ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

Published September 4, 2014.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Nevada Rehabilitation Division State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 (submitted FY 2013)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The Rehabilitation Division is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Director, Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Administrator, Rehabilitation Division

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryMaureen Cole

Title of SignatoryAdministrator, Nevada Rehabilitation Division

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/06/2013

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2014No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Rehabilitation Division

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

Annual Report – Recommendations for the 2012 Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) Annual Report described in Section 105(c)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act and CFR 361.17(h)(5), were received during the public meeting of the NSRC on November 27, 2012. The NSRC focused on the Strategic Goals and progress of achievement, agency collaborations and Federal Standards and Indicators for FFY12. A State Map detailing service locations along with the number of individuals who received services in each county and of those individuals the number who gained employment was included. Additionally, the DSU in conjunction with the NSRC held a contest among VR Clients for the selection of the Annual Report Cover Photograph. The winner received a $100 VISA Gift Card and a short biography was included in the report to highlight the individual’s success.

Annual Consumer Satisfaction Surveys – The review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, described in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4), was conducted by the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), Center for Research Design and Analysis and Nevada Center for Health Statistics and Informatics. At the request of the Designated State Unit (DSU) and NSRC, UNR conducted a multiple year longitudinal study of consumer satisfaction. Three consumer satisfaction survey instruments were utilized; the General Participant, Transition Student and Older Individuals Who Are Blind (OIB). The NSRC met on September 18, 2012 to obtain the results of these Surveys and to obtain information on recommendations from UNR. The NSRC recommended the findings be presented to DSU staff during the 2012 Annual In-Service Training also held in September. Additionally, the NSRC recommended the continuation of the use of gift card incentives. Contacted clients were notified that survey participants would be entered into a drawing for a chance to win one of four $50 prepaid Visa gift cards.

Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment – The NSRC and the Designated State Unit (DSU) jointly determined to award a contract to San Diego State University(SDSU), Interwork Institute to conduct a 2013 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. The Needs Assessment is scheduled to be completed on June 30, 2013 and the results will be presented to the NSRC during a public meeting on September 17, 2013. The 2010 Needs Assessment has continued to be a valuable tool and was utilized in developing and revising Strategic Goals, Strategies, and Indicators for the FFY 2014 State Plan. The NSRC and DSU anticipate utilizing the 2013 Needs Assessment to develop new Strategic Goals, Strategies and Indicators to be included in the FFY15 State Plan.

State Plan Goals – Consistent with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, the NSRC State Plan Committee, in partnership with the DSU, met in a public meeting on January 18, 2013 to develop and revise State Plan Goals with corresponding strategies and measurable indicators consistent with the recommendations, data analysis and other information revealed through the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment Report, the Customer Satisfaction Surveys, and sentiments expressed during NSRC meetings. The State Plan Goals were brought before the full Council in a public meeting on February 26, 2013 and approved by majority vote. The NSRC and DSU publicly noticed the opportunity to review proposed amendments to the FFY 14 State Plan. A public meeting was held on May 21, 2013; no public comments were made.

General NSRC input and recommendations in FFY12 included:

• The NSRC recommended that all available members continue to attend the DSU’s annual In-Service Trainings. Vocational Rehabilitation employees and NSRC members gathered in Reno, Nevada in September 2012 to attend the two day training.

• The NSRC recommended members and staff complete the newest State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) training modules focusing on Advocacy and Service Provision.

• The NSRC created a requirement that all members attend an Effective Communication Training hosted by the DSU, annually.

• During a public meeting held on July 16, 2012 the NSRC adopted policies for Equal Rights and Auxiliary Aids and Services.

• The NSRC nominated the Council Chair for attendance at the State Rehabilitation Council Forum, held June 24th – 25th.

• The NSRC recommended that the DSU continue its attempts to re-connect with Ernst and Young to explore a possible partnership. Ernst and Young teams with the Employer Assistance and Recruiting Network (EARN), a disabled veteran-owned nationwide recruiting and consultation service to promote opportunities to job candidates with disabilities.

The DSU concurred with the NSRC recommendations outlined above.

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2013 7:05PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

The Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation’s Rehabilitation Division (NRD) requests a Waiver of Statewideness for the remainder of FFY 2013. NRD has entered into interlocal agreements with sixteen (16) of the State’s school districts to outline the roles and responsibilities of each party in coordinating school district and Vocational Rehabilitation services to transition students. However, these long-standing agreements do not entail a formal financial arrangement for sharing the cost of program expansion, improvement and innovation.

NRD has entered into a new intermodal cooperative agreement with the Washoe County School District (WCSD) which will formalize the financial agreement between the parties to pool resources to provide new, more comprehensive services to eligible transition students of WCSD.   The locally developed cooperative agreement includes the following program description that exceeds the minimum requirements, as directed by mandate, and provides new or enhanced services to meet the specific needs of the eligible NRD consumers: 

Vocational Opportunities for Inclusive Career Education (VOICE)   The VOICE initiative serves secondary and post-secondary students with disabilities by facilitating the effective transition of the NRD’s and WCSD’s mutual student consumers from school to meaningful employment.    Under the cooperative agreement, NRD will assign Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, Rehabilitation Technicians and Administrative Assistants to be active members of the program team. Beginning in August, 2013, in conjunction with WCSD staff, NRD will open cases and provides enhanced VR services for VOICE participants during the two years prior to the student consumers leaving high school. Once the student has left public school, NRD will continue to work with the individuals until their Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE) are realized. The WCSD will furnish the non-Federal share of costs through certified expenditures or cash match. The certified expenditures from the school district are provided by redirected education staff providing unique patterns of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services exclusively to NRD student consumers. The school district provides training and enhanced programming exclusively to the NRD consumers to enable them to achieve employment utilizing community based vocational instruction, vocational and worksite training, job placement, work incentive wages, and follow-up services.    Utilizing leased space in Reno, NV adjacent to the northern district offices of the Vocational Rehabilitation program, WCSD will set up three classrooms and staff offices. VOICE participants still in school and participants who are out of school but still receiving public school special education services will gather at the VOICE location for vocational activities.   The proximity of the WCSD portion of the VOICE program to the assigned VR Counselor and to the VR services available at the district office will provide increased opportunities for the participants to develop professional relationships with the staff,  participate easily in planned activities, and develop peer support among the students in their group. Enhanced services include vocational assessment, career development, work experience, job search skills training, job development, placement, follow-up, and non-supported or Supported Employment job coaching. The advantage of the VOICE program is that these services are provided on a daily basis by a consistent staff presence such that lessons and behavior/attitudinal changes are reinforced, and positive momentum sustained.   Multiple work experiences, both paid and unpaid, will expose participants to a wider variety of career possibilities that is usually provide to transition students.   Additionally, VOICE participants will have the advantage of sharing their work experiences with their peers. The contracted services are not educational services that WCSD is legally mandated or required to provide. They are new, enhanced or added services and are available only to NRD consumers.   This cooperative program is not statewide due to the structure and geographical constraints of the Washoe County School District. However, NRD is in negotiations with other school districts to enter into similar cooperative agreements that will address the particular needs of the transition students in their districts and meet the federal requirements for cooperative agreements at the same time. While NRD does not have sufficient staff or budget authority to work with every potential cooperative partner and because cooperative agreements are voluntary programs, they are contingent upon the interest of the local partner agency. Should NRD enter into cooperative agreements with other school districts or other agencies, it will seek a waiver of statewideness to apply to those agreements as well. State Plan requirements apply to all services approved under any approved waiver. Additionally, NRD approves each service proposed under the waiver before it is put into effect. 

Written Assurances   The cooperative interlocal agreement contains written assurance that the cooperative partner agency will make the non-Federal share of funds available to NRD. The third-party cooperative agreement is a binding State contract that is approved by local governmental boards and the State of Nevada and is jointly signed and executed by the NRD and local governmental agency representatives prior to the delivery of services. Through the third-party cooperative agreement, local and State public agencies certify to the State, on a monthly or quarterly basis, the actual expenditure of funds that comprise the contribution of non-Federal funds. All certified match and cash match expenditures received are under the administrative supervision of NRD and no portion of the match expenditures come from Federal funds. The total cooperative agency certified expenditure share is matched to Federal funds at no less than 25%. The total cooperative agency cash match share is matched to Federal funds at no less than 21.3%. NRD has developed fiscal monitoring and reporting procedures and tools for both the NRD district staff and cooperative program contract administrators. The Rehabilitation Administration Operations unit has developed a Contractor Self-Assessment tool, and the Contract Manual provides detailed information on invoicing and supporting documentation requirements. NRD will provide annual training to local contract administrators regarding the development of contracts, and has additional training available regarding contract monitoring and invoicing. NRD also keeps data and conducts oversight of contract match and payment invoicing. This information is used to provide local technical assistance during program review site visits, on an as needed basis. If the value of the actual time certified by the cooperative agency falls below the actual total program cost, NRD reserves the right to reduce the program costs accordingly. All VR services provided to NRD consumers, through a third party cooperative agreement, are contractually identified with negotiated service goals. The provision of each vocational service is monitored and reported by the local NRD contract administrator. NRD reports and distributes the outcome goals for the VOICE program on both a quarterly and annual basis. All VR services provided under third party cooperative agreements must be authorized or otherwise approved by the VR Counselor in consultation with the NRD consumer in advance of provision of services. All DOR consumers, regardless of the service provider, are subject to the provisions of the NRD participant Policies and Procedures Manual. 

Unique Services Provided   The vocational services provided under the NRD third party cooperative agreement comply with Federal regulations requiring a unique pattern of service. (see additional discussion of the unique features of the VOICE program discussed above beginning at paragraph 3.) Specifically, the regulations require that the services provided by the cooperating agency are not the customary or typical services provided by that agency, but are new services that have a VR focus or existing services that have been modified, adapted, expanded, or reconfigured to have a VR focus. NRD has built in assurances that the third party cooperative programs will meet this Federal requirement. New programs are required to explain how the services in the proposed contract will meet this requirement when they apply for funding. Each cooperative contract also contains duty statements for staff that contrast the cooperative program functions to duties performed under their traditional agency role. Standard contract language also refers to the requirements to adhere to the Rehabilitation Act, and specifically to the requirement of a new pattern of service. The vocational services provided under NRD third party cooperative agreements comply with all provisions of the NRD State Plan, including both application and plan services.

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2013 7:06PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

The DSU has developed Interlocal Contracts with agencies external to the Workforce Investment System that are involved in serving people with disabilities. These Interlocal Contracts are designed to: 

·         Remove barriers affecting the delivery of mutually beneficial services,

·         Increase the availability of resources,

·         Eliminate duplication of services, and

·         Facilitate the development of programs and competencies.

The Interlocal Contracts include the DSU’s formal agreements with the Nevada Division of Welfare and Supportive Services (DWSS) and the Nevada Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services (MHDS). The DSU also holds Interlocal Contracts with the Section 121 Native American agencies known as the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, Moapa Band of Paiutes and Fort Mojave Indian Tribe.

The DWSS Interlocal Contract refers Welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The MHDS agreement defines the procedures for timely cross-referrals and information sharing. The agreement with MHDS also defines methods for the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs) through multi-disciplinary teams, funding of job placement and job coaching services, and the provision of extended follow-along services for people whose cases are closed with Supported Employment outcomes. Beyond these formal agreements, the DSU pursues cooperative efforts to extend the capacity of the DSU to reach and meet the needs of its diverse clientele. 

The DSU collaborates with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the Aging and Disability Services Division’s Independent Living Program allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs. As such, the DSU and the Independent Living Program (IL) amended their Interlocal Agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and Vocational Rehabilitation programs. The DSU claims the state dollars received from Independent Living as match in order to draw down federal VR dollars. 

The DSU has no programs with the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture.   The coordination of services for students with disabilities is achieved through a variety of cooperative efforts. The DSUutilizes inter-local contracts and participates in statewide and local transition technical and career education activities. Since FFY 2008, the DSU has continued its collaborative efforts by updating its Interlocal Contract with the Nevada Department of Education (NDOE) in conformance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. The NDOE is Nevada’s State Lead Educational Agency (LEA). The DSU considers the NDOE as the cornerstone for statewide collaboration, facilitating participation in local school transition activities.   Coordination with students, parents, and representatives is achieved through involving staff in consumer organizations and the participation of consumers in the DSU programs. Transition teams also participate in job fairs and other school-related events. The DSU is also represented at the statewide technical and career education planningsessions.   Parents of students with disabilities and representatives of the Nevada PEP organization have representation on the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council.   The DSU has agreements with sixteen (16) of Nevada’s school districts.  All of the agreements were updated in FFY-2012 and went into effect July 1, 2012. They reflect the intent of the NDOE Interlocal Contract for coordination of services designed to meet the educational, vocational, and independent living needs of students with disabilities. The DSUhas identified that the development of individualized relationships between rehabilitation and education staff is critical to the delivery of comprehensive services. North and south designated transition teams have been established as liaisons with the individual high school programs.

