ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

Published September 4, 2014.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
New York Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 (submitted FY 2013)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The The Department of Family Assistance/Office of Children and Family Services (DFA/ is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Department of Family Assistance/Office of Children and family Services [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

The Commissioner, Office of Children and family Services (OCFS)

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

The Commissioner (OCFS)

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryGladys Carrión

Title of SignatoryCommissioner

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/17/2013

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2014Yes

Comments:

To establish a State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the act, as required in Section 101(a)(21)(ii), so that the CBVH can work with the SRC to fulfill the responsibilities listed in Section 101(a)(21)(ii).

CBVH assures RSA that it will conduct a comprehensive statewide needs assessment (CSNA) on a triennial basis, having last performed the statewide assessment in FY 2011, as required by Section 101(a)(15)(A) of the act and 34 CFR 361.29.  A CSNA and its analysis will be completed by September 30, 2014.  

Name of Signatory: Gladys Carrión

Title of Signatory: Commissioner

Date Signed: 8/01/2013

Signed: Yes - Gladys Carrión

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryGladys Carrión

Title of SignatoryCommissioner

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/17/2013

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
New York State Commission for the Blind (NYSCB)

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

 

The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) met on March 21, 2013 to review and provide input into the 2014 Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS), Commission for the Blind and Visually Handicapped (CBVH) State Plan for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment Services. Members of the SRC received copies of the proposed State Plan prior to that meeting. State Rehabilitation Council Goals and Objectives The SRC and CBVH comprise a strategic partnership. SRC members include current and former participants in the CBVH vocational rehabilitation program, parents of children who are legally blind, representatives from advocacy groups, a representative from the Blinded Veterans Association, representatives from the rehabilitation service provider agencies, representatives from business, industry and labor as well as ex-officio members representing both CBVH and other state agencies. The SRC assists CBVH in developing and reviewing the State Plan, including CBVH’s goals and priorities. The SRC provides policy advice and reviews consumer needs and satisfaction with services. CBVH collects and analyzes consumer satisfaction data on a regular basis. The data is shared with the SRC for review and comment at one of their quarterly meetings.   SRC Recommendations to the CBVH FY 2014 State Plan 1. Comment: In Attachment 4.8(b)(2) under “Procedures for Outreach,” CBVH should be in support of a program that mandates early childhood comprehensive vision screenings so that vision issues can be detected while the child is young enough to learn the necessary skills to succeed. The evaluation should include specialized testing to include color and visual field evaluation. Response:  CBVH agrees that all children should receive vision screening, and that children with serious vision problems should receive the evaluation and treatment they need. The key to successful remediation is early identification and intervention, which may prevent educational problems and permanent vision impairments. Article 19 of the New York State Education Law requires that students receive vision screening as part of the school health services provided by each school district. The intention of the formal interagency agreement with the State Education Department is to develop and establish the roles of each party with respect to transition planning. CBVH transition services occur for children between the ages of ten (10) to eighteen (18).  CBVH plans to develop and implement procedures for outreach and identification of students who are legally blind, for the purpose of informing students about the vocational rehabilitation program, application procedures, eligibility requirements and potential scope of services. A school district’s Director of School Health Services is responsible for assuring that all health screenings are performed by trained, licensed health care professionals. CBVH Children’s Consultants work closely with teachers of the visually impaired to make sure that the child with a visual impairment receives the appropriate educational accommodations.

2. Comment: In Attachment 4.8(b)(2) under “State Education Agency (SEA) Agreement,” the SRC recognizes that planning must begin early with the early vision evaluations and given the results of the evaluation, teaching of the Expanded Core Curriculum. The SRC also recognizes the Expanded Core Curriculum offers more to a child who is blind or has low vision.   On this basis, CBVH should be supporting any and all recommendations to implement the Expanded Core Curriculum in NY State. Response: CBVH supports the Expanded Core Curriculum (ECC) from the National Agenda for the Education of Children and Youths with Visual Impairments.  The ECC is the body of knowledge and skills needed by students with vision loss in order to be successful in school and in post-graduate pursuits as a result of unique, disability-specific needs. A certified teacher of the visually impaired (TVI) is generally the lead professional in assessment and goal development for ECC skills. CBVH Children’s Consultants and Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors work closely with TVI’s and encourage staff at the school to implement the ECC. CBVH is not responsible for educational programs, but empowers students and parents by providing information and teaching them to advocate for an appropriate educational program that meets the child’s needs.       3. Comment: In Attachment 4.8(b)(3),  CBVH should insure that contract agency staff are appropriately credentialed. Response: CBVH continues to adhere to the CBVH Comprehensive Services Contract, Appendix H-Personnel Standards. Contract agencies must submit staff credentials where credentialing is required to perform contracted services.   4. Comment: In Attachment 4.11(c)(1), CBVH should work to encourage more comprehensive integrated services to individuals with multiple disabilities while addressing all the issues seamlessly and removing “service silos” which restrict or limit services to agencies without considering the blind person’s needs.  Response: CBVH will review the results of the 2013 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment to determine if this is a significant service delivery issue.  If the Needs Assessment does identify this as an issue impacting consumers, CBVH will evaluate the problem to determine an appropriate response.   5. Comment: In Attachment 4.11(c)(4) under “Chapter 515 Implementation Team,” CBVH should add bullet “To include removal of the silos and service limitation issues with Supported Employment services.” Response: If the needs assessment identified this as an issue impacting consumers, CBVH will address this with our state agency partners.   6. Comment: In Attachment 4.11(d), Goal 1, Strategy 1, CBVH should identify staff assigned to increase and document outreach efforts and how this will be accomplished. Strategies 3 and 7, CBVH should support credentialing of the service provider to insure they are qualified to provide services to people who are blind. Such credentialing should include a minimum of Certified Rehabilitation Counselor or Vocational Rehabilitation degree. Response: Goal 1, Strategy 1, District offices will develop business outreach plans with their community rehabilitation partners, and document these efforts on a standardized form.   Strategy 3, CBVH provides guidance to Workforce Investment Boards and Job Centers on making their facilities and training programs accessible to individuals who are blind. As requested, CBVH has also provided training about blindness to Job Center staff, but has no credentialing authority.   Strategy 7, all CBVH approved benefits advisement providers must have attended a multi-hour benefits advisement program and be certified by Social Security or through the Cornell Industrial and Labor Relations (ILR).   7. Comment: In Attachment 4.11(d), Goal 3, CBVH should add the following strategy “Provide more and better outreach to minority communities as an attempt to address RSA’s request in section 2.1 minority ratio”. Response: In lieu of adding this strategy , CBVH has revised Attachment 4.11(d), Goal 3 to move the following language that provides clarification of this issue from after “2.1: Ratio Minority” to before the listed strategies : “RSA Standards and Indicators – In addition to implementing the strategies listed below, CBVH notes that progress toward achieving Goals 1 and 2 and the implementation of their accompanying strategies will positively impact CBVH’s performance on the Standards and Indicators.”    8. Comment: In Attachment 4.11(d), Goal 4, Strategy 1, CBVH should add a new strategy to promote the provision of Support Service Providers (SSPs). Response: CBVH will add the following strategy “CBVH will encourage all efforts to increase access to Support Service Providers (SSPs.)”     9. Comment: In Attachment 4.11(d), “Provision of Assistive Technology Services” section, People with multiple disabilities including blindness need assistive technology services, however, the assistive technology centers only address blindness.   Response: CBVH has amended this section to include: “As needed, other vendors may be used to provide assistive technology training. These vendors have varied expertise including the ability to provide assessment and training for a wide variety of needs”.  

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 2:27PM by Michael Rose

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has not requested a waiver of statewideness.

This screen has never been updated.

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

 

