providing opportunities for counselors and institutional disability services representatives to interact and be informed about administrative and accommodative functions and issues.

In order to carry out OVRS’s responsibilities under the cooperative agreements with the community college system and OUS, a designated OVRS staff person serves as the state level liaison to these systems and organizes regional team meetings; documents regional and local needs and concerns, including those related to training; and presents information to the state-level workgroups.

This screen was last updated on Jul 2 2012 6:42PM by saorlincolns

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH PRIVATE NON-PROFIT VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICE PROVIDERS OVRS, in engaging in innovation and expansion activities, enters into cooperative agreements with non-profit organizations to provide a service or set of services to a specific group or groups of individuals. OVRS does this in two ways. To address the diversity of needs that local branches encounter in providing high quality services to consumers, OVRS branch managers have the ability to develop agreements at the local level. Central office staff develop cooperative agreements to address identified needs and gaps. In recommending and selecting proposals, the following criteria are utilized:

  • Addresses gaps in services identified by OVRS’ needs assessment;
  • Number and quality of competitive job placements;
  • Wages earned by consumers;
  • Number of small business/self-employment outcomes;
  • Number of partnerships with state and local workforce investment boards, and private sector employers;
  • Program capacity for people with disabilities through partnerships with employers, schools and community agencies;
  • Number of employment partnerships with tribal entities, African-American, Hispanic and Asian populations;
  • Diversity of people served, staff, and service providers.
  • Quality of customer service; and
  • Use of technological tools that enhance performance.

In February 2009, OVRS revised the Oregon Administrative Rules governing the selection of vendors. OVRS contracts with non-profit and for-profit vendors in order to ensure the availability of a full spectrum of vocational rehabilitation and related services tailored to the specific needs identified in clients’ IPEs, or necessitated by the client’s participation in a vocational rehabilitation program. These individually contracted-for services are arranged on a fee-for-service or performance-based/milestone payment contract basis. The new rule provides for performance standards and qualifications applicable to the specific service in question, rather than attempting to standardize the vendorization process across types and disciplines of vendors. Under the new rule and related procedures, approved vendors must first respond to the applicable Request for Qualified Applicants (RFQA) or otherwise demonstrate that they meet the standards OVRS establishes for the service in question before they will qualify for placement on the statewide approved vendor list. Standards for tutors and vehicle modification providers are under development. Standards governing selection of job development and related services and child care have been established. The new vendor selection rules also provide for a greater amount of flexibility so that clients in rural parts of the state, or where vendor resources are scarce, may still find qualified providers because the new rules make clear that variables such as client choice, cultural competency, vendor past performance, and accessibility/availability are additional criteria that will drive the selection process. OVRS maintains a statewide list of vendors in the ORCA system who have been through the approval process. This process involves coordination between OVRS administrative staff, local field offices, and DHS’ contracts unit. Field staff may locate a client’s chosen provider on this list, and if the provider is not yet on the list, the provider is given information about the approval process. In order to qualify for payment, a vendor must be on the approved list, and the services must be pre-authorized through an Authorization for Purchase that describes the service to be provided, the relationship between the service and the individual’s employment goals, and the duration/frequency of the service. The vendor may also be subject to additional performance requirements or specific payment standards that are set forth in a separate contract. For example, for job development and related services, OVRS is moving towards a system of milestone payments that will be outlined in a specific performance contract. While OVRS may opt to pay on an hourly basis for the services of some vendors, most vendors will be subject to a performance-based contract. These vendor selection and contracting rules and procedures apply to both for-profit and non-profit vendors working with OVRS. Adoption of the final rules is pending. This attachment last updated June 29, 2009

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2012 8:02PM by saorlincolns

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

EVIDENCE OF COLLABORATION REGARDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES AND EXTENDED SERVICES OVRS continued to partner and collaborate with numerous organizations and programs in providing, refining and expanding the availability of supported employment services, including:

  • The Addictions and Mental Health Division (Oregon’s state mental health authority) and publicly and privately operated county mental health programs.
  • The Seniors and Persons with Disabilities Division (responsible for administering Oregon’s system of services to persons with developmental disabilities and physical disabilities), and county developmental disability programs and developmental disability service brokerages.

(For specific examples of and additional information about OVRS’ partnerships and collaboration in the area of supported employment services and extended services see Attachments 6.3 and 4.8.b.1.) This attachment last updated June 29, 2009

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2012 8:02PM by saorlincolns

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

OVRS is a program office within the Children, Adults and Families Division of the Department of Human Services (DHS). OVRS is the designated state unit within DHS. Human resources or personnel functions are a part of DHS’ consolidated Administrative Services Unit.

During this annual update period, DHS and OVRS, like other units of state government with significant number of retirements, continue to face changes and challenges that impact OVRS’ Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD). The current status of this system and related future plans follow.

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

The Oregon legislature has the sole authority to establish the type and number of state government positions, including OVRS positions. The chart below indicates the type and number of positions allocated by the legislature for the state 2011-13 biennium (7/1/11-6/30/13) and type and number of vacancies and projected vacancies over the next five years.

In the pool of 124 vocational rehabilitation counselors (VRCs), OVRS has 14 VRC specialist positions. The counselors in these positions provide training, technical assistance and caseload support to other field staff on a given area of focus, in addition to carrying a general caseload. The areas of focus include: autism, deaf and hard of hearing services, developmental disabilities, mental health, motivational intervention, spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injury and workers’ compensation.

All OVRS field staff are provided with the supervision necessary to ensure that the position is providing the level of direct services or support services deemed necessary. A minimum of 20 hours of in-service training per OVRS employee per year has been established as a staff development performance benchmark. The in-service training grant provides OVRS with the resources to assist staff in achieving that benchmark. Managers meet annually with staff to address professional development needs for the upcoming year. Strategies for building the skills of managers in this area are included in the in-service training plan.

In FFY 2011, OVRS served 15,207 Oregonians with disabilities; in FFY 2010, OVRS served 15,245 Oregonians with disabilities. In FFY 2011, the ratio of VRCs to clients served was 1 to 130; in FFY 2010, the ratio was 1 to 130.

The present and projected staffing level and configuration meet currently identified needs.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor 124 7 49
2 Human Service Assistants/Office Assistants 75 24 30
3 Field Services Managers 14 0 3
4 0 0 0
5 0 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

Oregon has two institutions of higher education with graduate programs in Rehabilitation Counseling, Western Oregon University (WOU) and Portland State University (PSU).

Western Oregon University has two Rehabilitation Counseling degree options:

  • The Rehabilitation Counselor for the Deaf (RCD), which was established in 1974 and is one of three deafness specialty programs in the United States. Students in this program plan to seek employment as counselors or consultants for culturally deaf people, recently deafened individuals and persons who are hard-of-hearing. The RCD option is available to up to 10 new students a year.

  • The Rehabilitation Counselor (RC), which was authorized by the Oregon University system in 1991. Graduates of this option provide counseling and consultative services to the general population of persons who have disabilities. Entering students must be able to document two to three years of work experience and/or volunteer experiences with persons who have disabilities. The RC option is available up to ten new students a year.

Portland State University (PSU) offers a Master of Science in Rehabilitation Counseling, which consists of 77 credit hours. PSU’s Department of Counselor Education provides students with a balanced program of academic coursework and supervised clinical field experience in rehabilitation settings. Students specializing in rehabilitation counseling are provided with both the theoretical background and the practical skills that will enable them to function as rehabilitation counselors in a variety of settings. Students complete the course work in 2.5 to 3 years of full-time enrollment. PSU accepts up to 13 new students a year.

Two other university rehabilitation programs exist in the region.

Washington has one institution of higher education that offers graduate education in rehabilitation counseling, Western Washington University (WWU). The program consists of a combination of face-to-face and distance classes and takes two years to complete. For individuals who already have a master’s in counseling, WWU offers a Certificate in Rehabilitation Services, which allows a student to take the additional coursework needed to be able to apply for the CRC credentialing process.

Idaho also has a related graduate program. The University of Idaho, Counseling Program offers a program of study leading to either a Masters of Education or a Masters of Science in Counseling and Human Services, with an emphasis in Rehabilitation Counseling. The Rehabilitation Counseling emphasis is a blend of academic and field-based course work with an emphasis on supervised practicum and internship experiences in a variety of human service agencies.

In FFY 2011, 7 OVRS VRCs earned Master’s degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling or related fields:

  • 3 in Rehabilitation Counseling: 2 from Western Oregon University and 1 from Assumption College

  • 1 in Rehabilitation Counseling for the Deaf from Western Oregon University

  • 1 in Counseling/Guidance from Portland State University

  • 2 in Social Work from Portland State University

Also in FFY 2011, 11 OVRS VRCs were hired:

  • 6 with a Master’s degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling: 4 from Western Oregon University, 1 from the University of Oregon and 1 from the University of Montana

  • 3 VRCs with related Master’s degrees: 1 in Educational Psychology from the University of Minnesota, 1 in Human Development from Pacific Oaks College NW, and 1 in Counseling/Guidance from Portland State University

  • 2 VRCs with Bachelor’s degrees in related fields; 1 in Psychology from Portland State University and 1 in Social Sciences from Western Oregon University

As of April 1, 2012, of OVRS’s VRCs:

  • 91 have Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or a Master’s Degree in a related field;

  • 25 have Bachelor’s degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling or a related field;

  • 9 have yet to complete a degree in rehabilitation counseling or a related field; and

  • 47 had current CRC status.

In FFY 2012, OVRS will continue to:

  • Work with Portland State University, Western Oregon University, Western Washington University and other education programs that provide opportunities for staff to meet our CSPD requirements.

  • Assist staff in obtaining CRC certification by paying for the registration fees for taking CRC exam preparation workshops.

  • Utilize distance learning Rehabilitation Counseling Programs, such as University of West Virginia’s to assist VRCs without Masters Degrees in obtaining Masters Degrees in rehabilitation counseling.

  • Encourage and assist VRCs who lack their undergraduate degrees to obtain those degrees and further advance.

For related information, see "Personnel Standards" below.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Western Oregon University 22 0 8 12
2 Western Washington University 46 0 10 15
3 Portland State University 35 0 21 10
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

OVRS continues its commitment to increase the diversity of its workforce in conjunction with DHS’ long-term plan to ensure that diversity goals are identified, supported, and achieved. OVRS continued to actively participate and is continuing to participate in DHS’ Diversity Development Coordinating Council.

OVRS continues to work closely with the graduate rehabilitation counseling programs at WOU, PSU and elsewhere in order to increase recruitment of minority applicants.

OVRS continues to actively partner with PSU and WOU’s Rehabilitation Counseling Programs to create additional opportunities for graduate student internships. For the 2010-11 school year, OVRS hosted seven graduate interns, five of which also completed their graduate practicum in its field offices across the state.

Due to budgetary limitations, OVRS was unable to provide stipends to graduate school and other intern stipends in the 2010-11 school year. The OVRS Administrator’s Stipend Program has helped OVRS attract and support interns, as well as develop a richer and more diverse pool of applicants for its VRC positions. OVRS hopes that the budgetary climate will allow the reinstatement of stipends in the future. Cooperative agreements (referred to as interagency agreements in Oregon) between OVRS and universities offering graduate degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling are developed and implemented prior to disbursement of stipend funds.

OVRS staff members continue to serve on Rehabilitation Counselor Education Advisory Councils for programs in the region (WWU, PSU, and WOU). An increasing number of staff - managers and VRCs - and students are participating in the mock interviews held for students, as the event is becoming an annual exercise that aids student in preparing for VRC job interviews in a supportive and learning environment.

OVRS continues to participate in the Regional Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program’s "Recruitment Project", which has been reviewing staffing needs of vocational rehabilitation systems in Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Alaska. This collaborative effort developed regional recruitment information for state agencies, including information to disseminate via websites, and regional marketing strategies for different populations, including youth, members of Generation X and Y, and second career workers.

OVRS worked within DHS’ web content guidelines to keep internet information about OVRS and for job applicants, interns, consumers and the public current. OVRS continues to participate in CSAVR VR-NET and the RSA State Coordinators for the Deaf/Hard of Hearing/Deaf-Blind listserv.

In order to replace staff expected to retire or resign over the next three to five years, OVRS is projecting that it will need to hire approximately 49 additional VRCs, 30 additional Human Services Assistants/Office Specialists, and 3 additional Field Managers.

OVRS projects that it will be serving approximately 15,000 individuals annually at the end of five years and that approximately 12,450 or 83 percent will be individuals with significant disabilities. The projected retirements are based on the number of staff who will either reach age sixty-five or will have thirty years of service with the State of Oregon within the next five years.

 

OVRS continues to utilize an established set of standards to evaluate and select vocational rehabilitation counselors. These standards are based on a modified version of standards utilized by the Workers’ Compensation Division (WCD). The State of Oregon’s VRC classification is shared by WCD, the Oregon Commission for the Blind and OVRS. It requires that VRCs possess:

  • A Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling; or be certified by either the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC), the Certified Insurance Rehabilitation Specialist (CIRS), or the Certification of Disability Management Specialists Commission as a Certified Disability Management Specialist D (CDMS), and six months full-time work experience providing vocational rehabilitation-related services; OR

  • A Master’s degree in psychology, counseling, or a field related to Vocational Rehabilitation (such as one that promotes the physical, psychosocial, or vocational well-being of individuals with disabilities) and 12 months full-time work experience providing vocational rehabilitation-related services, OR

  • A Bachelor’s degree in a related field, such as one that promotes the physical, psychosocial, or vocational well-being of individuals with disabilities, and three years of full-time work experience providing vocational rehabilitation-related services to individuals with disabilities. There is no direct experience substitute for a Bachelor’s degree.

OVRS has had and continues to have a goal that all employees classified as VRCs will hold a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or a closely related field. OVRS will continue to seek counseling staff with Master’s degrees, but VRC candidates with an appropriate Bachelor’s degrees and related work experience may be hired as an exception to OVRS’ policy of hiring counselors with Master’s degrees, with approval of OVRS’ Administrator.

A number of factors have made it difficult for OVRS to achieve its VRC standards and goal. These include:

  • An insufficient number of graduates from the nation’s university rehabilitation programs, compounded by the loss of federal funding of two of the four programs in the Northwest (one of these programs recently regained federal funding).

  • Financial disincentives for graduates interested in employment with OVRS are escalating. Over the past several years, staff have been required to take unpaid furloughs and salary increases have been delayed.

  • Difficulty recruiting qualified staff in the rural areas of the state, where it is often a challenge to find candidates with Bachelor’s degrees, let alone candidates with graduate degrees in Rehabilitation Counseling.

OVRS presently has four VRCs with Bachelor’s degrees in unrelated fields and four VRCs who lack a Bachelor’s degrees. As a result, OVRS did not attain its goal in this area in 2011. These individuals were hired or promoted into their positions prior to adoption of the current standard and goal or because of the lack of more qualified candidates. OVRS has encouraged these individuals to obtain their degrees, and has offered assistance for them to do so.

On a related basis, OVRS has been advised by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), which represents OVRS’s VRCs, of SEIU’s intent to litigate any personnel standards that would discharge, demote or displace any VRC with acceptable performance solely on the basis of a degree requirement.

These challenges notwithstanding, OVRS continues to support degree attainment by its counseling staff in order meet its VRC standards and goals, as well as to promote staff development and advancement, through flexible work scheduling that facilitates attending and completing a graduate degree in rehabilitation counseling with PSU, WOU or WWU, or through a distance learning program, such as the one at Assumption College. On related note, OVRS’ annual In-service Conference included a session on completing a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling while continuing to work as a VRC.

OVRS continues to expect that all staff participate in appropriate professional development activities. The established benchmark is a minimum of 20 hours of training per employee per year and most staff continue to meet or exceed this number.

 

Staff Development

In 2010, OVRS received a five-year in-service training grant from the U.S. Department of Education. OVRS’ in-service training plan, developed as part of the proposal for that grant, is designed to:

  • Address the recruitment and retention of qualified rehabilitation professionals;

  • Provide succession planning;

  • Develop leadership and build capacity; and

  • Provide training on the Workforce Investment Act; the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as reauthorized in 1998, including its regulations and related policy.

The In-Service Training Program assists OVRS in carrying out the mission of the State/Federal rehabilitation service program of increasing employment outcomes for people with disabilities through informed choice and career development. OVRS uses a series of processes to identify training needs. These include two formal needs assessment processes and an informal, continuing process:

  • A periodic training needs assessment. The most recent training needs assessment was completed in December 2011.

  • A three-year comprehensive statewide needs assessment of the rehabilitation needs of Oregonians with disabilities. In partnership with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), a new comprehensive needs assessment was completed in September, 2010 (for more, see Attachment 4.11.a).

  • Continuing assessment of training needs through informal processes, including feedback from OVRS managers and staff, SRC, and clients, and information obtained through case file reviews.

During FFY 2011, OVRS continued to expect that all staff participate in appropriate professional development activities. The established benchmark is a minimum of 20 hours of training per employee per year.

A key staff development activity in FFY 2011 was OVRS’ annual statewide In-service Conference. Utilizing in-service training grant funds, OVRS uses this comprehensive staff training event to increase staff technical skills, as well as to showcase best practices. This past year’s In-Service, “The Road to Quality Outcomes”, was held on August 2-3 in Salem. It included training for VRCs on counseling issues, case management processes and substantive and topical VR issues, including traumatic brain injury, alcohol and drug assessment, fibromyalgia and chronic pain, worksite modifications, successful plan development, hearing aid technology, seizure disorders, personality disorders, reasonable accommodations, managing college and university services, stress reduction, using the career information system, and SSA work incentives and benefits planning. In addition, a dedicated track of training was provided for our Human Services Assistants, the paraprofessional staff who assist and support our VRCs.