DSUstaff members actively participate in Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings and are available to provide other consultation, outreach and IEP development assistance, and informational support.   An Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is jointly developed either in consultation with the Special Education Team or directly with the consumer and/or their parent or guardian depending on the individual’s preference. The IPE is agreed to and signed before the student leaves the school by the rehabilitation counselor and the student, or the parent or guardian if the student is not of the “Age of Majority,” as mandated in CFR’s 361.22, 361.45.   The DSU’s Bureau of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI) collaborated with the Clark County School District in the assessment of assistive technologies specific to the needs of visually impaired students. BSBVI Staff participate in transition workshops to provide group and individual training of students with visual impairments.   In March 2013, the Washoe County School District (WCSD) made presentation to the DSU of a proposed inclusive career education partnership between WCSD and Northern Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation.   In the spring of 2013, the DSU developed the S.T.E.P. Program; Student Transition Employment Program.  This 3 week residential program is designed to empower visually impaired young adults by providing the tools they need to live independently within the community, in their own homes, and includes job seeking workshops to assist them in searching for and obtaining employment.  Creation of this program lessens the necessity to send individuals with these needs out of state.   In FFY 13 the DSU negotiated new contracts for Transition Coordination.  The providers chosen for Southern Nevada were AACRES and ASAP Services Inc. and pending Board of Examiners (BOE) approval the Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living for Northern Nevada with plans to expand to Rural Nevada in FFY 14. 

The DSU management and transition staff coordinates kick-off meetings with each School District in order to introduce the “Transition Connect” program and contract staff. In partnership with each school district, the DSU management staff conducts routine communication in the form of conference calls and regular meetings, in order to discuss any participant-specific need or program issue.   For several years, the DSU, in collaboration with the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), ASAP Employment Services, the Clark County School District, Rebuilding All Goals Efficiently (RAGE), University of Nevada’s Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) and Nevada Dept. of Education has provided a week long College Preparatory Summer Camp known as, Careers, Recreation and Vocational Education (CRAVE) for ten (10) transition students in the 11th and 12th grade.  This event is held at the UNLV campus.  The DSU presents the Clark County School District’s Youth Educational Success (YES) Program to the students interested in going to college. The program’s short-term goal is to assist participants in eliminating barriers so they may consider college as a future choice and the long-term goal is to increase the percentage of students attending college. The program expanded in 2012 to include students from northern and rural Nevada and students from southern Nevada. After the weeklong camp; students were offered summer employment opportunities in their field of interest with a number of local businesses.   In the summer of 2012 the DSU again partnered for the third year with the University of Nevada, Reno, Washoe County School District and The Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities to offer northern transition students the opportunity to explore their areas of vocational interest first hand. Site visits were set up and approximately sixty (60) students met with employers and had an opportunity to job shadow. On-the-Job Training opportunities were then extended to employers interested in offering this training to students.    The southern district has four full-time Rehabilitation Counselors and two Rehabilitation Technicians that work as two full time dedicated teams, coordinating transition services to Clark County School District which has forty-seven (47) high schools, charter schools and alternative learning centers. 

The northern district, which covers four (4) counties and eleven (11) high schools, has one (1) dedicated transition team comprised of a Rehabilitation Counselor III, a Rehabilitation Counselor II and a Rehab Tech. The team works with transition students in addition to carrying a caseload of specialized special education VR clients.  It is estimated that this team will successfully close fifteen (15) transition cases this next year, and will grow to a full thirty (30) cases anticipated the following year.   In Carson City, the DSU is meeting monthly to collaborate with the Lyon Co. School District, Dayton High School to provide outreach services, including Community Based Assessment (CBA) and On the Job Training (OJT) to eligible special education transition students.   In the rural district, VR hosts a monthly meeting with the Rural Regional Center to discuss clients in common or potential clients. VR also participated in a community fair for community agencies in Elko and Pahrump. Staff from VR, Rural Regional Center, Center for Independent Living, and other agencies was present to discuss their programs. The Winnemucca office counselor attends the Chamber of Commerce breakfasts. Carson City VR collaborates with the Carson Mental Health and Douglas Mental Health agencies. In the north, the District Manager sits on the Transportation Coalition Committee which is a committee to determine the needs of disabled, youth, and senior citizens on transportation. The north works closely with the Northern Nevada Literacy Council. They have participated in workshops provided by the Food Bank of Northern Nevada in developing a comprehensive community approach to reducing poverty as well as attending monthly meetings of the National Federation of the Blind.  Currently the DSU has no programs with the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture.

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2013 7:09PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

The DSU’s Rural District currently has inter-local agreements with the eleven (11) school districts it serves. Each of the five (5) rural Rehabilitation Counselors is assigned to aspecific geographical area that serves all school districts within their designated area in addition to carrying a caseload of VR clients. The DSU’s Northern and Southern Districts currently has inter-local agreements with five (5) school districts. The north and south designated transition teams have been established as liaisons with the individual high school programs. DSUstaff members actively participate in Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings and are available to provide other consultation, outreach and IEP development assistance, and informational support.

On a statewide basis, the Rehabilitation Counselors are assigned to work with Transition students at specific schools within their geographic areas. The Counselors work closely and coordinate with high school special education teachers, counselors, and transition coordinators or transition specialists to ensure that the students are referred to the DSU in a timely manner. The IPE is jointly developed either in consultation with the Special Education Team or directly with the consumer and/or their parent or guardian depending on the individual’s preference. The IPE is agreed to and signed before the student leaves the school setting by the rehabilitation counselor and the student, or the parent or guardian if the student is not of the “Age of Majority,” as mandated in CFR’s 361.22, 361.45.   The DSU’s Rehabilitation Counselors and the educational agencies work closely in an effort to ensure that transition planning is included in each student’s IEP. Throughout the state, the Rehabilitation Counselors are actively engaged in each of their school districts with Counselors assigned to specific high schools. DSU staff provides presentations on a regular basis to individual classrooms or to the schools at large regarding information on the world of work, discussing work experiences, career opportunities, job shadowing andpost- secondary educational opportunities. Transition students are referred for vocational evaluations and also often participate in Community Based Assessments. This information is shared with the student and his IEP team. The DSU staff attends IEPs when invited and provides input for meaningful transition goals and objectives leading to a successful transition from school to work. .   Procedures for outreach and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services are achieved in a variety of methods. Coordination with students, parents, and representatives is achieved through involving staff in consumer organizations and the participation of consumers in the DSU programs.   Transition teams also participate in job fairs school presentations, and other school -related events. The DSU is also represented at the statewide technical and career education planningsessions.  Another outreach method is our statewide Transition Coordinator contract. These Transition Coordinators are very active and work hand in hand as part of the overall Transition team which includes the DSU counselors, the school district staff and the students. Finally the DSU participates in an annual Transition Summit.  

In April 2006 the DSU entered into an inter-local agreement with the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE), a state-sponsored higher education system composed of the University of Nevada, Reno; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Nevada State College; College of Southern Nevada; Great Basin College; Truckee Meadows Community College; and Western Nevada College.

    The agreement, amended April 2008, outlines the roles and responsibilities of both the DSU and NSHE when providing mutual services to Transition Students. The agreement also establishes the provision of services by each entity and reimbursement to the DSU for services rendered. The process for resolving disputes regarding which entity is responsible for payment has been included. This agreement has been updated and is in effect from July 1, 2010 through June 30, 2014.   Starting in FFY 08, the DSU created an Interlocal Contract with the University of Nevada – Reno, Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) to provide assistive technology (AT) services to individuals with disabilities. This Interlocal Contract has been extended through June 30, 2014 with the intent that it will continue to be extended as long as funding is available for the project. Vocational rehabilitation and independent living participants are referred to the NCED laboratory for AT needs assessments, training, demonstrations, and hands-on trial services. The DSU provides AT equipment based on participant need after receiving recommendations from NCED. This is an Adaptive Resources Grant funded through the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS).   Should the grant lose funding, the DSU will continue to provide computer hardware and software needed to perform AT assessments and training for individuals with disabilities on a fee for service basis. The newly refurbished independent AT lab, which has the newest AT equipment, is housed at the DSU’s Reno Vocational Rehabilitation Office. In addition to traditional AT, this lab has a heavy emphasis on iDevices and other AT for the blind and visually impaired. Staff will continue training to develop internal expertise in the field of AT. The goal is to continue assessing the needs of and providing AT equipment to vocational rehabilitation participants. This collaborative also provides for assessments and training of AT for rural Nevada vocational rehabilitation participants. If needs arise that cannot be satisfied through the AT grant, VR staff will make referral to Easter Seals for additional service provision.   Currently, the DSU also refers Older Individuals Who Are Blind clients to NCED for assessment and training under a fee for service arrangement.

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2013 7:15PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

The DSU utilizes Interlocal Contracts, provider agreements and direct purchase methods to coordinate the provision of consultative, evaluative and rehabilitation services. Contracts, provider agreements and direct purchase arrangements for consultative, evaluative and rehabilitation services are based on a comparison of available service provider expertise to identify potential vendors. The DSU then negotiates a rate of payment based on the type of service and geographical location. 

The DSU directly purchases most job placement and job coaching services on a structured fee for services/milestone basis. The fee-for-service arrangements require eligible participants to meet the terms of a standard agreement for service provision, and insurance and licensing requirements. The fee-for-service payment for job development is outcome-based, wherein contractors are only paid for attaining employment objectives for each consumer assigned to them. The largest benchmark payment for job development is for attaining a 90-day competitive employment.   In the past, the cumulative fee for each successful closure has been $2000.00, paid at milestone intervals. Starting SFY 2012, the fee was increased to $3000.00, acknowledging the impact economic trends have had on the job market.  Additionally, the fees paid to vendors providing benchmarked Supported Employment Job Development services have been increased from $2000.00 to $4600.00 paid at milestone intervals.   In FFY 2013 such agreements included:     ·         Ackerman, John dab Workforce Solutions ·         American Rehabilitation Corp – Job development and placement in Clark County ·         ASAP Services – Selective job development and placement in Clark County ·         Deaf & Hard of Hearing Advocacy Resource Center, Sparks ·         Easter Seals Southern Nevada, Las Vegas ·         Elite Community Services ·         Ellsworth, Tiffany dab Empowering Life Project ·         Excentra ·         Expanding Life LLC dba Life Coaching Services, Reno ·         Goodwill Industries of Southern Nevada Inc., North Las Vegas ·         Haugen & Keck Employment Consulting – Job development and placement in Carson City and Douglas County ·         High Sierra Industries ·         Jim Callender ·         Marcinik, Sean ·         Nichols, Robert J dba Workable Choices LLC, Ely, Las Vegas ·         Opportunity Village ARC Inc. – Job development and placement in Clark County. ·         Page, John dba Las Vegas Central Foursquare ·         Preston, Barnard – Job development and placement in Clark County ·         Shaw, Grace dba Career & Life Skills Consultant ·         United Cerebral Palsy of Nevada ·         Wasula, Wendy C dba Wendy C Wasula, Las Vegas

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2013 7:17PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

The DSU has long-standing relationships with many partners both within and without the workforce system that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities and to achieve the maximum success in assisting individuals with most significant disabilities into successful employment outcomes. Current efforts are focused in building more effective partnerships and relationships with entities throughout the state that support efforts to provide the most effective outreach to identify individuals with the most significant disabilities who may benefit from Supported Employment services and to expand employment opportunities.

Supported Employment services are arranged with entities (i.e., individual employers) that provide supports on-the-job, co-workers or job coaches. Natural supports are encouraged and monitored by the Supported Employment provider. Most Supported Employment programs are found in the larger counties: Clark and Washoe. Supported Employment opportunities in the rural counties come largely from individual employers utilizing natural supports.   In addition, starting in June 2011, DSU, Nevada Center for Excellence in Disability (NCED) and the Sierra Regional Center formalized a contract to identify and serve co-eligible individuals who are most significantly disabled and in need of Supported Employment services. Services include extensive interest inventory, video resume, community based assessment, job carving, job coaching, and all required follow along through successful closure.   To date, over sixty-five (65) individuals have been referred to this program, and of those who have achieved successful employment all remain employed.  Many others are in job development and identifying specific work sites.  These services will be much more individualized and intensive than the traditional model.  The fee for each placement will be $5400.00, recognizing the impact of this economy and the historic challenges those with cognitive disabilities have faced in the workplace.  Though more expensive, it is worthy to note that 100 percent of those placed, remain employed.   While this program began as a demonstration program, it has evolved into an outreach and marketing tool the agency has used to educate employers, service providers and the public regarding the employment potential of individuals with significant disabilities.  Vignettes from the video resumes of program participants have been featured in many television programs, marketing materials, and conference presentations.   Other sources of potential funding for Supported Employment have been identified. They are:   ·               Social Security Work Incentives-Plan for Achieving Self-Support (PASS) and Impairment Related Work Expenses (IRWE). ·               Diversion of JDT (Jobs in Day Training/Waiver) funding for pre-vocational training ·               Natural Supports.   Starting in January 2013, the DSU entered into a vendor relationship with a community rehab program; High Sierra Industries (HSI) and the Sierra Regional Center (SRC).  The regional center agreed to divert JDT/Waiver funding for identified individuals in CRP’s to utilize those funds to pay for pre-vocational, soft-skills training to make them better candidates for competitive/non-sheltered employment outcomes through BVR.  This collaboration is a notable shift in the conventional wisdom for what was considered an acceptable employment outcome for individuals with these disabilities.   Additionally, there are several agencies within the community that provide the needed long term support to participants that have been identified and meet the criteria for Supported Employment. Depending on the participant’s severity of cognitive disability they would be referred to one of three community agencies for this service.   1.      Desert Regional Center, Las Vegas, Nevada Sierra Regional Center, Reno, Nevada Rural Regional Centers: Carson City, Gardnerville, Fallon, Winnemucca, Elko, Nevada   If a participant has a diagnosis of a developmental disability, the agencies listed above would provide long term follow along for eligible DSU participants. They receive community training funds, which allow them to open cases and provide long term, follow along services for the duration of their employment needs. Rehabilitation counselors coordinate services with Regional Center case managers to ensure that this connection is made before the participant’s case is closed as successfully employed.   2.      Southern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services, Las Vegas, Nevada; Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services, Reno, Nevada

Rural Clinics Community Mental Health Centers: Carson City, Gardnerville, Silver Springs, Fallon, Elko, Ely, Battle Mountain, Lovelock, Caliente and Winnemucca, Nevada   When mental illness has been identified as the disability and it is determined that the rehabilitation participant meets the criteria for Supported Employment, the Rehabilitation Counselor will work with public and private mental health service providers to assist in obtaining long-term supported services.   3.   Natural Supports: When Supported Employment participants do not meet the eligibility requirements for one of the above community resources for long-term support, rehabilitation counselors will identify other natural supports that can be utilized. Often family members, such as parents, siblings, or spouses can assist. Also, members of various advocacy groups may serve as a natural support. Counselors may work closely with the employer to identify a coworker who can provide the long term follow along and supportive services that an individual may require to retain successful employment.

