ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Nevada Rehabilitation Division State Plan for Fiscal Year 2012 (submitted FY 2011)

1.1 The Rehabilitation Division is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Nevada Department of Employment Training and Rehabilitation [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Director Department of Employment Training and Rehabilitation

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Administrator Rehabilitation Division

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
No

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Maureen Cole

Title of Signatory
Administrator

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/30/2011

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2012
Yes

Comments:

DETR assures that it will take the necessary actions to ensure that an SRC that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 is fully constituted prior to the submission of the State Plan and related attachments for FY 2012.  Nevada Rehabilitation Division assures that it will work with the newly constituted SRC to perform the functions specified in Section 101(a)(21)(ii) of the act.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Maureen Cole

Title of Signatory
Administrator

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/30/2011

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Rehabilitation Division

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

Nevada’s State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) provides input to the Designated State Unit (DSU) in the following ways:

·        Annual Report

 

Recommendations from the annual report of the council described in Section 105(c)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(5), were received during the public meeting of the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) on November 16, 2010.  The Council determined to include information from the General Participant, Transition Student and Older Individuals Who are Blind (OIB) Satisfaction Survey Instruments, State Plan Goals, populations served and various demographic charts as well as participant “success stories.”

 

·        Annual Consumer Satisfaction Surveys

 

The review and analysis of consumer satisfaction described in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4), was conducted by the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), Center for Research Design and Analysis and Nevada Center for Health Statistics and Informatics.  Three consumer satisfaction survey instruments were utilized:  the General Participant, Transition Student, and Older Individuals Who are Blind (OIB) Satisfaction Surveys.  The NSRC met on September 14, 2010 to obtain the results of these Surveys and to obtain information on recommendations from UNR. The NSRC and DSU jointly requested UNR to begin a multiple year, longitudinal study of Consumer Satisfaction.

 

Increased Response to Survey Utilizing Gift Card Incentives

 

The cooperation rate for this year’s survey (83%) was up 2% from the rate obtained for the 2009 General Client Satisfaction Survey (81%), 9% from the rate obtained for the 2008 survey (74%), and 11% from the rate obtained for the 2007 survey (72%).  It is possible that the continued increase in cooperation rate is due, in part, to the continuation of the use of a monetary incentive; contacted clients were notified that survey participants would be entered into a drawing for a chance to win one of four $50 prepaid Visa gift cards.

·        Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment of Individuals with Disabilities

 

Consistent with the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as Amended in 1998, the NSRC, in partnership with the DSU, has developed, agreed to and reviewed state goals and applied corresponding strategies with measurable indicators.  The NSRC and DSU met in public meetings to design valuable goals consistent with the recommendations and data analysis revealed in the Needs Assessment Summary Report and Consumer Satisfaction Surveys.  The final meeting was conducted in Federal Fiscal Year (FFY) 2011, to ratify the State Plan by majority vote.  The NSRC publicly noticed the opportunity to review the proposed amendments to the State Plan.  A public meeting was held on May 10, 2010; no public comments were made.

 

The NSRC sub-committee met in a public meeting on January 11, 2011 and came before the full NSRC Council for final approval of the FFY 2012 goals in a second public meeting on May 10, 2011.

 

The NSRC and the DSU jointly determined to award a contract to San Diego State, Interwork Institute to conduct a comprehensive, statewide Needs Assessment beginning in FFY 2010.  The Needs Assessment was completed on June 30, 2010 and the results presented to the NSRC on September 14, 2010 resulting in revisions of existing goals which were incorporated into the FFY 2012 State Plan.

 

·        State Plan Goals

 

A major issue discussed during NSRC meetings in FFY 2011 included State Plan revisions.  The NSRC State Plan Committee revised the goals with corresponding strategies and measurable indicators to align them with the recommendations and information revealed through the comprehensive statewide Needs Assessment, the customer satisfaction survey and sentiments expressed in NSRC meetings.  The NSRC reviewed and approved the updated goals at their May 10, 2011 meeting. 

 

·        Revisions to the Participant Services Policy and Procedures Manual

 

In FFY 2011, the DSU and NSRC jointly agreed that the previous two years spent developing, implementing, rewriting and accepting revisions to the Participant Services Policies and Procedures Manual (P&P Manual) was sufficient in FFY 2011.  The P&P Manual contains policies and procedures of general applicability pertaining to the provisions of Vocational Rehabilitation services.  The DSU and NSRC agreed to hire a contractor to gain perspectives in FFY 2011/2012 from other state models, VR Counselors, DSU and NSRC toward upgrading/rewriting the P&P Manual.

·        NSRC Training, Input and Requests to DSU

 

o      New Council Member Training has been  a Council focus  since 2009.  Additionally, the DSU  has encouraged completion of the SRC on-line training series.  As of this date, all but one of the NSRC members has received certificates of completion.

§         NSRC Member Roles and Responsibilities

§         Overview of By-laws

§         Robert’s Rules of Order

§         Nevada Open Meeting Law

§         Rehab Net Online Training Courses: The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended, and the History of Rehabilitation Programs, and The State Plan.

 

o       The NSRC requested the DSU to assist them to obtain training and become more involved in the subject of Assistive Technology Services provided by the DSU.

 

o      A presentation on Nevada Economic & Employment Trends was a subject of much attention, given the high rate of unemployment, bankruptcies and home foreclosures as Nevada led the nation in Unemployment and Economic Crisis, after a decade of prosperity.