In addition to collaborating with State Workforce partners, CBVH works with a number of community and national partners. Specific collaborations around employment include:   Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) CSAVR’s National Employment Team (NET) provides a coordinated approach to serving business customers through employer development, business consulting and corporate relations. By establishing partnerships with businesses, VR can better match employer staffing needs with the skills and interests of consumers seeking employment, as well as help business to retain employees who experience disability. The NET provides:   ·       Businesses with direct access to qualified applicants and support services from the public VR system, ·       VR consumers with access to national employment opportunities and career development resources, and ·       VR agencies with a national system for sharing employment resources, best practices and business connections.   A designated point of contact serves as the primary contact for employers seeking to partner with CBVH. In the past year, through the NET partnership, CBVH has shared information and job postings from Federal and corporate partners with CBVH staff and placement partners. In addition, CBVH has distributed NET shared information on a number of internship and skill camp opportunities for high school and college students.   The NET has brought two important partnerships to CBVH: The Walgreens Retail Employees Disability Initiative (REDI) has resulted in placement of seven individuals as customer service representatives in Walgreens drugstores; and the new CVS Distribution Center in Waverly, NY has hired one individual and will continue to offer the possibility of additional placements as they expand.   Working with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) CBVH is interested in improving the capacity of community rehabilitation partners to successfully place consumers who are legally blind. CBVH, the Region II Technical Assistance and Continuing Education program, and CRPs jointly plan training to address information and skill needs of both CBVH and CRP staff.  A key component of these joint training efforts is the annual Vision Institute which focuses on issues related to employment.   The Metropolitan Placement Consortium, collaboration among placement providers in the NYC metro area, has been meeting regularly and continues to expand membership.   The Consortium’s mission is to work cooperatively to expand job opportunities for individuals who are legally blind and seeking employment.   Chapter 515 Interagency Implementation Team The Chapter 515 Interagency Implementation Team composed of mid-level managers from CBVH, Adult Career and Continuing Education Services-Vocational Rehabilitation (ACCES-VR, formerly VESID), Office of People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD, formerly OMRDD) and Office of Mental Health (OMH), continues to meet to discuss ongoing concerns with implementation of supported employment intensive and extended services in New York State. The primary focus of the team continues to be discussion of solutions to systemic barriers and revising the Supported Employment Memorandum of Understanding toward more effective planning and coordination of intensive and extended services.   Most Integrated Setting Coordinating Council (MISCC) The Most Integrated Setting Coordinating Council, established by Chapter 551 of the Laws of 2002,  which was responsible for developing a comprehensive statewide plan to provide that people of all ages with physical and mental disabilities receive care and services in the most integrated settings appropriate to their individual needs, has been replaced by Executive Order 84, which creates a new Cabinet to develop a plan to comply with Olmstead v. L.C., 119 S.Ct. 2176 (1999), in the areas of housing, transportation and employment. OCFS is a member of the cabinet, which is charged to develop a plan by May 2013.   Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) New York’s Medicaid Infrastructure Grant ended September 30, 2012. It funded the “New York Makes Work Pay” initiative which has taken a multi-pronged approach to improving employment outcomes. CBVH staff, providers and employers participated in many of the initiatives under this program and expect to continue many of the best practices resulting from this grant such as:   ·       Use of the Discovery Process as a means to gain a greater understanding of consumers’ strengths, interests and abilities and the supports available to enable them to achieve employment through a customized approach; ·       Collaboration to expand entrepreneurial employment opportunities; and ·       Engaging certified individuals trained in Benefits Advisement and Asset Development to help recipients of SSI and SSDI make better informed decisions about employment.   Meeting the Needs of Special Populations CBVH continued to participate on the Interagency Council for Services to Persons who are Deaf, Deaf-Blind, or Hard of Hearing formed to coordinate the collection of information on population needs, engage in comprehensive strategic planning and prepare legislative and policy recommendations to the Governor and the State Legislature.   A strategic plan was developed addressing six priorities: interpreters/support service providers, assistive technology, children’s education, community education, mental health services and future needs. The Council will be reconvening in 2013 with CBVH’s continued participation.   Cooperation with National Industries for the Blind CBVH has designated National Industries for the Blind (NIB) as its designee for NYS Preferred-Source products to assume the role previously fulfilled by Industries for the Blind of NYS.  In an initial interim designation agreement, set to expire on December 1, 2013, the creation of service sector jobs is highlighted as a priority for the year.   CBVH has encouraged NIB associated agencies to provide needed work experience and skill training to enable individuals to seek competitive employment in an integrated setting.   Cooperative Agreement with Recipients of Grants for Services to American Indians In 2003, CBVH established an interagency agreement with the Seneca Nation of Indians Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation (SNI TVR) Program. CBVH will be working with the SNI TVR Program to renew the agreement which expires in 2013. The agreement represents both parties’ commitment to mutual cooperation, coordination and collaboration to increase vocational opportunities for members of the Seneca Nation of Indians who are legally blind. It establishes shared values, outlines how services will be coordinated and how members of both organizations will participate in cross-training activities. The collaborative relationship between the CBVH Buffalo District Office and the Seneca Nation of Indians Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation Program has increased awareness, acceptance and utilization of CBVH services. CBVH maintains a relationship in which referrals are handled in a timely and culturally sensitive manner. CBVH staff conducts in-service training with agencies on the Cattaraugus Reservation, and works closely with staff of the Salamanca satellite of the Section 121 program and with the Area Office for the Aging on the reservation. CBVH staff serves on the Section 121 Project Advisory Board, which meets monthly.   CBVH further supports the activities of the Section 121 Tribal VR Program through the delivery of state-funded services to children and elderly individuals, allowing them to better focus resources on tribal members seeking employment.   Programs Carried Out by the Undersecretary for Rural Development CBVH does not have programs carried out by the Undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture.   State Use Contracting Programs CBVH does not have state use contracting programs.

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 2:32PM by Michael Rose

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

 

Formal Interagency Agreement with the State Educational Agency   Understanding the importance of interagency planning and the need to increase the availability, access and quality of transition services, CBVH continues to work with school districts as they develop and implement transition services. CBVH is currently in the process of revising the State Education Agency (SEA) Agreement. This agreement will no longer include the Office of Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities, now called Adult, Career and Continuing Services (ACCES), but will be a separate agreement with the State Education Agency, Office of P-12 Education.   Specifically, the new agreement will:   ·       delineate the responsibilities of CBVH to provide consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of youth from school to post-school activities;   ·       provide for the responsibilities of each party with respect to the provision of transition planning in order to facilitate the development of the Individualized Education Program;   ·       include the financial responsibilities of each agency related to the provision of services, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;   ·       include the procedures for outreach to, and identification of, students with disabilities in need of transition services.   The current Joint Agreement on the Provision of Transition Services, signed in 1993 by CBVH, the Office of Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities (VESID) and the Office of Elementary, Middle, Secondary and Continuing Education (EMS) in the State Education Department articulates the expected relationship between vocational rehabilitation and secondary education programs in New York State. The joint agreement covers the following:   1.       Increasing successful transition outcomes;   2.       Enhancing vocational assessments;   3.       Implementing transition planning procedures; and,   4.       Implementing functional referral criteria for schools to refer students to VESID and to CBVH.     Roles and Responsibilities The joint agreement clarifies that school districts have the primary planning and programmatic responsibilities for the provision of transition services for their students in school. School districts are financially responsible for transition services mandated for school districts by Federal or State statutes and regulations. CBVH personnel currently have a consulting role with the schools to see that adult services are involved in the planning and decision-making process regarding transition services for students with disabilities. CBVH is responsible only for services written into the IEP by the Committee on Special Education with the direct knowledge and agreement of the CBVH counselor. The transition services for youth are to be aligned with labor market needs, integrated community living opportunities, and coordinated with the adult world to facilitate employment, post-secondary education, and community living outcomes. CBVH may be consulted for vocational evaluation interpretation, occupational opportunities, decision making with the Committee on Special Education, coordination with adult services, peer counseling, role modeling and job placement analysis. CBVH will provide transition services if they are beyond the scope of the special education program and within the scope of VR services. Assessments for in-school youth may be purchased by CBVH when existing assessments fail to provide adequate information for the counselor to determine CBVH eligibility or to develop plans for CBVH services. In addition, if the student needs specific vocational services to prepare for employment upon exiting school, CBVH will fund these services.   Consultation and Technical Assistance CBVH staff is required to consult with school personnel to assist in recommending assessment practices and interpreting results in relation to employment. CBVH counselors assist the school by identifying resources in the community that are familiar with blindness and that offer comprehensive assessments.   As a participant in the school’s transition process, CBVH staff is encouraged to contribute knowledge of rehabilitation services and outcomes, and to discuss post-school plans with the youth, family and school personnel.   Procedures for Outreach A standardized process has been implemented for school district referrals. ACCES-VR and CBVH collaborate with school districts and other State agencies to facilitate a coordinated approach for the provision of transition services and to eliminate the duplication of assessment, services and reporting. The agreement specifically states that every student with a disability will receive comprehensive, coordinated educational services to prepare for employment, post-secondary education and/or community living when they leave school.   Plans, policies and procedures for coordination with education officials and roles and responsibilities of each agency The CBVH transition policy states that as a participant in the school’s transition planning process, CBVH staff should contribute knowledge of rehabilitation services and outcomes, and identify the need for involvement by other State agencies, adult service programs, independent living centers, and community based services whose resources can assist students who are legally blind, their families, and education personnel during the transition process. It also states that CBVH is responsible only for services written into the IEP by the Committee on Special Education with the direct knowledge and agreement of the CBVH counselor. Financial responsibility for services, other than those which are mandated for school districts by Federal or State statute or regulation, may be shared by other agencies, including CBVH.   Cooperative efforts between the schools and CBVH take place on a daily basis at the district office level. CBVH Children’s Consultants provide schools with technical support, help parents learn to advocate effectively for their children, and purchase services to supplement those that school districts are required to provide. As the student nears transition age, the CBVH Children’s Consultants’ familiarity with particular students allows for a more effective transition to the vocational rehabilitation program. In cooperation with the school and community agencies, CBVH vocational rehabilitation counselors encourage and help individuals to live independently and develop meaningful employment plans. During school years, CBVH counselors can provide vocational guidance and counseling, resource information, and the preparation of post high school service plans. In addition, CBVH counselors may be able to provide job related occupational tools, purchase low vision aids, assist in obtaining employment and facilitate summer employment. CBVH currently employs eight vocational rehabilitation counselors who work exclusively with transition age youth. The transition counselors have provided educational guidance to CBVH vocational rehabilitation counselors and encouraged student and parent involvement in the transition process. Brochures describing CBVH services have been widely distributed. The brochures are available in regular print, large print and Braille (upon request) and electronically. A publication called “Transition: A Guide for Parents and Students” has been developed and distributed to families and school personnel. CBVH staff frequently visit transition career fairs and attend high school open houses and present information about CBVH at college programs that are held on college campuses. In addition, staff participates in transition conferences and works closely with many staff from local school districts to reinforce the mission of VR, explain the role VR plays in the transition process, and discuss VR policies and procedures.   The 1993 agreement states that transition services and the agencies responsible for the provision of such services should be indicated on the Individual Education Plan (IEP) for all students with disabilities, ages 15 years or older. The CBVH Transition Policy recommends that the student’s Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) be developed, to the extent possible, during the annual review of the transition component of the IEP. At that time, information required on the IPE should be consistent with the content of the IEP, including vocational goals, educational and rehabilitation objectives, projected dates and responsibilities for participation in the transition process. CBVH policy requires that an IPE be completed for each eligible student by the time the student graduates from high school. CBVH transition counselors have received training on this policy requirement and on the requirements of developing an IPE and coordinating the IPE with the IEP. All CBVH transition counselors have been actively developing employment plans for youth.       The New York Deaf-Blind Collaborative The New York Deaf-Blind Collaborative (NYDBC) is a five-year (10/1/2008 to 9/30/2013) federally funded project which provides technical assistance to improve services for children and youth who are deaf-blind (ages 0-21). The NYDBC is housed at Queens College in Flushing, New York and is funded by the United States Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP). CBVH has agreed to collaborate on specific initiatives with NYDBC. Specifically, CBVH assisted NYDBC in disseminating a state-wide needs assessment to increase the early identification of children who are deaf-blind in New York State. CBVH staff will also receive considerable technical assistance and training from NYDBC that will increase knowledge and skills in addressing the developmental and educational needs of children who are deaf-blind.   During the past year CBVH staff has received training on a number of topics, including: ·       An overview of deaf-blindness; ·       communication strategies for individuals who are deaf blind, and ·       person-centered planning for individuals who are deaf-blind.   CBVH staff attended a regional focus group hosted by NYDBC. The focus group included a variety of professionals, parents and consumers.   CBVH will also be involved in collaborative relationships with local, regional and statewide teams (as necessary) to support and improve systems to better serve children and youth.  