This screen was last updated on Jul 22 2013 12:06PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

The Rehabilitation Division, as the DSU, has established the following procedures and activities setting forth the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD), which will ensure an adequate supply of qualified Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the operation of the vocational Rehabilitation programs.

The CSPD is coordinated by the Administrator of the DSU with the participation of: the Nevada State Rehabilitation (NSRC); Human Resources staff of the Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation (DETR); and staff of the Bureaus of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR) and Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI).   1a.  Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development   DETR’s personnel records enable an annual analysis of the numbers and types of Rehabilitation personnel. Through the State of Council Nevada Personnel Department database, information on budgeted positions, duration of vacancy for each position and vacancy rates are available through a data warehouse system.   In addition, a personnel log is maintained at the agency level, delineating the location, type of position and date vacated, in order to provide current tracking of vacancies including the status of each vacant position. This tracking mechanism has proved successful in reducing the vacancy rate and the amount of time that each position is vacant. All the sources of information are used to track and forecast the DSU’s personnel needs.   Assuming an overall vacancy rate (for all reasons) for Rehabilitation Counselors and Technicians is 10% and taking into account the number of other personnel expected to retire or leave the field and other relevant factors, the DSU will need replace sixty-one (61) vacated positions in the next five (5) years.   The DSU had five-thousand-seven hundred-ninety-seven (5,797) applications and eligible individuals with disabilities (this number includes carry-overs) in FFY 2012, including individuals with significant disabilities. The ratio of authorized Rehabilitation Counselor positions serving the vocational rehabilitation program (45 FTEs) in Nevada was one (1) Rehabilitation Counselor to one-hundred-twenty-nine (129) program participants.   The following projection for personnel needs is based on the projected population increase for Nevada, applying that same increase to the vocational rehabilitation participant numbers served, as depicted in the following chart: 

  FFY Population Increase *DeterminedEligible(By Year)Applications andEligibilities (WithCarry Overs)VR Counselor Projection (1 to129 Participants)VR Technician Projection (1 to 2 Counselors)
2012 2,8145,7974529
20131.2%2,8485,8674529
20141.3%2,8855,9434629
20151.3%2,9236,0204729
20161.3%2,9616,0984729
20171.3%2,9996,1774829

*          Based on data obtained from the State Demographer’s Office (Nevada County Population Projections 2012 – 2031).   This ratio of Rehabilitation Counselor to participants is in the mid-range as compared to other VR agencies. The current caseload average statewide is sixty-seven (67) participants per one (1) Rehabilitation Counselor. The current staffing levels are sufficient for the number of participants seeking services, as evidenced by the low average caseload and the fact that the DSU passed five (5) of the seven (7) Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) performance indicators for FFY 2012.   1b.  Projections of the Number and Type of Personnel Needed in Five Years   The DSU anticipates that a minimum of forty-eight (48) counseling positions will be necessary to achieve the goals of increased services and successful employment outcomes. The DSU currently employs forty-five (45) counselors.   The DSU will need to hire a total of three (3) additional Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors in the next five (5) years; however the DSU will not need to hire any additional Rehabilitation Technicians.  These projections for the next five (5) years will be sufficient to provide services to all individuals with disabilities including those with the most significant disabilities.    Currently there are eight (8) Vocational Rehabilitation supervisors, each of whom may supervise up to eight (8) direct reports. With the increase in Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, eight (8) supervisors will be sufficient to provide the oversight necessary to ensure quality services to individuals with disabilities. Current staffing levels for Account Clerks, Administrative Assistants, Rehabilitation Instructors, Vocational Evaluators, and administrative staff will not require an increase in the next five (5) years. This is an area that Rehab Administration is exploring for best use of personnel allocations. Positions may be reclassified in the future.   The number of qualified personnel for VR is allocated in biennial legislative sessions based on the projected needs of the DSU and available funding. In FFY 2012 there were 137 positions (including vacancies) within the DSU to provide support, administration and vocational rehabilitation services with the following breakdown:

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Administratorand Deputy Administrator 3 0 2
2 Rehab and Disability Employment Policy Chief 2 0 0
3 Rehabilitation Manager and Supervisor 10 0 4
4 Rehabilitation Counselor 45 7 25
5 Rehab and Orientation / Mobility Instructor 6 1 2
6 Vocational Evaluator and Program Officer 6 0 2
7 Rehabilitation Technician 31 1 15
8 Business Process and Management Analyst 6 1 0
9 Administrative Assistant and Workforce Rep 17 4 8
10 Accounting, QC Specialist and Intern 11 0 3

 

Historically, not since the 1990’s have any of Nevada’s institutions of higher education offered Council On Rehabilitation Education (CORE)-accredited programs for Vocational Rehabilitation professionals. 

In response to this need, the DSU has begun formal conversations with the University of Nevada Reno to develop a CORE-accredited master’s degree program in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling.   Currently, all DSU Rehabilitation Counselors have Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) credentials or are eligible to sit for the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) national examination, with the exception of one counselor who is enrolled in a CORE-accredited Master’s degree program. This one Rehabilitation Counselor has thirty-six (36) months from the date of hire to meet the standards. The following provides information regarding the status of the number of staff completing their certifications:   ·                 The southern district’s Rehabilitation Counselor I has been stationed in the DSU’s main Westbay office. She is progressing through her coursework at Southern University of Baton Rouge and anticipates submitting her paperwork to CRCC to be determined eligible to sit for the CRC in July 2013.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Southern University of Baton Rouge 1 0 0 1
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

Since 1994, the DSU and San Diego State University (SDSU) have collaborated on Nevada’s CSPD. Nevada’s CSPD applies an integrated human resources systems approach which is described below in the sections on personnel standards and personnel development. The DSU has also strengthened recruitment efforts through contact and discussion with SDSU and other CORE-accredited universities and colleges that provide Masters’ degrees in rehabilitation counseling, resulting in improvement of Nevada’s access to qualified Rehabilitation professionals. The DSU and SDSU have also built on this foundation by offering distance education opportunities to Rehabilitation Counselors for continuing education credits.

The DSU works closely with Nevada Department of Personnel and the DSA’s Human Resources Section to recruit and hire qualified personnel for positions within the Division. The DSU currently has seven (7) vacant Rehabilitation Counselor positions statewide. The DSU has offered specialized training through the SDSU Interwork Institute program for Rehabilitation Counselors. The training focuses on emerging trends and the following topics:    ·         Social Security: SSI, SSDI, PASS and Ticket to Work ·         Job Analysis in Rehabilitation Services ·         Benefits Planning & Work Incentives ·         Tools for Developing Successful Placements ·         Positive Employment Outcomes via Partnership Development ·         Transition-Work After High School ·         Mental Health and Co-Occurring Disabilities in Employment ·         Develop Meaningful Employer Relationship-Positive Placements ·         Building Relationships in the Business World/VR as a diversity tool for business ·         Supported Employment, Job Carving and Customized Employment   In conjunction with SDSU, the DSU has developed an “e-rehab” learning tool. This is an online training for Rehabilitation Counselors. The online curriculum consists of nine (9) modules, and at the end of each module there is a quiz. Upon successful completion of each module, individuals can achieve a certificate that is applicable for continuing education units with the national Certified Rehabilitation Counselor program. In addition to the Counselor “e-rehab” training tool the DSU is also developing an “e-rehab” tool for job developers and job coaches. This curriculum consists of four (4) training modules.   ·         Nevada Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor Training.  The series modules are the following: Module 1:  Overview, Key Values and Concepts Module 2:  Informed Choice Module 3:  Decision Making and Ethics Module 4:  Determining Eligibility Module 5:  Assessment of Vocational Needs Module 6:  IPE/Provision of Services Module 7:  Job Readiness and Employment Module 8:  Case Closure Module 9:  Case Management and Case Documentation.   ·         NV DETR Job Development Training Series:  Creating Employment Opportunities. The modules in the series are the following: Module 1:  Introduction to Job Development and the Role of the Job Developer Module 2:  Getting to Know Your Customer Module 3:  The Employer as Partner Module 4:  Job Placement and Retention Services.   The DSU is also in contact with SDSU to provide updated specialized training for Rehabilitation Technicians employed by the Division, and have established an Academy for Rehabilitation Supervisors. Additionally, the DSU worked in conjunction with SDSU’sTechnical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) to have several trainings in calendar year 2013 provided by TACE Coordinator on the following topics:   ·         Mediation and Conflict Resolution ·         Community Resources/Relationships ·         Ethics ·         Rehabilitation Supervisor Academy ·         Staff Self-Care   The DSU regularly contacts and/or visits CORE-accredited programs including those closest to Nevada, such as the California State University (Fresno and Sacramento campuses), Arizona State University, and Utah State University for recruitment prospects, outreach and internships. Additionally, the RehabNet, PET-RA contacts, and CSAVR listserves extend recruitment opportunities.    The DSU provides outreach through disability groups and organizations serving individuals from minority populations. The DSU also dedicates funding for the provision of reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities who need assistance to perform the essential functions of their jobs. Examples include interpreters, flexible work schedules and assistive technology. The DSU continues to seek funding resources for education-related costs and has received in-service training grants from the U.S. Department of Education to help support the ongoing education program. In the DSU’s Southern District, a designated Rehabilitation Technician assists with transporting two Rehabilitation Counselor Instructors with a vision disability to various program-related work sites and participant-related meetings. In addition, at the annual In-Service and at special sessions throughout the year, the Quality Assurance Team provided Effective Communication Training to all staff members.   The DSU currently has two (2) full-time paid interns located in Las Vegas at the Westbay office.   Public Service Interns are enrolled in a program of post graduate study and assist the regular staff in performing the duties required in carrying out the purpose and function of the unit. They must possess a Bachelor’s degree related to the field of employment and be enrolled with continued successful performance in an academic graduate program of Vocational Rehabilitation at an accredited college or university. 

 

The DSU has established policies and procedures to ensure that professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained.