 

o      The DSU also brought in Social Security Administration Staff to address the NSRC’s request to receive training regarding the Social Security Administration’s Ticket To Work and Self Sufficiency Program and Employment Networks (EN’s).

 

o      The DSU’s Vocational Rehabilitation employees and the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council members gathered in Reno for a two-day in-service training session in FFY 2010.  The DSU offers continuing education opportunities for  professional and para-professional staff members. NSRC members are also encouraged to attend.  The training is funded primarily through the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) In-Service Training Grant.

 

·        NSRC Recommendations to DSU

 

o       The DSU concurred with the NSRC recommendations outlined above.

This screen was last updated on Aug 4 2011 1:14PM by Heather Johnson

This agency has not requested a waiver of statewideness.

This screen was last updated on Aug 13 2009 4:28PM by Heather Johnson

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

The DSU has developed cooperative agreements with agencies external to the Workforce Investment System that are involved in serving people with disabilities. These cooperative agreements are designed to:

 

·        Remove barriers affecting the delivery of mutually beneficial services,

·        Increase the availability of resources,

·        Eliminate duplication of services, and

·        Facilitate the development of programs and competencies. 

 

The cooperative agreements include the DSU’s formal agreements with the Nevada Division of Welfare and Supportive Services (DWSS) and the Nevada Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services (MHDS).  The DSU also holds cooperative agreements with the Section 121 Native American agencies known as the Moapa Band of Paiutes and Fort Mojave Indian Tribe and a Memorandum of Understanding with the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone Tribe.

The DWSS cooperative agreement refers Welfare recipients to VR programs for completion of vocational testing and assessment. The MHDS agreement defines the procedures for timely cross-referrals and information sharing.  The agreement with MHDS also defines methods for the development of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs) through multi-disciplinary teams, funding of job placement and job coaching services, and the provision of extended follow-along services for people whose cases are closed with supported employment outcomes. Beyond these formal agreements, the DSU pursues cooperative efforts to extend the capacity of the DSU to reach and meet the needs of its diverse clientele.

 

The DSU has been collaborating with other reciprocal agencies in the delivery of service to individuals who need supportive services or assistance in activities of daily living. Working with the Aging and Disability Services Division’s Independent Living Program allows for greater community involvement and co-sharing of responsibilities and costs.  As such, the DSU and the Independent Living Program (IL) amended their Interlocal Agreement to collaboratively case manage and cost-share goods and services that meet a particular need for an individual who is a mutual client of both the Independent Living and Vocational Rehabilitation programs.  The DSU claims the state dollars paid by Independent Living as match in order to draw down federal VR dollars.

 

As well, the DSU assists the IL in the yearly consumer satisfaction survey which focuses on quality service delivery, timeliness, and goods received.  This tool allows the DSU and IL to provide more effective services through the information obtained in the survey.

The DSU has no programs with the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture.

This screen was last updated on Aug 4 2011 1:14PM by Heather Johnson

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

The coordination of services for students with disabilities is achieved through a variety of cooperative efforts. The DSU utilizes inter-local contracts and participates in statewide and local transition technical and career education activities.

 

Since FFY 2008, the DSU has continued its collaborative efforts by updating its Interagency Cooperative Agreement with the Nevada Department of Education (NDOE) in conformance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as Amended 1998. The NDOE is Nevada’s State Lead Educational Agency (LEA).  The DSU considers the NDOE as the cornerstone for statewide collaboration, facilitating participation in local school transition activities.

 

Coordination with students, parents and representatives is achieved through involving staff in consumer organizations and the participation of consumers in the DSU programs.  Staff of the DSU work with local school transition teams and conduct informational presentations at the schools, for parents and teacher assemblages, job fairs and other school-related events.  The DSU is also represented at the statewide technical and career education planning sessions.

 

Parents of students with disabilities and representatives of the Nevada PEP organization have representation on the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council.

 

The DSU has agreements with all of Nevada’s 17 school districts.  All of the agreements were updated in FFY-2008 and went into effect July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2012.  They reflect the intent of the NDOE cooperative agreement for coordination of services designed to meet the educational, vocational and independent living needs of students with disabilities.  The DSU has identified that the development of individualized relationships between rehabilitation and education staff is critical to the delivery of comprehensive services. Statewide, rehabilitation counselors and technicians have been identified to serve as designated liaisons with the individual high school programs.  DSU staff members actively participate in Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings and are available to provide other consultation, outreach and IEP development assistance and informational support.

 

An Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is jointly developed either in consultation with the Special Education Team or directly with the consumer and/or their parent or guardian depending on the individual’s preference.  The IPE is agreed to and signed before the student leaves the school by the rehabilitation counselor and the student, or the parent or guardian if the student is not of the Age of Majority.

 

The DSU’s Bureau of Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI) collaborated with the Clark County School District in the assessment of assistive technologies specific to the needs of visually impaired students.  BSBVI Staff participate in transition workshops to provide group and individual training of students with visual impairments.

 

In 2006 the DSU, in agreement with the Clark County School District, entered into a contract with Easter Seals, Southern Nevada to provide Transition Service Coordinators or liaisons between the school district professionals, rehabilitation counselors, parents and students.  The program is named “Transition Connect.” The coordinators work under the guidance of a rehabilitation counselor to identify and encourage students to apply for services, assist with implementation of Individual Plans for Employment and job readiness. Linkages between school professionals and vocational rehabilitation counselors have been strengthened through this process.