More than 350 persons attended the 2011 In-service, including almost all of OVRS’ staff, as well as representatives of the many other agencies, vendors and providers and stakeholder groups that work with and support OVRS, including:

  • Oregon State Rehabilitation Council

  • Oregon Commission for the Blind

  • Oregon Centers for Independent Living

  • 121 Vocational Rehabilitation programs from the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, Warm Springs and Klamath Tribes

  • Advocacy organizations and groups, including Disability Rights Oregon, the Arc of Oregon, the Brain Injury Association of Oregon (BIAOR), RISE (formerly the Oregon Parent Training & Information Center (OrPTI), the Oregon chapter of the Autism Society of America, the Oregon Commission on Autism Spectrum Disorders

  • Local school district YTP specialists and the University of Oregon YTP Technical Assistance Team

  • Community rehabilitation providers, job developers and job coaching services

  • University of Washington, Center for Continuing Education in Rehabilitation

  • Service brokerages for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

  • County and nonprofit community mental health programs

  • Oregon Department of Human Services/Oregon Health Authority service delivery area representatives

  • Oregon State Hospital, Supported Employment Program

  • Oregon Workers Compensation Division

  • Oregon Department of Education, Office of Student Learning & Partnerships

  • Portland State University, Graduate School of Education

  • University of Oregon, Family & Human Services

  • Western Oregon University, Regional Resource Center on Deafness

  • Western Oregon University, Rehabilitation Counselor Education Program (including counselor interns and students)

  • Chemeketa Community College Occupational Skills Training Program

  • Over 40 local vendors providing information, assistive technology and resources for rehabilitation professionals & individuals with disabilities

Another major personnel development and training activity involved completion of a new and comprehensive policy manual for delivery of field services. A joint effort of OVRS administration, managers and staff and the State Rehabilitation Council, this process produced a substantially expanded manual. In addition, OVRS administrative rules were revised and updated, and numerous technical assistance guides were developed or revised in order to provide guidance to staff in implementing certain specific policies and procedures.

Upon completion of the policy manual, a team of managers and senior staff developed and piloted a two-day training on the manual, rules and TAGs with OVRS’ branch managers. Thereafter, eight two-day trainings were held throughout the state. This training focused on the following policy areas:

  • Informed choice

  • Presumed and interim eligibility

  • Transportation and vehicle modification

  • Physical and mental restoration services

  • Cost guidance

  • Self-employment

  • Financial aid

Concomitantly, an internet-based self-study program was developed to assist staff in familiarizing themselves with policies not addressed in the two-day trainings and testing their knowledge and understanding of all of the policies. In addition, branch managers facilitated discussions about the new policy manual and policies with the field staff they manage. All field services staff and all central office professional staff were required to take and complete the two-day in-person training and the self-study program.

We continue to provide our New Counselor/Counselor Training to new and continuing VRCs. Two five-day trainings were provided and attended by over 37 VRCs and other staff.

In addition to above described staff development and training events, a number of other staff development and training activities were provided. These included:

  • Ethical Issues for VR Counselors (4 sessions)

  • Employment Outcomes Professionals II Workshop and Employment Professionals (6 two-day sessions)

  • Motivational Interviewing (22 sessions)

  • Youth Transition Issues (statewide conference)

In the case of most of the above referenced trainings, VRCs who completed the training were awarded with continuing education credits.

OVRS five-year basic in-service training grant supports OVRS’ In-Service Training Program and in particular the OVRS annual In-service conference. As part of the Training Program, OVRS maintains a plan for its personnel development and training activities. Looking ahead, these activities will likely include training on:

  • OVRS Policy Manual for Field Services

  • Counselor Training, with modules and content on: intake, application and eligibility; order of selection; plan development; employment; supported employment; self-employment, counseling and case management; closure; and disability discrimination complaints

  • Basic and advanced and motivation intervention training and continuing support through staff mentors

  • Job development services and OVRS’ performance based JD model, processes and rates

  • Ethics for Vocational Rehabilitation Professionals

  • The most recent iteration of ORCA (OVRS’ automated case management system)

Other anticipated in-service training and personnel development activities include:

  • Completion of a new training needs assessment

  • Review and as needed updating of the in-service training plan so that it aligns with needs assessment findings and any changes made to the state plan

  • A two-day annual in-service training conference for all staff and OVRS partners

  • Participation in DHS leadership initiatives and events, including DHS’ Transformational/Lean Leaders initiative, DHS Leadership Academy, Portland Metro Leadership Cohort, and regional leadership academies

  • Participation in the University of Washington TACE/CCER Emerging Leaders Series (depending on whether out of state travel limitations remain in effect)

  • Utilization of DHS and Department of Administrative Services’ training opportunities on leadership

  • Provision to staff of out-of-class work opportunities (when appropriate and feasible)

  • Staff recruitment, including:

    • Continued partnership with DHS, Office of Human Resources in recruiting new staff

    • Recruitment of staff at conferences and events

    • Support for career advancement within OVRS

 

OVRS employs a variety of approaches in communicating with persons who do not speak English or who have a limited proficiency in English.

OVRS continued to hire and retain staff capable of communicating with diverse populations including individuals whose first language is Spanish, Russian, Ukrainian and American Sign Language.

OVRS continued to develop and utilize training materials in alternate formats, including new counselor training materials, to meet the accommodation needs of VRCs who are blind. The training unit assisted staff and consumers who need accommodations for training events with assistive listening devices and qualified interpreters.

In specific geographic areas and for specific caseloads, OVRS engaged in targeted recruiting for job applicants with specific language skills.

OVRS staff who are not fluent in the native language of an applicant or a client have access to and training in the use of AT&T’s language service and access to qualified interpreters. In addition, the office has developed and utilizes outreach and application materials in alternate language formats, including Spanish and Russian.

Prior DHS Director Bruce Goldberg appointed a member of OVRS administrative unit to the Oregon Council on Healthcare Interpreters. DHS charged this council with creating and implementing minimum qualifications, evaluation and certification programs and renewal processes for contractors and staff providing spoken language interpretation services for DHS (now DHS/OHA) consumers across the state. In the coming year, the Council’s Bilingual Differential Pay Advisory Committee (to which an OVRS staff person is assigned) will work on similar standards and processes for DHS/OHA (including OVRS) staff who receive the 5% pay differential for bilingual skill use.

OVRS continues to contract and collaborate with the Latino Connection in reaching out to and providing specialized job placements services to native Spanish-speaking individuals with disabilities. The focus of these services has been in Portland, Salem and Woodburn, which have large Latino communities.

OVRS continued to implement its videophone pilot with DHS (as means to provide accessible communication via Video Relay Services (VRS) and Video Remote Interpreting (VRI), although the pilot’s progress has been slowed somewhat by later than anticipated delivery and installation of equipment in many offices. OVRS’ State Coordinator for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services (SCD) has been an active member of the national group of VR SCDs for several years and is working closely with other VR SCDs who have already guided their programs through the videophone installation project. It is now hoped that the system will be operational by the fall of 2012.

OVRS presently maintains videophones for a number of staff who require ASL interpretation and to make it possible for a VRC counselor with a predominantly Deaf caseload to communicate directly with clients their native language. In addition, OVRS’ Statewide Deaf and Hard of Hearing Coordinator utilizes a videophone in interacting with Deaf and Hard of Hearing individuals, including Deaf student interns. In conjunction with the videophone pilot project, all staff with fluency in American Sign Language and serving Deaf clients will receive a webcam and videophone software on their desktop computers.

 

OVRS continues to work in partnership with the Department of Education as well as local school districts and high schools in support of Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Highlights of recent and continuing activities include:

  • OVRS, ODE, the Office of Developmental Disability Services and the Oregon Council on Developmental Disabilities have worked to develop a charter and memorandum of understanding to better coordinate services they jointly and discretely provide to youth with disabilities.

  • The coordinator of OVRS’ Youth Transition Program (YTP) serves on ODE’s State Advisory Council for Special Education.

  • ODE staff serve on the YTP Management Team and advise OVRS on IDEA developments and changes in ODE policy that may or do affect YTP.

  • Continuing collaboration with ODE and high school staff on YTP and transition-related training, including that provided through OVRS’ In-service, annual conferences on transition and YTP, and site specific YTP technical assistance and training.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2012 5:26PM by saorlincolns

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

In Federal Fiscal Year 2010, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services, the State Rehabilitation Council and the Interwork Institute of San Diego State University collaborated to develop a comprehensive assessment of the vocational rehabilitation needs of persons with disabilities residing in the state of Oregon. Interwork subsequently administered the assessment, gathered and analyzed the results and provided OVRS and SRC with written and in-person reports on its findings. The needs assessment process, results and findings are summarized below. The findings are being considered and addressed by OVRS and SRC in reviewing, updating and refining OVRS’ goals, priorities (objectives), strategies and activities. The process that was developed for conducting the needs assessment involved:

  • Electronic and telephone surveys conducted with four stakeholder groups (individuals with disabilities, representatives of organizations that provide services to persons with disabilities, employers and OVRS staff);
  • Focus groups conducted with three stakeholder groups (individuals with disabilities, representatives of organizations that provide services to persons with disabilities, and OVRS staff)
  • Key informant interviews conducted with employers and with individuals identified as knowledgeable about the needs of individuals with disabilities in the state, and
  • Analysis of a variety of existing demographic and case service data relevant to individuals with disabilities.

The approach was designed to capture input from a variety of perspectives in order to acquire a sense of the multi-faceted needs of persons with disabilities in the state. Responses to the individual survey reflect the opinions of current and former clients of OVRS as well as individuals on the agency’s waiting list for services. Efforts were made to gather information pertinent to un-served and under-served populations through inquiries with individuals who serve a broad range of persons with disabilities in the state. Likewise, the OVRS staff that was surveyed serves clients representing a broad range of backgrounds and experiences. Efforts were made to solicit responses from businesses reflecting the opinions of employers representing a variety of industries. Four hundred and eight survey responses were received from individuals with disabilities, 46 partner surveys were completed, 101 OVRS staff surveys were completed, and 129 business surveys were completed. A total of 90 persons participated in 12 focus groups conducted in Ontario, Bend, Medford, and Salem, while 18 individuals participated in the key informant interviews. The following summary highlights the most commonly cited needs associated with achieving employment goals and accessing OVRS services derived from the surveys, focus groups, and key informant interviews. Barriers to achieving employment goals Individuals with disabilities, representatives of partner organizations, and OVRS staff all identified the lack of available jobs as a frequently-cited barrier to achieving employment goals. Similarly, employers’ perceptions about employing persons with disabilities were also among the most frequently-identified barriers for all three respondent groups. Both partners and OVRS staff frequently identified housing issues as a barrier to achieving employment goals. Key informants identified attitudinal barriers; accommodations, especially assistive technology; and lack of available jobs as the top three barriers. Barriers to achieving employment goals for individuals with most significant disabilities Partners and OVRS staff identified employers’ perceptions about employing persons with disabilities most frequently as a barrier to achieving employment goals for persons with the most significant disabilities. Both groups also identified not having job skills and the lack of available jobs as barriers to achieving employment goals for individuals with the most significant disabilities. In addition, most key informants agreed that the barriers to employment are greater for people whom OVRS classifies as having the most significant disabilities. In general, the sentiment was that employment barriers increased proportionately to an individual’s functional limitations. Barriers achieving employment goals for youth in transition There was noteworthy consistency between partners and OVRS staff with respect to the most frequently cited barriers to achieving employment goals for youth in transition. Both identified not having job skills, a lack of education or training, a lack of job search skills, and a lack of available jobs as among the top barriers for achieving employment goals for youth in transition. The general consensus among key informants was that the barriers to employment for youth with disabilities are unique. Many cited shortfalls in youth in transition programs. Others described youths’ resistance to a diagnosis and their struggle with the stigma of disability. Barriers to achieving employment goals for consumers who are racial or ethnic minorities There was remarkable consistency between partners and OVRS staff with respect to the top barriers to achieving employment goals for consumers who are racial or ethnic minorities, however the number of respondents to this question was low. Both identified the same four barriers – language barriers, not having education or training, not having job skills, and not enough jobs available – as among the top barriers to achieving employment goals for this group. Most informants agreed that minority status is an additional complicating factor when attempting to secure employment. Informants stated that the service systems are inadequately equipped to address the needs of diverse individuals. Furthermore, cultures have different perceptions of disabilities and may not seek services, especially from state or federal agencies. Thus, there is a need to direct outreach campaigns to minority groups. Barriers to accessing OVRS services Individuals with disabilities, partners, and OVRS staff identified two items - limited accessibility of OVRS via public transportation and difficulties completing the individualized plan for employment (IPE) - as among the top barriers to accessing OVRS services. Both partner and OVRS staff respondents identified difficulties accessing training or education programs as among the top barriers to accessing services. Business needs, disability in the workplace With respect to disability in the workplace, the top needs indicated by respondents to the business survey were associated with financial incentives and training for workers with disabilities:

  • Obtaining information on other incentives for employing workers with disabilities
  • Obtaining information on other training programs available for workers with disabilities
  • Obtaining information on tax credits for employing workers with disabilities

Responses to needs associated with the applicants with disabilities section of the survey generally reflected a lower percentage of respondents indicating a need. The top responses pertained to needs for assistance recruiting and assessing worker characteristics:

  • Assessing applicants’ skills
  • Recruiting applicants with good social/interpersonal skills
  • Recruiting applicants with good work habits

Focus groups Most unmet needs were captured in three categories: service systems, other (needs), and mobility. A service system is defined as all agencies or organizations (in addition to OVRS) that provide vocational or independent living services to individuals with disabilities. The predominant unmet needs in this category included:

  • Cooperation and information sharing amongst agencies/organizations,
  • Health care services, and
  • Employer outreach and education.

Next, a large proportion of unmet needs for people with disabilities were relegated to the "other" category. The needs expressed in this category do not succinctly fit into any one category yet are clearly related to unmet employment and independent living needs. The three unmet needs described most frequently included:

  • Job placement (including more job developers and better coordination of services),
  • Assistance navigating the various state and federal systems, and
  • More housing in general and affordable housing in particular.

Finally, several unmet needs related to mobility were expressed. This category encompasses a wide array of needs including everything from public transportation to accessible housing. The unmet mobility needs included:

  • Expanded public transportation routes,
  • Expanded hours of operation for the regional public transportation systems, and
  • Physically accessible buildings.

All of the needs described represent areas of high consensus within a region and across the state. This attachment last updated June 30, 2011

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2012 8:02PM by saorlincolns

Annual Estimates

The 2008 Oregon Population Survey estimate for the state of Oregon is 3,784,821. The number of individuals who reported a disability that limits the kind of work they can do is 500,484 (13.2% of the total population). The 2008 American Community Survey (ACS) estimate of the total civilian non-institutionalized population of Oregon is 3,746,320. The ACS estimate of the percentage of the total population with any disability is 13.3%, while the estimate of the percentage of the civilian non-institutionalized population between the ages of 18 and 64 with a disability is 10.9%. (Data is from that OVRS 2010 Comprehensive Needs Assessment and was the most current available information at the time the assessment was written.)

During FFY 2011, OVRS served a total of 15,207 individuals with disabilities with Title I and Title VI, Part B funding. Of these individuals, OVRS provided 785 clients with supported employment services and a total of 185 obtained employment outcomes. In addition, of the 785, 234 of the 785 clients receiving supported employment services were assisted with Title VI, Part B funds.

Annual Estimates of Individuals to be served with funds provided under Part B of Title I and Part B of Title VI of the Act

OVRS projects that it will serve 15,207 persons in FFY 2013, including persons expected to apply for services, be determined eligible for services and/or receive services through Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs). In addition, OVRS estimates that it will provide supported employment services to 800 persons in this same time period and 240 of these persons will receive services funded by Title VI, Part B.

OVRS anticipates that it will cost and OVRS will expend approximately $48,717,112 in federal and state funds to provide services at current service levels and with its existing program capacity. These service and expenditure projections are based on caseload projections, forecasted cost per case and anticipated revenue. The program has developed a five year fiscal plan to ensure that Match and Maintenance of Effort requirements are met and all federal dollars are expended in the required time frames.

OVRS intends to remain in the Order of Selection in 2013 so that, if it becomes necessary to reinstitute a mandatory wait list, the program is able to do so expeditiously and so minimize the challenges and problems for clients, staff and the program. While OVRS is currently able to serve all individuals in Order of Selection wait list priority levels, at least three factors argue for the continuation of the Order. The first is the continuing uncertainty about the availability of state general funds through the remainder of the 2011-13 state budget. The state continues to collect less in revenues than the legislature projected when it set the current budget. The second is uncertainty about the outcome and effects of recently filed litigation by Disability Rights Oregon challenging the use of sheltered workshops by ODDS. The state, Department of Human Services, ODDS and OVRS are the parties being sued. The third is the lack of clarity around the Governor’s new budgeting process. The Governor has developed a 10-year strategic plan which focuses on five critical areas. OVRS has been attached to “Economy and Jobs.” OVRS and other programs will present to a five member “bidding panel” that, in turn, will make funding recommendations to the Governor.

OVRS served 7,038 individuals through IPEs in FFY 2011; OVRS projects this number will increase slightly to 7,089 in FFY 2013 because it is now serving all individuals found eligible for services. OVRS estimates that in FFY 2013 the number of eligible individuals receiving IPE services by priority level will be:

The estimated total cost of client services for individuals estimated to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services is $16,021,138. (This does not include the cost of staff, facilities, cost allocation and other non-client service costs.) For specifics, see the table below.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Priority One (3 or more limitations) Title I $9,292,260 4,073 $2,281
Priority Two (2 limitations) Title I $4,325,707 2035 $2,125
Priority Three (1 limitation) Title I $1,602,114 722 $2,218
Priority Four (all other eligible individuals) Title I $801,057 259 $3,092
Totals   $16,021,138 7,089 $2,260

This screen was last updated on Jul 3 2012 7:45PM by saorlincolns

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Development of 2013 State Plan Update

This update was developed jointly and agreed to by the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (OVRS) and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC). This was done through a series of OVRS-SRC work group and other meetings in which successive drafts of the Update were developed, reviewed and refined. In turn, the draft Update was reviewed by the full SRC at its quarterly spring meeting. Subsequently, the draft Update was made available for public review and comment (and summarized below). Thereafter, the OVRS Executive Team and SRC Executive Committee reviewed the results of public comment process and made additional refinements. Staff completed the 2013 State Plan Update in late June.