The State of Nevada does not have state-approved or other recognized certification, licensing, or registration requirements that apply to personnel who are providing Vocational Rehabilitation services. The determination of applicants who are qualified Rehabilitation staff is based on State Department of Personnel’s interpretation of the Division’s minimum qualifications.   The Nevada Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation Director appoints the Administrator based on the requirements of Nevada Revised Statute (NRS) 232.945. The Administrator serves at the pleasure of the Director. The current Administrator attained a Bachelor’s in History & Political Science from the University of Nevada, Reno and a law degree from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon. Her employment history includes the Peace Corps in Venezuela, South America; the Nevada Equal Rights Commission; Equal Employment Opportunity Officer for DETR; Administrator of the State Job Training Office; Equal Opportunity and Training Manager for the City of Reno; Washoe Affordable Housing; and the Business Enterprises of Nevada program before becoming Nevada’s Rehabilitation Division Administrator. The DSU currently has one (1) Division Administrator position statewide.   The DSU hires or promotes the Deputy Administrators who meet the minimum standards as set by the State of Nevada. The Deputy Administrators must have a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university in business or public administration, education, human services or other relevant field and five (5) years of experience supervising and managing comprehensive, complex programs and budgets, and professional personnel. Entry level knowledge includes a working knowledge of principles and methods of administration and management including budget and personnel administration and staff development, coordination and supervision, principles and techniques used in planning, organizing, developing and administrating comprehensive programs which are subject to unprecedented circumstances, strategic and program planning principles and practices, State Legislative processes to include drafting legislative bills and position statements; state and federal laws, regulations and administrative processes.  One of the current Deputy Administrators oversees Operations and has a Bachelor’s Degree and is a Certified Public Manager (CPM), and the other oversees Program Services, and has a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation, CRC Certification and has achieved PET-RA Certification.  The DSU currently has two (2) Deputy Administrator positions statewide,   The DSU hires or promotes the Chief who also possesses current national certification or is eligible to sit for the national examination, in addition to meeting the minimum standards for three years management and supervisory experience in vocational rehabilitation including responsibility for program planning, development and implementation, interpretation and application of regulations, budget development and managing professional personnel. The Chief must have a working knowledge of quality management; effective change management; programmatic and operational aspects of related agencies at local, regional and national levels; program policies and procedures; and, state budget development and monitoring processes. The Chief is CRCC certified and meets the minimum standards. The Chief is also a Certified Public Manager (CPM). The DSU currently has one (1) Chief of Program Services position statewide.   The DSU hires or promotes the Chief of the Office of Disability Employment Policy who has at minimum a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with a major in business or a field of social science, or related field and at least 3 years of managerial experience.  Responsibilities include program planning, interpreting and applying regulations and managing personnel.  Under the working title of Business Development Manager, the DSU has utilized this position to develop a program and protocol to reach out to business to educate employers on the benefits of hiring persons with disabilities.  The Chief has a bachelor of science from an accredited university and many years of successful entrepreneurial experience and economic development at the State level.  The DSU currently has one (1) Chief of the Office of Disability Employment Policy position statewide.   The DSU hires or promotes Rehabilitation District Managers who possess current national certification or are eligible to sit for the national examination, in addition to meeting the minimum standards for two (2) years management and supervisory experience in vocational Rehabilitation. He/she must have a working knowledge of federal and state laws and regulations applicable to programs for persons with disabilities; principles and practices of management and public administration; program development, implementation and evaluation; budget development and administration; social, economic, educational and vocational trends including high demand occupations and related labor market demand; principles of organizational structure, analysis and design; medical, social, vocational, psychological and independent living needs of persons with disabilities; state and federal trends impacting programs and services.  Both of the current District Managers are CRCC certified.  The DSU currently has two (2) District Manager positions statewide.     The DSU hires or promotes Rehabilitation Supervisors who possess current national certification or are eligible to sit for the national examination, in addition to meeting the minimum standards for one-year management and supervisory experience in vocational rehabilitation. National certification standards require supervision by individuals who hold current credentials. To provide a mechanism to attract Rehabilitation counselor interns and enable current Rehabilitation professional staff to qualify for national certification, Nevada employs supervisory personnel who hold these credentials. Currently, all supervisory staff is CRCC certified or are eligible to sit for the CRCC exam and meet the minimum qualifications. The DSU currently has eight (8) Rehabilitation Supervisor positions statewide.   The DSU appoints individuals as Rehabilitation counselors who:   a)      Have a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling from a CORE-accredited program and who are eligible to sit for the national certification examination; or   b)      Have a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling that was not fully accredited by CORE at the time the applicant’s degree was granted and who are eligible to sit for the national certification examination; or   c)      Have a Master’s degree granted by a college or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting body at the time the degree was conferred and who are eligible to sit for the national certification examination.   d)     Have a Master’s degree granted by a college or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting body at the time the degree was conferred and who can achieve eligibility to sit for the national certification examination by committing to an approved Employee Educational Plan (EEP) within 90 days of the date of hire and completing the necessary EEP coursework, at employee expense, within 36 months of the date of hire.   e)      As stated above, Nevada is currently working with and looking to recruit students from over the nation’s CORE approved universities that offer a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling for paid internships with the DSU. The salaried paid internship allows DSU to attract and recruit candidates for VR Counselor positions who have a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation while they are still in school and before they are recruited by other agencies. While interns are working with the DSU, they accrue sick days and vacation days and receive health insurance, group life insurance and other employee benefits at the date of hire. When completing said internship, they can, if there are vacant positions available, move into a Rehabilitation Counselor II position within the DSU provided that they meet all hiring requirements. This change adds an additional employment incentive for Public Service Intern candidates to choose to work for Nevada’s DSU. The DSU currently has forty-five (45) Rehabilitation Counselor positions statewide.   It is the preference of the DSU to hire Rehabilitation teaching staff, which includes Orientation and Mobility Instructors and Rehabilitation Instructors who must:   a)      Hold a Master’s degree in a Rehabilitation related field (e.g. rehabilitation counseling, rehabilitation orientation and mobility, rehabilitation teaching, low vision specialist) granted by a college or university accredited by a regional accrediting body at the time the degree was conferred and are eligible to sit for the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals (ACVREP) certification examination; or   b)      Hold a Bachelor’s degree in a rehabilitation related field (e.g. rehabilitation counseling, teacher of the visually impaired, rehabilitation teaching, low vision specialist) and a minimum of one year of training and/or employment as an Orientation and Adjustment Instructor working with individuals who are blind or visually impaired and who hold ACVREP certification or are eligible for certification; or   c)      Hold an initial or renewable professional certification in Rehabilitation Teaching or Orientation and Mobility from the ACVREP.   The DSU currently has four (4) Orientation & Mobility instructor positions and three (3) Rehabilitation Instructor positions statewide.   The DSU hires or promotes Vocational Evaluators who have a Master’s degree in Vocational Rehabilitation with emphasis on vocational evaluation; or have a Bachelor’s degree in vocational rehabilitation or vocational evaluation and one year of professional experience providing vocational assessment and work adjustment services for injured workers and clients with disabilities in a rehabilitation setting. The Vocational Evaluators meet the minimum qualifications. The DSU currently has five (5) Vocational Evaluator positions statewide.   The DSU paraprofessional staff has the job title, Rehabilitation Technician. Minimum qualifications at the Rehabilitation Technician II level include one year of experience in a rehabilitation setting, which involves interactive relationships with individuals with disabilities. All Rehabilitation Technicians have met the minimum qualifications.  The DSU currently has thirty-two (32) Rehabilitation Technician positions statewide.   The DSU hires or promotes Management Analysts (MA). All Management Analysts meet the minimum qualifications:   a)      The MAIII must have a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent and three (3) years of professional experience in research, development, evaluation, or revision of programs, organizations, methods, or procedures. He/she must have a general knowledge of financial statements and statistical methods required to analyze, project and present fiscal effects; governmental accounting, auditing, financial reporting and/or research/statistical methods.   b)      The MAII must have a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent and two (2) years of professional experience in development, evaluation, or revision of programs, organizations, methods, or procedures. He/she must have a working knowledge of legislative proceedings and processes; state government agencies, resources and functions sufficient to locate and obtain needed information and/or resources.   c)      The MAI must have a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent and one year of professional experience in development, evaluation, or revision of programs, organizations, methods or procedures. He/she must have a general knowledge of research and analysis techniques and methodologies; governmental accounting and budgeting; management and public administration concepts; principles and practices sufficient to assist in evaluating, developing and recommending effective administrative and/or operational policies and procedures for the work unit; and various computer software including word processing, spreadsheet and database applications.   The DSU currently has four (4) Management Analyst positions statewide.   The DSU hires or promotes Business Process Analysts (BPA). Business Process Analysts meet the minimum qualifications:   a)      The BPA II must have a Bachelor’s degree and two (2) years of professional level experience in a related program area analyzing, interpreting, and implementing program laws, regulations, policies and procedures, which include one (1) year of experience applying recognized data processing concepts to business process planning or analyses or equivalent and have a working knowledge of system documentation principles; data processing concepts including general database, system security, data communication, and multiple platform strengths and weaknesses; and, business process planning and analysis.   b)      The BPA I must have a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent and two (2) years of professional level experience in a related program area analyzing, interpreting, and implementing program laws, regulations, policies and procedures, which includes one (1) year of experience applying recognized data processing concepts to business process planning or analyses or equivalent and have a working knowledge of a variety of end-user tools and applications and DETR policies and procedures in relation to other departments, agencies, organizations and business customers.   The DSU currently has two (2) Business Process Analyst positions statewide.   The DSU hires or promotes a Program Officer (PO) who has a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent and one year of professional experience in development, evaluation, or revision of programs, organizations, methods or procedures. He/she must have a general knowledge of principles and practices sufficient to assist in evaluating, developing and recommending effective administrative and/or operational policies and procedures for the work unit; and various computer software including word processing, spreadsheet and database applications. The DSU currently has one (1) Program Officer position statewide.   The DSU hires or promotes Administrative Assistants (AA). All Administrative Assistants meet the minimum qualifications:   a)      The AAIV must have graduated from high school or equivalent and have four (4) years of progressively responsible relevant work experience which included experience in one (1) or more of the following areas: providing administrative/program support to professional staff and management; performing secretarial duties in support of a manager; coordinating communications between the manager, staff and program clientele; supervision of subordinate staff; researching information from internal and external sources and sufficient working knowledge of software. He/she must have a working knowledge of functions and operation of an administrative office and/or program area, principles of supervision and training if applicable to the assignment, maintenance of budget and financial records if applicable to the assignment.   b)      The AAIII must have graduated from high school or equivalent and have three (3) years of progressively responsible relevant work experience which included experience in one (1) or more of the following areas: maintenance of complex records and files; public/customer relations including explaining detailed policies, regulations and requirements; preparation and processing of financial and statistical documents such as payroll, travel, claims and budgeting forms; and assisting staff and management with projects and activities. He/she must have a working knowledge of functions and operation of an administrative assistant; operation and use of word processing; spreadsheet, database management and other associated business.   c)      The AAII must have graduated from high school or equivalent and have two (2) years of progressively responsible relevant work experience which included experience in one (1) or more of the following areas; maintaining records and files; preparing a variety of materials using a personal computer or word processor; assisting customers in completing forms and applications; and or performing secretarial duties in support of professional staff. He/she must have a working knowledge of administrative support functions.   d)     The AAI must have graduated from high school or equivalent and have one (1) year of progressively responsible, relevant work experience which included experience in one (1) or more of the following areas; maintaining records, answering telephones, and reviewing forms, documents and other written materials. He/she must have a working knowledge of standard office procedures, practices and methods; word processing software; data entry techniques; record keeping techniques; and telephone etiquette.   The DSU currently has nineteen (19) Administrative Assistant positions statewide.   The DSU hires or promotes a Workforce Services Representative IV. The Work force Services Representative must have graduated from high school or equivalent and must have (3) years of employment services experience. Responsibilities include interviewing job seeking customers to gather education and work history information or job requirements from business customers; evaluating job seeking customer’s education and qualifications and applying that knowledge of occupational requirements and labor market conditions to develop appropriate job matching opportunities between the RAISON and One Stop Operating System data bases.   The DSU currently has one (1) Workforce Services Representative position statewide.   The DSU hires or promotes Accounting Assistants who meet the minimum qualifications:     a)       The Accounting Assistant III positions must have graduated from high school or equivalent education and three (3) years of progressively responsible clerical accounting experience which included duties such as responsibility for accounts payable, accounts receivable, payroll and/or other accounting data; setting up computer spreadsheets to record, track, manipulate and report data; researching and interpreting financial data to prepare reports and respond to budget and account-related inquiries; and reconciling accounts.  He/she must have a knowledge of clerical accounting principles, practices and techniques, budgeting and funding regulations, practices and procedures; payroll, accounts payable and accounts receivable functions sufficient to recognize discrepancies, inconsistencies and errors and complete the required documents and procedures to make corrections; computer spreadsheet techniques sufficient to record, track, manipulate and report data.   b)      The Accounting Assistant II positions must have graduated from high school or equivalent education and three (3) years of progressively responsible clerical accounting experience which included duties such as coding documents to distribute funds; preparing accounts payable and accounts receivable documents; using computer spreadsheets to record, track, manipulate and report data; balancing accounts; and identifying and applying established financial or record keeping procedures. He/she must have a working knowledge of accounting coding used to distribute funds in payroll, accounts receivable and accounts payable bookkeeping; use of computer spreadsheets to track, manipulate and record accounting related data, payroll accounts payable and accounts receivable functions; correct English usage, spelling punctuation and grammar sufficient to write standard memoranda, letters and report narratives; standard processes, procedures and methods used to reconcile accounts. c)       The Accounting Assistant I positions must have graduated from high school or equivalent education and one (1) year of clerical experience, six months of which included accounts payable and/or accounts receivable responsibility; and the use of computer spreadsheets and a calculator by touch. He/she must have a general knowledge of clerical accounting and financial record keeping procedures; the use of accounting codes for the distribution of funds for payroll, accounts receivable and accounts payable bookkeeping; accounts payable and receivable procedures; computer spreadsheets used for bookkeeping and accounts maintenance.   The DSU currently has seven (7) Accounting Assistant positions statewide.   The DSU has created a new Quality Assurance Team. The DSU hires or promotes Quality Control Specialists with the following individual minimum qualifications:   a)      Quality Control Specialist II: Master’s in Rehabilitation Counseling, Certified Rehabilitation Counselor, 18 years’ experience in public a Vocational Rehabilitation agency as Counselor, Supervisor and Quality Control Specialist   b)      Quality Control Specialist I: Bachelor’s Degree, 8 1/2 years’ experience in a public Vocational Rehabilitation agency as Rehabilitation Technician and Quality Control Specialist.   The DSU currently has two (2) Quality Control Specialist positions statewide.   The DSU hires or promotes Public Service Interns who are enrolled in a program of post graduate study. Public Service Interns assist the regular staff in performing the duties required in carrying out the purpose and function of the unit. This may include support in administration of the program, serving clientele, or conducting research. Interns receive instruction from staff; observe and apply agency methods, practices, and procedures to activities and projects. They may assist staff in experimental and research work, gather and analyze data and prepare reports summarizing conclusions. They must possess a Bachelor’s degree related to the field of employment and be enrolled with continued successful performance in an academic graduate program of Vocational Rehabilitation at an accredited college or university. They must possess a general knowledge of the principles and practices of Vocational Rehabilitation and the ability to compose reports of work activities. The DSU currently has two (2) Public Service Interns.   All employees are provided Work Performance Standards evaluations by supervisors, at a minimum, of one (1) time per year, 3 times a year during the first year of employment. Each Rehabilitation Counselor receives an annual employee appraisal of which 20% to 25% of their case load is reviewed. Additionally, twice yearly the Quality Assurance Team monitors and conducts the statewide case reviews and quarterly they conduct targeted case reviews. These reviews are conducted in order to monitor case management, federal and state performance indicators, vocational counseling services, eligibility and ineligibility determination, and management of case expenditures. During weekly budget and program meetings, administration meets to discuss regarding vacant positions and projected funding for additional positions if needed for the Division are addressed. At monthly and quarterly Management and Supervisory meetings, ideas regarding hiring projections, or in-process recruitments, are discussed to ensure that qualified persons are hired. This continues to be a priority topic. 