 

In 2008, the DSU also negotiated contracts with ASAP Services, Inc. for Southern Nevada and Easter Seals Sierra Nevada for Northern and Rural Nevada to provide student transition services. These contracts have been extended to September 30, 2011. DSU management and transition staff coordinates kick-off meetings with each School District in order to introduce the “Transition Connect” program and contract staff.  In partnership with each school district, DSU management staff conducts routine communication in the form of conference calls and meetings, in order to discuss any participant-specific need or program issue.

 

For several years, the DSU, in collaboration with the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), ASAP Employment Services, and the Clark County School District, has provided a week long College Preparatory Summer Camp for ten 11th and 12th grade transition students at the UNLV campus.  The DSU presents the Clark County School District’s Youth Educational Success (YES) Program to the students interested in going to college.  The program’s short-term goal is to help participants break down barriers to consider college as a choice with the long-term goal of increasing the percentage of students going to college.  The program’s success increases participant numbers to 20 in 2010. The DSU, in collaboration with Rebuilding All Goals Efficiently (RAGE) and the University of Nevada’s Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) held a week long Summer Camp in June 2011.  The DSU is extending this program to students in northern and rural Nevada.

 

Additionally, in summer of 2010 the DSU partnered with the University of Nevada, Reno, Washoe County School District and Sierra Regional Center to offer northern transition students the opportunity to explore their areas of vocational interest first hand.  Site visits were set up and approximately 45 students met with employers and had an opportunity to job shadow.  On-the-Job Training opportunities were then extended to employers interested in offering this training to students.

 

The Southern District has three full-time rehabilitation counselors, one part-time rehabilitation counselor and two rehabilitation technicians dedicated to coordinating transition services.  Clark county school District has 47 high schools which necessitates a dedicated counseling staff and support services. 

 

The Northern District, which covers four counties and eleven high schools, has identified twelve rehabilitation counselors who work with transition students in addition to carrying a caseload of VR clients.  In addition, we have entered into an Interlocal agreement with the Washoe County School District Transition Team and have co-located a dedicated transition counselor and technician team to work exclusively on co-enrolled cases. It is estimated that this team will successfully close fifteen transition cases this next year, and will grow to a full thirty cases anticipated the following year.

 

The DSU’s Rural District currently has inter-local agreements with the twelve school districts it serves.  Each of the five rural rehabilitation counselors is assigned to a specific geographical area that serves all school districts within their designated area in addition to carrying a caseload of VR clients.  In summary, there are eighteen vocational rehabilitation counselors which include one counselor specifically designated to assist with visually impaired individuals and provide outreach and vocational rehabilitation services to transition students.

 

In February 2006, the DSU entered into an inter-local agreement with the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE), a state-sponsored higher education system composed of the University of Nevada, Reno; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Nevada State College; College of Southern Nevada; Great Basin College; Truckee Meadows Community College; and Western Nevada College.

 

The agreement outlines the roles and responsibilities of both the DSU and NSHE when providing mutual services to Transition Students.  The agreement also establishes the provision of services by each entity and reimbursement to the DSU for services rendered.  The process for resolving disputes regarding which entity is responsible for payment has been included.  This agreement has been updated and is in effect from July 1, 2008 through June 30, 2012.

 

In FFY08, the DSU created a cooperative agreement with the University of Nevada, Reno, Research and Educational Planning Center, Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities (NCED) to provide assistive technology (AT) services to individuals with disabilities.  This cooperative agreement has been extended through June 30, 2012 with the intent that it will continue to be extended as long as funding is available for the project.  Vocational rehabilitation and independent living participants are referred to the NCED laboratory for assistive technology needs assessments, training, demonstrations and hands-on trial services.  The DSU provides AT equipment based on participant need after receiving recommendations from NCED.  This is an Adaptive Resources Grant funded through the Nevada Department of Heath and Human Services (DHHS).

 

Should the grant lose funding, the DSU will continue to provide computer hardware and software needed to perform AT assessments and training for individuals with disabilities on a fee for service basis.  An independent assistive technology lab with the newest AT equipment is currently being assembled in the DSU’s Reno Vocational Rehabilitation Office.  In addition to traditional AT, this lab will have a heavy emphasis on AT for the blind and visually impaired. Staff will continue training to develop internal expertise in the field of assistive technology.  The goal is to continue assessing the needs of and providing AT equipment to vocational rehabilitation and independent living participants.  Arrangements are being made for assessments and training of assistive technology for rural Nevada vocational rehabilitation participants.

 

Currently, the DSU also refers Older Blind Independent Living clients and Life Skills clients to NCED for assessment and training under a fee for service arrangement.

 

This screen was last updated on Aug 3 2011 4:55PM by Heather Johnson

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

The DSU utilizes cooperative agreements and direct purchase methods to coordinate the provision of consultative, evaluative and rehabilitation services.  Direct purchase arrangements for consultative, evaluative and rehabilitation services are based on a comparison of available service provider expertise to identify potential vendors.  The DSU then negotiates an hourly rate of payment roughly based on the Medicare reimbursement schedule when appropriate.

 

The DSU directly purchases most job placement and job coaching services on a structured fee for services basis.  The fee-for-service arrangements require eligible participants to meet the terms of a standard agreement for service provision, and insurance and licensing requirements.  The fee-for-service payment for job development is outcome-based, wherein contractors are only paid for attaining employment objectives for each consumer assigned to them.  The largest benchmark payment for job development is for attaining a 90-day competitive employment.