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 2:36PM by Michael Rose

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

 

CBVH establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers for assessment and training services through three outcomes-based contracts: comprehensive services, assistive technology services, and vocational evaluation/placement services. Contractors provide not only the agreed upon assessment and training services, but also provide those services in a specific geographic area. Where an individual need calls for specialized services outside the scope of these contracts, or where there is no service available in a particular geographic area, CBVH district offices seek out additional providers and develop a local agreement to obtain the services.   Comprehensive contract services are designed to assist consumers with a goal of employment to develop or improve the basic skills essential to successfully seek and maintain a job. Each contract agency assesses consumer needs followed by comprehensive and integrated training in basic life skills for preparation for competitive or supported employment. Additionally, these agencies may provide pre-vocational and vocational training services to prepare consumers to seek employment and enter the workforce.   CBVH’s current five-year comprehensive services contract with sixteen agencies incorporated to provide services to the blind will expire in December 2013. To prepare for the next contract cycle, CBVH has created a workgroup to receive input from both CBVH staff and providers that is expected to result in additional enhancements to the manner in which service is provided and outcomes achieved.   Also due to expire at the end of 2013 is CBVH’s vocational evaluation/job placement contract, which is expected to continue under the more diverse model, implemented in 2009. Under this model, contracts for evaluation were awarded to 14 providers and contracts for job placement were awarded to 45 private not-for-profits and sole proprietors through a request for qualifications process. Some comprehensive services providers also applied for and received these awards.   Assistive technology contract services are designed to provide consumers with computer and/or computer-related technical training leading to employment. In Fall 2012, assistive technology center contracts were awarded, through an RFP process, in seven areas of the state: Buffalo, Rochester, Central New York, Capital District, Hudson Valley, New York City, and Hempstead, Long Island. CBVH had previously awarded contracts in these areas for more than 15 years. The current five-year contract (January 2013-December 2017) requires that consumers referred for computer technology services undergo a readiness evaluation, a comprehensive assessment, training and post-testing to prepare them for post-secondary education, vocational training, and employment. Consumers have an opportunity to view a wide selection of appropriate hardware and adaptive software, and have input into the development of an equipment recommendation that will meet their individual needs. In addition to these contracts, CBVH has a separate, outcome-based contract with Helen Keller National Center to provide all of the above services to individuals who are deaf-blind.  

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 2:38PM by Michael Rose

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

EVIDENCE OF COLLABORATION REGARDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES AND EXTENDED SERVICES

Individuals who are legally blind often have needs that require a variety of services and supports. CBVH has designed programs to educate the public concerning issues of blindness, to identify individuals who may need CBVH services and to integrate people who are legally blind into local community activities. CBVH regularly collaborates with other agencies providing vocational services to all individuals including individuals with disabilities in order to access necessary individual, family and other community based supports. Memorandums of Agreement provide a framework for building a service delivery system which integrates vocational rehabilitation services with necessary community supports.

Collaborative activities with respect to supported employment are focused on achieving the following goals:

1. Having an array of supported employment services available for clients to access in a timely manner.

2. Coordinating services and eligibility requirements between agencies.

3. Identifying responsibility for funding and administration of intensive and extended supported employment services.

4. Enabling individuals whose placements have been interrupted to re-enter the supported employment system without difficulty.

Chapter 515 of the Laws of 1992 requires State agencies to coordinate their efforts on competitive employment for individuals with disabilities through a State Integrated Employment Plan. This legislation reduces duplication of services and increases quality, efficiency and effectiveness of services focusing on the needs and expectations of both consumers and employers.

As part of the legislation, a Memorandum of Interagency Understanding Regarding Supported Employment was developed among ACCES-VR (formerly VESID), CBVH, the Office of Persons with Developmental Disabilities (formerly OMRDD) and the Office of Mental Health (OMH). The Chapter 515 Committee, composed of representatives of these agencies, has been meeting regularly to refine the MOU to provide a clear mission and framework for collaboration which will support individual agreements defining more specific policy, procedure and funding issues. Discussions have focused on understanding the impact of recent policy changes among member agencies and the need to maximize the use of natural supports for those individuals who are not eligible.

The Committee prepares an Annual Report on Integrated Employment and has refined the report to more clearly explain data presented, and to share “next steps” to increase collaboration and increase integrated employment outcomes.

In addition, CBVH served on the Most Integrated Setting Coordinating Council (MISCC) which includes the four agencies above as well as other state and not-for-profit organizations involved with the employment of people with disabilities. CBVH serves on the MISCC Employment Committee which established guiding principles, and through its subcommittees addressed ways to better utilize employment data for planning, decrease duplicative efforts, create “no wrong door” access to services, market to employers, and find ways to better access public employment opportunities for all individuals with disabilities, including those in supported employment. CBVH also served on the Transportation Committee which was created to promote and advocate for the accessibility, reliability and affordability of transportation alternatives for individuals with disabilities.

As State Vocational Rehabilitation partners, CBVH and ACCES-VR work together to distribute Title VI-C funds and make decisions regarding supported employment services. A representative of CBVH participated in an ACCES-VR workgroup to develop new guidelines for providers of supported employment services, and new policy for VR staff to follow. CBVH is currently revising its policy to more closely parallel ACCES-VR’s.

CBVH has also supported and participated in activities being implemented under the Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG), and serves on the steering committee to the MIG. Activities under the MIG which will particularly benefit individuals in supported employment are pilots of customized employment approaches, development of a statewide employment data base “New York Employment Services System (NYESS),” and expansion of the availability of work incentives advisement.

CBVH staff regularly attend the Empire State Association of Persons in Supported Employment (APSE) conference to dialogue with providers, consumers and advocates, and keep abreast of evidence-based practices.

Through ongoing collaboration, CBVH and partner agencies expect to:

1. Continue to develop, enhance and expand supported employment for persons with severe disabilities.

2. Establish a process that will improve the statewide management of supported employment programs by avoiding duplication of effort and funding, while increasing accountability.

3. Maximize the quality of service delivery through a comprehensive, continuous, efficient and effective referral process, individual program planning, coordination of intensive vocational services with extended services, and information collection, dissemination and technical assistance.

4. Identify issues, policies and practices that present systemic barriers to effective participation of individuals with severe disabilities and develop appropriate resolutions to remove such barriers.

5. Establish a planning process, consistent with the directions of the former State Interagency Council for Vocational Rehabilitation, for budget coordination which defines and projects the numbers of people in need of intensive and extended services for each fiscal year and facilitates program and fiscal planning.