 

Educational opportunities are provided by the DSU to increase the technician’s capacity to effectively serve and interact with consumers and to provide technical support to the Rehabilitation counselor.

The DSU established a system for the continuing education of Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals. It has maintained its comprehensive provision of educational assistance to ensure that all personnel who do not meet the personnel standards described previously are provided opportunities to achieve these standards.   The DSU’s training priorities and educational strategies are driven by the counselor needs assessment data. These needs assessments are collected from staff and supervisor; managers and administration review them for upcoming training needs. Also, each staff are evaluated individually yearly for their work performance and are required to complete a Developmental Training Plan for the upcoming year. They can list training requests for assistance with role performance, professional maintenance, and career development. The DSU provides a training calendar and staff can request training through the DSU, DETR and/or the State of Nevada Department of Personnel.    The DSU has an ongoing working/training relationship with Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Region IX and have instituted the following trainings:   ·                  PET-RA; ·                  Academy for Rehabilitation Supervisors; ·                  Rehabilitation Technician Training; and ·                  Ongoing quarterly training provided in person/statewide by TACE Region IX.   Topics include: Mediation and Conflict Resolution, Community Resources/Relationships, Ethics, Rehabilitation Supervisor Academy, Job Placement/Job Development, Supported Employment, Staff Self-Care and ongoing disability topic specific training.   In addition, DSU staff attends the California State University, Northridge (CSUN) Annual International Technology and Persons with Disabilities Conference to receive training and exposition in rehabilitation technology. DSU staff also receives specialized training in this area through program partners such as Easter Seals of Nevada and the University of Nevada – Reno, Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED). The DSU and NCED are expanding Rehabilitation Technology training in the North to include 8 formal staff trainings from September 2013 through May 2014.    The Administrator and Deputy Administrator of Operations have successfully completed the San Diego State University Interwork Institute’s National Rehabilitation Leadership Institute (NRLI) Executive Leadership Seminar. This four-part course is offered over a period of eighteen (18) months for State directors, senior administrators, and emerging leaders. Three (3) of the courses are provided at the SDSU campus and one course is provided at The George Washington University in Washington DC. The seminars build sequentially on one another and serve as a four-part developmental learning process. The one-on-one executive coaching component, provided throughout the course of the NRLI experience, allows participants to customize their learning around the 360-degree feedback information and the goals identified in their Leadership Development Plan. Both Deputy Administrators and the Administrator have completed the NRLI program.   A Rehabilitation Supervisor recently completed the Certified Managers Program offered through the State of Nevada, Department of Personnel in March 2013. This is a two (2) year program to support and grow professional leadership in State employees through coursework and a cap-stone project which is designed to identify and create a process improvement that will save the State money. Three (3) Rehabilitation Division staff submitted their applications for the next class beginning in summer 2013.   The Quality Assurance (QA) Team, which was established as a result of a need identified in the 2008 Rehabilitation Services Administration Report, has established an internal statewide case review monitoring schedule.  The team facilitated the comprehensive State Wide Case Reviews held in November, 2012. In addition the QA Team conducted two (2) additional targeted case reviews in January 2013 and March 2013 which evaluated the agency in specific areas (e.g. Eligibility Determinations, and Determining VR Services).  They also added, a targeted review specifically for Transition cases in fall 2012, they began training on Ethics, Supported Employment and Policies and Procedures for job developers and Job Coaches. For all DSU staff, the team has provided training in the following: Effective Communication (Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended Section 504, Americans with Disabilities Act Title II. Subtitle A), Policies and Procedures Highlights (overview of changes to the P&P manual), Over view of VR Process. Specifically for new counselors, training was offered in Eligibility Determination, Informed Choice, AVRN/IPE Development and Case Documentation.   The QA Team provides staff instructional material before each targeted review to ensure staff understands their responsibilities in these areas, and a report of findings after each review. The QA Team also provides formal classroom instruction, in conjunction with the State Wide Case Review, in key areas such as eligibility determinations, assessment of vocational needs, informed choice, case documentation, case movement and progress, as well as training for supervising counselors on the basics of completing supervisory reviews of case files.

 

The DSU utilizes staff and a variety of interpreters as the need arises in order to translate documents to Spanishand to facilitate communication.  The northern and rural district have a number of bilingual staff who provide service to the northern region of Nevada, including a Rehabilitation Technician and Administrative Assistant stationed at the main Corporate Office. The southern district has a number of bilingual staff who provides services to the Las Vegas community.  The DSU provides services to Spanish speaking consumers in each of the BVR office locations.  The Southern District has two (2) bilingual staff stationed in the main southern field.  The North Las Vegas JobConnect office and has a bilingual Rehabilitation Technician, and the West Charleston office which has one (1) Rehabilitation Counselor and one (1) Rehabilitation Technician who are bilingual.  When needed, the DSU regularly contracts with bilingual interpreters when providing services.  The DSU has a total of eight (8) Spanish speaking employees Statewide.

The DSU has set requirements for field staff working with specific disability and/or minority groups to have skills in sign language, Braille, foreign languages, or other modes of communication. Additionally, the DSU has staff that can provide translation/interpretation services for clients who speak German, French, Thai, Filipino and Mandarin Chinese. Requirements also include the ability to conduct outreach activities and knowledge and skills in the culture of the specific group served. If DSU personnel are unavailable, the services of vendors or volunteers from community agencies are purchased or contracted, as needed, to communicate in the native language(s) or to communicate via sign language, of applicants and eligible individuals. Currently, the DSU has hired one (1) Rehabilitation Technician who uses American Sign Language in the Southern District, and received her certification in March 2013.   The DSU remains compliant with all directives and guidance from the Office for Civil Rights. The agency has developed policy regarding communication with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. 

 

The activities, which are carried out under this system of personnel development are coordinated with the provisions for personnel development required under the IDEA as evidenced by the following efforts:

a.  The Nevada DSU and the Nevada Department of Education, Office of Special Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and School Improvement Programs have an Interlocal Contract, which contains provisions for the joint training of vocational Rehabilitation staff and special education personnel.   b.  The DSU currently is working with the School Districts to provide for joint in-service training coordinated by local vocational rehabilitation offices. The local offices work with special education departments and technical and career education programs for the establishment of pre-vocational coordinated activities. Future plans include an increased effort for outreach to all students with disabilities, including students with disabilities who are not enrolled in special education.   c.  In the Rural District, VR is providing work readiness training at Battle Mountain High School; Community Based Assessment Training and On the Job Training with Lowry High School in Winnemucca; services working with the high schools in Wells and Wendover; vocational counseling and guidance for potential training for college with the Indian tribe in Owyhee; and is work closely with the Transition Service Coordinator.  In Carson City, three (3) students have been working in a Community Based Assessment at Western Nevada College.   i.   BSBVI staff provides ongoing assistive technology training in southern Nevada for special education teachers so that they can provide this training to students who are blind or visually impaired.   ii.  Statewide, BSBVI and BVR staff attend transition team meetings with local schools and school districts to provide ongoing orientation and education regarding vocational Rehabilitation services, as well as having co-located offices with school district personnel in Washoe and Clark Counties.   iii. Clark County School District’s Transition Staff offer a regional conference bi-annually to the community called “Students Talking About the Real World” (STAR). STAR is a program that is designed to educate families, students, and professionals about transition services available in Clark County. BSBVI and BVR are one of many agencies that participate in this program. Transition counselors provide information about services to assist students’ transitioning from school to adult life.    iv.  The DSU and the Nevada System of Higher Education mutually developed and implemented an inter-local contract designed to facilitate the delivery of higher education opportunities to eligible students.   v.  The DSU is a member of the Interagency Transition Advisory Board (ITAB). The Board provides information and research regarding issues relating to transition students in Nevada. The DSU Administrator is a legislatively mandated board member.   vi.  The DSU is a member of the Nevada Department of Education’s Nevada Transition Advisory Committee.  Their mission is to educate legislators, provide awareness campaigns to the public regarding students with disabilities, assist with self-advocacy, train providers and employers, and network building. Members of the Committee are experts in transition services and provide recommendations around best practice/compliance in transition services.

This screen was last updated on Aug 7 2013 7:23PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

 During the spring of 2009, the Rehabilitation Division, in conjunction with the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC), entered into a contract with the San Diego State University (SDSU) Interwork Institute to perform a statewide Needs Assessment. This needs assessment survey was used to guide the State Plans for FY 2011, FY 2012 and FY 2013.    In summary, the survey found that: 

a)      Persons with cognitive impairments, persons with mental retardation and persons with depressive/mood disorders are three groups identified that were underserved in the state;

b)      Individuals with autism spectrum disorders are an underserved group;

c)      Transition students are an underserved group;

d)     Persons with disabilities may be less likely to connect with the division if they are not affiliated with other referral sources;

e)      Hispanic/Latino and Asian ethnic groups are underserved in the state;

f)       The composition of the racial/ethnic applicant pool differs from the racial/ethnic composition of the state’s general population;

g)      The proportion of white applicants decreased compared to the percentage of the white population and to the number served in 2005; and

h)      While the number of applicants in the state north and south has increased, the number of applicants from the rural areas has not despite population growth. 

In general, the survey recommended that the division engage in long-term planning to meet anticipated needs in personnel, program, and vendor services due to expected population increases in the next twenty (20) years.   Themes expressed by more than one group or in more than one interview included the following: ·         Need for better outreach to employers and to people with disabilities; ·         Need for more training in life skills, including budgeting, self-care and use of public transportation; ·         Need for more assistive technology to improve communication and to facilitate success on the job; ·         Need for more Supported Employment services and opportunities; ·         Need for general work training, college based education/training, on the job training, interviewing skills, workplace expectations, job placement assistance, work tolerance, adjustment to work, and post-employment supports; ·         Need for additional services to transition students; ·         Need for more effective collaboration among agencies who may serve the same client; ·         Need for consistent service delivery throughout the state; ·         Need for more VR staff; ·         Need services for people with less significant disabilities; ·         Need for more/better public transportation, more/better health care, more/better recreational services, and more/better social services; and ·         Need for more opportunities to develop social skills.

This screen was last updated on Jul 22 2013 12:06PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

The DSU projects it will increase the number of individuals determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation services in proportion to the State’s population growth as detailed below. 

Federal Fiscal YearPopulation IncreasePotentially Eligible
FFY 2012: Actual2,723,32210,893
FFY 2013: Projected (1.2%)2,756,00211,024
FFY 2014: Projected (1.3%)2,791,83011,167
FFY 2015: Projected (1.3%)2,828,12411,312

The number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order.   The number of eligible individuals to be served with funding from Vocational Rehabilitation (Title I, Part B) and Supported Employment (Title VI, Part B) under the State Plan is shown in the tables below. The tables contain data based on the State Demographer projections of population growth. The last column includes all clients at the time of application whether eligible or ineligible. The DSU is not under an Order of Selection at this time.  

Costs of the services described in subparagraph (b) (1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order. 