 

In the past, the cumulative fee for each successful closure has been $2000.00, paid at milestone intervals.  Starting SFY 2012, the fee will increase to $3000.00, acknowledging the impact economic trends have had on the job market.  The FFY 2011 such agreements include:

 

·  Action Career Services – Job development and placement in Washoe County

·  AK Consulting – Job development and placement in Washoe County

·  Allison, Brown & Collegae, Inc. – Job development and placement in Washoe County

·  American Rehabilitation Corp – Job development and placement in Clark County

·  ASAP Services – Selective job development and placement in Clark County

·  Career Builders of Southern Nevada –  Job development, job placement and job coaching in Clark County

·  Clinton, Robert – Job development and placement in Washoe County

·  Compatible Job Placement Partners – Job development and placement in Clark County and Las Vegas area

·  Damaza Business Support Services LLC – Job development and placement in Statewide Nevada

·  GNJ Family Life Center – Job development and placement in Clark and Nye Counties

·  Grade A Tutoring – Job development and placement in White Pine County

·  Groves, Denise – Job development and placement in Elko County

·  Gustavson Disability Placement – Job development and placement in Washoe County

·  Haugen & Keck Employment Consulting – Job development and placement in Carson City and Douglas County

·  Himmelreich Rehab Services – Job development and placement Statewide Nevada

·  Howden, Ed & Associates – Job development and placement Statewide Nevada

·  Humboldt Human Development Services – Job development and placement in Humboldt, Pershing, Lander, Elko, and Churchill Counties

·  Large, Cassandra – Job development and placement in White Pine, Eureka, Lincoln and Nye Counties

·  Life Coaching Service – Job development and placement in Washoe County

·  Job Finders – Job development and placement in Clark County

·  Murray, Ruth – Job development and placement in the Pahrump area

·  Opportunity Village – Job development and placement in Clark County.

·  Ormsby Association for Retarded Citizens – Job development and placement in the Carson City area

·  Preston, Barnard – Job development and placement in Clark County

·  Ravnikar, Jamie, Job Development – Job Development and placement in Elko County

·  Rebuilding All Goals Efficiently (RAGE) – Job development and placement in Clark County

·  Rural Nevada Life Skills – Job development and placement in Statewide Nevada

·  Special Employment Services Inc. – Job development and placement in Clark County

·  ST Gregg & Associates – Job development and placement in Clark County

·  Sumner, Diane – Job development and placement in Washoe County

·  T & K Consultants, LLC - Job development and placement in Carson City Transitions

·  Trails at the Lake – Job development and placement in Douglas County and Carson City

·  Useful Skills LLC – Job development and placement in Washoe County

·  Washoe ARR – Job development and placement in Washoe County

·  Wellness, Redemption and  Rehabilitation Program, Inc. – Job development and placement in Clark County

·  Wendy C. Wasula – Job development and placement in Clark County

·  Ormsby Association for Retarded Citizens – Job development and placement in Carson City

·  Woods Image 2 Counseling – Job development and placement in Clark County

 

This screen was last updated on Aug 4 2011 1:14PM by Heather Johnson

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

The DSU has long-standing relationships with many partners both within and without the workforce system that are designed to effectively identify eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities and to achieve the maximum success in assisting individuals with most significant disabilities into successful employment outcomes.  Current efforts are focused in building more effective partnerships and relationships with entities throughout the state that support efforts to provide the most effective outreach to identify individuals with the most significant disabilities who may benefit from supported employment services and to expand employment opportunities.

 

Supported employment services are arranged with entities (i.e. individual employers) that provide supports on-the-job, co-workers or job coaches.  Natural supports are encouraged and monitored by the supported employment provider.  Most supported employment programs are found in our larger counties:  Clark and Washoe.  Supported employment opportunities in our rural counties come largely from individual employers utilizing natural supports.

 

The DSU continues to review, revise and expand cooperative agreements with agencies and entities such as community mental health centers, regional centers that work with individuals with developmental disabilities, and community rehabilitation services providers.

 

The DSU currently collaborates with all State of Nevada Community Mental Health and Regional Centers for supported employment service provision to participants with the most significant disabilities.  Both formal and informal agreements have been developed at the local level with service providers who utilize state of Nevada Mental Health and Developmental Services (MHDS) funding as the primary source of long-term support.  Services consist of assessments, job selection, job development and stabilization services.

 

The DSU will continue to work collaboratively with the MHDS, Washoe Ability Resource Center, Ormsby Association of Carson City and Fallon/Fernley Industries to provide quality training via Interwork Institute at San Diego State University on fundamentals of supported employment.  There currently is no certification process for supported employment service providers.  The training provided through San Diego State University is essential in assuring that personnel who provide supported employment services have the necessary skills, values, and tools to deliver effective services.

 

Other sources of potential funding for supported employment have been identified.  They are:

 

  • Social Security Work Incentives-Plan for Achieving Self-Support (PASS) and Impairment Related Work Expenses (IRWE).
  • Natural Supports.

Currently there are several agencies within the community that provide the needed long term support to our participants that have been identified and meet the criteria for supported employment.  Depending on the participant’s severity of cognitive disability they would be referred to one of three community agencies for this service.

 

1.      Desert Regional Center, Las Vegas, Nevada

Sierra Regional Center, Reno, Nevada

Rural Regional Centers: Carson City, Gardnerville, Fallon, Winnemucca, Elko, Nevada

 

If a participant has a diagnosis of a developmental disability, the agencies listed above would provide long term follow along for eligible DSU participants.  They receive community training funds, which allow them to open cases and provide long term, follow along services for the duration of their employment needs. Rehabilitation counselors coordinate services with Regional Center case managers to ensure that this connection is made before the participant’s case is closed as successfully employed.