This screen was last updated on May 31 2012 9:11AM by Michael Rose

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

 

This plan outlines strategies to update staff credentials so that all staff meets the highest academic standards for their profession. The in-service training unit of CBVH coordinates and evaluates all training programs attended by staff. All in-service training records are maintained electronically in a Microsoft Access program.  A training file is maintained for each staff member containing: name, title, phone number, date hired, district office, college major, highest degree earned, a note section to track courses needed (if necessary), Certification or Certification eligible, and in-service training programs attended. CBVH can thus easily access data regarding staff credentials and Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) eligibility or status. Number of Personnel Employed As of January 1, 2013, CBVH employees totaled 135 individuals in seven district offices and the home office. There were an additional 17 vacancies. The total number of field staff was 67, with 12 positions vacant. Approximately 4,400 legally blind individuals are "active" on Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors’ (VRC) caseloads at any given time. The average caseload is 61 consumers per VRC upstate, and 72 consumers per VRC downstate. The discrepancy in caseload sizes from upstate to downstate is due to the concentrated number of consumers in the downstate area.   Of the 50 Senior VRC and VRCs in field staff positions, 47 are Certified Rehabilitation Counselors (CRC) or CRC eligible. Two VRCs have reached retirement age, and have elected not to upgrade their credentials.  One individual opted not to establish a training plan and has elected not to upgrade his credentials. They will receive Sr. VRC sign-off prior to establishing eligibility, signing the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) (including any amendments and the annual IPE review) and closing the cases.   CBVH’s current staffing allows CBVH to effectively provide services to all individuals who apply for and are determined eligible for VR services. CBVH is aware that many professional staff intends to retire within the next five years.   The result of personnel transactions for calendar year 2012 as they affected each district office is as follows:   Buffalo - one Rehabilitation Teacher position is vacant, one District Manager position is vacant, and one Senior Counselor position is vacant.  One VR-Children’s Consultant was hired.   Syracuse - one Orientation and Mobility position is vacant, one District Manager position is vacant and two VR counselor positions are vacant.  One VR-Children’s Consultant was hired.     Albany - one Senior Counselor position is vacant. One District Manager was hired and one Vision Rehabilitation Therapist was hired.   White Plains - one VR counselor was hired.   Manhattan - one Senior Counselor position is vacant. One VR counselor was hired   Hempstead - one Orientation and Mobility Instructor was hired.   Harlem – one VR counselor position is vacant.   CBVH is requesting budgetary approval to fill all of the vacant positions.  CBVH must seek NYS Division of the Budget approval for a waiver from the ongoing state hiring freeze in order to hire any personnel.   Staff Five Year Projections CBVH estimates that by the year 2018, 27 current VRCs and Senior VRCs will be age 55 or older and eligible to retire.  Many of those within retirement age, however, will not have enough time in service to retire at age 55 and will retire at a later time.  In using age 57 as a likely retirement age, we estimate that some employees who are older than 57 will remain employed by CBVH, and other VRCs, under age 57, may be promoted or leave for other reasons.  Using this analysis of potential retirees and staff leaving for other reasons, we estimate that 26 VRCs and Senior VRCs will leave CBVH in the next five years. Twenty-six of the 27 VRCs and Sr. VRCs expected to remain will be CRC or CRC eligible.   The person ineligible for CRC status will be unable to perform the non-delegable functions of the VRC.   Using the same formula, it is estimated that four of the eight O&M instructors and RTs will retire or leave for other reasons.  All vacancies in the O&M and RT disciplines are expected to be replaced.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor 49 2 24
2 Senior Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor 9 3 4
3 Orientation and Mobility Instructor 5 1 4
4 Vision Rehabilitation Therapist 3 2 0
5 0 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

Data on Personnel Development

CBVH maintains contact with the three colleges and universities in the state that prepare vocational rehabilitation counselors as a source for CBVH staff positions.

In addition, CBVH continues to work closely with the colleges to develop a process for the recruitment of students from diverse populations, and to establish a curriculum based on best practices, research, and development trends.

For the calendar year beginning January 2012 and ending December 2012, the colleges reported the enrollment outlined in the table below.

Row 4 below: *Hunter College of CUNY is the only university preparation program in New York State graduating O&M instructors and VRTs. Graduates from this program are eligible for certification by the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals (ACVREP).

 

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Hofstra University 53 16 0 16
2 Hunter College of the City of New York 63 35 0 35
3 State University of New York at Buffalo 86 18 0 18
4 Hunter College CUNY O&M/RT* 24 9 6 9
5 0 0 0 0

 

 

Plan for Recruitment, Preparation, and Retention of Qualified Personnel The following steps describe the ongoing activities that will enable CBVH to continue the long-term CSPD plan and develop resources needed to recruit, prepare and retain qualified personnel in New York State:   1.       Maintain relationships established with the Regional Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE), the VR counseling pre-service preparation programs in NYS, pre-service O&M and RT programs, and long distance learning pre-service programs from other states.   2.       Continue to track the number of students who graduate from pre-service programs statewide and the percentage of diverse populations (e.g. severely disabled, Latino) within those programs.   3.       Continue to develop relationships with distance learning programs to locate curricula that meet the learning styles and needs of CBVH staff. These include video conferencing, videotapes, and/or computer technology.   4.       Increase opportunities for staff in-service training.   5.       Maintain a training database for all CBVH staff that includes the following information: CRC status, educational history, proficiency areas (sign language, foreign language), training priority requests, graduate course work.   6.       Continue to recruit qualified VRCs, O&Ms, and RTs including those from diverse backgrounds or who have foreign language skills.   7.       Continue to partner with ACCES-VR (formerly VESID) with regard to the CSPD and the long term training of employees.   8.       Provide financial stipends to masters level students who complete an internship program at CBVH as part of their Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor program.   9.       Collaborate with colleges and universities to train Orientation and Mobility Specialists and Vision Rehabilitation Therapists. Graduates will qualify for national certification through the ACVREP or the National Blindness Professional Certification Board (NBPCB). CBVH and stakeholders have been meeting with officials from the University at Buffalo to establish a certificate training program in Orientation and Mobility. The certificate program would be the first of its kind and graduates would be eligible for certification by the ACVREP. 

 

 

Personnel Standards Highest Standard for VRCs CBVH hires only individuals who meet the New York State Department of Civil Service’s personnel standard for vocational rehabilitation counselors. The standard is:   A.       A current Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC certificate); OR B.       A Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling, including a supervised internship, from a Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) accredited program; OR C.       A Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or Counseling and notice of academic eligibility for the CRCC certificate examination.   Plans to Retrain Staff Who Do Not Meet the Highest Requirements Staff who do not meet the highest academic standards will either have a training plan in place or they will require supervisory approval prior to establishing eligibility, signing the IPE or determining case closure.  

The NYS Department of Civil Service does not permit CBVH to hire new staff in VR Counselor positions who do not meet the personnel standard.

 

 

 

Staff Development The CBVH in-service training program funds attendance at workshops, conferences, formal course work, and agency developed training sessions, and TACE developed or sponsored training and conferences. Training has been offered in counseling, rehabilitation, medical aspects of disability, job placement, rehabilitation technology, cultural diversity, informed choice, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998, and other topics related to vocational rehabilitation. CBVH contracts with six Adaptive Technology Centers with seven sites throughout the state. Upon request, the centers provide training to CBVH staff on new access technology for individuals with disabilities.   Information gained by staff attending conferences or training is shared at staff meetings with local staff. District managers share the information with senior staff at bi-weekly conference calls and quarterly meeting of district managers and information is disseminated to all staff as appropriate.

 

Personnel to Address Individual Communication Needs

CBVH continues to obtain the services of individuals able to communicate in the native language of individuals who have limited English speaking ability or require American Sign Language. Qualified interpreters are hired for services for individuals who are deaf-blind or who require in-person language interpretation. CBVH staff with the required qualifications may be used for this purpose, or sub-contractors with specialty skills may be used.

 

CBVH also uses the Language Line telephone interpretation services program that offers interpretation services in over 170 languages.

 

 

 

Coordination of CSPD with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) 

 

CBVH coordinates policy and services relating to transition services for students who are legally blind from school to adult services and begins planning VR services for individuals with disabilities prior to their exiting high school. The coordination of meaningful transition services for students with disabilities from school-age to postsecondary settings is a priority for CBVH and may begin as early as age 10. CBVH designates VR liaisons to school districts to inform educators on CBVH services and application processes; participates in regional trainings, annual kick-off meetings and/or teacher in-service trainings with school districts; provides informational pamphlets on CBVH services; and participates in local job fairs where youth with disabilities are seeking employment opportunities.   CBVH and the New York State Education Department collaborate on a regular basis to provide guidance to educational agencies and vocational rehabilitation personnel responsible for facilitating transition services, and to provide information about consultation and technical assistance resources to assist schools and related community support entities in planning for transition of students who are legally blind.   At the state level, both agencies have designated personnel that provide oversight and leadership for the development of policies, procedures, interagency training and other state-level partnership activities for transition services. At the local level, VR counselors work closely with school district staff and local school districts have transition to work specialists that collaborate together.   CBVH will continue to work closely with schools to enable the smooth transition of students who are legally blind from school to work.