The actual client service expenditures for FFY 2012 needed to serve eligible individuals are provided in the table below. The DSU expended a total of $9,479,440 for all client services in FFY 2012. These client service expenditures were paid from: 

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
2012: Actual Title I $9,341,703 5,592 $1,670
2013: Projected (1.2%) Title I $9,453,803 5659 $1,670
2014: Projected (1.3%) Title I $9,576,702 5733 $1,670
2015: Projected (1.3%) Title I $9,701,199 5808 $1,670
2012: Actual Title VI $137,737 205 $671
2013: Projected (1.2%) Title VI $139,390 207 $673
2014: Projected (1.3%) Title VI $141,202 210 $672
2015: Projected (1.3%) Title VI $143,038 213 $671
Totals   $38,634,774 23,627 $1,635

This screen was last updated on Jul 22 2013 12:06PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and Supported Employment programs. 

The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

A major issue discussed during meetings in FFY 2013 included State Plan Revisions developed with the NSRC. The NSRC’s State Plan Committee reviewed and revised the goals with corresponding strategies and measurable indicators to align them with the recommendations and information revealed through the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment and sentiments expressed in the NSRC meetings. The NSRC and the DSU were also able to consider input received from previous RSA monitoring activities.

Goal 1:   Emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities, and improve transition from school to work and school to post-secondary education.

Goal 2:   Extend outreach efforts toward diverse populations, of Nevada’s with disabilities. 

Goal 3:   Extend outreach efforts toward ethnically diverse populations, specifically minority populations with disabilities represented in Nevada’s workforce. 

Goal 4:   Work together and share resources with state, private, non-profit agencies to leverage resources and coordinate benefit opportunities in order to maximize the overall employment outcomes. 

Goal 5:   Emphasize the employment potential of applicants and eligible persons receiving Supported Employment services.

This screen was last updated on Jul 22 2013 12:06PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on Jun 22 2009 1:12PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

The NSRC and the DSU jointly agreed to the following revised goals in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and Supported Employment programs: 

Goal 1:   Emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities, and improve transition from school to work and school to post-secondary education. 

Goal 2:   Extend outreach efforts toward diverse populations of Nevadan’s with disabilities. 

Goal 5:   Emphasize the employment potential of applicants and eligible persons receiving Supported Employment services. 

This continues to align the Supported Employment goal with the recommendations and information revealed through the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and sentiments expressed in the NSRC meetings. In the north, the Customized/Supported Employment program continues in collaboration with Nevada Center for Excellence in Disability (NCED) and Sierra Regional Center (SRC).  This initiative strives to serve co-enrolled clients and deliver Supported Employment services, specifically job carving and person-centered customized employment. Substantial funding was made available and distributed to support this effort. 

A new initiative developed in Northern Nevada to address the changing thinking on sheltered workshop outcomes is the Pathways Program. Pathways is a collaboration between the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disability (NCED), Sierra Regional Center (SRC), the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR) and High Sierra Industries (HSI).  This collaborative takes individuals with existing Jobs In Day Training contracts (JDT’s) and redirects that funding to HSI, a community rehab partner along with BVR matching funds to provide the services and opportunities to prepare these eligible clients for transition to competitive employment opportunities.  After their participation in the Pathways Program, clients’ transition to full time job development activities to gain appropriate competitive employment with JDT funding reverted to provide long term follow along services after BVR case closure. 

The Vocational Rehabilitation-Clark County Transition Services relationship remains strong, and continuation of the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) & University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) Summer Camp Supported Employment youth outreach programs, delivery of new and expanded Autism specific training to field level counselors/staff north and south. 

In Northern Nevada, the Career Exploration Summer Camp, a collaboration between Vocational Rehabilitation, the Washoe County School District, Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities, Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living and the Nevada Center for Excellence in Disability, which is in its fourth year, is an opportunity for transition students with Supported Employment needs to spend a week learning pre-vocational and independence skills.  Experiences include travel training, on site work shadowing, cooking and laundry, resume development, interview practice/preparation and career exploration.  In summer of 2012 the DSU again partnered for the third year with the University of Nevada, Reno, Washoe County School District and The Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities to offer northern transition students the opportunity to explore their areas of vocational interest first hand. Site visits were set up and approximately forty-five (45) students met with employers and had an opportunity to job shadow. On-the-Job Training opportunities were then extended to employers interested in offering this training to students.

In Carson City, the DSU is meeting monthly to collaborate with the Lyon Co. School District, Dayton High School to provide outreach services, including CBA and OJT’s to eligible special education transition students. 

Vocational Opportunities for Inclusive Career Education (VOICE)

Recognizing a void of innovative transition to career opportunities for the Severely Learning Disabled, Intellectually Disabled and Autistic populations, Washoe County School District (WCSD) and the Bureau of Vocation Rehabilitation (BVR) collaborated to explore opportunities. This new program is the resulting partnership between WCSD and BVR to provide transition students with intensive vocational/transition preparation and services.  In its first year, the program, which will be co-located at the main northern BVR office, will serve 60 students. Utilizing in-kind staff from the WCSD and co-enrolling all students for BVR services, this collaborative will be the first Third Party Cooperative Agreement in the State of Nevada.  The goal for the program is for students to obtain competitive employment utilizing a job carving/customized employment approach. 

Job Discovery II

This new collaborative between the Clark County School District, Opportunity Village, Inc. and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation will serve students ages 18-22 to provide work experience for competitive employment outcomes.  Working at identified community sites, students get exposure to a number of different career paths to help identify individual interests and strengths.  These outcomes are capitalized upon through plan development for competitive employment. There are 17 students participating in the program at this time. 

The DSU will continue to assess potential funding opportunities for on-going employment supports in the revised regulations of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act.

This screen was last updated on Jul 22 2013 12:06PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

The DSU developed the following State strategies to address identified needs and determine how Title I funds will be used. 

Goal 1: Emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities, and improve transition from school to work and school to post-secondary education.  Strategies: ·         Explore the utilization of social and Web-based media as a communication tool. ·         Improve special outreach efforts to Transition Students, i.e. camps, Transition Summit Leadership trainings. ·         Encourage participation of successful transition students in the referral and outreach activities of other students (peer support mechanism). ·         Serve more Transition Students by developing referral mechanisms with secondary schools and post-secondary institutions. ·         Comparison to states with similar population and demographics, and in accordance with the recommendations of the Needs Assessment. ·         Identification of students that have fallen out of Vocational Rehabilitation programs. ·         Creative marketing to schools and students. ·         Maintain Statewide “Transition Connect” Expansion Project. ·         Increased communication between Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, Special Education Teachers, and 504 Coordinators. ·         Educating teachers, parents, and youth with disabilities regarding the Vocational Rehabilitation process, programs, and referral services. ·         Work with youth with disabilities, the Nevada Department of Education, local education authorities, parent organizations, and families to encourage early discussions with students about the expectations of employment and their skills, abilities, and talents that will empower them to achieve self-sufficiency. ·         Vocational rehabilitation representatives to participate with parent/teacher Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) conferences. ·         Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal. ·         Formalize third-party match. ·         Expand Community Based Assessment opportunities for students to explore employment options. ·         Explore a Job Shadowing and/or mentor program in collaboration with the National Disability Employment Awareness month.   Indicators: ·         Increase enrollment by Transition Students in the Program Services of the Division. The Division’s performance regarding increased enrollment in FFY 2014 will equal or exceed FFY 2013 performance levels. ·         Increase competitive employment outcomes for Transition Students. The Division’s performance regarding increased competitive employment outcomes in FFY 2014 will equal or exceed FFY 2013 performance levels. ·         Increase post-secondary educational services for Transition Students. The Division’s performance regarding increased post-secondary educational services in FFY 2014 will equal or exceed FFY 2013 performance levels.  Goal 2: Extend outreach efforts toward diverse populations of Nevadans with disabilities.  Strategies: ·         Continue marketing efforts with Mental Health hospitals, Mental Health service providers, Social Security Administration (SSA) and State Welfare. ·         Partner with Mental Health service providers and Community Rehabilitation Training Centers (CTC’s). ·         Partner with Department of Health and Human Services, State commissions related to populations concerned with autism, developmental disabilities, cognitive and mental health disabilities. ·         Partner with advocacy groups. ·         Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal. ·         Participate in Disability Awareness Month activities. ·         Increase outreach for eligible individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing. ·         Hold town hall outreach meetings, specifically for individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing. ·         Continue participation on the Employment First Initiative Work Group, the Nevada Autism Adult Services Work Group, and the Mental Health Planning Advisory Committee. ·         Identify underserved populations based on the current Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment data and conduct targeted outreach as needed.   Indicators: ·         Increase enrollment by eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities. The Division’s performance to increase enrollment by eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities in FFY 2014 will equal or exceed FFY 2013 performance levels. ·         Report indicators by region.   Goal 3: Extend outreach efforts toward ethnically diverse populations, specifically minority populations with disabilities represented in Nevada’s workforce.   Strategies: ·         Recruit bilingual and/or bicultural staff. ·         Increase marketing and participation efforts with ethnically diverse populations and media, and specifically to Latino and Asian populations. ·         Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal. ·         Collaborate with minority groups with program development and program referrals. ·         Participate in appropriate cultural activities or events. ·         Ensure documents are available in other languages as needed.   Indicators: ·         Increase enrollment by minority populations representative of Nevada’s minority workforce. The Division’s performance regarding increased enrollment by minority populations in FFY 2014 will equal or exceed FFY 2013 performance levels. Report data by race and ethnicity statewide.  Goal 4: Work together and share resources with state, private, non-profit agencies to leverage resources and coordinate benefit opportunities in order to maximize the overall employment outcomes.   Strategies: ·         Document dollars utilized as comparable benefits. ·         Identify sources of benefits on the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). ·         Identify federally matched dollars. ·         Formalize third-party match. ·         Strengthen relations to maximize matching fund opportunities. ·         Provide In-service training regarding how to identify matching funds opportunities.   Indicators: ·         Document dollars captured in collaborative efforts and document that the training is held.  Goal 5: Emphasize the employment potential of applicants and eligible persons receiving Supported Employment services.   Strategies: ·         Partner with other public and private State entities that provide Supported Employment. ·         Expand communication and training to staff, State Rehabilitation Council members and consumers on Supported Employment. ·         Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal. ·         Identify and support best practices that encourage high-wage/career track employment. ·         Utilize the VR Business Development Manager to improve Supported Employment services outcomes. ·         Continue participation on the Employment First Initiative work group, the Nevada Autism Adult Services work group, the Mental Health Planning Advisory Committee, and the Supportive Employment Leadership Network.   Indicators: ·         Increase the number of Supported Employment consumers that close successfully, earning at least the federal minimum wage. The Division’s performance regarding an increase in the number of Supported Employment consumers that close successfully in FFY 2014 will equal or exceed FFY 2013 performance levels.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

The DSU provides assistive technology assistance on a statewide basis. The DSU’s southern district office has an on-site assistive technology staff position. This position is responsible for providing evaluations, assessments, and support services to participants to assist them in getting and maintaining employment. Counselors statewide also have the option of referring participants to Easter Seals of Southern Nevada or Innovative Rehabilitation Technology Inc. to provide assistive technology equipment and/or services unavailable internally. 

The DSU’s Northern and District Offices, in collaboration with the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and NCED, continue to receive grant funding for assistive technology services. The DSU has developed this program to expand assistive technology services to northern and rural Nevada clients. Although this grant has been reduced at the State level, the GMU remains committed to this project and have maintained funding levels.   In field practice, the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor takes into consideration the need for assistive technology assistance at each stage of providing assistance to participants. Specifically, consideration for assistive technology assistance is provided during the assessment process. The participant’s physician may recommend assistive technology assistance at any stage of the process. The Counselor refers the participant to the appropriate assistive technology specialist.   The Nevada State Rehabilitation Council in partnership with the DSU has determined that assistive technology services are a contributing factor in four (4) out of five (5) State Goals and is included as a strategy in these goals.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

  • Continue marketing efforts with Mental Health hospitals, Mental Health service providers, SSI and State Welfare.
  • Partner with Mental Health service providers and Community Rehabilitation Training Centers (CTC’s).
  • Partner with Department of Health and Human Services, State commissions related to populations concerned with autism, developmental disabilities, cognitive and mental health disabilities.
  • Partner with advocacy groups.
  • Participate in Disability Awareness Month activities.
  • Recruit bilingual and/or bicultural staff.
  • Increase marketing and participation efforts with ethnically diverse populations and media, and specifically to Latino and Asian populations.
  • Collaborate with minority groups with program development and program referrals.
  • Participate in appropriate cultural activities or events.
  • Ensure documents are available in other languages as needed.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Not applicable.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

  • Aggressively recruit rehabilitation counselors (RC) to maintain a vacancy rate lower than 10%.
  • Retention incentives have been developed and continue to be updated.
  • Provide feedback to staff on individual performance goals on a monthly basis and continue team approach to attaining statewide performance goals.
  • Continue to distribute, monitor, and develop action plans from information on management reports to provide real time information on performance at the office, district, and state levels.
  • Continue to leverage Nevada JobConnect resources to place clients in jobs.
  • Establish relationships with employers that provide health benefits.
  • Staff will establish target industry specific employers to cultivate knowledge and awareness of the unique needs of that industry and thereby establishing relationships with employers for greater number of quality placements.
  • Identify minority groups and establish relationships throughout the state of Nevada.
  • Continue dedicated Transition RCs throughout the state of Nevada.
  • Coordinate with non-profits and other providers to assist with provision of services to Transition Students that will lead to employment and follow through.
  • Continue to develop relationships with school counselors, teachers, and administrators on transition issues.
  • Maintain Interlocal Agreements with every school district in Nevada.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