 

2.      Southern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services, Las Vegas, Nevada

            Northern Nevada Adult Mental Health Services, Reno, Nevada

Rural Clinics Community Mental Health Centers:  Carson City, Gardnerville, Silver Springs, Fallon, Elko, Ely, Battle Mountain, Lovelock, Caliente and Winnemucca, Nevada

 

When mental illness has been identified as the disability and it is determined that the rehabilitation participant meets the criteria for supported employment, the rehabilitation counselor will work with public and private mental health service providers to assist in obtaining long-term supported services.

 

3.      Nevada Community Enrichment Program (NCEP), Las Vegas, Nevada

 

            Participants with a diagnosis of traumatic brain injury who also meet the criteria for supported employment are referred to NCEP to receive follow along services once their rehabilitation case is closed as successfully employed.  NCEP often refers individuals with a disability to the DSU for placement services.  The DSU and NCEP staffs coordinate services; once a job placement is made, NCEP case managers will provide the long-term follow up.

 

4.  Natural Supports

 

When supported employment participants do not meet the eligibility requirements for one of the above community resources for long-term support, rehabilitation counselors will identify other natural supports that can be utilized.  Often family members, such as parents, siblings or spouses can assist.  Also, members of various advocacy groups may serve as a natural support. Counselors may work closely with the employer to identify a coworker who can provide the long term follow along and supportive services that an individual may require to retain successful employment.

 

o       In August 2009, the DSU Administration and Program Services attended planning sessions with the Department of Health and Human Services, Mental Health and Developmental Services Division, NV Center for Excellence in Disabilities, Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities with each of these community partners representing the Employment Summit Steering Committee.  Information and Statistics were obtained from RSA data, Cornell University studies, Employment Leadership Networks and national Developmental Disability and Technical Assistance entities.  These planning sessions culminated in Statewide Employment Summits that created a programmatic focus for agencies, programs and people who serve Nevadans with developmental disabilities.  The Summits were held in May and June of 2010 in the Northern, Southern and Rural Nevada Regions and were attended by 231 people from 31 agencies and programs.  The DSU, as well as other agencies, sent trained Facilitators to all of the Summits.  The outcomes and learning from the summits have already resulted in greater collaboration by agencies and several offshoot programs and opportunities.  Six identified priorities were used as the basis for the $750,000, 2011 Medicaid Infrastructure Grants in Nevada. 

Starting in June 2011, BVR is entering in to an inter-local agreement with UNR/Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities and the Sierra Regional Center. The intent is to identify those individuals at the Regional Center who are best prepared for competitive employment.  Collaboratively, a team of the Regional Center case manager, the BVR counselor and the NCED job developer will work to develop customized employment opportunities.  Service highlights include unique, interest-based workplace assessment, a video resume, job carving and identification of long term supports.  These services will be much more individualized and intensive than the traditional model.  The fee for each placement will be $4500.00, recognizing the impact of this economy and the historic challenges those with cognitive disabilities have faced in the workplace.  It is anticipated that this pilot will generate 30 successful closures from this referral source.

This screen was last updated on Aug 4 2011 1:14PM by Heather Johnson

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

The Rehabilitation Division, as the DSU, has established the following procedures and activities setting forth the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD), which will ensure an adequate supply of qualified Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals for the operation of the vocational Rehabilitation programs.

 

The CSPD is coordinated by the Administrator of the DSU with the participation of: the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC); Human Resources staff of the Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR); and staff of the Bureaus of Vocational Rehabilitation (BVR) and Services to the Blind and Visually Impaired (BSBVI).

 

(a)  Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

 

DETR’s personnel records enable an annual analysis of the numbers and types of Rehabilitation personnel.  Through the State of Nevada Personnel Department database, information on budgeted positions, duration of vacancy for each position and vacancy rates are available through a data warehouse system.

 

In addition, a personnel log is maintained at the agency level, delineating the location, type of position and date vacated, in order to provide current tracking of vacancies including the status of each vacant position.  This tracking mechanism has proved successful in reducing the vacancy rate and the amount of time that each position is vacant.  All the sources of information are used to track and forecast the DSU’s personnel needs.

 

Through collaboration with San Diego State University and TACE, we are close to taking delivery of a CORE accredited on-line study curriculum entitled E-Rehab.

 

(1)     Qualified Personnel Needs

 

(A)  The number of qualified personnel for VR is allocated in biennial legislative sessions based on the projected needs of the DSU and available funding. In FFY 2010 there were 140 positions (including vacancies) within the DSU to provide support, administration and vocational rehabilitation services with the following breakdown.

 

(B) The DSU had 6,479 applications and eligible individuals with disabilities (this number includes carry-overs) in FFY 2010, including individuals with significant disabilities.  The ratio of authorized rehabilitation counselor positions serving the vocational rehabilitation program (46 FTEs) in Nevada was 1 to 129 program participants.  This ratio of rehabilitation counselor to participants is in the mid-range as compared to other VR agencies.  The current caseload average statewide is 70 participants per counselor. The current staffing levels are sufficient for the number of participants seeking services, as evidenced by the low average caseload and the fact that the DSU passed 6 of the 7 RSA performance indicators for FFY 2010.