As a part of last year’s planning process, OVRS and SRC made numerous changes to OVRS’ goals, priorities (“objectives”), strategies and outcomes. The process included review of OVRS’ performance vis-à-vis federal VR standards and indicators and State Plan outcomes and targets, the results of the most recent OVRS’ Comprehensive Needs Assessment (September 2010), and other information and input, including staff and public feedback. This year’s process for updating the plan, while involving comparable steps, was more modest and resulted in fewer changes. No goals were changed, several objectives were omitted (because they have been completed), and a number of strategies, outcomes and targets were revised, refined or omitted to reflect developments of the past year and anticipated events. In addition, a number of State Plan attachments (sections) were been updated.

The proposed Update was posted on OVRS website for a 16 day period in May, along with information about public hearings on the Update, and how to submit oral and/or written comments about the Update. Notice of the Update, the hearings and how to submit comments was also posted in OVRS field offices and sent to over 50 allied and stakeholder organizations, groups and individuals across Oregon for posting. Hearings were held in Bend, Portland, Roseburg and Salem. In response, eight individuals provided oral comments and four parties submitted written comments, including job developers, clients and family members, and allied service providers. Their comments are summarized below.

  • Several commenters expressed objections to OVRS’ continued rollout of performance based contracts for job development services. Commenters asserted that the move to performance based contracting and the new payment structure and rates are unfair and unduly burdensome to job developers, and will result in a loss of job developers and job development capacity. In addition, some asserted that performance based contracting will be detrimental to employment of individuals with significant disabilities, including those with intellectual/developmental disabilities. One commenter asserted that the new contracting process is discriminatory. Another commenter proposed that job developers be made state workers.

  • One commenter voiced support for the changes to job development and asserted that the rates are fair.

  • A couple of commenters voiced a desire for increased services to mature or older individuals with disabilities, while acknowledging the value of OVRS’ youth transition services. Another commenter expressed concerns about over focusing on special groups at the expense of serving the general population of people with disabilities.

  • One commenter voiced concerns about what a provider is charging OVRS for the cost of providing clerical and computer training to OVRS clients given, the age and condition of the computer equipment. This commenter suggested the needed training could be self-directed and better made available to clients through OVRS branch offices.

  • Several commenters expressed concern about the implementation of ODDS’ Employment First policy due to the lack of clarity from Salem and lack of resolution of known problems.

  • Several commenters questioned OVRS employment rates for individuals with intellectual and intellectual/developmental disabilities given the experience of their programs.

  • One commenter expressed support for Lane Independent Living Alliance which has become an affiliate of the USBLN.

Sheltered Workshop Litigation

On January 25, 2012, the United Cerebral Palsy Association of Oregon and Southwest Washington along with eight individuals filed a class action lawsuit against Governor John Kitzhaber, Erinn Kelley-Siel, Director of the Department of Human Services, Marylee Fay, Administrator of the Office of Developmental Disability Services and Stephaine Parrish Taylor, Administrator of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services, over the placement of individuals with disabilities into sheltered workshops. A planning process to address issues raised in the lawsuit is underway. It includes stakeholders, advocates and Disability Rights Oregon, which represents the plaintiffs in the suit. OVRS is an active participant in this process.

  1. GOAL I. Increase the number and quality (as measured by wages, availability of benefits, number of hours worked, and client satisfaction) of employment outcomes for all OVRS clients

    1. OBJECTIVE A.: Increase number of employment outcomes

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue development and implementation of Enhancing Employment Outcomes Program initiative

        2. Educate and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies

        3. Continue to work with the Employment Department and University of Oregon Career Information System to provide labor market information to OVRS counseling staff

        4. Continue to work with Department of Human Services (DHS) and City of Portland to become model employers of people with disabilities

        5. Maintain the Preferred Workers Program with Workers Compensation Program and explore feasibility of expanding

      • OUTCOMES

        • Number of employment outcomes (Indicator 1.1): 2013 Target=2,000

        • Increase percent of clients in plan who obtain an employment outcome (Indicator 1.2): 2013 Target=57%

    2. OBJECTIVE B.: Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and number of hours worked

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to implement, evaluate and refine the Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative

        2. Complete development and initiate utilization of a job development vendor report card with a focus on quality outcomes such as living wage, health benefits and advancement

        3. Maintain the Preferred Workers Program with Workers Compensation Program and explore feasibility of expanding

        4. Educate about and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies

        5. Continue to implement the charter and memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        6. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implementing agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

        7. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with the Department of Education (ODE) and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of agreed upon data

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

      • OUTCOMES:

        • Increase of clients obtaining employment who received employer paid medical benefits: 2013 Target=26%

        • Job Development Report Card

        • Increase average number of hours worked: 2013 Target=28

        • Increase average wage (Indicators 1.1 and 1.5): 2013 Target= $12.00

        • Percent of clients obtaining post-secondary degree or certificate who also obtain employment: 2013 Target= 55%

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and authorized ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommended policy and legislative changes

    3. OBJECTIVE C.: Implement new self-employment policy

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Review and revise new Self-Employment policy as needed

        2. Continue to train staff on Self-Employment policy

        3. Continue to refine and implement a Business Plan Committee charged with reviewing and approving proposed self-employment business plans (based on feasibility and viability)

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increased Self-Employment outcomes: 2013 Target=50

    4. OBJECTIVE D.: Increase the number of adults with significant disabilities who are employed

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Increase the number of supported employment clients obtaining employment outcomes

        2. Pilot Ticket to Work/Partnership Plus with the ODDS and continue to work with DHS to establish it as a TTW "employment network" in order to fund services to individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, psychiatric disabilities and traumatic brain injuries

        3. Continue to collaborate with Addictions and Mental Health Division in implementing and expanding evidence-based supported employment

        4. Continue to utilize training from the Oregon Center for Excellence on Supported Employment for individuals with psychiatric disabilities

        5. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        6. Continue to partner with the ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implementing agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

        7. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of data

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of SSI /SSDI recipients with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target=590

        • Increase number of employment outcomes for supported employment clients (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target=238

        • Increase percent of supported employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4) : 2013 Target=56%

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and authorized ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommended policy and legislative changes

        • Increased employment outcomes for working age adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities*: 2013 Target=400

          • *Persons 18-64 y/o with autism, cerebral palsy, intellectual and/or a congenital disability

    5. OBJECTIVE E.: Increase the participation of and outcomes for individuals from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to contract with Latino Project in Portland and Salem metro areas and Woodburn, and explore feasibility of expanding elsewhere

        2. Continue to support, collaborate with and provide technical assistance (TA) to the 121 programs of the Confederated tribes of Grande Ronde and Warm Springs; initiate support, collaboration and provision of TA to new 121 programs of the Klamath, Umatilla and Siletz tribes

        3. Continue to recruit bicultural and bilingual staff

        4. Identify additional opportunities to outreach to cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities who are potential clients

        5. Ensure linguistic access to services through the use of interpreters, translators and bilingual materials

        6. Work with DHS Office of Equity to identify and address barriers to employment faced by individuals with disabilities who are cultural, ethnic or linguistic minorities

        7. Provide culturally competent services

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of minority clients served (Indicator 2.1): 2013 Target=1,500

        • Increase percent of minority clients obtaining employment (Indicator 1.2): 2013 Target=55%

    6. OBJECTIVE F.: Maintain and develop connections to programs and services that assist clients obtain and maintain employment outcomes

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue Work Readiness Alternatives Workshop programs (as funding permits)

        2. Continue to work with Independent Living Centers to identify services that support and improve employment outcomes

        3. Collaborate and coordinate with Veterans’ programs across the state to address rehabilitation needs of returning veterans, in accordance with HB 2403 (2011)

      • OUTCOMES

        • Contracts are in place for Work Readiness Alternatives Workshop/s

        • Maintain number of contracts OVRS branches have with Independent Living Centers to provide services: 2013 Target=7

    7. OBJECTIVE G.: Refine, administer and sustain a statewide work incentives planning system (WIN)

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to provide work incentives/benefits planning services through 11 certified coordinators housed in six Centers for Independent Living throughout the state

        2. Continue to pursue policy option package and other options for funding the Work Incentives Network (WIN) over the short and long-term

        3. Utilize a departmental work group to support implementation of WIN

        4. Continue to pursue funding to support the expansion of work incentives/benefits planning coordinators in high schools to targeted transition age youth

        5. Continue to provide training to staff on WIN

        6. Provide training to 121 tribal programs on the work incentives planning system and new Social Security Ticket to Work regulations

        7. Continue to provide training and outreach on work incentives to parents, caregivers of persons with significant disabilities

        8. Continue to evaluate effectiveness of WIN in increasing employment outcomes and reducing dependency on public benefits, and utilize results in making case for WIN

        9. Continue to partner with Disability Rights Oregon’s Work Incentives and Planning Assistance (WIPA) program in providing work incentives/benefits planning services (subject to continuation of WIPA)

      • OUTCOMES

        • Submit policy option package

        • Percent of SSI/SSDI employments that meet substantial gainful SGA at closure (Indicator 1.6): 2013 Target=25%

        • Number of work incentives system referrals who become OVRS applicants: 2013 Target=225

    8. OBJECTIVE H.: Provide assistive technology (AT) services and devices needed statewide by clients at each stage of the VR process

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to collaborate with Access Technologies, Inc (ATI) to provide AT services and devices needed by clients at each stage of the VR process.

        2. Collaborate with ATI loan program to increase the availability of existing and emerging AT tools that facilitate employment

      • OUTCOMES

        • Fulfillment of contract deliverables

    9. OBJECTIVE I.: Improve access and quality of services for Deaf and hard of hearing persons

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to participate in DHS pilot for videophones/video relay interpreting

        2. Increase the number of staff with American Sign Language skills

        3. Continue statewide coordination of services to Deaf and hard of hearing persons

        4. Provide outreach to the Deaf and hard of hearing persons

        5. Explore how accessibility of job development services to Deaf and hard of hearing persons may be increased

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase the number of Deaf and hard of hearing persons with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target=325

        • Increase number of transition age Deaf youth (18-24) and youth who are hard of hearing with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target= 26

        • Expanded availability and use of videophones/video relay interpreting

    10. OBJECTIVE J.: Enhance coordination with workforce partners and vocational rehabilitation programs so that people with disabilities have better access and are better prepared for employment

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue participation in the Workforce Policy Cabinet

        2. Continue to collaborate with workforce partners to provide training and technical assistance to Oregon’s workforce regions in developing, implementing and updating Resource Sharing Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding

        3. Continue to assess the training needs of workforce partners located in Employment Department offices and One-stops at the local level and provide training as appropriate

        4. Increase the number of cases co-staffed with workforce partners

        5. Ensure staff are aware of workforce system resources including training resources

        6. Collaborate and coordinate with Veterans’ programs across the state to address rehabilitation needs of returning veterans, in accordance with HB 2403 (2011)

      • OUTCOMES

        • Updated resource sharing agreements and MOU

    11. OBJECTIVE K.: Increase the availability and quality of job development services

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Monitor and evaluate performance of staff and contract job development services

        2. Continue job development training and coaching

        3. Continue to implement and refine outcome based payment system for job development services

        4. Continue to refine job development vendor report system

        5. Complete development of and utilization of a job development vendor report card with a focus on quality outcomes, such as living wage, health benefits and advancement

        6. Review rollout of job development services to special populations, including individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, identify any needed adjustments or refinements, and implement

      • OUTCOMES

        • Job Development Report Card

        • Increased quality Job Development outcomes (establish baseline with report card, set targets thereafter)

  2. GOAL II. Increase the number of youth who seek OVRS services and the number and quality of employment outcomes for this population.

    1. OBJECTIVE A.: Increase the number of transition age youth (14-24) who obtain employment outcomes

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue transition job fairs in partnership with Oregon Commission for the Blind, governmental units, business groups and others

        2. Continue Youth Transition Program through development and implementation of YTP biennial agreements with local school districts. Address Order of Selection as needed

        3. Develop and implement strategy to engage select local YTP programs and OVRS branches in providing transition services to students earlier in the academic process

        4. Continue implementation of Project Access, a grant opportunity to demonstrate a new youth transition service model, which engages students at an earlier age and earlier in the academic process

        5. Continue collaboration with the Early Assessment Screening and Treatment (EAST) Project to provide needed services and supports to transition age youth with psychiatric disabilities

        6. Continue contract with Arc of Oregon for Project Employ, which assists youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities and their families in learning about and utilizing services and resources in order to increase employment outcomes for these youth

        7. Continue to provide funding for Oregon RISE Center’s annual statewide Building Futures Conference on transition

        8. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        9. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implementing agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

        10. Continue to implement the charter and memorandum of understanding with the ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of data

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of transition age youth served: 2013 Target=1850

        • Increase percent of transition age youth obtaining an employment outcome (Indicator 1.1): 2013 Target=58%

        • Increase percent of transition age youth who obtain a post-secondary degree or certificate and obtain a successful closure (Indicator 1.2): 2013 Target=82%

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommended policy and legislative changes

    2. OBJECTIVE B.: Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and hours worked

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to implement, evaluate and refine the Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative

        2. Complete development of and initiate utilization of a job development vendor report card with a focus on quality outcomes, such as living wage, health benefits and advancement

        3. Educate about and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies

        4. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        5. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implement agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

        6. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the governance structure and project plan for the MOU and charter

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of agreed upon data

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase average wage (Indicators 1.3 and 1.5): 2013 Target= $9.50

        • Increase percent with employer paid benefits: 2013 Target=10%

        • Increase number of hours worked: 2013 Target=25

        • Job development report card

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommend policy and legislative changes

    3. OBJECTIVE C.: Increase the number of youth with more significant disabilities who receive services

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to partner with ODDS to provide training and technical assistance to community-based developmental disability programs

        2. Arrange for training through the internal resources and the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education center to address training needs specific to this population

        3. Establish DHS as an SSA Ticket to Work ‘Employment Network’ in order to fund ongoing support services for youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        4. Continue collaboration with the Early Assessment Screening and Treatment (EAST) Project to provide needed services and supports to transition age youth with psychiatric disabilities

        5. Continue contract with Arc of Oregon for Project Employ, which assists youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities and their families in learning about and utilizing services and resources in order to increase employment outcomes for these youth

        6. Continue to provide funding for Oregon RISE Center’s annual statewide Building Futures Conference on transition

        7. Initiate planning and preparation for anticipated increased federal funding for expanded transition services and submission of a related grant proposal

        8. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        9. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and implementing agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed Legislative changes

        10. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of data

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and implementing agreed upon solutions

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of students who are SSI/SSDI recipients who obtain an employment outcome (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target=160

        • Increase the number of students in supported employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target=100

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommended policy and legislative changes

    4. OBJECTIVE D.: Improve partnerships with education agencies at the state and local level

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to partner with ODE, University of Oregon, and Oregon school districts to carry out the Youth Transition Program, restructured as needed to address Order of Selection limitations

        2. Continue to participate in the Work Group with the Commission for the Blind and Oregon Community Colleges in order to exchange information and address concerns

        3. Continue to participate on State Advisory Council for Special Education and other transition related committees

        4. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with the ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        5. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and implementing agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed Legislative changes

        6. Continue to implement a charter and MOU with the ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to identified barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through data tracking and analysis

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

      • OUTCOMES

        • Maintain number of Youth Transition Program sites: 2013 Target=39

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommended policy and legislative changes

    5. OBJECTIVE E.: Increase the awareness and understanding of transition among youth and their parents, teachers, and disability advocates and professionals

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Work with the local and state level advisory boards to Project Access to identify opportunities to increase awareness and understanding of transition issues

        2. Co-sponsor and participate in annual transition conference

        3. Educate OVRS staff, DHS partners, education staff and parents of youth in transition about services available to transition youth, including supported employment

        4. Explore supporting family-to-family training on transition, such as that provided through OCDD and RISE

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of transition age youth served: 2013 Target=1850

    6. OBJECTIVE F.: Increase the participation of and outcomes for youth from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities and Deaf and hard of hearing youth

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Ensure linguistic access through the use of bilingual staff, interpreters and translated materials

        2. Identify opportunities to outreach to potential cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minority clients with disabilities

        3. Provide culturally competent services

        4. Develop a strategy for increasing participation and positive outcomes for Deaf and hard of hearing youth

      • OUTCOMES

        • Interpreters available 100% of the time when requested: 2013 Target=100%

  3. GOAL III. Engage employers in order to increase the number and quality of employment outcomes for persons with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities

    1. OBJECTIVE A.: Increase understanding awareness, and interest of Oregon’s businesses in employing people with disabilities

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to promote employment of persons with disabilities on a business to business basis through dedicated business partnerships

        2. Continue to partner with the Oregon Commission for the Blind, CSAVR and others in implementing and coordinating employer engagement strategies

        3. Continue to work with the Employment Department and University of Oregon Career Information System to provide labor market information to OVRS counseling staff

        4. Continue implementation of Enhancing Employment Outcomes (EEO) Initiative

        5. Inform and educate employers about benefits of employing persons with disabilities

        6. Provide disability awareness education and training to businesses and employers as "value added services"

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase numbers of job referrals from business and employer related sources: 2013 Target=To be determined

        • Increase number of employment outcomes from VR-Net: 2013 Target=To be determined

    2. OBJECTIVE B.: Improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to participate in Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation’s National Employment Network (VR-NET)

        2. Expand partnerships with businesses and employers to gain and increase access of OVRS clients to business and employer job application pools and maintain existing partnerships

        3. Continue to work with Department of Human Services and City of Portland in becoming and serving as model employers for people with disabilities

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase numbers of job referrals from business and employer related sources: 2013 Target=60

        • Increase number of employment outcomes from VR-NET: 2013 Target=25

  4. GOAL IV. Continually improve the management of the program while insuring compliance with appropriate laws, rules and policy.