The Rehabilitation Division Administrator currently serves a s a member on the Local Workforce Investment Board (LWIB) in Northern Nevada. The DETR Director has made a request to have additional Rehabilitation Division representation on the LWIB in Southern Nevada, however the NRD has yet to receive a response to the request.  The NRD will continue to provide an update to RSA quarterly until an appointment is made.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

We will follow the strategies outlined in the State Plan:

  • Explore the utilization of social and Web-based media as a communication tool.
  • Improve special outreach efforts to Transition Students, i.e. camps, Transition Summit Leadership trainings.
  • Encourage participation of successful transition students in the referral and outreach activities of other students (peer support mechanism).
  • Serve more Transition Students by developing referral mechanisms with secondary schools and post-secondary institutions.
  • Comparison to states with similar population and demographics, and in accordance with the recommendations of the Needs Assessment.
  • Identification of students that have fallen out of Vocational Rehabilitation programs.
  • Creative marketing to schools and students.
  • Maintain Statewide “Transition Connect” Expansion Project.
  • Increased communication between Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, Special Education Teachers, and 504 Coordinators.
  • Educating teachers, parents, and youth with disabilities regarding the Vocational Rehabilitation process, programs, and referral services.
  • Work with youth with disabilities, the Nevada Department of Education, local education authorities, parent organizations, and families to encourage early discussions with students about the expectations of employment and their skills, abilities, and talents that will empower them to achieve self-sufficiency.
  • Vocational rehabilitation representatives to participate with parent/teacher Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) conferences.
  • Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal.
  • Continue marketing efforts with Mental Health hospitals, Mental Health service providers, SSI and State Welfare.
  • Partner with Mental Health service providers and Community Rehabilitation Training Centers (CTC’s).
  • Partner with Department of Health and Human Services, State commissions related to populations concerned with autism, developmental disabilities, cognitive and mental health disabilities.
  • Partner with advocacy groups.
  • Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal.
  • Participate in Disability Awareness Month activities.
  • Recruit bilingual and/or bicultural staff.
  • Increase marketing and participation efforts with ethnically diverse populations and media, and specifically to Latino and Asian populations.
  • Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal.
  • Collaborate with minority groups with program development and program referrals.
  • Participate in appropriate cultural activities or events.
  • Ensure documents are available in other languages as needed.
  • Document dollars utilized as comparable benefits.
  • Identify sources of benefits on the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE).
  • Identify federally matched dollars.
  • Formalize third-party match.
  • Strengthen relations to maximize matching fund opportunities.
  • Provide In-service training regarding how to identify matching funds opportunities.
  • Partner with other public and private State entities that provide Supported Employment.
  • Expand communication and training to staff, State Rehabilitation Council members and consumers on Supported Employment.
  • Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal.
  • Identify and support best practices that encourage high-wage/career track employment.
  • Utilize the VR Business Development Manager to improve Supported Employment services outcomes.

The agency has been recognized by RSA with 3 Emerging Practices which support program innovation and collaboration with other programs and agencies.  Improve special outreach efforts to Transition Students, i.e. camps, Transition Summit Leadership trainings.  We will continue to work with our school district partners to encourage collocation at our District Office. We are also in collaboration with Clark County School District to explore Third Party Cooperative Agreements.

The agency continues to align the Supported Employment goal with the recommendations and information revealed through the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and sentiments expressed in the NSRC meetings.  In the north, a pilot Supported Employment program has been established in collaboration with NCED and Sierra Regional Center. This initiative strives to serve co-enrolled clients and deliver Supported Employment services.  In the north, there is development of a fee for service relationship with High Sierra Industries for improved aptitude and interest testing of clients with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disabilities for plan development.  Through our TACE, the agency will continue to provide training opportunities to enhance staff knowledge of Supported Employment best practice.

 

This screen was last updated on Jul 22 2013 12:06PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

In FFY 2012 and effective March 2012, the DSU, in partnership with the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC), reviewed the goals as a result of the Statewide Needs Assessment and jointly revised the goals. (See Attachment 4.11 (a) for the details of the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment)

Goal 1:   Emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities, and improve transition from school to work and school to post-secondary education.

Federal Fiscal YearTotal All Participant ApplicationsTotal Transition StudentsPercent ofStudents
20113,785475520%
20123,13458019%

Federal Fiscal YearTotal All Student ClosuresStudents Closed - RehabilitatedPercent of Students
201164914022%
201271916523%

Federal Fiscal YearTotal All StudentsWith AuthorizationsStudents With Post - Secondary EdPercent of Students
201178012516%
201278211114%

Post-Secondary Education includes occupational, vocational, college and university training.   Evaluation of Goal 1:   The DSU did not meet the goal of increasing the percentage of transition students served from 755 (20%) in 2011 versus 580 (19%) in 2012. However, the DSU met its goal of increasing the percentage of students with disabilities closing successfully with an employment outcome from 140 (22%) in 2011 versus 165 (23%) in 2012.    The DSU did not meet the goal for improving the transition from school to post-secondary education. Additionally, the DSU saw the number of students receiving post-secondary education decreasing from 125 (16%) in 2011 to 111 (14%) in 2012. The DSU has been committed to serving youth with disabilities by promoting youth summer camps designed to enhance youth’s knowledge of college as well as extensive interaction with Clark County, Washoe, Nye and Douglas counties transition coordinators.   Goal 2:   Extend outreach efforts toward diverse populations, specifically, eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities.  

Federal Fiscal YearAll Closed ClientsParticipants With Mental Health DisabilitiesPercent With Disability
20113,6382,13259%
20123,5332,18862%

  Mental Health Impairments are defined as cognitive, psychosocial, and other mental disabilities. This data also includes clients with Autism.  

FederalFiscal YearAutism as Source / Causeof Disability
201162
201274

 

Federal Fiscal YearDevelopmental DisabilitiesCognitive DisabilitiesAll Other MentalHealth Disabilities
20111921,3891,106
20122051,4061,125

  Mental Health Impairments are defined as cognitive, psychosocial, and other mental disabilities. The following is a list of Cause / Source of Mental Impairments:   Developmental Disabilities Autism Cerebral Palsy Mental Retardation   Cognitive Disabilities Accident / Injury Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Alcohol Abuse or Dependence Congenital / Birth Injury Drug Abuse or Dependence Epilepsy Multiple Sclerosis Schizophrenia / Psychotic Disorder Specific Learning Disability Stroke Traumatic Brain Injury   All Other Mental Health Disabilities Anxiety Disorder Cause Unknown Depressive / Mood Disorder Eating Disorder Mental Illness (not listed elsewhere) Parkinson’s Disease Personality Disorder Physical Disorder   Goal 3:   Extend outreach efforts toward ethnically diverse populations, specifically minority populations with disabilities represented in Nevada’s workforce.

Federal Fiscal YearAll ClosedClientsNon – White(Minority) ClosuresPercent ofMinorities
20113,6381,39838%
20123,5331,43741%

 According to data obtained from DETR’s Research and Analysis Division, the percentage of minorities in Nevada’s workforce is 29%.

 

Goal 4:   Assist individuals to transition into work by the provision of quality employment outcomes, retention of competitive employment, and self-sufficiency through accessible and equitable services.

 

FederalYearClosed Rehab(All Clients)Closed RehabWith A/TClosed Other(All Clients)Closed OtherWith A/TTotal Closures
2011947882,691953,638
2012852772,681 733,533

Assistive Technology Device is any item, piece of equipment or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified or customized, that is used to increase, maintain or improve the functional capabilities of an individual with a disability.   Assistive Technology Service is any service that directly assists an individual with a disability in the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device. Services may include:   a)  evaluating the needs of an individual with a disability, including a functional evaluation of the individual in his/her customary environment; b)  purchasing, leasing, or otherwise providing for the acquisition by an individual with a disability of an assistive technology device; c)  selecting, designing, fitting, customizing, adapting, applying, maintaining, repairing, or replacing assistive technology devices; d)  coordinating and using other therapies, interventions, or services with assistive technology devices, such as those associated with existing education and rehabilitation plans and programs; e)  training or providing technical assistance for an individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the family members, guardians, advocates, or authorized representatives of the individual; and f)   training or providing technical assistance for professionals (including individuals providing education and rehabilitation services), employers, or others who provide services to, employ, or are otherwise substantially involved in the major life functions of individuals with disabilities to the extent that training or technical assistance is necessary for an individual with a disability to achieve an employment outcome.   Goal 5:   Emphasize the employment potential of applicants and eligible persons receiving services and Supported Employment.  

Federal Fiscal Year

All ClosedClientsAll Supported Employment ClientsPercent ofSE
20113,638822%
2012 3,533842%

 

Federal Fiscal YearSupported EmploymentClosed – RehabSupported Employment Closed – OtherTotal SE Clients
2011404282
2012453984

Note: Supported Employment is determined at the time of Plan; all Supported Employment clients have an IPE.

 

In FFY 2012, all three of the primary performance indicators (1.3, 1.4 and 1.5) were met by the DSU. The DSU also exceeded the performance level for Evaluation Standard 2 – Equal Access.

Federal Evaluation Standards 1:  Employment Outcomes   The DSU did not meet Performance Indicator 1.1 for the number of successful employment outcomes. In FFY 2012, the DSU achieved 852 employment outcomes as compared to a total of 947 last year.   The DSU did not meet Performance Indicator 1.2 requiring 55.8% of the individuals who, after receiving VR services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), were closed successfully. In FFY 2012, the DSU achieved a 49.19% rating versus the 52.52% rating in 2011.   Performance Indicator 1.3 requires 72.6% of the people who exit the vocational rehabilitation program in competitive employment, self-employment, or a Business Enterprise Program (BEP) (in Nevada termed Business Enterprises of Nevada) to earn at least the minimum wage. In FFY 2012, the DSU achieved a 100% rating.   Performance Indicator 1.4 requires that at least 62.4% of individuals with disabilities who enter competitive employment, self-employment, or a Business Enterprise Program earn at least the minimum wage. In FFY 2012, the DSU attained a 96.01% rating compared to 96.02% last year.   The DSU exceeded Performance Indicator 1.5. This indicator requires all individuals exiting the VR program in competitive employment, who are self-employed or are employed in a BEP facility to earn at least a .52 ratio of the statewide hourly average of all individuals employed in the state (as derived from the most recently available Bureau of Labor Statistics report entitled “State Average Annual Pay”). The most recent report indicates an hourly average wage of $20.89per hour for Nevada’s workforce. In FFY 2012, the DSU achieved an average hourly wage of $11.58. This finding results in a .554 performance ratio.   The DSU met Performance Indicator 1.6 which requires that a minimum of 53% of all individuals who earn at least the minimum wage when they exit the VR program in competitive employment, self-employment or in BEP employment report their own income as their largest single source of economic support at exit compared to the percentage of applicants who reported their own income as the largest source at application. In FFY 2012, 68.08%of people exiting the VR program with such employment outcomes reported being self-supporting.   Federal Evaluation Standard 2:   Equal Access to Services   The evaluation standard in Performance Indicator 2.1 requires the DSU to provide equal access to services for all people with disabilities from minority backgrounds. Equal access is determined by comparing the “Service Rate” for people with a disability from a minority background to the service rate for all non-minority people with disabilities. A ratio of .80 or greater is required to achieve Evaluation Standard 2. In FFY 2012, the DSU exceeded the required .80 ratio by achieving an equal access to “Service Rate” ratio of .957.