 

The following projection for personnel needs is based on the projected population increase for Nevada, applying that same increase to the vocational rehabilitation participant numbers served, as depicted in the following chart:

 

Federal Fiscal Year

Population Increase *

Determined Eligible

Applications and Eligibilities

VR Counselor Projection (1 to 129 Participants)

VR Technician Projection (1 to 2 Counselors)

2010

 

3,145

6,479

50

29

2011

0.0%

3,145

6,479

50

29

2012

0.3%

3,239

6,673

52

29

2013

0.3%

3,336

6,873

53

29

2014

0.1%

3,369

6,942

54

29

2015

1.0%

3,706

7,636

59

29

*          Based on data obtained from the State Demographer’s Office (Population Projections for Nevada’s Counties 2010 – 2030).

 

(C)       Projections of the Number and Type of Personnel Needed in 5 Years

 

The DSU anticipates that a minimum of 52 counseling positions will be necessary to achieve the goals of increased services and successful employment outcomes.  The DSU currently employs 46 counselors.

 

Using the above projections and assuming an overall vacancy rate (for all reasons) for Rehabilitation counselors and technicians of 10%, the DSU will need to hire a total of 13 additional vocational Rehabilitation counselors in the next five years and replace 22 vacated positions.  The DSU will not need to hire any additional Rehabilitation technicians for the next 5 years, however, the DSU will need to replace 12 vacated positions.  These projections for the next five years will be sufficient to provide services to all individuals with disabilities including those with the most significant disabilities. 

 

Currently there are eight Vocational Rehabilitation supervisors, each of whom can supervise up to eight direct reports. With the increase in Vocational Rehabilitation counselors, eight supervisors will be sufficient to provide the oversight necessary to ensure quality services to individuals with disabilities.  Current staffing levels for Account Clerks, Administrative Assistants, Rehabilitation Instructors, Vocational Evaluators and administrative staff will not require an increase in the next five years.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Administration Office 3 0 0
2 Operations Unit (BVR and BSBVI) 9 0 0
3 Program Services (BVR and BSBVI) 5 1 0
4 Northern District (BVR and BSBVI) 46 0 0
5 Rural District (BVR and BSBVI) 9 1 0
6 Southern District (BVR and BSBVI) 65 1 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

Historically, none of Nevada’s institutions of higher education have offered Council On Rehabilitation Education (CORE)-accredited programs for vocational Rehabilitation professionals. Currently, all DSU Rehabilitation counselors have Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) credentials or are eligible to sit for the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) national examination, with the exception of three counselors who are enrolled in a CORE-accredited Master’s degree program. These three Rehabilitation counselors have 36 months from the date of hire to meet the standards. The following provides information regarding the status of the number of staff completing their certifications:

 

  • The Southern District’s Rehabilitation Counselor I that was hired in 2008 has been stationed in the DSU’s Henderson JobConnect office. She was enrolled in classes through San Diego State University and she has completed all coursework and is in the process of submitting her paper work to CRCC to be determined eligible to sit for the CRC.
  • The Southern District’s Rehabilitation Counselor I that was hired in 2010 has enrolled with on line training program through San Diego State University.  She has completed 2 classes, and is currently enrolled in one class. She will need to take 2 additional classes that will be completed by January 2012 and at that time she should be eligible to sit for the CRC exam.
  • The Northern District’s Rehabilitation Counselor I began an online training at Texas Tech University in November 2008.  She has completed all course work and has been determined eligible to sit for the CRC.  She has been promoted to a Rehabilitation Counselor II.
  • The Northern District’s Rehabilitation Counselor that was taking on-line training through the University of Arkansas has completed all of her coursework.  It is anticipated that once she completes her 36 months of supervised employment in August 2011 she then will apply for her CRC eligibility.
  • There are two counselors attending SDSU who are receiving scholarships for their programs, with the agreement to continue working for the DSU for a three-year period.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 San Diego State University 4 0 0 0
2 Texas Tech University 1 0 0 0
3 University of Arkansas 1 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

Since 1994, the DSU and San Diego State University (SDSU) have collaborated on Nevada’s CSPD. Nevada’s CSPD applies an integrated human resources systems approach which is described below in the sections on personnel standards and personnel development. The DSU has also strengthened recruitment efforts through contact and discussion with SDSU and other CORE-accredited universities and colleges that provide Masters’ degrees in Rehabilitation counseling, resulting in improvement of Nevada’s access to qualified Rehabilitation professionals.  The DSU and SDSU have also built on this foundation by offering distance education opportunities to Rehabilitation counselors for continuing education credits.

 

The DSU works closely with Nevada Department of Personnel and the DSU’s Human Resources Section to recruit and hire qualified personnel for positions within the Division.  The DSU currently has four vacant Rehabilitation Counselor positions statewide. The projections also show that in the next five years the DSU will need to hire a total of thirteen additional vocational Rehabilitation counselors and replace 22 vacated positions.  The DSU will not need to hire any additional Rehabilitation technician positions, however twelve vacated positions will need to be replaced.  The DSU has offered specialized training through the SDSU Interwork Institute program for Rehabilitation Counselors.  The training focuses on emerging trends and the following topics: 

 

  • A Balancing Act: Ethical Rights and Responsibilities
  • Social Security: SSI, SSDI, PASS and Ticket to Work
  • Job Analysis in Rehabilitation Services
  • Benefits Planning and Work Incentives
  • Stress Management
  • Ethics:  Review of the CRC Code of Ethics
  • Tools for Developing Successful Placements
  • Positive Employment Outcomes via Partnership Development
  • Transition-Work After High School
  • Mental Health and Co-Occurring Disabilities in Employment
  • Develop Meaningful Employer Relationship - Positive Placements
  • Customized Employment and Where Do We Go From Here?