 

This screen was last updated on Aug 8 2013 2:49PM by Michael Rose

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

 

CBVH has contracted with Cornell University, Employment and Disability Institute to perform a Comprehensive Needs Assessment.   The assessment, though not complete, will consist of an analysis of the CBVH case management dataset since 2009, with a focus on factors related to successful case closure, including individual demographic factors such as secondary disability, functional limitations, race, ethnicity, geographic location and mix of services received. It will include a study of sub-groups such as transition-age youth, recipients of public assistance, and those participating in supported employment or post-secondary education.   Upon initial analysis of the data, Cornell will survey CBVH personnel using online survey tools to understand their perspectives on some of the observed trends in consumer outcomes from the secondary data analysis. Perceived barriers in providing services and collaborating with other providers of rehabilitation services for people with disabilities in New York State will also be explored.   Preliminary descriptive analysis and modeling has been completed in January 2013, and will be shared with CBVH and the SRC for review. The staff survey was completed through the internet in February 2013. Results will be fully compiled in May 2013 and will form the basis for new activities to increase broader participation and success by individuals participating in vocational rehabilitation services. The Comprehensive Needs Assessment is expected to be completed in entirety by the end of September, Federal Fiscal Year 2013.   In 2013, CBVH anticipates completing a Consumer Survey to gain consumer perspectives on their rehabilitation needs and how well they are being met by CBVH, CBVH providers and other components of the statewide workforce system. 

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 3:11PM by Michael Rose

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

 

CBVH provides a full range of vocational rehabilitation services to eligible individuals. CBVH has examined population data from the New York State Department of Health and applied a prevalence rate based on information available on the Prevent Blindness America website.  Using this data, CBVH estimates that there are 16,000 legally blind individuals between the ages of 14 and 64 in New York State. CBVH has also evaluated data on the number of individuals who applied for services, the number of people found eligible for VR services and the number of individuals served in the past three years. Based on this evaluation, CBVH estimates that during Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2014, 1,400 individuals will be found eligible for CBVH services. CBVH anticipates serving 5,000 individuals during FFY 2014. Of the 5,000 individuals expected to receive services, CBVH expects that 4,935 individuals will be served using Title I Vocational Rehabilitation funds at a total estimated cost of $24,000,000. CBVH expects that the remaining 65 individuals will be served using Title VI, Part B Supported Employment funds at a total estimated cost of $250,000.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Vocational Rehabilitation Part B of Title I Title I $24,000,000 4,935 $4,863
Supported Employment Part B of Title VI Title VI $250,000 65 $3,846
Totals   $24,250,000 5,000 $4,850

This screen was last updated on Aug 22 2013 3:25PM by Michael Rose

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

 

CBVH has updated the goals and priorities that were developed for the 2013 State Plan. These goals and priorities have been developed in accordance with the results of the Statewide Comprehensive Needs Assessment, recommendations from RSA, and CBVH administrative priorities. The SRC has provided input into these goals and priorities. The achievement of these goals will be measured against prior years data.  Proposed Goals:   Goal 1:         Increase the number of competitive employment outcomes using Fiscal Year 2012 data on the number of competitive employment outcomes as a baseline.   Goal 2:         Increase the number of individuals from ethnic and racial minority populations and other unserved and underserved groups who receive services, using Fiscal Year 2012 data as a baseline.   Goal 3:         Continue to pass the RSA Standards and Indicators.   Goal 4:         Increase the array of services available to individuals who are deaf-blind.   Goal 5:  Increase the number of individuals who are referred for Braille training.  Goal 6:  Increase the number of businesses state wide who received information about CBVH services by ten percent over fiscal year 2012. 

This screen was last updated on Aug 9 2013 10:15AM by Michael Rose

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen has never been updated.

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

 

The purpose of CBVH’s supported employment program is to enable individuals with the most significant disabilities to achieve and maintain competitive employment in their communities. CBVH continues to serve all eligible individuals who need supported employment services, with a goal of placing as many individuals as possible in employment. In FFY 2012, 66 individuals received supported employment services. A total of 20 consumers  were successfully placed in supported competitive employment and transitioned to extended supported employment services (an increase of 8 from FFY 2011).The average hourly wage rose from $8.02/hr. to $8.26/hr., and the average number of hours worked per week increased from 20.25 to 21.2.  A review of referral patterns reveals that referrals for supported employment have steadily decreased over the past four years from a high of 81 to a low of 32. However, in 2012 CBVH referrals to Supported Employment programs increased moderately to 37. CBVH has three primary goals for FY 2014. The first is to increase the number of individuals placed in supportive employment by 10 percent to 22 or greater; the second is to increase hourly wages to at least $8.50/hr.; the third is to maintain the average number of hours worked at a minimum of 21 hrs. /week. In New York State, the administrative responsibility for supported employment programs is consolidated in the Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services (ACCES-VR, formerly VESID), as established in accordance with Section 3, Chapter 515 of the Laws of New York of 1992. ACCES-VR will be incorporating supported employment into its new Core Rehabilitation Services Contract, and will be switching to a new outcome-funded model for supported employment. CBVH anticipates continuing to work cooperatively with ACCES-VR to provide opportunities for supported employment across the State. Because blindness is a low incidence disability, CBVH continues to be challenged in anticipating service needs and distributing the limited funds available. The lack of extended services funds further limits the number of individuals who can enter intensive supported employment services. CBVH plans to work more closely with ACCES-VR in the future to determine the distribution of funds available for intensive and extended services, while providing information and training to enable staff to better access extended services through the Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) or Office of Mental Health (OMH), as appropriate. CBVH continues to maintain case management, program monitoring and oversight responsibilities for the supported employment services provided to CBVH consumers. Service providers regularly provide CBVH with individual consumer reports, and CBVH staff meets regularly with providers and consumers. CBVH will continue to work with ACCES-VR to assess performance on an ongoing basis, participate in on-site reviews, and provide technical assistance or recommend adjustments to contracts as needed. CBVH, with ACCES-VR, continues to take a close look at supported employment caseloads to utilize Title VI-B funds in the most effective manner to assist individuals with most significant disabilities in obtaining competitive employment. Counselors have been instructed to: ·       Conduct comprehensive assessments, including situational assessments, prior to referral for supported employment services in order to increase the likelihood that individuals referred for supported employment will benefit from it. This also allows intensive service dollars to be focused more on job development, placement and training and should allow individuals to complete the intensive phase more quickly.   ·       Consider the use of natural supports following employment and start to establish eligibility for extended services at the beginning of the planning process. This will maximize the use of limited ACCES-VR funding for extended services.   ·       More closely monitor monthly training progress reports, especially for individuals who have been in training for more than 18 months. In 2013, CBVH will be revising its Supported Employment policy to more closely mirror changes made by ACCES-VR with input from an advisory group, including a CBVH representative. Provider agencies have been instructed to regularly review cases to determine which consumers no longer require extended services due to their increased experience and confidence, and the availability of natural supports. During the past year, CBVH has worked with other members of the Chapter 515 Implementation Team to improve the delivery of supported employment services. Specifically, the team has: ·       Drafted revisions to the existing Memorandum of Understanding to strengthen partner agencies’ commitment to the provision of supported employment services, and better planning and coordination of service delivery. ·       Shared information about program revisions within each agency’s service delivery system. ·       Reviewed data to monitor the effectiveness of supported employment services.

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 3:19PM by Michael Rose

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

 