 

Nevada State Rehabilitation Council Summary of Expenditures for Innovation and Expansion Activities for State Fiscal Year 2012:  

PersonnelManagement Analyst II and Administrative Assistant II to provide support to the Council.$25,219.15
Out-of-State TravelTravel expenses, including registration fees, for NSRC Members to attend the Spring and Fall Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) Conference.$5,497.70
In-State TravelTravel expenses for NSRC members and staff to attend various meetings held in Nevada, these included regular NSRC Meetings, RFP Evaluation Meetings, and State Plan Meetings.$2,338.58
Satisfaction SurveyConsumer satisfaction survey and supplies by University Nevada Reno (UNR) Center for Research Design and Analysis.$42,143.75
2011 Annual ReportCost of developing, printing and mailing of the 2011 NSRC Annual Report. 201.05$2,090.12
Contractual ServicesCost of transcriptionist and interpreters for NSRC meetings.$3,201.41
Operational CostsCost of basic operational supplies, insurance, postage legal notices, meeting rooms and equipment.$2,810.84
TotalExpenses designated specifically for activities of the NSRC.$83,301.55

Innovation and Expansion Activities Involving Transition Student Activities:  Based on feedback and data collected in the Needs Assessment and Customer Satisfaction Survey, the DSU has made a concerted effort to enhance and improve services to Transition Youth.  To this end, the DSU has dedicated one of the five program goals to improving services to Transition Youth from school to work and school to post-secondary education.  With the percentage of students being identified on the Autism Spectrum, the DSU felt an obligation to increase collaborations to meet the needs of these upcoming students.  Compounding this issue, is the fact that the State of Nevada has never been fully funded at the State General Fund level to allow the DSU to fully match the Federal funds allotted.  Vocational Opportunities for Inclusive Career Education (VOICE) Recognizing a void of innovative transition to career opportunities for the Severely Learning Disabled, Intellectually Disabled and Autistic populations, WCSD and BVR collaborated to explore opportunities.  This new program is the resulting partnership between WCSD and BVR to provide transition students with intensive vocational/transition preparation and services.  In its first year, the program, which will be co-located at the main northern BVR office, will serve 60 students.  Utilizing in-kind staff from the WCSD and co-enrolling all students for BVR services, this collaborative will be the first Third Party Cooperative Agreement in the State of Nevada. The goal for the program is for students to obtain competitive employment utilizing a job carving/customized employment approach.  Community Based Career Exploration Summer Camp Entering into its fourth year, this program includes Washoe County School District transition staff collaborating with BVR Transition staff working with transition students to cultivate individual sense of responsibility and discipline, enhance interpersonal relationship skills and job seeking skills, gain independence with bus training, meal preparation, independent living and budgeting skills.  Students have access to job coaches and receive Certification upon completion. This program is growing every year, with more students, more active employers providing work experiences and with more community support. It is anticipated to serve 60 students this year, which is an increase over last year.  This program is sponsored by Washoe County School District, Nevada Center for Excellence in Disability, Northern Nevada Center for Independent Living, Nevada Governor’s Council on Developmental Disability and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation.   Summer Transition Program Since 2009, the southern district has hosted the Careers, Recreation And Vocational Education (CRAVE) summer camp at UNLV. It hosted nineteen (19) students in 2012 residing on the UNLV campus for a week, ten (10) from the south and 9 (9) from the north and rural part of the state. The Nevada Department of Education (NDOE) paid for transportation which included airfare and mileage for students traveling from northern and rural Nevada. During the week students learned to navigate the college system, use advocacy, accommodations and supportive services to ensure access to campus courses, services and activities. This year CRAVE summer camp will host twenty-five (25) students at the UNLV campus on June 23-27, 2013.  This year a technician from the northern division will chaperone students traveling from northern and rural Nevada.  This addition will give firsthand experience of this southern program to northern staff, and help in future recruitment and replication.   The program’s short-term goal is to help participants break down barriers preventing them from going to college and obtaining employment. The long-term goal is to increase the percentage of transition students choosing to go on to post-secondary education. This program is co-sponsored by Clark County School District, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Rebuilding All Goals Efficiently (RAGE), Nevada Department of Education, ASAP Employment Services, and the State of Nevada, Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation.   Annual Nevada Student Leadership Transition Summit (NSLTS): The Nevada Student Leadership Transition Summit is an annual 2 day summit geared to increase graduation rates and improve postsecondary outcomes through a greater focus on college and other postsecondary preparation.  The conference is geared for students with mild disabilities representing sixteen (16) different school districts in Nevada.   The 2012 NSLTS conference consisted of over 400 people, which included high school students, their teachers, transition facilitators, young adult facilitators, a young adult panel, adult facilitators as well as conference planners and coordinators.    The DSU Transition team participated with the State of Nevada Department of Education and numerous other sponsors and partners in the 6th Annual Nevada Student Leadership Transition Summit which took place on the campus of the University of Nevada, Reno.   Special Education students, teachers, and counselors from sixteen (16) school districts across the state of Nevada attended this event to learn about services available to students after graduation from high school and to learn to become active participants in their transition process. They toured the University of Nevada, Reno learning about Disability Services available on college campuses and had a chance to network with other students with disabilities and learn about resources they were receiving and what their goals were after high school.   Young adult speakers with disabilities reflected upon their transition experiences and shared motivational stories on lessons learned as they moved from high school to adult life. The conference also included the parents of students with disabilities to help educate parents on services available to students in both high school and after high school.   The DSU transition counselors presented in a breakout session about services available to students with disabilities and how BVR can assist with the transition from school to work or school to post-secondary education then employment.   Nevada Student Transition Employment Program (S.T.E.P.) This 3 week residential program in Las Vegas based on the Kansas STEP model will serve 12 blind or visually impaired students, ages 16-21 in its first year.  This program will address currently unmet needs for independent living, training and skills for blind and visually impaired transition youth. Students will be empowered by qualified adults to learn to live independently, in their own homes, and learn to navigate their own community.  Activities are holistic including travel training, community awareness, housekeeping, ADL’s, career exploration and job seeking workshops. It will be held at the Marriott Residence Inn, where each room has a fully equipped kitchen, bedroom and spacious living quarters in which to learn the various tasks.   Job Discovery II This new collaborative between the Clark County School District, Opportunity Village, Inc. and the Bureau of Vocational Rehabilitation will serve students ages 18-22 to provide work experience for competitive employment outcomes.  Working at identified community sites, students get exposure to a number of different career paths to help identify individual interests and strengths.  These outcomes are capitalized upon through plan development for competitive employment. There are 17 students participating in the program at this time.   Project SEARCH Starting in 2011, Project SEARCH is a one year high school transition program for students with significant disabilities in their last year of high school.  It is targeted to transition students whose main goal is competitive employment.  It takes place at the University Medical Center in Las Vegas, where immersion in the workplace facilitates the teaching and learning process through continuous feedback and application of new skills.   Business Development Manager and Workforce Services Representative IV Beginning in January 2012 with the hire of a Business Development Manager, and continuing with the new hire of a Workforce Services Representative IV, the DSU is refining the way it does business with large employers and leveraging the state’s Job Connect (One Stop) resources. Emphasis is on marketing DSU services and clients to large employers who need to address their diversity needs and recognize the business case for hiring VR clients with inherent workplace incentives such as Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC), On The Job Training (OJT) and no-cost training provided by VR for employers.  Additionally, this team will do extensive job matching based on skills of “job ready” clients identified in the Vocational Rehabilitation case management system to existing job postings in the Job Connect data base.  This endeavor will benefit all clients, including transition students.  While this initiative was initially implemented in the North, it is the intention of the DSU to expand this program to serve the entire state as budget and positions allow.   Provider Agreements The DSU is transitioning to Provider Agreements which are essentially a contract for services between the vendor, acting as an independent contractor, and VR.  The purpose is to provide participants with as many vendor choices as possible while complying with State of Nevada’s purchasing and contract laws and regulations. Services include, but are not limited to: communication, interpretation, and translation services, medical, counseling, services to family members, training and employment supports.  No vendor currently providing services will be allowed to continue service without a signed agreement.  Vendors are required to maintain adequate insurance coverage, evidence of NV Business License, all applicable licenses, certifications, permits, registrations and credentialing necessary to do business, and adhere to any set fee schedule and HIPPA requirements.  This will ensure vendor quality and accountability for client safety and service assurance.  This will benefit all clients statewide, including Transition Students.   RAISON Paperless Beginning April 15, 2013, the DSU transitioned to a paperless case management system.  All new cases opened on or after this date will originate in a virtual format.  Any documentation from the outside will be faxed/auto-imaged into the system or scanned in at the field level. Documents requiring original counselor/client signatures will be printed out for signature and scanned into the system with originals destroyed.  This will enable cases to be reviewed from any DSU computer based on user permissions, allowing for greater supervision of offsite supervisors, administrators, Client Assistance Program (CAP) and auditors.  In turn this will eliminate the potential for paper loss, file loss, and ensure greater confidentiality and efficiency of process.  This will have a meaningful impact on all clients statewide, including Transition Students.

This screen was last updated on Jul 22 2013 12:06PM by Heather Johnson

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

SCOPE

Supported Employment in Nevada is an important component in the DSU’s services to people with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive Supported Employment services. Services provided will vary and are individualized, based on the kind of support needed by each individual. While in the most traditional models, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors provide assistance to find a job, learn the job, and provide ongoing support to maintain the job, Nevada is working toward a Customized Employment model where the individual interests and aptitudes drive the vocational goal. The program values the long term benefits of job carving to meet the needs of the individual. When done right, the client becomes integrated with co-workers who do not have disabilities in a business that is typical and representative of the whole community. Employment opportunities are based on the client’s abilities and interests.

The service delivery system is based on collaboration with statewide community rehabilitation programs, the State Employment Leadership Network, secondary and post-secondary educators and counselors, physicians, ophthalmologists, clients, parents, advocacy organizations, the Nevada Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services (MHDS), private vocational rehabilitation counselors, and other representatives.   The Title VI, Part B, Supported Employment grant funding is supplemented by the use of Title I, Part B funds, Social Security Administration reimbursements and in-kind funding from the supports provided by MHDS. The DSU provides Supported Employment services through all of its offices and expands services by:   ·            Co-location of rehabilitation counselors at the Southern Nevada Adult Mental Health Center. ·            Collaboration of the DSU with UNR/NCED/SRC for Customized Employment. ·            Collaboration of the DSU with San Diego State University and for Job Coach and Job Developer training. ·            Collaboration of the DSU with Opportunity Village exploration, training and placement. ·            Collaboration of the DSU with SRC/HSI for Pathways to Employment. ·            Identification of and support to projects designed to enhance employment of Nevadans with the most significant disabilities.  QUALITY Supported employment services must provide competitive work in integrated work settings with extended support services. Services are provided for clients with the most significant disabilities who have a documented need for Supported Employment, including extended support services. The job can be a full-time or a part-time job. The client and the counselor establish the Individualized Plan of Employment (IPE) to include a goal for the number of hours to work each week. The work must be in an integrated setting with coworkers who do not have disabilities.  Wages must at least be at the Nevada minimum wage amount. In addition to the standard contents of the IPE, the following must be included for any participant for whom Supported Employment services are planned: ·            A description of the Supported Employment services to be provided. ·            The identification of the provider of extended services.   The quality of Supported Employment outcomes is assessed individually, taking into account: client satisfaction with their work, the level of earnings, the benefits provided by the employer, transportation, work environment, and support services that are needed. The vocational rehabilitation counselor completes the assessment.   EXTENT Supported Employment will be considered as a possible vocational outcome for individuals with the most significant disabilities as a part of the eligibility determination process.   In addition to the full scope of services provided by the DSU under Title I, Part B, individuals may receive the following support services:   ·         An assessment of the need for Supported Employment; ·         Development of and placement into jobs; and, ·         Intensive services at or away from the worksite that are needed to maintain employment stability including:   o    The provision of skilled job coaches who accompany the client for intensive job skills training at the worksite; o    Social skills training; o    Independent community travel and transportation system training; o    Job seeking skills training; o    Job retention skills training; o    Regular observation and supervision of the client; o    Follow-up services consisting of regular contact with the client, employers, parents, guardians, or representatives of the client, and other professional and informed advisors to reinforce and stabilize the job placement; o    Facilitation of natural supports at the worksite; o    Work with clients who have elected to have their JDT funding redirected to programs such as Pathways which focus on competitive employment. o    Identification and coordination of extended follow along services to ensure job stability and retention such as the DSU’s use of the inter-local agreement with MHDS, use of community rehabilitation programs and the increased utilization of natural supports; and, o    Post-employment services targeted for the retention and advancement in employment.   Extended services are specific ongoing support services that are provided, organized, and made available in such a way as to assist the participant to maintain integrated competitive employment or employment in integrated work settings in which individuals are working towards competitive work, such as an enclave. Extended services are provided once the time-limited services of assessment, job development, placement and intensive job skills training at the work site are completed. Extended services are provided, at a minimum, twice monthly at the work site of the participant, or more often if requested by the participant or work site.  Title I and Title VI, Part B, funds may not be used for the provision of extended services. The specific method used to provide extended services may vary according to the employment setting, the funding source, and resources available. Sources may include interagency agreements with other agencies, such as the Mental Health and Developmental Services (MHDS), or natural supports such as family members, supervisors, or coworkers at the work site or residential care givers.   Validation: The DSU’s Quality Assurance Team will routinely audit and report on a representative sample of cases involving Supported Employment, in order to validate outcomes.   Below is a summarization of Supported Employment participants.  

Federal Fiscal Year

Total SE Clients ClosedTotal SE Clients Closed With EmploymentPercent ofOutcomes
200717411968.39%
20081238972.36%
20091296550.39%
20101227057.38%
2011 824048.78%
2012844553.57%

  Evaluation: The DSU has developed several strategies to increase the number of applicants that are eligible to receive Supported Employment services. These include partnering with other public and private State entities that provide Supported Employment, development of a brochure for Supported Employment and expanding communication and training to staff, State Rehabilitation Council members and consumers who are eligible for Supported Employment services.

This screen was last updated on Jul 22 2013 12:06PM by Heather Johnson

System Information

System information

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on:08/07/2013 7:32 PM

Last updated by:sanvjohnsonh

Completed on: 08/07/2013 7:32 PM

Completed by: sanvjohnsonh

Approved on: 08/26/2013 3:05 PM

Approved by: rsacavataioc