The DSU is working with SDSU to develop an “e-rehab “learning tool. This will be an online training for Rehabilitation Counselors.  The online curriculum consists of 9 modules, and at the end of each module there is a quiz.  Upon successful completion of each module, individuals can achieve a certificate that is applicable for continuing education units with the national Certified Rehabilitation Counselor program.  In addition to the Counselor “e-rehab” training tool we are also developing an “e-rehab” tool for job developers and job coaches.  This curriculum will consist of four training modules. 

 

Module 1:  Overview, Key Values and Concepts

Module 2:  Informed Choice

Module 3:  Decision Making and Ethics

Module 4:  Determining Eligibility

Module 5:  Assessment of Vocational Needs

Module 6:  IPE and Provision of Services

Module 7:  Job Ready and Employment

Module 8:  Case Closure

Module 9:  Case Management and Case Documentation.

 

NV DETR Job Development Training Series:  Creating Employment Opportunities.  The modules in the series are the following:

 

Module 1:  Introduction to Job Development and the Role of the Job Developer

Module 2:  Getting to Know Your Customer

Module 3:  The Employer as Partner

Module 4:  Job Placement and Retention Services.

 

The DSU is also in contact with SDSU to provide updated specialized training for Rehabilitation Technicians employed by the Division. Additionally, the DSU provided private, statewide Microsoft Outlook training available to all staff to promote computer-based organizational skills.  

 

The DSU regularly contacts and/or visits CORE-accredited programs including those closest to Nevada, such as the California State University (Fresno and Sacramento campuses), Arizona State University, and Utah State University for recruitment prospects. 

 

The DSU provides outreach through disability groups and organizations serving individuals from minority populations.  The DSU also dedicates funding for the provision of reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities who need assistance to perform the essential functions of their jobs. Examples include interpreters, flexible work schedules and assistive technology.  The DSU continues to seek funding resources for education-related costs and has received in-service training grants from the U.S. Department of Education to help support our ongoing education program.  In the DSU’s Southern District, a designated Rehabilitation Technician assists with transporting two Rehabilitation Counselor Instructors with a vision disability to various program-related work sites and participant-related meetings.

 

Nevada has worked with and completed two paid internships as of June 30, 2011.  The individuals participating in this internship, accrued sick days and vacation days and received health insurance, group life insurance and other employee benefits upon their date of hire. Nevada had one intern working in the Carson City JobConnect office in 2010.  She completed her internship, graduated from Utah State University and become employed with the DSU in 2010.  The DSU currently has another individual working in this Public Service Intern position.  She has completed her Master’s Program with Northern Colorado University and graduated in May 2011.

 

The DSU has established policies and procedures to ensure that professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained.

 

1.   The State of Nevada does not have state-approved or other recognized certification, licensing or registration requirements that apply to personnel who are providing vocational Rehabilitation services. The determination of applicants who are qualified Rehabilitation staff is based on State Department of Personnel’s interpretation of  the Division’s minimum qualifications

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2.   The DSU appoints individuals as Rehabilitation counselors who:

 

·        Have a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling from a CORE-accredited program and who are eligible to sit for the national certification examination; or

·        Have a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling that was not fully accredited by CORE at the time the applicant’s degree was granted and who are eligible to sit for the national certification examination; or

·        Have a Master’s degree granted by a college or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting body at the time the degree was conferred and who are eligible to sit for the national certification examination.

·        Have a Master’s degree granted by a college or university accredited by a recognized regional accrediting body at the time the degree was conferred and who can achieve eligibility to sit for the national certification examination by committing to an approved Employee Educational Plan (EEP) within 90 days of the date of hire and completing the necessary EEP coursework, at employee expense, within 36 months of the date of hire.

·        As stated above, Nevada is currently working with and looking to recruit students from over the nation’s CORE approved universities that offer a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling, nationwide, as a paid internship with the DSU. The salaried paid internship allows DSU to attract and recruit candidates for VR Counselor positions who have a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation while they are still in school and before they are recruited by other agencies. While interns are working with the DSU, they accrue sick days and vacation days and receive health insurance, group life insurance and other employee benefits at the date of hire.  When completing said internship, they can, if there are vacant positions available, move into a Rehabilitation Counselor II position within the DSU provided that they meet all hiring requirements. This change adds an additional employment incentive for Public Service Intern candidates to choose to work for Nevada’s DSU.

 

3.   It is the preference of the DSU to hire Rehabilitation teaching staff, which includes Orientation and Mobility Instructors and Rehabilitation Instructors who must:

 

·        Hold a Master’s degree in a Rehabilitation related field (e.g. Rehabilitation counseling, Rehabilitation orientation and mobility, Rehabilitation teaching, low vision specialist) granted by a college or university accredited by a regional accrediting body at the time the degree was conferred and are eligible to sit for the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals (ACVREP) certification examination; or

·        Hold a Bachelor’s degree in a Rehabilitation related field (e.g. Rehabilitation counseling, teacher of the visually impaired, Rehabilitation teaching, low vision specialist) and a minimum of one year of training and/or employment as an Orientation and Adjustment Instructor working with individuals who are blind or visually impaired and who hold ACVREP certification or are eligible for certification; or

·        Hold an initial or renewable professional certification in Rehabilitation Teaching or Orientation and Mobility from the ACVREP.