    1. OBJECTIVE A.: Build upon current data analysis to conduct ongoing program evaluation

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Pursue technical assistance from RSA, as needed

        2. Use Caseload Status Indicator (CSI) reports and file reviews to identify and target training and technical assistance provided to the field

        3. Use CSI reports, file review and performance data to target management focus for field staff supervision

        4. Continue to learn and implement Lean Daily Management tools, including but not limited to huddles, visual boards, Continuous Improvement and project management

      • OUTCOMES

        • Decrease the number of errors cited by RSA in yearly 911 reports: 2013 Target=40

    2. OBJECTIVE B.: Develop and implement those systems and processes necessary to maximize utilization of Social Security’s Ticket to Work Program

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Update Ticket to Work manual as needed

        2. Train OVRS field staff on Ticket to Work processes and procedures as needed

        3. Pilot Partnership Plus with ODDS’s Employment First sites

      • OUTCOMES

        • Maximize collection of Ticket reimbursements: 2013 Target=$900,000

    3. OBJECTIVE C. : Minimize risks and liabilities in the administration of the program

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to implement feedback loop for client file reviews that strengthens accountability and supports corrective action

        2. Continue to review and revise rules, policies, and procedures as needed

        3. Pursue technical assistance from RSA on fiscal management, contracting and performance based contracting for program and department staff

        4. Build revenue plan for 2013-15 biennium

        5. Revise Business Review protocol to align with DHS protocol

      • OUTCOMES

        • No compliance audit findings: 2013 Target=0

        • Accurate fiscal reports

  5. GOAL V. Ensure a highly trained workforce at every level of the organization

    1. OBJECTIVE A. : Ensure staff have the skills, knowledge and ability to perform their jobs at a high level of proficiency

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Train all staff on new iterations of ORCA as they are developed and installed online

        2. Require all new counseling staff to complete Counselor Training within three months of hire

        3. Require all staff to complete Values and Ethics Training

        4. Require all new staff to complete EEO job development and motivational intervention training

        5. Train all staff on cultural competency and diversity

        6. Develop and implement agency and branch diversity plans

        7. Provide continuing training to new and existing staff on OVRS new policy manual and new and revised rules, policies and technical assistance guides as developed and implemented

        8. Implement DHS Leadership and Performance Feedback model

      • OUTCOMES

        • Reduction in number of negative RSA review finding: 2013 Target=0

    2. OBJECTIVE B. : Increase staff knowledge in targeted areas

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Completion of Training Needs Assessment

        2. Refinement of training plan based on findings of Training Needs Assessment and Comprehensive Needs Assessment

        3. Staff participation in training relevant to brain injury; autism; Deafness and hearing loss; working with individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities and psychiatric disabilities; person-centered planning; and/or training to address training needs identified through the training needs assessment and training plan

        4. OVRS In-Service Conference

        5. Collaborate with relevant stakeholders to maximize training opportunities and resources

      • OUTCOMES

        • Completed training needs assessment and training plan

        • Internal and external training opportunities to address identified training needs

    3. OBJECTIVE C. : Continue to recruit to meet the Rehabilitation Act’s requirements for a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development and OVRS specific skill needs

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to work with DHS, Office of Human Resources in recruiting staff

        2. Recruit, as possible, at conferences and events

        3. Support career advancement within the program

        4. Continue participation in TACE/CCER Leadership Academy

        5. Continue participation with TACE advisory meetings

        6. Continue to utilize DHS and Department of Administrative Services’s leadership trainings

        7. Provide, as appropriate and feasible, out-of-class work opportunities for staff at every level of the organization

        8. Continue succession planning and retention activities

        9. Increased use of distance learning and development of internal capacity to provide distance learning

        10. Increased development and acquisition of model materials and practices

        11. Mentoring of managers and staff

      • OUTCOMES

        • Applicant pools whose skills, education and experience align with CSPD goals and specific skill needs

This screen was last updated on Jul 2 2012 6:01PM by saorlincolns

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

Order of Selection

It is the intent of the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (OVRS) to serve any and all persons in Oregon who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. Though it is likely that OVRS will be able to serve all eligible persons in Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2013, it will continue to operate under the Order of Selection which was invoked on January 15, 2009. OVRS’ decision to invoke the Order was based on caseload and cost per case projections; its decision to remain in the Order because of uncertainty about the availability of state and federal funding.

Status of the Order of Selection

From January 15, 2009 through June 30, 2009, OVRS’ services were limited to individuals who had authorized individual plans for employment (IPEs). Beginning in July 2009, OVRS had sufficient resources to begin taking Priority One individuals off of the Order waitlist. Over the ensuing twelve months, OVRS was able to successively remove individuals from the waitlist, as prioritized. As of July 2010, OVRS had taken all individuals off the waitlist and there has been no waitlist since then.

This progress was achieved through use of a mix of ARRA funds, re-allocation dollars matched by state general funds over and above the amount required to match the state’s grant and Social Security reimbursement dollars. ARRA funds allowed OVRS to remove 2,654 individuals from the waitlist and 471 individuals to move directly into services. ARRA funds and re-allotment dollars are not available going forward.

Justification for Continuation of the Order of Selection

OVRS intends to remain in the Order of Selection in 2013 so that, in the event that it becomes necessary to reinstitute a mandatory wait list, the program is able to do so expeditiously and in a manner that minimizes the challenges and problems for clients, staff and the program. While we are currently able to serve all individuals in all Order of Selection wait list priority levels, at least three factors argue for the continuation of the Order. The first is the continuing uncertainty about the availability of state general funds through the remainder of the 2011-13 state budget cycle. The state continues to collect less in revenues than the legislature projected when it set the current budget. The second is uncertainty about the outcome and effects of recently filed litigation by Disability Rights Oregon challenging the use of sheltered workshops by ODDS. The state, Department of Human Services, ODDS and OVRS are the parties being sued. The third is the lack of clarity around the Governor’s new budgeting process. The Governor has developed a 10 year strategic plan which focuses on five critical areas. OVRS has been attached to “Economy and Jobs.” OVRS and other programs will present to a five member “bidding panel” that in turn will make funding recommendations to the Governor.

Parameters of the Order of Selection

The Order of Selection was established to ensure that individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected first for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, those with significant disabilities second, and then all other eligible individuals. OVRS based the determination to invoke the Order on use of funds in the preceding year, projected funding, projected number and types of referrals, number of eligible individuals and counselor caseloads.

The Order of Selection is statewide and does not select one disabling condition over any other disabling condition. OVRS does not base the Order on age, sex, marital status, religion, race, color, national origin, political affiliation, or the vocational goal of the individual with a disability. Elements that relate to the significance of disability are the only elements used in the Order.

SRC and Public Input on Order of Selection

Prior to the Order of Selection invoked on January 15, 2009, OVRS:

  • Met and consulted with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), the agency’s policy partner;

  • Met and consulted with Disability Rights Oregon (DRO), the state’s protection and advocacy system and Client Assistance Program (CAP); and

  • Informed the public - including clients and prospective clients and over 100 allied public and private agencies and stakeholder organizations and groups - about its proposed Order of Selection and the opportunity to obtain additional information and comment on the proposed Order at public hearings. OVRS subsequently held public hearings in three locations around the state - Portland, Roseburg and The Dalles.

OVRS continues to provide the SRC, DRO/CAP and other consumer, advocacy and allied organizations and groups with information and updates the status of its Order of Selection and related developments. In addition, should a waitlist be reinstituted, OVRS will provide quarterly updates to individuals on the waitlist about their status on the list.

 

Description of Priority categories

Priority One:

Eligible Persons who meet all three of the following criteria shall be served first, in the order of each individual’s date of application:

  1. (A) The individual is classified with a Most Significant Disability consistent with OAR 582-001-0010 (22) (See FN1);

  2. (B) The individual has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits three or more functional capacities (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and

  3. (C) The individual is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome

Priority Two:

Eligible Persons not qualifying as Priority One who meet all three of the following criteria shall be served second, in the order of each individual’s date of application:

  1. (A) The individual is classified with a Most Significant Disability consistent with OAR 582-001-0010 (22);

  2. (B) The individual has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits two or more functional capacities (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and

  3. (C) The individual is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome

Priority Three:

Eligible persons not qualifying as Priority One or Priority Two and classified with a significant disability consistent with OAR 582-001-0010 (23)(See FN2) shall be served third, in the order of each individual’s date of application.

Priority Four:

All other eligible persons shall be served fourth in the order of each individual’s date of application

FN1: OAR 582-001-0010(22) provides as follows: "Individual with a most significant disability" refers to an eligible individual who: (a) Has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits two or more functional capacities (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and (b) Is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome.

FN2: OAR 582-001-0010(23) provides as follows: "Individual with a significant disability" refers to an eligible individual who does not qualify as an individual with a most significant disability as defined at OAR 582-001-0010(22); and (a) The individual is currently receiving Social Security Income or Social Security Disability Insurance payments; or (b) The individual: (A) Has a severe mental or physical impairment that seriously limits one’s functional capacity (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and (B) Is expected to require two or more vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time to achieve or maintain a successful employment outcome.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

Order of Selection

OVRS is required by federal law to implement an Order of Selection establishing priority levels for services to ensure the agency’s resources are devoted to serving individuals with the most significant disabilities first when the agency’s resources are insufficient to serve all eligible individuals.

Under Oregon’s Order of Selection, OVRS assesses eligibility and assigns a priority level (based on the number of functional capacity limitations present, the number of vocational rehabilitation services required and the anticipated duration of service) for all individuals interested in obtaining vocational rehabilitation services. OVRS may reassess priority levels if an individual’s condition changes. Once OVRS assigns a priority level, the office places individuals on a statewide waitlist according to the individual’s priority level. When resources allow, OVRS removes individuals from the waitlist and provides service in the order their applications were received.

Individuals receiving service sunder an IPE authorized prior to January 15, 2009 are not affected by the Order of Selection and will continue to receive the services agreed to in their IPEs. Former clients returning to OVRS for post-employment services are also not affected by the Order of Selection and may be provided appropriate post-employment services without being subject to the wait list.

In accordance with the applicable federal regulations, the Oregon Administrative Rules setting forth the priority levels and related definitions were amended effective December 19, 2008 and provided as outlined here.

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

Notes:

  • OVRS does not presently have an OOS waitlist for services. All eligible individuals in all priority levels are being served.

  • The numbers in the “cost of services” column represent the estimated average cost of ‘client services’ per client. These costs do not include the cost of staff, facilities, cost allocation and other non-client service costs.

  • The numbers immediately below represent the estimated total cost of ‘client services’ per priority category.

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 4,073 1,207 1,174 18.88 $2,281
2 2,035 349 229 17.65 $2,126
3 772 35 32 19.91 $2,219
4 259 5 4 14.96 $3,093

This screen was last updated on Jul 3 2012 7:51PM by saorlincolns

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

In FFY 2011, the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (OVRS):

  • Served 785 individuals in supported employment, of which 234 individuals were served utilizing Title VI, Part B funds.

  • Was allocated $267,643 in Title VI, Part B funds, of which it expended $267,643.

  • Closed 99 Title VI, Part B funded cases, of which:

    • 44 entered competitive employment in supported employment; and,

    • 55 cases were closed without entering employment.

OVRS anticipates expending in FFY 2013 approximately $268,446 in Title VI, Part B funds to provide plan services to these individuals.

Goal

In FFY 2013, OVRS will seek to provide supported employment services to 240 individuals, and assist 44 individuals in obtaining competitive employment.

Plans

OVRS’ supported employment program is potentially available to any individual with a most significant disability who needs such services to be successfully and competitively employed. Title VI, Part B funds are utilized for the time-limited services necessary for an individual to stabilize in competitive employment in an integrated setting. The counselor and the individual agree on the services to be provided to the client on an individualized basis. Services that may be part of a supported employment individual plan for employment (IPE) include:

  • Person-centered planning
  • Community-based assessment
  • Job development and job placement
  • On-site training for worker and/or co-workers
  • Long-term support development
  • Other services and goods
  • Post-employment services

This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2012 1:23PM by saorlincolns

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Note: For reference throughout this attachment, OVRS’s 2013 goals (“objectives”), priorities, strategies (including methods and procedure), outcomes and outcome targets are stated at the bottom of this text box.

See:

  • Goal I

    • Objective A, Strategies 1, 2, 4, 5

    • Objective B, Strategies 1, 2

    • Objective D, Strategy 2

    • Objective E, Strategy 1

    • Objective G, Strategy 2

    • Objective I, Strategy 1

  • Goal II

    • Objective A, Strategies 4, 5, 6

    • Objective B, Strategies 1, 2

  • Goal III

    • Objective A, Strategy 4

Also see objectives and strategies under Goals IV and V. These are intended to improve OVRS operations and services.

2013 Goals, Objectives, Strategies and Outcomes:

  1. GOAL I. Increase the number and quality (as measured by wages, availability of benefits, number of hours worked, and client satisfaction) of employment outcomes for all OVRS clients

    1. OBJECTIVE A.: Increase number of employment outcomes

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue development and implementation of Enhancing Employment Outcomes Program initiative

        2. Educate and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies

        3. Continue to work with the Employment Department and University of Oregon Career Information System to provide labor market information to OVRS counseling staff

        4. Continue to work with Department of Human Services (DHS) and City of Portland to become model employers of people with disabilities

        5. Maintain the Preferred Workers Program with Workers Compensation Program and explore feasibility of expanding

      • OUTCOMES

        • Number of employment outcomes (Indicator 1.1): 2013 Target=2,000

        • Increase percent of clients in plan who obtain an employment outcome (Indicator 1.2): 2013 Target=57%

    2. OBJECTIVE B.: Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and number of hours worked

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to implement, evaluate and refine the Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative

        2. Complete development and initiate utilization of a job development vendor report card with a focus on quality outcomes such as living wage, health benefits and advancement

        3. Maintain the Preferred Workers Program with Workers Compensation Program and explore feasibility of expanding

        4. Educate about and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies

        5. Continue to implement the charter and memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        6. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implementing agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

        7. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with the Department of Education (ODE) and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of agreed upon data

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

      • OUTCOMES:

        • Increase of clients obtaining employment who received employer paid medical benefits: 2013 Target=26%

        • Job Development Report Card

        • Increase average number of hours worked: 2013 Target=28

        • Increase average wage (Indicators 1.1 and 1.5): 2013 Target= $12.00

        • Percent of clients obtaining post-secondary degree or certificate who also obtain employment: 2013 Target= 55%

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and authorized ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommended policy and legislative changes

    3. OBJECTIVE C.: Implement new self-employment policy

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Review and revise new Self-Employment policy as needed

        2. Continue to train staff on Self-Employment policy

        3. Continue to refine and implement a Business Plan Committee charged with reviewing and approving proposed self-employment business plans (based on feasibility and viability)

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increased Self-Employment outcomes: 2013 Target=50

    4. OBJECTIVE D.: Increase the number of adults with significant disabilities who are employed

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Increase the number of supported employment clients obtaining employment outcomes

        2. Pilot Ticket to Work/Partnership Plus with the ODDS and continue to work with DHS to establish it as a TTW "employment network" in order to fund services to individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, psychiatric disabilities and traumatic brain injuries

        3. Continue to collaborate with Addictions and Mental Health Division in implementing and expanding evidence-based supported employment

        4. Continue to utilize training from the Oregon Center for Excellence on Supported Employment for individuals with psychiatric disabilities

        5. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        6. Continue to partner with the ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implementing agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

        7. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of data

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of SSI /SSDI recipients with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target=590

        • Increase number of employment outcomes for supported employment clients (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target=238

        • Increase percent of supported employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4) : 2013 Target=56%

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and authorized ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommended policy and legislative changes

        • Increased employment outcomes for working age adults with intellectual/developmental disabilities*: 2013 Target=400

          • *Persons 18-64 y/o with autism, cerebral palsy, intellectual and/or a congenital disability

    5. OBJECTIVE E.: Increase the participation of and outcomes for individuals from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to contract with Latino Project in Portland and Salem metro areas and Woodburn, and explore feasibility of expanding elsewhere

        2. Continue to support, collaborate with and provide technical assistance (TA) to the 121 programs of the Confederated tribes of Grande Ronde and Warm Springs; initiate support, collaboration and provision of TA to new 121 programs of the Klamath, Umatilla and Siletz tribes

        3. Continue to recruit bicultural and bilingual staff

        4. Identify additional opportunities to outreach to cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities who are potential clients

        5. Ensure linguistic access to services through the use of interpreters, translators and bilingual materials

        6. Work with DHS Office of Equity to identify and address barriers to employment faced by individuals with disabilities who are cultural, ethnic or linguistic minorities

        7. Provide culturally competent services

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of minority clients served (Indicator 2.1): 2013 Target=1,500

        • Increase percent of minority clients obtaining employment (Indicator 1.2): 2013 Target=55%

    6. OBJECTIVE F.: Maintain and develop connections to programs and services that assist clients obtain and maintain employment outcomes

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue Work Readiness Alternatives Workshop programs (as funding permits)

        2. Continue to work with Independent Living Centers to identify services that support and improve employment outcomes

        3. Collaborate and coordinate with Veterans’ programs across the state to address rehabilitation needs of returning veterans, in accordance with HB 2403 (2011)

      • OUTCOMES

        • Contracts are in place for Work Readiness Alternatives Workshop/s

        • Maintain number of contracts OVRS branches have with Independent Living Centers to provide services: 2013 Target=7

    7. OBJECTIVE G.: Refine, administer and sustain a statewide work incentives planning system (WIN)

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to provide work incentives/benefits planning services through 11 certified coordinators housed in six Centers for Independent Living throughout the state

        2. Continue to pursue policy option package and other options for funding the Work Incentives Network (WIN) over the short and long-term

        3. Utilize a departmental work group to support implementation of WIN

        4. Continue to pursue funding to support the expansion of work incentives/benefits planning coordinators in high schools to targeted transition age youth

        5. Continue to provide training to staff on WIN

        6. Provide training to 121 tribal programs on the work incentives planning system and new Social Security Ticket to Work regulations

        7. Continue to provide training and outreach on work incentives to parents, caregivers of persons with significant disabilities

        8. Continue to evaluate effectiveness of WIN in increasing employment outcomes and reducing dependency on public benefits, and utilize results in making case for WIN

        9. Continue to partner with Disability Rights Oregon’s Work Incentives and Planning Assistance (WIPA) program in providing work incentives/benefits planning services (subject to continuation of WIPA)

      • OUTCOMES

        • Submit policy option package

        • Percent of SSI/SSDI employments that meet substantial gainful SGA at closure (Indicator 1.6): 2013 Target=25%

        • Number of work incentives system referrals who become OVRS applicants: 2013 Target=225

    8. OBJECTIVE H.: Provide assistive technology (AT) services and devices needed statewide by clients at each stage of the VR process

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to collaborate with Access Technologies, Inc (ATI) to provide AT services and devices needed by clients at each stage of the VR process.