As noted in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State’s Goals and Priorities, CBVH, working with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), updated the goals and priorities that were developed for the 2013 State Plan. The goal of increasing the number of competitive closures remain a goal for this State Plan so that CBVH can continue to measure program service effectiveness. The goal of increasing the number of individuals from ethnic and racial minority populations also remains a goal for the 2014 State Plan because many stakeholders have indicated that there continues to be a need for CBVH to address this goal. These goals and priorities have been developed using feedback from CBVH workgroups, the Executive Board, the State Rehabilitation Council, participant input from CBVH open forums, the results of the Comprehensive Needs Assessment and CBVH administrative priorities.   Goal 1: Increase the number of competitive employment outcomes using Fiscal Year 2012 data on the number of competitive employment outcomes as a baseline.   Strategies 1.       Increase and document outreach efforts to employers to make them aware of the skills and abilities of individuals who are blind and to develop partnerships. 2.       Continue to work with the National Employment Team (NET) of the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and other employment networks to improve employment options for CBVH consumers. 3.       Work to build partnerships with America’s Job Centers to increase access to needed services by CBVH consumers. 4.       Develop additional vocational training programs that meet the needs of consumers and businesses. 5.       Develop working relationships with agencies that typically serve individuals with disabilities other than blindness. 6.       Support and promote the Business Enterprise Program in the implementation of the expanded state legislative priority in order to increase employment opportunities and successful outcomes. 7.       Expand availability of Benefits Advisement services to CBVH consumers through Independent Living Centers and other qualified entities with the goal of increasing the number of individuals seeking employment goals, including full time employment. 8.       Work with National Industries for the Blind in developing competitive integrated employment opportunities in the Service sector.         Goal 2: Increase the number of individuals from ethnic and racial minority populations and other unserved and underserved groups who receive services using Fiscal Year 2012 as a baseline.   Strategies 1.       Continue to promote CBVH services to the populations identified in the 2013 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) as underserved. 2.       Continue activities to provide additional and improved services to minority populations. In addition, CBVH will continue its efforts to diversify its staff and provide cultural competency training to new staff. 3.       Increase the availability of services to minority populations by providing access to information in different languages. Also, improve consumer access to English as a Second Language training programs, vocational training programs, job placement services and education services. 4.       Continue to develop working relationships with culturally specific community-based organizations such as literacy programs, faith based organizations, service groups and community action programs. Continue to encourage CBVH staff to attend community cultural events as a way to expand awareness of CBVH services. 5.       Expand outreach efforts to specific underserved populations identified by each CBVH district.   Goal 3: Continue to pass the following RSA Standards and Indicators:     1.1: Change in Number of Employment Outcomes - The number of individuals exiting the VR program who achieved an employment outcome during the current performance period compared to the number of individuals who exited the VR program after achieving an employment outcome during the previous period.   1.2: Percent Employed - Of all individuals who exit the VR program after receiving services, the percentage that are determined to have achieved an employment outcome.   1.3: Employed Competitively - Of all individuals determined to have achieved an employment outcome, the percentage who exit the VR program in competitive, self- or business enterprise program (BEP) employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage.   1.4: Significant Disability - Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-, or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage, the percentage who are individuals with significant disabilities.   1.5: Earnings Ratio - The average hourly earnings of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-, or BEP employment with earnings levels equivalent to at least the minimum wage as a ratio to the State’s average hourly earnings for all individuals in the State who are employed (as derived from the Bureau of Labor Statistics report "State Average Annual Pay" for the most recent available year).   1.6: Self-Support - Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-, or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage, the difference between the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of economic support at the time they exit the VR program and the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of support at the time they apply for VR services.   2.1: Ratio Minority - The service rate for all individuals with disabilities from minority backgrounds as a ratio to the service rate for all non-minority individuals with disabilities.   RSA Standards and Indicators – In addition to implementing the strategies listed below, CBVH notes that progress toward achieving Goals 1 and 2 and the implementation of their accompanying strategies will positively impact CBVH’s performance on the Standards and Indicators.     Strategies 1.       CBVH will continue to work with district office staff to improve the accuracy of data in our Case Information System (CIS). 2.       CBVH will continue to make enhancements to CIS to improve the accuracy of data collection. 3.       Encourage the use of benefits advisement to help improve consumer’s earnings and CBVH performance on indicators 1.5 and 1.6. 4.       Evaluate the results of the Comprehensive Needs Assessment to better serve individuals who are at risk for unsuccessful closure.   Goal 4: Improve services to individuals who are deaf-blind.   Strategies 1.       Continue to implement recommendations from the Deaf-Blind Needs Assessment which are within the purview of CBVH.   a.       Review and update the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with ACCES-VR, for serving individuals who are deaf-blind, as necessary. b.       Explore development of additional programs and services to meet the needs of individuals who are deaf-blind and advocate for appropriate community resources to meet the needs of individuals who are deaf-blind.   2.       With the Office of Persons with Developmental Disabilities, examine the deaf-blind population served by that agency and the issues faced by this population, and develop opportunities for service collaboration.   3.       Continue membership on the Interagency Coordinating Council for Services to Persons Who Are Deaf, Deaf-Blind or Hard of Hearing and continue to actively work with the Council to address its work plan and priorities.   Goal 5: Support teaching functional Braille to adults for daily living and employment activities.   Strategies 1.       Revise Vision Rehabilitation Therapy Progress Report forms in the CBVH case management system to enable CBVH to more easily track Braille instruction.   2.       Continue to encourage counselors to discuss the value and benefit of learning functional Braille skills with consumers.   3.       Recruit prospective students to enroll in Vision Rehabilitation Therapy programs in order to increase the availability of Braille instruction.   Goal 6: Increase awareness of CBVH services in the statewide business community.   Strategies 1.       Promote business awareness of CBVH workforce programs and business services through print, broadcast and electronic media, and continue to promote awareness of CBVH through personal face-to-face contacts with businesses. Develop and implement local marketing plans in each CBVH district that encourage and strengthen partnerships between CBVH and community providers when creating business relationships.   2.       Brand CBVH as part of CSAVR’s National Employment Team (NET) which assures businesses that CBVH will understand and meet business’s onboarding needs with the same level of consistency and quality as other NET member VR agencies across the country.   3.       Assist businesses in finding employees who have the education, skills and abilities to meet business needs.   4.       Enhance the information and resources for business that are available on CBVH website and promote the website link in all marketing efforts.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

 

Provision of Assistive Technology Services CBVH provides assistive technology services and devices to individuals during each stage of the rehabilitation process through assistive technology center (ATC) contracts and through private vendors.   The new ATC contracts began in January 2013 and include a new outcome service, ATC Readiness Evaluation, in addition to the ATC Assessment and ATC Training outcome services and additional fee based services.  Training on the new contract guidelines is being provided to both CBVH staff and ATC staff.  The outcome services provide a comprehensive and rigorous array of assessments and training with the goal of preparing students for success in school and employment.   As needed, other vendors may be used to provide assistive technology training. These vendors have varied expertise including the ability to provide assessment and training for a wide variety of needs. A list of approved private vendors is posted on the CBVH website. Technology equipment is purchased based on recommendations from the ATC and approval by the counselor and district office supervisory staff and a review and approval by the home office technology consultant.   The ATCs and private vendors are located across the state to allow easy access to the training statewide.  Two CBVH loan closets also provide statewide access to loaner equipment while a consumer is awaiting delivery of equipment purchased for them for school or employment.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

 

Increase the number of individuals from ethnic and racial minority populations and other unserved and underserved groups who receive services using Fiscal Year 2012 as a baseline.   Strategies 1. Continue to promote CBVH services to the populations identified in the 2013 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) as underserved.   2. Continue activities to provide additional and improved services to minority populations. In addition, CBVH will continue its efforts to diversify its staff and provide cultural competency training to new staff.   3. Increase the availability of services to minority populations by providing access to information in different languages. Also, improve consumer access to English as a Second Language training programs, vocational training programs, job placement services and education services.   4. Continue to develop working relationships with culturally specific community-based organizations such as literacy programs, faith based organizations, service groups and community action programs. Continue to encourage CBVH staff to attend community cultural events as a way to expand awareness of CBVH services.   5. Expand outreach efforts to specific underserved populations identified by each CBVH district.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

 

Establishing, Developing or Improving Community Rehabilitation Programs   As identified in the needs assessment, there does not appear to be a need to establish new community rehabilitation programs. However, the need to develop and improve existing community rehabilitation programs was identified. CBVH will work closely with community resources to:   1.       Continue to improve the assistive technology services provided by contract agencies. CBVH issued an RFP for assistive technology center services in the Fall of 2012. The RFP included new standards for the provision of assistive technology services to CBVH consumers. There are three required outcomes in the new contract: Readiness Evaluation, Assessment, and Training. There is also an additional hourly service, Remote Technical Assistance, which allows the provider to troubleshoot problems from a distance.   These changes in the contract were developed through the efforts of a workgroup comprised of CBVH staff that met for an extended period. The group reviewed the existing standards; assessment and training programs in use by other state agencies; and the current skills demanded by educational institutions and business. CBVH also pilot tested a commercial product and reviewed a second commercial product. From the workgroup recommendations, CBVH developed an evaluation tool which will be administered both during the assessment phase and again at the end of training to determine whether the level of skill attained will enable the consumer to compete in school or at work. The new ATC standards became effective January 1, 2013.   2.       Develop and implement new and innovative training and placement programs for consumers. CBVH is partnering with community rehabilitation programs to help them target growing job sectors and develop training programs to provide individuals with the appropriate skills to meet the needs of businesses in those sectors.   3.       Improve and augment Comprehensive Services, Adaptive Technology, and Evaluation/Placement services. A joint CBVH/provider workgroup to discuss current practice and challenges in implementation of the Comprehensive Services Contract began meeting in January of 2011. The group, which consisted of senior counselors and agency program directors, worked to establish best practices, service provision and documentation.   4.       Continue joint training initiatives with community contractor agencies. CBVH and the Region 2 TACE Center sponsored the annual Vision Rehabilitation and Employment Institute.   Approximately 100 attendees participated in an array of workshops that related to Career Search, Landing a Job on the Phone, Consumers with Criminal Backgrounds, Work Readiness and Career Management.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

 

The following strategies as noted in Goal 3 above will be implemented to improve CBVH’s performance on the Standards and Indicators   1.       CBVH will continue to work with district office staff to improve the accuracy of data in our Case Information System (CIS).   2.       CBVH will make necessary enhancements to CIS to improve the accuracy of data collection.   3.       CBVH will encourage the use of benefits advisement to help improve consumer’s earnings and CBVH performance on indicators 1.5 and 1.6.   4.       CBVH willevaluate the results of the Comprehensive Needs Assessment to better serve individuals who are at risk for unsuccessful closure.  