        2. Collaborate with ATI loan program to increase the availability of existing and emerging AT tools that facilitate employment

      • OUTCOMES

        • Fulfillment of contract deliverables

    9. OBJECTIVE I.: Improve access and quality of services for Deaf and hard of hearing persons

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to participate in DHS pilot for videophones/video relay interpreting

        2. Increase the number of staff with American Sign Language skills

        3. Continue statewide coordination of services to Deaf and hard of hearing persons

        4. Provide outreach to the Deaf and hard of hearing persons

        5. Explore how accessibility of job development services to Deaf and hard of hearing persons may be increased

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase the number of Deaf and hard of hearing persons with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target=325

        • Increase number of transition age Deaf youth (18-24) and youth who are hard of hearing with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target= 26

        • Expanded availability and use of videophones/video relay interpreting

    10. OBJECTIVE J.: Enhance coordination with workforce partners and vocational rehabilitation programs so that people with disabilities have better access and are better prepared for employment

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue participation in the Workforce Policy Cabinet

        2. Continue to collaborate with workforce partners to provide training and technical assistance to Oregon’s workforce regions in developing, implementing and updating Resource Sharing Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding

        3. Continue to assess the training needs of workforce partners located in Employment Department offices and One-stops at the local level and provide training as appropriate

        4. Increase the number of cases co-staffed with workforce partners

        5. Ensure staff are aware of workforce system resources including training resources

        6. Collaborate and coordinate with Veterans’ programs across the state to address rehabilitation needs of returning veterans, in accordance with HB 2403 (2011)

      • OUTCOMES

        • Updated resource sharing agreements and MOU

    11. OBJECTIVE K.: Increase the availability and quality of job development services

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Monitor and evaluate performance of staff and contract job development services

        2. Continue job development training and coaching

        3. Continue to implement and refine outcome based payment system for job development services

        4. Continue to refine job development vendor report system

        5. Complete development of and utilization of a job development vendor report card with a focus on quality outcomes, such as living wage, health benefits and advancement

        6. Review rollout of job development services to special populations, including individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities, identify any needed adjustments or refinements, and implement

      • OUTCOMES

        • Job Development Report Card

        • Increased quality Job Development outcomes (establish baseline with report card, set targets thereafter)

  2. GOAL II. Increase the number of youth who seek OVRS services and the number and quality of employment outcomes for this population.

    1. OBJECTIVE A.: Increase the number of transition age youth (14-24) who obtain employment outcomes

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue transition job fairs in partnership with Oregon Commission for the Blind, governmental units, business groups and others

        2. Continue Youth Transition Program through development and implementation of YTP biennial agreements with local school districts. Address Order of Selection as needed

        3. Develop and implement strategy to engage select local YTP programs and OVRS branches in providing transition services to students earlier in the academic process

        4. Continue implementation of Project Access, a grant opportunity to demonstrate a new youth transition service model, which engages students at an earlier age and earlier in the academic process

        5. Continue collaboration with the Early Assessment Screening and Treatment (EAST) Project to provide needed services and supports to transition age youth with psychiatric disabilities

        6. Continue contract with Arc of Oregon for Project Employ, which assists youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities and their families in learning about and utilizing services and resources in order to increase employment outcomes for these youth

        7. Continue to provide funding for Oregon RISE Center’s annual statewide Building Futures Conference on transition

        8. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        9. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implementing agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

        10. Continue to implement the charter and memorandum of understanding with the ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of data

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of transition age youth served: 2013 Target=1850

        • Increase percent of transition age youth obtaining an employment outcome (Indicator 1.1): 2013 Target=58%

        • Increase percent of transition age youth who obtain a post-secondary degree or certificate and obtain a successful closure (Indicator 1.2): 2013 Target=82%

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommended policy and legislative changes

    2. OBJECTIVE B.: Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and hours worked

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to implement, evaluate and refine the Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative

        2. Complete development of and initiate utilization of a job development vendor report card with a focus on quality outcomes, such as living wage, health benefits and advancement

        3. Educate about and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies

        4. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        5. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and solutions and implement agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

        6. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the governance structure and project plan for the MOU and charter

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of agreed upon data

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase average wage (Indicators 1.3 and 1.5): 2013 Target= $9.50

        • Increase percent with employer paid benefits: 2013 Target=10%

        • Increase number of hours worked: 2013 Target=25

        • Job development report card

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommend policy and legislative changes

    3. OBJECTIVE C.: Increase the number of youth with more significant disabilities who receive services

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to partner with ODDS to provide training and technical assistance to community-based developmental disability programs

        2. Arrange for training through the internal resources and the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education center to address training needs specific to this population

        3. Establish DHS as an SSA Ticket to Work ‘Employment Network’ in order to fund ongoing support services for youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        4. Continue collaboration with the Early Assessment Screening and Treatment (EAST) Project to provide needed services and supports to transition age youth with psychiatric disabilities

        5. Continue contract with Arc of Oregon for Project Employ, which assists youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities and their families in learning about and utilizing services and resources in order to increase employment outcomes for these youth

        6. Continue to provide funding for Oregon RISE Center’s annual statewide Building Futures Conference on transition

        7. Initiate planning and preparation for anticipated increased federal funding for expanded transition services and submission of a related grant proposal

        8. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        9. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing and implementing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and implementing agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed Legislative changes

        10. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure and project plan

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through tracking and analysis of data

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and implementing agreed upon solutions

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of students who are SSI/SSDI recipients who obtain an employment outcome (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target=160

        • Increase the number of students in supported employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4): 2013 Target=100

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommended policy and legislative changes

    4. OBJECTIVE D.: Improve partnerships with education agencies at the state and local level

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to partner with ODE, University of Oregon, and Oregon school districts to carry out the Youth Transition Program, restructured as needed to address Order of Selection limitations

        2. Continue to participate in the Work Group with the Commission for the Blind and Oregon Community Colleges in order to exchange information and address concerns

        3. Continue to participate on State Advisory Council for Special Education and other transition related committees

        4. Continue to implement the charter and MOU with the ODDS to improve employment outcomes for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        5. Continue to partner with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. This will likely include:

          • Identifying policy gaps and developing revised policy to address gaps

          • Identifying programmatic/systems barriers and implementing agreed upon solutions

          • Recommending needed Legislative changes

        6. Continue to implement a charter and MOU with the ODE and ODDS to jointly address the needs of transition age youth through increased planning, coordination and collaboration, leveraging of resources and system redesign. Strategies and activities will likely include:

          • Refining and implementing the charter and MOU governance structure

          • Implementing agreed upon solutions to identified barriers and problems

          • Monitoring progress made in fulfilling objectives and achieving outcomes through data tracking and analysis

          • Recommending needed legislative changes

      • OUTCOMES

        • Maintain number of Youth Transition Program sites: 2013 Target=39

        • Implemented ODDS-OVRS MOU and ODDS-OVRS charter

        • Implemented ODE-ODDS-OVRS MOU and charter

        • Recommended policy and legislative changes

    5. OBJECTIVE E.: Increase the awareness and understanding of transition among youth and their parents, teachers, and disability advocates and professionals

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Work with the local and state level advisory boards to Project Access to identify opportunities to increase awareness and understanding of transition issues

        2. Co-sponsor and participate in annual transition conference

        3. Educate OVRS staff, DHS partners, education staff and parents of youth in transition about services available to transition youth, including supported employment

        4. Explore supporting family-to-family training on transition, such as that provided through OCDD and RISE

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of transition age youth served: 2013 Target=1850

    6. OBJECTIVE F.: Increase the participation of and outcomes for youth from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities and Deaf and hard of hearing youth

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Ensure linguistic access through the use of bilingual staff, interpreters and translated materials

        2. Identify opportunities to outreach to potential cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minority clients with disabilities

        3. Provide culturally competent services

        4. Develop a strategy for increasing participation and positive outcomes for Deaf and hard of hearing youth

      • OUTCOMES

        • Interpreters available 100% of the time when requested: 2013 Target=100%

  3. GOAL III. Engage employers in order to increase the number and quality of employment outcomes for persons with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities

    1. OBJECTIVE A.: Increase understanding awareness, and interest of Oregon’s businesses in employing people with disabilities

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to promote employment of persons with disabilities on a business to business basis through dedicated business partnerships

        2. Continue to partner with the Oregon Commission for the Blind, CSAVR and others in implementing and coordinating employer engagement strategies

        3. Continue to work with the Employment Department and University of Oregon Career Information System to provide labor market information to OVRS counseling staff

        4. Continue implementation of Enhancing Employment Outcomes (EEO) Initiative

        5. Inform and educate employers about benefits of employing persons with disabilities

        6. Provide disability awareness education and training to businesses and employers as "value added services"

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase numbers of job referrals from business and employer related sources: 2013 Target=To be determined

        • Increase number of employment outcomes from VR-Net: 2013 Target=To be determined

    2. OBJECTIVE B.: Improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to participate in Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation’s National Employment Network (VR-NET)

        2. Expand partnerships with businesses and employers to gain and increase access of OVRS clients to business and employer job application pools and maintain existing partnerships

        3. Continue to work with Department of Human Services and City of Portland in becoming and serving as model employers for people with disabilities

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase numbers of job referrals from business and employer related sources: 2013 Target=60

        • Increase number of employment outcomes from VR-NET: 2013 Target=25

  4. GOAL IV. Continually improve the management of the program while insuring compliance with appropriate laws, rules and policy.

    1. OBJECTIVE A.: Build upon current data analysis to conduct ongoing program evaluation

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Pursue technical assistance from RSA, as needed

        2. Use Caseload Status Indicator (CSI) reports and file reviews to identify and target training and technical assistance provided to the field

        3. Use CSI reports, file review and performance data to target management focus for field staff supervision

        4. Continue to learn and implement Lean Daily Management tools, including but not limited to huddles, visual boards, Continuous Improvement and project management

      • OUTCOMES

        • Decrease the number of errors cited by RSA in yearly 911 reports: 2013 Target=40

    2. OBJECTIVE B.: Develop and implement those systems and processes necessary to maximize utilization of Social Security’s Ticket to Work Program

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Update Ticket to Work manual as needed

        2. Train OVRS field staff on Ticket to Work processes and procedures as needed

        3. Pilot Partnership Plus with ODDS’s Employment First sites

      • OUTCOMES

        • Maximize collection of Ticket reimbursements: 2013 Target=$900,000

    3. OBJECTIVE C. : Minimize risks and liabilities in the administration of the program

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to implement feedback loop for client file reviews that strengthens accountability and supports corrective action

        2. Continue to review and revise rules, policies, and procedures as needed

        3. Pursue technical assistance from RSA on fiscal management, contracting and performance based contracting for program and department staff

        4. Build revenue plan for 2013-15 biennium

        5. Revise Business Review protocol to align with DHS protocol

      • OUTCOMES

        • No compliance audit findings: 2013 Target=0

        • Accurate fiscal reports

  5. GOAL V. Ensure a highly trained workforce at every level of the organization

    1. OBJECTIVE A. : Ensure staff have the skills, knowledge and ability to perform their jobs at a high level of proficiency

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Train all staff on new iterations of ORCA as they are developed and installed online

        2. Require all new counseling staff to complete Counselor Training within three months of hire

        3. Require all staff to complete Values and Ethics Training

        4. Require all new staff to complete EEO job development and motivational intervention training

        5. Train all staff on cultural competency and diversity

        6. Develop and implement agency and branch diversity plans

        7. Provide continuing training to new and existing staff on OVRS new policy manual and new and revised rules, policies and technical assistance guides as developed and implemented

        8. Implement DHS Leadership and Performance Feedback model

      • OUTCOMES

        • Reduction in number of negative RSA review finding: 2013 Target=0

    2. OBJECTIVE B. : Increase staff knowledge in targeted areas

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Completion of Training Needs Assessment

        2. Refinement of training plan based on findings of Training Needs Assessment and Comprehensive Needs Assessment

        3. Staff participation in training relevant to brain injury; autism; Deafness and hearing loss; working with individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities and psychiatric disabilities; person-centered planning; and/or training to address training needs identified through the training needs assessment and training plan

        4. OVRS In-Service Conference

        5. Collaborate with relevant stakeholders to maximize training opportunities and resources

      • OUTCOMES

        • Completed training needs assessment and training plan

        • Internal and external training opportunities to address identified training needs

    3. OBJECTIVE C. : Continue to recruit to meet the Rehabilitation Act’s requirements for a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development and OVRS specific skill needs

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to work with DHS, Office of Human Resources in recruiting staff

        2. Recruit, as possible, at conferences and events

        3. Support career advancement within the program

        4. Continue participation in TACE/CCER Leadership Academy

        5. Continue participation with TACE advisory meetings

        6. Continue to utilize DHS and Department of Administrative Services’s leadership trainings

        7. Provide, as appropriate and feasible, out-of-class work opportunities for staff at every level of the organization

        8. Continue succession planning and retention activities

        9. Increased use of distance learning and development of internal capacity to provide distance learning

        10. Increased development and acquisition of model materials and practices

        11. Mentoring of managers and staff

      • OUTCOMES

        • Applicant pools whose skills, education and experience align with CSPD goals and specific skill needs

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

See Goal I, Objective H, Strategies 1, 2

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

See:

  • Goal I

    • Objective E, Strategies 1-7

    • Objective D, Strategies 1-7

  • Goal II

    • Objective F, Strategies 1-4

    • Objective C, Strategies 1-10

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Not applicable

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

See Goals I and II, all objectives and strategies

Note: In FFY 2011, OVRS exceeded all standards and indicators.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

See Goal I, Objective J, Strategies 1-6

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

See OVRS’s goals, objectives, strategies, and outcomes in their entirety (in above text box).

See:

  • Goal I

    • Objective A, Strategies 1, 2, 4, 5

    • Objective B, Strategies 1, 2

    • Objective D, Strategy 2

    • Objective E, Strategy 1

    • Objective G, Strategy 2

    • Objective I, Strategy 1

  • Goal II

    • Objective A, Strategies 4, 5, 6

    • Objective B, Strategies 1, 2

  • Goal III

    • Objective A, Strategy 4

See:

  • Goal I

    • Objective E, Strategies 1-7

    • Objective D, Strategies 1-7

  • Goal II

    • Objective F, Strategies 1-4

    • Objective C, Strategies 1-10

 

This screen was last updated on Jul 3 2012 3:53PM by saorlincolns

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

The following is OVRS’s evaluation and report on its progress in FFY 2011 in addressing its goals and priorities ("objectives") through implementation of new and continuing strategies, and what it achieved ("outcomes" and outcome "targets.")

  1. GOAL I. Increase the number and quality (as measured by wages, availability of benefits, number of hours worked, and client satisfaction) of employment outcomes for all OVRS clients.

    1. OBJECTIVE A. Increase number of employment outcomes

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue development and implementation of Enhancing Employment Outcomes (EEO) initiative

        2. Educate and engage employers in hiring persons with disabilities utilizing Goal III strategies

        3. Analyze current performance to identify strategies and practices that correlate with increased performance and plan for replication

        4. Ensure availability of labor market information to counselors

      • OUTCOMES

        • Number of employment outcomes (Indicator 1.1)

          • Target:1,199

          • Outcome: 1,793

        • Increase percent of clients in plan who obtain an employment outcome (Indicator 1.2)

          • Target: 60%

          • Outcome: 57%

        • Comment regarding above Outcome: The effects of a poor economy, high unemployment, budget and staffing issues hindered reaching this target.

        • Other Comments:

          • Continued to implement its Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative (EEO) statewide, with focus on:

            • Completing training of current counseling staff to ensure understanding of motivational intervention (MI) counseling techniques

            • Increasing the cadre of MI mentor counselors in order to have sufficient mentors to cover all OVRS field offices

            • Creating an MI train-the-trainer team of three counselors, with two serving as all-purpose trainers and one focusing on provision of Motivational Enhancement Training (MET) to small groups

            • Incorporating a one-day EEO overview into the New Counselor/Counselor Training

            • Requiring contract job developers to participate in EEO approach to job development

            • Providing training to those new and existing staff responsible for purchasing job development services from contract job developers about EEO marketing “best practices”

            • Providing EEO training and support to OVRS’s state and community partners

          • Continued to develop and implement organizational infrastructure needed to support the new job development model.

            • Job Development Advisory Council continued to meet and actively participated in modifying and amending the contract for job placement assistance. Changes identified and to be implemented in FFY 2012 include:

              • Eliminating the hourly job development rate and replacing it with a milestone placement payment

              • Adding a retention only milestone payment

              • Removing job preparation and job coaching from the contracts and providing for them as sub-categories of another contractual service (“employment services”)

              • Adding milestone payments for referral and proposal

              • Creating a separate process for participants who will benefit from a supported or customized approach to job development

            • MI Support Team continued to train and assist staff in providing MI counseling to individual clients and providing small group based motivation interventions

        • Job Development Coordinator and Employment Team continued to manage and staff the job development efforts described here. For more, see other comments re. EEO throughout this attachment.

        • Continued efforts to educate and engage employers. See above and I.K and III.A. below.

        • Continued to review and refine strategies and practices in order to increase client employment outcomes. This primarily involved development and utilization of advanced motivational interventions and job marketing and development methodology for clients with MH or IDs/DDs and who benefit from supported/customized employment.

        • Continued to provide labor market information to staff.