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

 

Assisting Other Components of the Statewide Workforce Investment System     1.       Efforts to connect with Disability Resource Coordinators (DRCs) in America’s Job Centers and to participate in Local Workforce Investment Boards serve multiple purposes: connecting CBVH to businesses, promoting knowledge about CBVH and its services, and connecting job seekers to services at the job centers which may lead to more competitive outcomes.   2.       Participation by CBVH staff in Chapter 515 meetings allows discussions among CBVH, ACCES-VR, the Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD), and the Office of Mental Health (OMH) about the challenges facing mutual consumers including minorities and individuals who are deaf-blind and those in more isolated communities. The group works to achieve more effective transition from pre-employment programs to employment, identify barriers to participation in employment and distribute services to achieve equitable access. In planning and coordinating activities, including training, the group will help staff to increase skills needed to help consumers achieve integrated employment while increasing knowledge and access to each other’s services.   3.       By supporting increased use of benefits planning through Independent Living Services, DRC’s and other qualified resources, CBVH anticipates that more consumers will choose careers, and work hours, which will allow them to go off SSA benefits and achieve economic self-sufficiency. In addition, CBVH is working with the OMH to develop a Partnership Plus agreement with the OMH administered State Employment Network. This will increase opportunities for consumers to obtain continued support to maintain their jobs after case closure. CBVH works with ACCES-VR to allocate contract capacity for Supported Employment services to try to assure the services are available to any most significantly disabled individual seeking those services.            

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

 

Innovation and Expansion Funds   CBVH plans to use Innovation and Expansion funds for the following projects in FY 2014.   1.       Marketing materials – CBVH has contracted with a New York State based company to develop marketing materials to use as part of a variety of outreach initiatives. In FY 14, they will be developing brochures targeted to eye care professionals and the general public. This will enable CBVH to focus on two valuable referral sources.   2.       Pre-College Programs – CBVH is contracting with two private agencies for the blind to provide pre-college programs for CBVH consumers entering their senior year of high school.   The goal of the program is to provide these students the opportunity to refine their academic, social and independent living skills before beginning college.   The programs will begin in the summer of 2013 and will continue for four consecutive summers. The students will be housed on a college campus for the four week program and will participate in two non-credit courses: an “Introduction to College” course which will focus on adaptive academic and college “survival” skills such as acquiring books in alternative formats, requesting accommodations and identifying important resources on a college campus; and a “Developmental Writing/Technology Seminar” where students will receive individual and group writing instruction using an online webinar format where they will be introduced to web conferencing and discussion forums.     3.       Benefits Advisement - CBVH is developing relationships with independent living centers (ILCs) and other entities with expertise in providing benefits advisement to individuals with disabilities. These ILCs and other providers are being approved to provide benefits advisement to CBVH consumers. CBVH is using the model that was developed by the Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPA) projects and is promoting the use of benefits advisement for all CBVH consumers as appropriate. CBVH will use innovation and expansion funds to increase the use of benefits advisement with the goal of increasing employment outcomes for CBVH consumers.     

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 3:34PM by Michael Rose

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

 

CBVH evaluates progress towards the achievement of goals and priorities on an ongoing basis. CBVH is reporting on the goals and objectives identified in the 2012 VR State Plan. Employment outcomes increased during fiscal year 2012. CBVH placed 403 individuals in competitive employment. This was a 4 percent increase over Fiscal Year 2011, when 388 individuals were placed in competitive employment. The average hourly wage for FY 2012 was $18.92, six-point-four-percent decrease from FY 2011, when the average hourly wage was $20.20.   Goal 1: Increase the number of competitive employment outcomes using Fiscal Year 2011 data on the number of competitive employment outcomes as a baseline.   1.       Of the eight ARRA-funded Innovative Training and Employment projects, CBVH determined that six were sustainable as vocational training programs with each provider agency. Of the other two, one was determined to be similar to a more comprehensive vocational program already run by the provider. The other program, Scopist training, can be supported with local technical support applied to the same on-line training program used in the project. Since the original projects began, 97 individuals have completed training and 44 have obtained competitive integrated employment.    As future vocational training programs are developed, CBVH intends to require that vendors provide documentation that they have a business partner(s) that will provide input into the curriculum, provide on-site training opportunities and offer employment to qualified graduates of the program. CBVH will also seek to directly contract with  businesses willing to design a training program to prepare CBVH consumers for positions within their company.   2.       In 2012, CBVH, along with ACCES-VR, continued to work with Walgreen’s Retail Employment Disability Initiative (REDI). As a result, two additional legally blind consumers have obtained employment in Walgreens pharmacies, for a total of six since the program was initiated in 2010. Two other individuals will have the opportunity to retest to be hired. At least three trainees, under a new bidding system, will begin training in 2013. As an experienced Walgreens partner, CBVH has shared its perspective and strategies with other State VR agencies starting the program under initial National expansion efforts. CBVH is now exploring a pharmacy technologist training program with CVS, based on a model developed by the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission.   3.       CBVH regularly receives job postings through the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation’s (CSAVR) National Employment Team (the NET) and participates in webinars with a variety of businesses, including private and Federal employers. Job postings and business profiles are shared with counseling staff and placement providers. In addition, CBVH confers with other state agencies in the NET about approaches and resources used by other states, with the aim to improve CBVH’s outcomes. Staff also participates in local placement consortiums.   4.       CBVH continues its efforts to identify and work with vocational training programs in local communities to expand training opportunities for CBVH consumers.   5.       All district offices and satellites of CBVH now have business marketing materials, which include print materials, audio/visual materials, and a business kit to demonstrate assistive technology.   CBVH is developing an instrument to document business outreach efforts to measure outreach efforts and determine which approaches appear to be most effective. CBVH will also work with the CSAVR National Employment Team and/or Region II Technical Assistance and Continuing Education project to develop additional marketing training for staff.   Goal 2: Increase the number of individuals from ethnic and racial minority populations who receive services, beginning with a baseline of data from Fiscal Year 2010.   1.       CBVH continues outreach activities to underserved populations identified in the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA). The CBVH Outreach Coordinator, in conjunction with CBVH district office staff, continues to do outreach presentations across the state, focusing on schools, colleges, churches, community centers, advocacy groups, health fairs, healthcare providers and coalitions, ethnic festivals and senior centers.   2.       CBVH continues to participate in the agency-wide initiative known as the Disproportionate Minority Representation/Cultural Competence Committee. Concluding early in 2012, a second round of cultural competency training was provided for CBVH and contractor agency staff with a focus on identifying and eliminating racial and ethnic inequities in agency service delivery systems, practices and policies.   3.       CBVH continues to participate in the agency-wide effort to identify those consumers for whom English is not their primary language. CBVH continues to comply with NYS Executive Order No. 26 and the agency language access plan in identifying and prioritizing all vital documents for translation into six languages. CBVH will continue to provide its written materials in Spanish, Arabic, Chinese and Russian. CBVH continues to utilize “Language Line”, a telephone translation service that provides interpreters for consumers who are non-English speaking. In 2012, CBVH assigned all district managers as language access liaisons for each specific district in the State as part of the agency language access plan. The language access liaisons are responsible for the coordination of language access efforts within each district office area.     4.       CBVH continues to partner with two private agencies for the blind, Aurora of Central New York, Inc. in Syracuse and Visions Services for the Blind and Visually Impaired in New York City, to develop and implement comprehensive outreach programs for underserved legally blind individuals in the upstate New York and New York City areas. CBVH continues to work closely with these two programs with the long term goal of increasing referrals. In 2012, CBVH partnered with SUNY Buffalo Region 2 Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE) to begin benchmarking best practices from the Aurora and Visions programs for replication of specific best practices with each CBVH district office in the state.       5.       CBVH continues to partner with TACE to provide diversity planning with each CBVH district office in the state. The primary focus is identification of service strategies and approaches that promote the delivery of services reflective of regional and local populations and communities.   Goal 3: Continue to pass the RSA Standards and Indicators.   1.       The results of FY 2012 data show that CBVH has passed Standard 1 and Standard 2. CBVH implemented a change to the Consumer Information System (CIS) that reminds counselors to enter SSI and SSDI information at the time they are completing the Economic Status Report to document whether a consumer meets economic need. Other edit checks relating to SSI and SSDI information are incorporated into CIS at the time of eligibility determination.   2.       Progress on implementing the strategies and achieving the goals in the State Plan was discussed at quarterly management meetings. District managers and senior counselors report on activities related to the goals and strategies. Sharing information statewide provides opportunities for best practices in one office to be replicated in other offices.   Goal 4: Improve services to individuals who are Deaf-Blind.   1.       CBVH’s preliminary analysis of the deaf-blind needs assessment resulted in strategies outlined in the State Plan. CBVH is revising policy regarding services to individuals who are deaf-blind and will revisit the agreement between CBVH and ACCES-VR when feasible.   2.       CBVH is working with community partners, primarily Helen Keller National Center and the Harlem Independent Living Center (ILC), to delve further into issues facing deaf-blind consumers in the metropolitan New York City area where a large portion of the state population is located. The diversity of the population in terms of communication techniques, age, and race/ethnicity (African–American, Hispanic and Asian) create additional challenges. The Harlem ILC is exploring developing socialization groups to build confidence among deaf-blind adults which would prepare them to move more effectively toward employment. They are also looking at the needs of deaf-blind youth in transition to understand their needs and the challenges they may face as they enter work or college.   3.       CBVH has shared the deaf-blind needs assessment with the State Rehabilitation Council, private agencies for the blind, CBVH district management staff and the CBVH Executive Board. The agency plans to share the results with ACCES-VR, the Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD), and the Office of Mental Health (OMH), in preparation for discussion of solutions to shared challenges and advocacy for appropriate community resources.   4.       CBVH will be meeting with the OPWDD to discuss the results of the Needs Assessment specific to the Deaf-Blind developmentally delayed population. To the extent that OPWDD can identify consumers within its system who are deaf-blind, CBVH will work with OPWDD to consider cross-training and other collaborations needed to serve this population as they move to competitive employment. The Interagency Coordinating Council for Services to Persons Who Are Deaf, Deaf-Blind or Hard of Hearing is included in the new Justice Center bill signed by Governor Cuomo. CBVH will continue to participate in activities of the Council, which are anticipated to increase in 2013.   Goal 5: Provide assistive technology services to an increased number of CBVH consumers.   1.       A CBVH workgroup met throughout 2012 for the purpose of reviewing CBVH’s technology policy. The group is completing its deliberations and is readying its recommendations for presentation to CBVH’s senior management team.   2.       CBVH awarded two contracts for pre-college residential programs. Both programs will include an online class in utilizing technology to complete college requirements. Technology to be utilized during the program is being determined and students will receive training to use the equipment prior to beginning the summer program.   3.       366 individuals received assessment and 300 received training at the seven contracted assistive technology centers in 2012. This represents an eleven- percent increase in assessment and an eight-percent increase in training over 2011. Over 200 individuals also received assistive technology training through other vendors in 2012.   4.       CBVH district offices continue outreach to recruit private technology vendors in areas that are underserved. All private vendors pass an experience and technical screening interview with a CBVH technology specialist.   Goal 6: Increase CBVH consumer access to mental health services.   1.       CBVH is in the process of revising policy to increase the duration of support for psychological and psychiatric therapy.   2.       CBVH has increased reimbursement rates for mental health providers.   3.       In January 2012, CBVH added a new social casework outcome to the Comprehensive Service Contract to enable contract agencies to provide brief therapy for consumers who require that service.  Since that time nine contract agencies have been approved to provide this more intensive social casework service to consumers.   Goal 7: Support teaching functional Braille to adults for daily living and employment activities.   1.       CBVH is continuing to work with the software developer that manages the CBVH case management system to track Braille instruction provided to consumers.   2.       Each VR consumer referred for vision rehabilitation therapy services is assessed to determine their ability to use Braille for labeling and identification and for their ability to use Grade 1 and Grade 2 Braille. If training is recommended, Braille instruction is provided to enable the consumer to achieve his/her vocational goal.   3.       CBVH continues to encourage counselors to discuss the value and benefit of learning functional Braille skills with consumers. CBVH believes that to succeed in school, work and life, people who are blind need the opportunities that literacy provides. Research done through the American Foundation for the Blind (AFB) has shown a correlation between learning braille and lifetime achievement. One study shows that only 30% of people who are blind are employed, but of this group, ninety-percent are Braille readers. CBVH staff continues to discuss the value of learning Braille with consumers, and share with young consumers and families the “Why Braille” document created for CBVH by an AFB editor. In addition, many consumers are taught functional braille skills.  

 

 

Progress In Achieving Supported Employment Goals In FY 2012, CBVH had two primary goals for supported employment: to increase the number of individuals placed in supportive employment to at least the 2009 level and to increase the average number of hours worked to at least 20.20 hours per week.  In 2012, 20 individuals were placed in competitive jobs and successfully transitioned to extended supported employment services. This was a significant increase (eight) over the previous year, but three below the goal of 23. CBVH did achieve its goal of increasing the number of hours worked by individuals in supported employment. The average weekly work hours increased from 20.20 to 21.20. While not a stated goal, wages also increased by $.24/hour to $8.26/hour in the same period.   The increase in successful outcomes is due in part to the creative efforts of CBVH and its providers to design work opportunities which can be filled by individuals with extensive functional limitations. However, it continues to be difficult to find jobs at higher wages and increased hours for this population. Employers continue to have fewer jobs available, and typically expect workers to be able to perform multiple functions.

 

 

Standards and Indicators During FY 2012, CBVH passed all of the indicators in Standard 1 and passed Standard 2. CBVH will continue to monitor progress toward meeting the Standards and Indicators for FY 14.

 

 

Innovation and Expansion Activities Based on the needs of the two loan closets that serve the entire state, CBVH purchased access software, portable CCTVs, scanning software and related items to have available for loan. These items, along with the initial stock of equipment purchased when the loan closets were established, are loaned to consumers who are ready to start a job or a college training program and are awaiting delivery of equipment purchased for them. In FY 2012, 142 individuals were served by the loan closets. In addition, CBVH did not need to use the Innovation and Expansion funds solely for the expanded loan closets.  Funds were also used for an upstate manager for business development, the CBVH pre-college program and for staff training sessions as part of the Disproportionate Minority Representation Initiative with the TACE. 

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 3:34PM by Michael Rose

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

QUALITY, SCOPE AND EXTENT OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

The Vocational Rehabilitation division of the Office of Adult Career and Continuing Education Services (ACESS-VR, formerly VESID) continues to have primary responsibility for supported employment programs and other integrated employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in New York State. A memorandum of understanding is in place covering the respective roles and responsibilities of CBVH, ACCES-VR, the Office of Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities (now Office for Persons with Developmental Disabilities – OPWDD) and the Office of Mental Health (OMH) in supported employment for consumers who are blind.

Since 1989, the number of community agencies utilizing Supported Employment Grant Funds under Title VI-B of the Rehabilitation Act to provide supported employment services to individuals who are blind has expanded from eight to 51. The grant awards stipulate adherence to all requirements set forth in Title VI-B of the Rehabilitation Act. Targeted populations include individuals with multiple disabilities who are aging out of educational programs, individuals in day treatment and long term extended employment and those who have been unable to maintain employment in integrated community settings. The "individual placement" is the prevailing model; however, this does not preclude consideration of alternatives including the "enclave" and "affirmative business." The 51 agencies are located in major cities and in suburban and rural areas across the State.

Supported employment services are delivered through the ACCES-VR contracting system, as agreed under Section 3, Chapter 515 of the Laws of New York of 1992. CBVH transfers its supported employment funds to ACCES-VR, but retains case management responsibility for individuals in the intensive service phase. Under the contract, individual agencies have agreed to serve individuals who are blind; however, limited funding and the low incidence of blindness make it difficult to accurately anticipate where supported employment funds should be allocated. This creates challenges when an individual needs services in an area not covered by a contract, or in which capacity for serving individuals who are blind has already been met.

When the individual’s work performance is actualized and the services (job coaching, adjustment counseling and advocacy) reach the lowest level necessary for the individual to maintain employment, the individual’s supported employment case is closed. Extended services provide ongoing support and can be provided by a State agency, private organization, employer, co-workers and family members, or any other source available to assist the individual to maintain employment. Under the Memorandum of Interagency Understanding Regarding Supported Employment, OMH and OPWDD provide follow-along services for individuals who meet their respective eligibility criteria.

Individuals who do not meet OMH or OPWDD criteria may receive extended services through designated ACCES-VR funds or through natural supports in the work place. Individuals in extended services may request Post Employment Services or, if necessary, ask to have their cases reopened.

Traditional vocational rehabilitation services continue to be available to supported employment candidates using Vocational Rehabilitation funds in the development as well as the execution of Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). In this regard there is no distinction from other vocational rehabilitation consumers.

Quality assurance is a matter of ongoing concern. Providers receive Guidelines for Supported Employment which are updated as needed and convey the expectations for quality services. ACCES-VR quality assurance staff, with input from CBVH and other partners, established new case review form protocols to gather information that can be used to monitor and improve services. CBVH district office staff is invited to participate in reviews of agencies in their catchment area; however, they typically participate only in reviews of agencies that are serving consumers who are blind.

The CBVH supported employment coordinator and staff regularly monitor reports and contract implementation. The coordinator regularly talks with CBVH district office, staff, contractors and state monitors to address progress and opportunities for program improvement, providing technical assistance and training as needed.

This screen was last updated on May 31 2012 10:07AM by Michael Rose

System Information

System information

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on:08/22/2013 3:25 PM

Last updated by:sanyrosem

Completed on: 08/22/2013 3:25 PM

Completed by: sanyrosem

Approved on: 09/10/2013 6:14 PM

Approved by: rsadoylej