    2. OBJECTIVE B. Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and number of hours worked

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Conduct a feasibility study to determine the need for, structure of and funding requirements and sources for a Job Developer Academy to increase the quality and number of employment outcomes

        2. Maintain the Preferred Workers Program (PWP) with Workers Compensation Program (WCD) and explore feasibility of expanding as requested

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of clients obtaining employment who received employer paid medical benefits

          • Target: 33%

          • Outcome: 24%

        • Increase average number of hours worked

          • Target: 31

          • Outcome: 27

        • Increase average wage (Indicators 1.1 and 1.5)

          • Target: $11.50

          • Outcome: $11.68

        • Percent of clients obtaining post-secondary degree or certificate who also obtain employment

          • Target: 60%

          • Outcome: 53%

        • Comment regarding above outcomes:The effects of a poor economy, high unemployment, budget and staffing issues hindered reaching the above targets.

        • Feasibility Study Recommendations

          • Outcome: Feasibility study completed (FFY 2009)

          • Comment regarding above Outcome: Continued to address job developments needs through EEO initiative and development and implementation of performance based job development services (these strategies emerged through implementation of EEO and previously completed feasibility study).

          • Other Comments: Continued interagency agreement with the Worker’s Compensation Division to operate PWP and provide employment benefits and incentives to injured workers and employers. OVRS assisted Preferred Worker Program (PWP) cardholders in Clackamas, Columbia, Multnomah, Lane, Jackson, Josephine and Washington counties.

    3. OBJECTIVE C. Implement new self-employment policy and associated technical assistance guide

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Obtain technical assistance from the Rehabilitation Services Administration and other resources on self-employment

        2. Provide training to staff on self-employment policy and best practices

        3. Develop a self-employment tool kit

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase self-employment outcomes

        • Outcome: Baseline to be established in FFY 2012

        • Comments:

          • Completed writing and began implementation of new Self-Employment Policy and TAG.

          • Trained all staff on new policy and TAG, as part of intensive, statewide training provided on new OVRS Policy Manual.

          • Established a Self-Employment Business Plan Review Committee, review procedure and completed a Self-Employment Toolkit.

    4. OBJECTIVE D. Increase the number of adults with significant disabilities who are employed

        STRATEGIES

        1. Increase the number of supported employment clients obtaining employment outcomes

        2. Continue to explore establishing the Department of Human Services as a Ticket to Work "employment network" revenue stream for ongoing support services for individuals with psychiatric disabilities, intellectual/developmental disabilities and/or traumatic brain injuries

        3. Continue to revise and update supported employment training and resource materials, including a toolkit

        4. Continue to collaborate with Addictions and Mental Health Division in implementing and expanding evidence-based supported employment

        5. Utilize training from OCESE for individuals with psychiatric disabilities

        6. Continue to collaborate with Office of Developmental Disability Services (ODDS) and brokerages in providing supported employment to individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities

        7. Collaborate with ODDS in developing and implementing its new Employment First policy

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of SSI/SSDI recipients with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4)

          • Target: 480

          • Outcome: 428

        • Increase number of employment outcomes for supported employment clients (Indicator 1.4)

          • Target: 100

          • Outcome: 185

        • Increase percent of supported employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4)

          • Target: 60%

          • Outcome: 53%

        • Comment regarding the first and third outcomes: The effects of a poor economy, high unemployment, budget and staffing issues hindered reaching these targets.

        • Other Comments:

          • Continued working with the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE) and ten community mental health programs to implement Ticket to Work/Partnership Plus, and renewed related agreements between OVRS and the community programs.

          • OVRS and the Competitive Employment Project/Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (CEP) continued to partner with and utilize OSECE in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. The partnership has increased the number of community mental health programs utilizing IPS. That number remained at 18 in FFY 2011.

          • OVRS staff continued to provide supported employment services to individuals with psychiatric disabilities, in partnership with community mental health programs.

          • OVRS counseling staff continued to provide supported employment services to persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities, in partnership with ODDS and Oregon’s brokerages (of services to persons with IDs/DDs.

          • Updated Supported Employment Toolkit’ Consumer Guide (in FFY 2010)

          • OVRS continued to provide support to ODDS in implementing Employment First policy through continued participation in state level planning and regional initiation activities. In addition, CEP funding helped the cost of consultants and activities.

          • Starting in February 2011, the Employment First Outreach Team began publishing a biweekly e-newsletter to share information and build skills.

    5. OBJECTIVE E. Increase the participation of and outcomes for individuals from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities

        STRATEGIES

        1. Continue Latino Project in Portland and Salem and explore feasibility of expanding elsewhere

        2. Continue to support, collaborate with and provide technical assistance to the 121 programs of the Confederated tribes of Grande Ronde and Warm Springs

        3. Continue to recruit bicultural and bilingual staff

        4. Identify additional opportunities to outreach to cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities who are potential clients

        5. Ensure linguistic access to services through the use of interpreters, translators and bilingual materials

        6. Identify and address barriers to employment faced by individuals with disabilities who are cultural, ethnic or linguistic minorities

        7. Provide culturally competent services

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of minority clients served (Indicator 2.1)

          • Target:1,081

          • Outcome: 1,232

        • Increase percent of minority clients obtaining employment (Indicator 1.2)

          • Target: 60%

          • Outcome: 53%

        • Comment regarding above Outcome: The effects of a poor economy, high unemployment, budget and staffing issues hindered reaching the above target.

        • Other Comments:

          • Continued to:

          • Contract with Latino Connection to provide outreach and other services and supports to assist the Latino community in accessing OVRS services. Services provided in Portland and Salem metro areas and expanded to Woodburn. Support, partner and provide to technical assistance to 121 tribal programs, in accord with cooperative agreements. Presently have five year agreements with the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the Confederated Klamath Tribes and the Confederate Tribes of Siletz Indians; an agreement with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation, which was awarded 121 status in 2010, remains under development.

          • Recruit bilingual, bicultural staff.

          • Partner with the Immigrants and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO), which provides assistance to 30 ethnic refugee and immigrant groups in the Portland metropolitan area. OVRS’ field offices provided trainings to IRCO and worked with an IRCO job developer network.

          • Sponsor and participate in annual two-day Options for Success Conference in Southern Oregon for VR professionals, disability providers and persons with disabilities and their families.

          • Coordinate with the WOU Deafness Rehabilitation program; implement a videophone pilot with DHS; implementing FM and induction loop technology in all offices to facilitate linguistic access; continued collaboration with Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services for provision of ASL interpreters, text based service providers and coordination of services. In addition, developed training materials specific to identification of functional limitations experienced by Deaf and Hard of Hearing consumers and distributed them statewide. Three OVRS VRCs serve statewide and local boards for the Hearing Loss Association of Oregon.

          • Use bilingual/bicultural interns in targeted OVRS branches; publication of OVRS informational materials in multiple languages; installation of videophones in targeted branches as implementation of the videophone/video remote interpreting pilot continued. Delays in purchase and installation of equipment have slowed rollout of the pilot. It is now hoped the system will be fully operational in the fall of 2012. For more on the pilot, see Attachment 4.10.

    6. OBJECTIVE F. Maintain and develop connections to programs and services that assist clients obtain and maintain employment outcomes

        STRATEGIES

        1. Continue Work Readiness Alternatives Workshop (WRAW) programs on a statewide basis

        2. Continue to partner with Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development in supporting and implementing the Disability Navigator Program

        3. Maintain the Career Workforce Skills Training Programs at community colleges

        4. Continue to work with Independent Living Centers to identify services that support and improve employment outcomes

      • OUTCOMES

        • Contracts in place for Work Readiness Alternatives Workshops

          • Outcome: Continued to contract with Lane County and Medford area WRAW programs.

          • Comment: Contracts renewed through FFY 2012. After imposition of Order of Selection in 2009, WRAW was discontinued but was subsequently reinstituted on limited basis with federal stimulus funds.

        • Quarterly meeting attendance with Department of Community Colleges and Workforce Development

          • Outcome Workforce Services Coordinator continued to represent OVRS in interactions with CCWD.

        • Maintain number of contracts OVRS branches have with Independent Living Centers to provide services

        • Target: 7

        • Outcome: 7

        • Comment:

          • Clarified policy in support of payment for IL services promoting successful employment outcomes.

          • Provided funds for CIL staff to attend NCIL conference, to further develop CIL compliance with Standards and Indicators, to develop peer consultation through web-based video conference, and to increase visibility and statewide access to IL services through development of Oregon IL website

          • Continued to collaborate with Oregon Commission for the Blind and the State Independent Living Council to provide IL services that overcome barriers to employment.

          • Independent Living staff provided information about the scope of services provided by Centers for Independent Living services that support successful employment at the August 2011 OVRS In-Service.

        • Other Comments:

          • CWSTP was discontinued June 30, 2009, as a result of Order of Selection

          • Disability Navigator Program was discontinued in 2010, after Congress did not reauthorize the program

    7. OBJECTIVE G. Refine, administer and sustain a state-wide work incentives planning system
      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to pursue policy option package (POP) to support continuation of the work incentives planning system

        2. Develop and utilize a departmental work group to support implementation of the work incentives planning system

        3. Pursue grant funding to support the expansion of work incentives counselors in high schools to target transition age youth

        4. Provide training to staff on the work incentives planning system (WIN)

        5. Provide training to 121 tribal programs on the work incentives planning system (WIN) and new Social Security Ticket to Work (TTW) regulations

        6. Provide training and outreach on work incentives to parents and caregivers of persons with significant disabilities

      • OUTCOMES

        • Submission of policy option package

          • Outcome: No Policy Option Package (POP) submitted

          • Comment regarding above Outcome: Not submitted because of limited legislative session

        • Percent of SSI/SSDI employments that meet substantial gainful activity at closure (Indicator 1.6)

          • Target: 33%

          • Outcome: 21%

          • Comment: The effects of a poor economy, high unemployment, budget and staffing issues hindered reaching this target.

        • Number of work incentives system referrals who become OVRS applicants

          • Target: 125

          • Outcome: 217

        • Submission of Grant Proposal

          • Outcome: Abandoned pursuit of grants for transition in 2010 after determining it was not a viable strategy.

          • Additional Comments:

            • Departmental Work Group met and identified and explored funding strategies for sustaining WIN, including using mental health and developmental disability Medicaid funds (several promising leads followed but no resolution by end of the year).

            • WIN Work Incentive Coordinators continued to provide training to OVRS field staff through presentations and at the statewide OVRS In-Service conference; and consult with field staff and clients about client specific work incentive and benefits needs, options and plans.

            • WIN continued to provide training to parents and caregivers through statewide conference participation and local presentations to high school transition staffs and parents.

    8. OBJECTIVE H. Provide assistive technology (AT) services and devices needed statewide by OVRS clients at each stage of the VR process

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to contract with Access Technologies, Inc. (ATI) to provide assistive technology services and AT devices needed by OVRS clients at each stage of the VR process

      • OUTCOMES

        • Fulfillment of Contract Deliverables

        • Outcome: Contract Fulfilled

        • Comments: OVRS purchased over 190 devices and services through ATI in FFY 2011, including hearing, vision, cognitive and orthotic devices and services.

    9. OBJECTIVE I. Improve access and quality of services for Deaf and hard of hearing persons

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Identify current technology needs; available technology; conduct cost benefit analysis; and develop corresponding recommendations.

        2. Increase the number of staff with American Sign Language skills

        3. Continue statewide coordination of services to Deaf and hard of hearing persons

        4. Provide outreach to the Deaf and hard of hearing communities

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase the number of Deaf and hard of hearing impaired persons with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4)

          • Target: 345

          • Outcome: 293

        • Increase number of transition age Deaf youth (18-24) and youth who are hard of hearing with employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4)

            Target: 30

          • Outcome: 26

        • Comment regarding above outcomes: The effects of a poor economy, high unemployment, budget and staffing issues hindered reaching the above target.

        • Technology recommendation

          • Outcome: Recommendation developed

          • Comment: Recommendation is for use of video remote interpreting (VRI) and videophones. Implementation has been slowed but it is hoped the planned for system will be fully operational by fall of 2012.

        • Additional Comments:

          • Continue to increase number of staff with ASL skills.

          • Deaf/hard of hearing coordinator continued coordination of Deaf/hard of hearing services.

          • Deaf/hard of hearing counselor specialists continued outreach and services.

    10. OBJECTIVE J. Enhance coordination with workforce partners and vocational rehabilitation programs so that people with disabilities have better access and are better prepared for employment

        STRATEGIES

        1. Continue participation in the Workforce Policy Cabinet

        2. Continue to collaborate with workforce partners to provide training and technical assistance to Oregon’s workforce regions in developing, implementing and updating Resource Sharing Agreements (RSAs) and Memoranda of Understanding (MOU)

        3. Continue to assess the training needs of workforce partners located in Employment Department offices and one-stops at the local level and provide training as appropriate

        4. Increase the number of cases co-staffed with workforce partners

        5. Ensure staff are aware of workforce system resources including training resources

        6. Engage the Employment Department’s Veteran’s representative

      • OUTCOMES

        • Presence on Workforce Policy Cabinet

          • Outcome: OVRS Administrator continued to represent OVRS and participate on cabinet.

        • Maintenance of Resource Sharing Agreements:

          • Outcome: Resource Sharing Agreements and MOUs extended for another year while continuing to await reauthorization of federal Workforce Investment Act

        • Comments:

          • OVRS Workforce Services Coordinator and Employer Services Coordinator interfaced with Oregon’s workforce regions as presently configured on a number of capacities, including updating and extending the resource sharing agreements.

          • OVRS staff continued to collaborate with local workforce system partners on a case by case basis, when appropriate, and when services such as labor market research, resume writing, and interview skills practice were available.

          • OVRS field staff provided clients who are veterans with info about resources available to them through the Employment Department, the Brain Injury Association of Oregon and other agencies and programs.

    11. OBJECTIVE K. Increase the availability and quality of job development services

        STRATEGIES

        1. Explore the feasibility of creating staff job developers

        2. Develop standardized job developer reports

        3. Explore the feasibility of certifying job developers

        4. Explore the feasibility of outcome based payment for job development services

        5. See strategies for Goal I, Objective B

      • OUTCOMES

        • Analysis and report on feasibility of staff job developers

          • Outcome/Comment: Continued to train counselors on EEO job development/marketing approach and methods and utilize them and contract job developers to provide need job development services. With completion of analysis in FFY 2009, decision was made to train all counselors on EEO job development/marketing approach and methods and to provide needed job development services through staff and private job developers.

        • Standardized job developer reports

          • Outcome: Initial standardized report developed and implemented in FFY 2009. Continued to refine reports through contracts issued for job development services.

        • Analysis and report on feasibility of certifying job developers

          • Outcome/Comment: Upon completion of analysis in FFY 2009, decision made to train job developers on EEO job development/marketing approach and continue move to performance based, contract job development services, rather than certification.

          • Analysis and report on outcome based payment for job development services

            • Outcome: Analysis completed

            • Comment: Continued to develop, implement and refine outcome based payment system for job development services. 130 contract job development vendors participated in outcome based system for job development, placement and retention services. Continued development of outcome based system and process. Effort led and coordinated by Employment Services Team and Job Development Coordinator.

  2. GOAL II. Increase the number of youth who seek OVRS services and the number and quality of employment outcomes for this population.

    1. OBJECTIVE A. Increase the number of transition age youth (14-24) who obtain employment outcomes

        STRATEGIES

        1. Continue transition job fairs in partnership with Oregon Business Leadership Network and others

        2. Continue Youth Transition Program (YTP)

        3. Continue Career Workforce Skills Training Program (CWSTP)

        4. Continue implementation of Project Access, a grant opportunity to demonstrate a new youth transition service model

        5. Analyze current performance to identify strategies and practices that correlate with increased performance and replicate statewide

        6. Continue collaboration with the Early Assessment Screening and Treatment (EAST) Project, which focuses on transition age youth with psychiatric disabilities

        7. Work with Office of Developmental Disabilities Services (ODDS) establish collaborative relationships with the three new developmental disability supports and services brokerages scheduled to go online over the next year

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of transition age youth served

          • Target: 1,400

          • Outcome: 1,720

        • Increase percent of transition age youth obtaining an employment outcome (Indicator 1.1)

          • Target: 60%

          • Outcome: 56%

        • Increase percent of transition age youth who obtain a post-secondary degree or certificate and obtain a successful closure (Indicator 1.2)

          • Target: 65%

          • Outcome: 48%

        • Comment regarding above outcomes: The effects of a poor economy, high unemployment, budget and staffing issues hindered reaching latter two targets.

        • Additional Comments:

        • OVRS continued to:

          • Hold transition job fairs. These were carried out in partnership with OVRS’ Employer Services Coordinator and RISE, Inc. and Incight, Inc, under a contract for the fairs and other employer engagement services. (OVRS ceased contracting with OBLN after its dissolution in 2010.)

          • Implement YTP with 38 school districts and consortia and 105 schools under YTP cooperative agreements for State Fiscal Years (SFY) 2009-11; and new grants were solicited and awarded and new agreements negotiated and begun with 39 school consortia and school districts, representing 109 high schools, for SFY 2011-13. For more, see Attachments 4.8.b.1 and 4.7.b.3

          • As result of Order of Selection, the Career Workforce Skills Training program (CWST) was discontinued on June 30, 2009

          • Implement Project ACCESS. As ACCESS underwent its 3rd grant year, participating educational professionals and OVRS counselors completed curricula and taught 433 students in 18 different classrooms in the five participating high schools through three one-hour classes per week. In addition, a three-day summer academy was held for the teachers and VRCs staffing ACCESS; and OVRS continued to collect data on ACCESS outcomes. (It will be several years before the results are known, after ACCESS participants graduate from high school and get jobs or continue onto higher education.) For more, see Attachment 4.8.b.2

          • Collaborate with the Early Assessment Screening and Treatment (EAST) Project to minimize unemployment of young people with early psychosis.

          • Collaborate with Oregon’s 13 services and supports “brokerages” for individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities in assisting individuals with such disabilities in pursuing employment outcomes.

          • Collaborate with ODDS in continuing to roll out its Employment First policy. See I.D. above for more

    2. OBJECTIVE B. Increase the quality of employment outcomes as measured by wages, availability of employer paid benefits, and hours worked

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Support Office of Developmental Disabilities Services’ (ODDS) job development training pilot

        2. Continue Career Workforce Skills Training Program (CWSTP)

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase average wage (Indicators 1.3 and 1.5)

          • Target: $8.93

          • Outcome: $9.27

        • Increase percent with employer paid benefits

          • Target: 20%

          • Outcome: 12%

        • Increase number of hours worked

          • Target: 28

          • Outcome: 23.5

        • Comment regarding above outcomes: The effects of a poor economy, high unemployment, budget and staffing issues hindered reaching these targets.

        • Additional Comments:

          • In regards the job development pilot, the strategy has been modified. As part of its EEO initiative, OVRS has adopted a marketing based approach to job development, and implemented performance based contracts with private job developers. For more, see I.B and III.A comments

          • As result of Order of Selection, CWSTP was discontinued June 30, 2009

          • OVRS field offices and the Work Incentives Network continued work with continuing and new developmental disability brokerages in providing supported employment services to individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities. For more, see II.A.

    3. OBJECTIVE C. Increase the number of youth with more significant disabilities who receive services

        STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to partner with the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services (ODDS) to provide training and technical assistance to community-based developmental disability programs

        2. Continue to revise, update and disseminate supported employment training and resource materials, including a toolkit

        3. Arrange for training through external and internal resources to address training needs specific to this population

        4. Determine the feasibility of Project Search to increase employment outcomes

        5. Pursue grant funding to support the expansion of work incentive counselors and Disability Navigators Program in high school to target transition age youth

        6. Continue to explore the feasibility of establishing the Department of Human Services as a Ticket to Work "employment network" as a strategy to create a revenue stream to fund ongoing support services for persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of students who are SSI/SSDI recipients who obtain an employment outcome (Indicator 1.4)

          • Target: 100

          • Outcome: 105

        • Increase the number of students in supported employment outcomes (Indicator 1.4)

          • Target: 50

          • Outcome: 68

        • Other Comments:

          • OVRS continued to partner with ODDS in implementing ODDS’ Employment First policy through:

            • Provision of CEP funding for consultants, training, informational events and materials.

            • Participation in joint planning and implementation and follow-up events and activities, at the state and local levels. See I.D. above for more.

          • OVRS and ten community mental health programs, with the support of the Addictions and Mental Health Division and Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence, continued the Ticket to Work initiative. For more, see I.D. OVRS continued to explore the possibility carrying out a related effort with ODDS and Oregon’s brokerages (for services to persons with IDs/DDs) but no decision had been made by the end of FFY 2011.

          • Oregon Health Sciences University and St. Vincent DePaul are collaborating on a Project Search initiative. A separate Project Search initiative with Legacy Emanuel Hospital proved financially infeasible (2009). OVRS is not involved with the OHSU/St. Vincent initiative

    4. OBJECTIVE D. Improve partnerships with education agencies at the state and local level

        STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to partner with Department of Education (DoEd), University of Oregon (UofO), and Oregon school districts to carry out the Youth Transition Program (YTP)

        2. Continue to partner with three community colleges in carrying out the Career Workforce Skills Training Program

        3. Explore opportunities with the Oregon School for the Deaf to develop integrated services

        4. Continue to participate in the Work Group with the Commission for the Blind and Oregon Community Colleges (CoB) in order to exchange information and address concerns

        5. Continue to participate on State Advisory Council for Special Education (SACSE) and its Transition Committee; and, Modified Diploma Taskforce

      • OUTCOMES

        • Maintain number of Youth Transition Program sites (number of cooperative agreements)

          • Target: 38

          • Outcome: 38

          • Comment: One site withdrew for budgetary reasons in the first year of the 2009-11 YTP agreements (FFY 2010); and another site was added in the second year (FFY 2011).

        • Determine the number of employment outcomes attributed to partnerships

          • Comment: Not established - unable to collect data.

          • Additional Comments:

            • Continued to partner with DoEd, UofO and Oregon education school districts, consortia and schools to carry out YTP. For more, see Attachment 4.8.b.2

            • As result of Order of Selection, CWSTP discontinued June 30, 2009

            • Completion of cooperative agreement with DoEd and School for the Deaf administration for OVRS to provide transition services to youth who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing is not possible because of legal status of the School of the Deaf

            • OVRS Workforce Services Coordinator continued to participate in bi-annual regional and core work groups with Oregon’s university system, community colleges systems and CoB to exchange information and address concerns

            • OVRS new YTP Coordinator replaced the outgoing YTP Coordinator as OVRS representative on SACSE

    5. OBJECTIVE E. Increase the awareness and understanding of transition among youth and their parents, teachers, and disability advocates and professionals

        STRATEGIES

        1. Work with the local and state level advisory boards to Project Access to identify opportunities to increase awareness and understanding of transition issues

        2. Co-sponsor and participate in annual transition conference

        3. Educate OVRS staff, DHS partners, education staff and parents of youth in transition about services available to transition youth, including supported employment

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of transition age youth served

          • Target: 1,400

          • Outcome: 1,720

          • Additional Comments:

            • Sponsored, supported and participated in 2011 Annual Youth Transition Conference in Hood River. Over 170 teaching, vocational rehabilitation and allied professionals attended.

            • YTP Coordinator and counselor specialists continued to educate staff, partners and other stakeholders about transition services, including supported employment, through OVRS’ annual in-service conference, transition and other conferences and provision of case specific technical assistance.

    6. OBJECTIVE F. Increase the participation of and outcomes for youth from cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minorities and Deaf and hard of hearing youth

        STRATEGIES

        1. Explore the feasibility of partnering with counselors of the 121 tribal programs to provide vocational awareness activities to transition age youth with disabilities

        2. Ensure linguistic access through the use of bilingual staff, interpreters and translated materials

        3. Identify opportunities to outreach to potential cultural, ethnic and/or linguistic minority clients with disabilities

        4. Provide culturally competent services

        5. Develop a strategy for increasing participation and positive outcomes for Deaf and hard of hearing youth

      • OUTCOMES

        • Interpreters available 100% of the time when requested

          • Target: 100%

          • Outcome: 95%

          • Comment: The lack of interpreters in rural areas continued to be a challenge.

        • Additional Comments:

        • Continued to:

          • Contract with Latino Connection to provide outreach and other services and supports to assist the Latino community in accessing OVRS services. Services provided in Portland and Salem metro areas and expanded to Woodburn

          • Support, partner and provide to technical assistance to 121 tribal programs, in accord with cooperative agreements. Presently have five year agreements with the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde, the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, the Confederated Klamath Tribes and the Confederate Tribes of Siletz Indians. Development of a cooperative agreement with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation continue (the tribe was awarded 121 status in 2010

          • Continued to Partner with the Oregon School for the Deaf in facilitating provision of summer work experiences in occupational fields of potential interest to Deaf and hard of hearing high school students

        • For more, see I.E. above. Many of the strategies and activities undertaken with and for ethnic and cultural minority adults also benefited minority youth

  3. GOAL III. Engage employers in order to increase the number and quality of employment outcomes for persons with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities

    1. OBJECTIVE A. Increase understanding, awareness, and interest of Oregon’s businesses in employing people with disabilities

        STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to contract with the Oregon Business Leadership Network to promote employment of persons with disabilities on a business to business basis

        2. Continue to partner with the Oregon Commission for the Blind in developing and coordinating employer engagement strategies

        3. Continue to partner with Employment Department’s business and account representatives to access the labor market information

        4. Continue implementation of Enhancing Employment Outcomes Project

        5. Support and participate in U.S. Business Leadership Network 2008 annual conference

        6. Inform and educate employers about incentives for employing persons with disabilities

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase numbers of job referrals from business and employer related sources

          • Comments:

              Continued to refine capacity and strategies to engage Oregon businesses and employers in order to increase the job opportunities for OVRS clients. (Contract with OBLN Ended in Spring 2010 when it failed to become self-sustaining.

              • OVRS Employer Services Coordinator, in partnership with OCB staff, RISE, Inc., and Incight, Inc., (with which OVRS contracts) organized over 15 “live resume,” job fair, career fair and other employer engagement and disability awareness events around the state. The events were attended by over 60 employers, over 60 employees and over 300 job seekers with disabilities.

              • OVRS Employer Services Coordinator continued to develop and refine partnerships with businesses and employers in the region in order to secure continuing employment opportunities for OVRS clients. Partnerships with Lowes, U.S. Department of Forestry, Northwest Natural Gas and Portland General Electric continued; while Safeway and several other businesses. As result, OVRS was made aware of 30 specific job openings (resulting in 12 documented hires of OVRS clients). The businesses and employers have agreed to be continuing supporters and participants in OVRS sponsored “live resume” and job and career fair events and other related activities.

            • Continued to partner with Employment Department and University of Oregon” Career Information System to obtain labor market info

            • Continued implementation of EEO initiative statewide. The EEO job development approach seeks to increase job placements and outcomes by recognizing and addressing the needs of employers. For more about EEO, see I.B. needs. Emphasizes time spent on employment engagement by job developers rather than client preparation. For more, see other comments re. EEO

            • Sponsored and participated in USBLN 2008 annual conference (October 2008)

            • OVRS Employer Services Coordinator and partners (referenced above) continue to meet and provide employers with information about the benefits of employing individuals with disabilities, including specific incentives. OVRS Employment Team has rebranded OVRS employer engagement and job development services as “OVRS Staffing Solutions”, as part of their larger effort to more effectively engage Oregon’s employer and business community.

            • We are continuing to review how best to quantify and report on the outcomes of this objective.

    2. OBJECTIVE B. Improve employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities

        STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to participate in Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation’s National Employment Network (VR-NET)

        2. Expand partnerships with businesses and employers to gain and increase access of OVRS clients to business and employer application pools; and maintain partnerships with Lowes, U.S. Department of Forestry, and Northwest Natural Gas.

        3. Explore with the Department of Human Services and the City of Portland the possibility of these governmental units becoming model employers of persons with disabilities.

      • OUTCOMES

        • Increase number of employment outcomes from VR-NET

            Outcome:64 job opportunities were identified through VR-Net. 10 clients pursued opportunities but none were hired. The focus on VR-Net continues to be on east coast employers.

    3. OBJECTIVE C. Participate in the development of a state and national marketing campaign for employment of persons with disabilities

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Pursue grant funding and support to air Look at My Ability public service announcements (PSA)

        2. Collaborate with other state Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) projects to develop the state and national marketing campaign and implement in Oregon

      • OUTCOMES

        • Broadcast of Look at My Ability (which evolved into Think Beyond the Label) in major Oregon media markets

          • Outcome: The plan to implement Think Beyond the Label (TBTL) throughout Oregon through television, radio and print outlets was completed and scheduled for implementation in the fall of 2011. OVRS informed employers of the impending campaign through training and presentations of TBTL at large conferences and trade shows; and OVRS Branch Managers were trained on TBTL and plans were developed to reach out to employers in branch areas during the campaign.

          • Comment: Think Beyond the Label was the successor media strategy to My Ability.

        • Secure one or more major campaign sponsors from both private and pubic sectors

          • Outcome: See above. The Oregon Alliance for the Mentally Ill (OrAMI) requested use of TBTL as part of a campaign in Coos County that was funded by businesses in the area. OrAMI subsequently created a business plan to expand this use of TBTL with their message to hire individuals with mental illness, to the tri-county area during the next reporting period.

  4. GOAL IV. Continually improve the management of the program while insuring compliance with appropriate laws, rules and policy.

    1. OBJECTIVE A. Build upon current data analysis to conduct ongoing program evaluation

        STRATEGIES

        1. Pursue technical assistance from Rehabilitation Services Administration

        2. Use available data to determine the best use of training and technical assistance provided to the field

        3. Use available data to determine management focus for field staff supervision

      • OUTCOMES

        • Decrease the number of errors cited by RSA in yearly 911 reports

          • Target: 40

          • Outcome: 0

          • Comment: Upon submission of OVRS response to RSA, no errors remained.

            • Target strategies determined most effective based on data to improve successful outcomes

              • Outcome (completed in FFY 2009): Utilized data to target, refine and expand most effective strategies – those strategies were development /implementation of the Work Incentives Network and development/implementation of the Enhancing Employment Outcomes initiative and performance based job development services

            • Identification of and implementation of operational indicators

              • Outcome (completed in FFY 2009): Program metrics are identified and provided to OVRS Administration and Field Managers through a number of ongoing reports. The data is utilized by management in managing OVRS field services

              • Comments: RSA provided needed technical assistance in FFY 2009

        • OBJECTIVE B. Maximize the use of technological tools to increase the contact time that counseling staff spend with clients

          • STRATEGIES

            1. Bring new iterations of ORCA online

          • OUTCOMES

            • Increase time spent with clients by reducing the amount of time spent on case administration

            • Improve accuracy of data collection

            • Comments regarding above outcomes:

              • Determined above outcomes are impractical to quantify

              • Above outcomes impractical to quantify. To be replaced with: "Reduce Staff Time Spent Producing Authorizations for Purchases". Baseline is being to be established in 2012

              • ORCA 5.9.1 installed in 2011

            • Elimination of temporary Ticket-to-work staffer

              • Comment: Outcome omitted in 2011. No longer applicable because quantity of TTW work increased.

        • OBJECTIVE C. Develop and implement those systems and processes necessary to maximize utilization of Social Security’s Ticket to Work Program

          • STRATEGIES

            1. Develop current Ticket to Work manual

            2. Train OVRS field staff on Ticket to Work processes and procedures

          • OUTCOMES

            • Increase the number of Tickets assigned

              • Comment: Outcome omitted in 2009 because new TTW regulations assigned tickets to all clients.

            • Increase the amount of Ticket reimbursements

              • Target: $1.5m

              • Outcome: $1,244,000

              • Comment: TTW/cost reimbursement payments declined since July 2010, when SSA rescinded a waiver for submitting claims.

            • Additional Comments: TTW Coordinator continued to provide TTW training to field staff on location and as a part of OVRS’s annual in-service conference.

          OBJECTIVE D. Minimize risks and liabilities in the administration of the program

          • STRATEGIES

            1. Administrative staff perform ORCA file reviews prior to field file reviews to determine focus areas

            2. Provide overview of branch review findings to policy and training staff

            3. Update current OVRS policy manual, technical assistance guide and best practices

            4. Continue to review OVRS’ policies, procedures and practice to ensure compliance with federal and state law; appropriateness of policies, practices and procedures; and, appropriate utilization of resources

            5. Pursue technical assistance from Rehabilitation Services Administration on fiscal management, contracting and performance based contracting for program and department staff

            6. Attend RSA Fiscal Conference

          • OUTCOMES

            • No compliance audit findings

              • Target: 0

              • Outcome:0

            • Accurate fiscal reports

              • Outcome: All reports were accurate.

            • Standardized contracting procedures including reporting requirements and compliance with federal requirements

              • Outcome (initially completed in 2009): All contracts continue to contain standard terms and conditions provided by the Office of Contracts and Procurement

              • Comments:

                • All OVRS managers have been trained All contracts are reviewed by OVRS Administration to assure compliance with reporting requirements.

                • The OVRS Budget & Analysis Unit performs file reviews on a regular basis. Results are provided to OVRS Field Services Managers, who review with Branch Managers and their staffs.

                • A new, comprehensive OVRS policy manual, including technical assistance guides on many policies, was completed. All staff subsequently took and completed a two-day training on targeted policies and completed a net-based self-instruction study course and quiz for the remaining policies.

                • The Budget & Performance Manager and Research, Budget and Accounting Analysts attended RSA 09 Fiscal Conference (2009).

  5. GOAL V. Ensure a highly trained workforce at every level of the organization.

    1. OBJECTIVE A. Ensure staff have the skills, knowledge and ability to perform their jobs at a high level of proficiency

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Train all staff on new iteration of ORCA

        2. Require all new staff to complete New Counselor Training
        3. Require all staff to complete Values and Ethics Training

        4. Require all new staff to complete training associated with Employment Enhancement Opportunity Program initiative

        5. Reduction in number of negative RSA review findings

      • OUTCOMES

        • Reduction in number of negative RSA review findings

          • Target: 0

          • Outcome: 0

          • Comments:

            • ORCA 5.9.1 implemented and staff trained on its use.

            • Continued to provide New Counselor/Counselor Training provided to new counselors and other staff. Ethics training provided to new managers and counselors. For more, see Attachment 4.10.

            • Continued to provide EEO initiative training provided to all new and continuing staff. EEO training was incorporated into the New Counselor/Counselor Training curriculum. EOP II job development curriculum made available to field staff on quarterly basis

            • Significant additional training provided to staff, including through OVRS 2011 In-service, training provided to all staff on OVRS’ new policy manual, ethics training, etc. See V.c. below and Attachment 4.10.

    2. OBJECTIVE B. Increase staff knowledge in targeted areas

        STRATEGIES

        1. Completion of Training Needs Assessment (TNA)

        2. Development of training plan based on findings of TNA and 2007 Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA)

        3. Staff participation in training relevant to brain injury; autism; Deafness and hearing loss; working with individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities and psychiatric disabilities; and person-centered planning

        4. OVRS In-Service Conference

        5. Collaborate with relevant stakeholders to maximize training opportunities and resources

      • OUTCOMES

        • Completed training needs assessment and training plan

          • Outcome: Completed annual TNA and plan (September, 2010)

        • Internal and external training opportunities to address identified training needs

          • Outcome: Significant training opportunities provided to address identified staff training needs

          • Comments:

            • Extensive training provided to staff, including:

              • OVRS 2011 In-Service Conference, The Road to Quality Outcomes, was held on August 2-3 and was attended by over 352 rehabilitation professionals, including most OVRS managers and staff, and many OVRS partners and vendors. For more, see Attachment 4.10

              • Nine two-day trainings were held on targeted policies at field offices throughout the state and a self-study internet based course and quiz on the entire manual was made available in order that all staff be trained on OVRS new field services policy manual (for more, see V.A. above and Attachment 4.10). The new and revised policies and administrative rules were developed in partnership with the State Rehabilitation Council

              • Two New Counselor/Counselor trainings were held and attended by 37 counselors and other professional staff

              • Ethics Trainings were held in six locations and completed by 95 OVRS staff

        • OVRS continued to collaborate with stakeholders across multitude of training and related events, including In-Service Conference, transition conferences, EEO initiative trainings, Employment First summit and regional forums, evidence-based mental health supported employment trainings, work incentives/benefits planning trainings, etc. For more, see above comments and Attachment 4.10

    3. OBJECTIVE C. Continue to recruit to meet the Rehabilitation Act’s requirements for a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development and OVRS specific skill needs

      • STRATEGIES

        1. Continue to work with Department of Human Services, Office of Human Resources in recruiting staff

        2. Recruit, as possible, at conferences and events

        3. Support career advancement within the program

        4. Continue participation in TACE/Center for Continuing Education Leadership Academy (depending on restrictions on out of state travel)

        5. Continue participation with TACE advisory meetings

        6. Continue to utilize Department of Human Services’ and Department of Administrative Services’ leadership trainings

          Provide, as appropriate, out-of-class work opportunities for staff at every level of the organization

      • OUTCOMES

        • Applicant pools whose skills, education and experience align with CSPD goals and specific skill needs

          • Outcome: Applicant pools largely aligned. However, OVRS continues to experience challenges in recruiting VRC applicants that meet its VRC standard in rural Eastern Oregon.

          • Comments:

            • Continued to recruit with DHS/OHR and utilize DHS, DAS leadership training. Management and field are active participants in DHS Transformation initiative

            • Continued support career advancement and out of class work opportunities

            • Participation in Leadership Academy deferred because of continuing restrictions on travel

            • Continued to participate in TACE advisory meetings

            • Continue to utilize DHS and DAS trainings

            • Continue to provide out-of-class opportunities but these have been limited due to budget restrictions

        • For more on all strategies, see Attachment 4.10.

 

For details on OVRS’s supported employment goals, objectives (i.e., sub-goals or priorities), strategies, and outcomes, and impediments to achieving these, see the following Text Box 1 above:

  • Goal I, Objective D, Strategies 1-7, and corresponding outcomes and comments.

  • Goal II, Objective C, Strategies 1-7, and corresponding outcomes and comments.

    Also see Attachment 6.3

  •  

    OVRS exceeded all seven federal minimum standards for each indicator on the most current federal standards and indicators (FFY 2011):

    Standards and Indicators
    Federal IndicatorFederal StandardOVRS Performance

    1.1 Change in employment outcomes1,1771,793

    1.2 Percent of Employment outcomes55.8%56.6%

    1.3 Competitive employment72.6%95.2%

    1.4 Significant disability62.4%94.7%

    1.5 Earnings ratio0.520.57

    1.6 Self support53%74.2%

    2.1 Access to services for minorities0.800.976

    Other OVRS Outcomes

    OVRS is pleased to report significant progress in fulfilling the other outcomes reported in this attachment. In relation to many of our objectives, we still have some distance to cover in order to meet our targets, but the program has made a strong rebound since FFY 2010 when a recession, extraordinarily high unemployment and an Order of Selection waitlist hindered our performance. The effect of these negative events (particularly the poor economy and continuing high unemployment) and newer challenges (budget and staffing issues) continue to buffet OVRS but recent performance data suggests that we are continuing to rebound.

    Secretary of State Audit

    In 2010, the Secretary of State published a report (Save on Vocational Rehabilitation Cost to Serve More Clients) on its findings of a performance audit it had completed on OVRS. The audit identified a number of areas that the auditors saw in need of improvement and believed would increase OVRS’s effectiveness, result in cost savings, and improve oversight of the program. A number of these areas had been identified by program staff – because they were the focus of current or planned work at the time of the audit. The audit findings fell into four broad areas: training, case management, cost containment and accountability. In response to the findings, OVRS developed and completed a program improvement plan.

     

    For details about OVRS’ innovation and expansion strategies and activities, see the following strategies and comments about the strategies in 1 above.

    • Goal I

      • Objective A, Strategies 1, 2

      • Objective B, Strategies 1, 2

      • Objective D, Strategy 2

      • Objective E, Strategy 1

      • Objective G, Strategy 1

      • Objective K, Strategy 5

    • Goal II

      • Objective A, Strategies 4, 6

      • Objective C, Strategy 6

    • Goal III

      • Objective A, Strategy 4

      • Objective C, Strategy 1

    This screen was last updated on Jul 3 2012 4:07PM by saorlincolns

    • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
    • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

    OVERVIEW

    Supported employment (SE) is a major OVRS initiative. OVRS’ SE program provides opportunities for individuals with the most significant disabilities to achieve competitive employment in integrated settings with ongoing support provided by a variety of partners. These same individuals are those for whom competitive employment has not traditionally occurred. OVRS provides a continuum of SE services and, in partnership with other human services agencies and programs, the continuing supports that persons with the most significant disabilities need to develop, maintain and advance in competitive employment. OVRS continues to work closely with other divisions and offices within the Department of Human Services, local governmental units and community-based organizations and groups to develop, refine and expand the availability of SE services throughout Oregon.

    Over the coming year, OVRS will endeavor to sustain the quality, scope and extent of its SE services. However, a number of developments may have an effect on the delivery and availability of SE services and supports. These developments include:

    • Reductions in funding for services. Over the past year, virtually all state programs have had their budgets reduced and additional cuts may follow, as Oregon’s economy remains weak and the state continues to collect less in revenues than was projected when the legislature adopted the 2011-13 biennial budget.

    • Continuing higher than average unemployment. While the Oregon’s unemployment rate has declined from record high levels, the rate remains considerably higher than normal and data suggests that individuals with disabilities were laid off at higher rate than other workers.

    • Health care reform. Oregon is moving quickly to institute health care reform. As part of this effort, many requirements about health care services, including Oregon law governing delivery of evidence based services, may be changed or eliminated. It is not clear how such a change, if implemented, would affect delivery of the evidence based mental health services that an increasing number of community programs are providing (in conjunction with OVRS).

    • Litigation challenging use of sheltered workshops. Earlier this year, Disability Rights Oregon filed suit against the state challenging the use of sheltered workshops. It remains to be seen how this litigation will be resolved.

    QUALITY OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

    In general, the quality of an OVRS SE plan is evaluated to ensure that it complies with defining criteria of SE:

    • Work is performed in an integrated setting that provides regular interactions with individuals who do not have disabilities, other than caregivers.

    • The individual is receiving a wage commensurate with non-disabled workers doing the same work.

    • The ongoing support needs and sources of support have been identified and secured.

    • Supported employment services provided to clients are for the maximum number of hours possible, based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

    • Clients and employer are satisfied with placements.

    Historically, OVRS has aligned with AMH in promoting Individualized Placement and Support (IPS), an evidence-based SE model. Quality of these programs is assessed through compliance with a fidelity scale. The scale measures the ’fidelity’ or the degree to which a program is being implemented in accordance to the program design. Some of the measures used in the fidelity scales are the kinds of employment outcomes participants are obtaining; the degree of collaboration with vocational rehabilitation; availability of rapid job search and evidence of consumer choice. OVRS maintains quality SE outcomes through ongoing collaboration with mental health providers on the local level and AMH central office staff.

    SCOPE OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES (AND EVIDENCE OF COLLABORATION)

    In FFY 2011, OVRS provided SE services to 785 individuals with significant disabilities, including persons with psychiatric disabilities, intellectual and/or developmental disabilities or traumatic brain injuries. During this same period, 185 individuals who received SE services entered into competitive employment, and 263 individuals continued to participate in their SE IPEs.

    Supported Employment for Persons with Psychiatric Disabilities

    OVRS continues to work to make evidence-based mental health SE services available throughout Oregon.

    Background

    OVRS’ efforts in this area were initiated nearly eleven years ago, when its field offices in the Portland metropolitan area and Grants Pass in southern Oregon began collaborating with AMH, local mental health programs and Portland State University to provide evidence-based SE services to individuals with psychiatric disabilities served by OVRS.

    In 2002, OVRS and AMH sought to expand the availability of evidence-based mental health SE services and initiated a project in Jackson, Douglas and Polk counties with Options of Southern Oregon, a community-based mental health provider. This project was aided by a three year grant from Dartmouth College/Johnson & Johnson Community Mental Health Project.

    Although the Johnson & Johnson grant funding ended in 2005, OVRS and AMH continued to support the efforts of Options and Life Works. This same year began the Oregon Competitive Employment Project (OCEP), funded by a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG). OCEP subsequently identified expansion of SE services as one of its primary objectives (for more on OCEP, see Attachment 4.11.e.2).

    Recent to Current Activities

    In 2006, OVRS, OCEP and AMH continued their efforts to stimulate and perpetuate SE services though provision of MIG mini-grants to local mental health programs in seven counties. OCEP also funded Options of Southern Oregon and Lifeworks Northwest to provide training and technical assistance on SE to local mental health providers. At the same time, OVRS, OCEP and AMH continued to seek long-term funding for SE services.

    In 2007 and 2008, OVRS and AMH continued to provide evidence-based SE services to persons with significant psychiatric disabilities through OVRS field offices and community-based mental health programs. In addition, OVRS, OCEP and AMH continued their initiatives to expand and sustain SE services:

    • Options for Southern Oregon and Lifeworks Northwest of metro Portland were provided with innovation and expansion funding to provide job placement and support services to OVRS clients living in their catchments.

    • Additional OCEP mini-grants were provided to local mental health programs.

    • A leadership, technical assistance and training center on evidence-based SE mental supported employment - the Oregon Supported Employment Center for Excellence (OSECE), was established in December 2007. OSECE has since provided training and TA to 38 job developers with 17 county mental health programs, utilizing the Dartmouth College/Johnson & Johnson evidence-based model.

    In FFY 2010, OVRS counseling staff continued to provide supported employment services to individuals with psychiatric disabilities, in partnership with Oregon’s community mental health programs. A primary OVRS focus continues to be on expansion of evidence-based supported employment services by increasing the number of county mental health organizations providing such services and meeting fidelity standards. OVRS and CEP continued to support, partner with and utilize OCESE in developing and refining evidence-based supported employment services. As of September 2011, community mental health programs in 18 counties were providing such services.

    In addition, OVRS continues to support and collaborate with the Project Early Assessment Screening and Treatment (Project EAST) in assisting young people with psychiatric disabilities by assisting them in obtaining or maintaining employment (an evidence-based practice, which is effective in reducing the onset and symptoms of mental illness). OVRS continues to provide Enhancing Employment Outcomes training to allied mental health providers. Through OCEP, OVRS has begun to explore the benefits of peer support for individuals with psychiatric disabilities in the workplace.

    Supported Employment for Persons with Developmental Disabilities

    OVRS partners with the Office of Developmental Disabilities Services (ODDS) and others, including support services brokerages (DD brokerages), county case managers, rehabilitation service providers and advocates in providing SE services to persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities.

    In 2003, OVRS and ODDS began serving and supporting persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities affected by the Staley settlement. The agreement, prompted by a federal lawsuit, requires the state to provide qualified persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities with access to community services, including SE.

    From 2004 to 2006, OVRS and ODDS funded and developed local SE teams, comprised of DD brokerage and OVRS field staff. These teams meet and exchange information, solve problems and coordinate local activities, with the intent of increasing provision of SE services to persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities. In implementing this initiative, OVRS and ODDS:

    • Provided planning materials, training and ongoing technical assistance to the local teams.

    • Developed, disseminated and utilized a ’Supported Employment Toolkit with Guidelines for OVRS Field and Support Services Brokerage Staff’ (Toolkit). The toolkit was updated in FFY 2007.

    • Surveyed DD brokerages and OVRS branch offices in order to assist the teams in promoting quality services for DD brokerage/OVRS clients.

    More recently, OVRS and ODDS have sought to expand the availability of SE services to persons with developmental disabilities through staff participation with related groups, including:

    • The Developmental Disabilities Supported Employment Task Force, which is comprised of advocates, community stakeholders and services providers and advises SPD, OCEP and OVRS on SE issues.

    • The SPD Employment Group, which is working to restructure rates for SE services provided under Oregon’s home and community-based services Medicaid waiver.

    • Oregon Rehabilitation Association’s (ORA) Customized Employment Network. ORA represents Oregon’s rehabilitation service providers.

    The most significant and important development in this area in recent years has been ODDS’s development, adoption and implementation of an "Employment First" policy. Under this policy, first consideration must be given to employment in developing services and supports for working age individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities.

    The Employment First policy is a result of a multi-year effort involving:

    • The leadership and commitment of ODDS

    • The efforts of disability advocates, most notably Oregon’s Council on Development Disabilities, and

    • The support and collaboration of OVRS and CEP, which were instrumental in bringing the issue to the table at the outset of OVRS’ receipt of the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant in 2005; and which underwrote ODDS’ initial participation in the Supported Employment Leadership Network (SELN), a state and national effort to renew and expand state SE services to persons with intellectual/developmental disabilities, and participated in development of the policy.

    Through FFY 2010 and into 2011, OVRS and CEP continued to support and collaborate with ODDS in implementing its Employment First policy. OVRS management participated in planning implementation of the policy and a subsequent two-day statewide summit and regional day-long forums to kick-off the policy. CEP helped underwrite these events, as well as ODDS’ use of consultants from Washington Initiative for Supported Employment (WISE).

    In a 2010-11 development related to ODDS’ Employment First policy, OVRS and ODDS refined the Memorandum of Understanding the two programs have with one another, and developed a charter to better plan, coordinate and deliver supported employment services to individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities. In addition, ODDS and OVRS have worked with the Department of Education to develop a similar MOU and charter for serving youth with intellectual/developmental disabilities as they transition from high school to employment or higher education. Going forward, the MOUs and charters will be implemented and data gather and tracked to monitor the progress made.

    Supported Employment for Persons with Traumatic Brain Injuries

    OVRS continues to provide SE services to persons with traumatic brain injuries (TBI). Using the Center for Disease Control estimates, the Brain Injury Association of Oregon (BIAOR) calculates that there are over 72,000 individuals in Oregon living with a brain injury; that each year over 17,000 individuals in the state will sustain a brain injury; and that over 8,500 of these individuals will sustain a short-term disability or more.

    In 2009, OVRS/OCEP and BIAOR continued to work to establish a registry for accurately determining the number of individuals in Oregon who acquire or sustain a TBI, and develop a statewide SE service model for individuals with TBI and identify funding for these services. Legislation creating the registry has since been passed and the registry is being developed by the Division of Public Health. OVRS continues to work with BIAOR to expand the availability of SE services to individual with TBI and related capacities, and supported and participated in BIAOR’s 2009 Northwest Brain Injury Conference (which occurred in FFY 2010).

    Other Supported Employment Developments and Activities

    OVRS continues to carry out other significant activities related to supported employment.

    • OCEP continued to operate and refined its statewide Work Incentives Network (WIN) and continued its efforts to sustain WIN on a long-term basis by obtaining continuing funding. WIN provides information, referral and planning services to persons with disabilities on the use of federal and state benefits and work incentives in order to assist them in achieving their employment goals. Work incentives/benefits planning is an important element for many individuals who are utilizing or intend to utilize supported employment and data on benefits planning programs, including WIN, indicates that benefits planning is useful in facilitating employment. (For more, see Attachment 4.11.e.2.)

    • OVRS continued to explore opportunities available to the Department of Human Services (DHS) and other DHS divisions under Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work Program, in follow-up to revision of Ticket to Work regulations in order to increase Ticket utilization.

    • In FFY 2007, OVRS refined its capacity to identify and process Ticket Cost Reimbursement claims through the creation and filling of a Ticket coordinator position, and as a result significantly increased its Ticket Cost Reimbursement revenue.

    • In 2010, OVRS and AMH initiated implementation of the DHS as an EN initiative, with initiation of ten Ticket-related pilots with community mental health programs that provide evidence-based supported employment services. The agreements for the pilots were subsequently extended through June 2011 and OVRS anticipated continuing them thereafter, OVRS is exploring similar arrangements with ODDS and developmental disability ‘brokerages’ in order to increase provision of supported employment services to individuals assisted by the brokerages.

    • Under the EN initiative, OVRS serves as a Ticket administrative unit and submits and tracks Tickets and collects and disburses Ticket reimbursements; while TTW qualified local programs, such as the community mental health centers, initiate and maintain contact with clients who are Ticket holders, ensure Tickets are assigned to DHS/OVRS, submit Ticket reimbursement claims, and promote supported employment of persons with disabilities with some or all of their TTW proceeds.

    For more on OVRS’ Ticket activities, see Attachments 4.8.b.1, and 4.11.d.2.

    EXTENT OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

    Supported employment is integrated into the array of services and programs available to Oregonians with disabilities, including Oregon’s mental health and developmental disability service systems. Success in SE requires a partnership among the responsible state and community programs, other service providers, consumers and families, advocacy organizations, employers and others. Long-term success continues to depend on the availability of funding for follow-along SE services.

    OVRS utilizes Title VI, Part B and Title I funds for the time-limited services necessary for an individual to stabilize in a community-based job. Services that may be part of a SE IPE include:

    • Person centered planning

    • Community-based assessment

    • Job development

    • Job placement

    • On-site training for worker and/or co workers

    • Long-term support development

    • Other services and goods

    • Post employment services

    The specific type, level and location of ongoing supports provided to an individual are based upon his or her needs and those of the employer. Ongoing support may be provided by a variety of public and/or private sector resources including:

    • AMH and community mental health programs

    • ODDS community supports

    • County developmental disability case managers and developmental disability service brokerages

    • Social Security work incentives

    • Employer-provided reasonable accommodations

    • Natural supports

    • Family or community sponsorship

    TIMING OF THE TRANSITION TO EXTENDED SERVICES

    Generally, OVRS will not exceed its 18-month in-plan status with an SE case. This 18-month time-line can be extended for exceptional circumstances, if the counselor and client jointly agree to the extension. Job coaching and/or on the job training supports are usually structured into a much shorter time-frame, with long-term extended services being built into the plan as quickly as possible to ensure ongoing success when OVRS involvement ends.

    This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2012 12:42PM by saorlincolns

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