 

4.   The DSU currently has three Orientation and Mobility instructors and four Rehabilitation Instructors employed with the agency statewide.

 

5.   The DSU paraprofessional staff has the job title, Rehabilitation Technician.  Minimum qualifications at the Rehabilitation Technician II level include one year of experience in a Rehabilitation setting, which involves interactive relationships with individuals with disabilities. All Rehabilitation technicians have met the minimum qualifications. The DSU currently has thirty-one Rehabilitation Technicians employed with the agency statewide.

 

6.   The DSU hires or promotes Vocational Evaluators who have a Master’s degree in Vocational Rehabilitation with emphasis on vocational evaluation; or have a Bachelor’s degree in vocational Rehabilitation or vocational evaluation and one year of professional experience providing vocational assessment and work adjustment services for injured workers and clients with disabilities in a Rehabilitation setting. The Vocational Evaluators meet the minimum qualifications. The DSU currently has seven Vocational Evaluators positions with the agency statewide. The DSU had one additional evaluation position that was vacant and this position will be eliminated effective 7/1/2011 due to budget cuts.

 

7.   The DSU currently has eight Rehabilitation Supervisors employed with the agency statewide. The DSU hires or promotes Rehabilitation Supervisors who possess current national certification or are eligible to sit for the national examination, in addition to meeting the minimum standards for one-year management and supervisory experience in Vocational Rehabilitation. National certification standards require supervision by individuals who hold current credentials. To provide a mechanism to attract Rehabilitation counselor interns and enable current Rehabilitation professional staff to qualify for national certification, Nevada employs supervisory personnel who hold these credentials. Currently, all supervisory staff is CRCC certified or are eligible to sit for the CRCC exam and meet the minimum qualifications.

 

8.   DSU hires or promotes Rehabilitation District Managers who also possess current national certification or are eligible to sit for the national examination, in addition to meeting the minimum standards for two years management and supervisory experience in vocational Rehabilitation. He/she must have a working knowledge of federal and state laws and regulations applicable to programs for persons with disabilities; principles and practices of management and public administration; program development, implementation and evaluation; budget development and administration; social, economic, educational and vocational trends including high demand occupations and related labor market demand; principles of organizational structure, analysis and design; medical, social, vocational, psychological and independent living needs of persons with disabilities; state and federal trends impacting programs and services. Currently, the two District Managers employed with the agency statewide are CRCC certified or are eligible to sit for the CRCC exam and meet the minimum qualifications

 

9.   The DSU hires or promotes the Chief who also possesses current national certification or is eligible to sit for the national examination, in addition to meeting the minimum standards for three years management and supervisory experience in Vocational Rehabilitation including responsibility for program planning, development and implementation, interpretation and application of regulations, budget development and managing professional personnel. The Chief must have a working knowledge of quality management; effective change management; programmatic and operational aspects of related agencies at local, regional and national levels; program policies and procedures; and, state budget development and monitoring processes. The Chief is CRCC certified and meets the minimum standards. The DSU currently has one Chief of Program Services employed with the agency statewide.

 10.    The DSU hires or promotes the Deputy Administrators that meet the minimum standards as set by the State of Nevada. The Deputy Administrators must have a Bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university in business or public administration, education, human services or other relevant field and five years of experience supervising and managing comprehensive, complex programs and budgets, and professional personnel.  Entry level knowledge includes a working knowledge of principles and methods of administration and management including budget and personnel administration and staff development, coordination and supervision, principles and techniques used in planning, organizing, developing and administrating comprehensive programs which are subject to unprecedented circumstances, strategic and program planning principles and practices, State Legislative processes to include drafting legislative bills and position statements; state and federal laws, regulations and administrative processes. Both Deputy Administrators meet the minimum qualifications. The DSU currently has two Deputy Administrators employed with the agency statewide, one Deputy Administration oversees Operations, and the other oversees Program Services.

 

11.   The Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation Director appoints the Administrator based on the requirements of Nevada Revised Statute (NRS) 232.945.  The Administrator serves at the pleasure of the Director.  The current Administrator attained a Bachelor’s in History & Political Science from the University of Nevada, Reno and a law degree from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, Oregon.  Her employment history includes the Peace Corps in Venezuela, South America; the Nevada Equal Rights Commission; Equal Employment Opportunity Officer for DETR; Administrator of the State Job Training Office; Equal Opportunity and Training Manager for the City of Reno; Washoe Affordable Housing; and the Business Enterprises of Nevada program before becoming Nevada’s Rehabilitation Division Administrator. 

 

The DSU currently has one Division Administrator employed with the agency Statewide.

 

12.   The DSU hires or promotes Management Analysts (MA). All Management Analysts meet the minimum qualifications:

 

·              The MAIII must have a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent and three years of professional experience in research, development, evaluation or revision of programs, organizations, methods or procedures.  He/she must have a general knowledge of financial statements and statistical methods required to analyze, project and present fiscal effects; governmental accounting, auditing, financial reporting and/or research/statistical methods.

·              The MAII must have a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent and two years of professional experience in development, evaluation or revision of programs, organizations, methods or procedures. He/she must have a working knowledge of legislative proceedings and processes; state government agencies, resources and functions sufficient to locate and obtain needed information and/or resources.

·              The MAI must have a Bachelor’s degree or equivalent and one year of professional experience in development, evaluation or revision of programs, organizations, methods or procedures. He/she must have a general knowledge of research and analysis techniques and methodologies; governmental accounting and budgeting; management and public administration concepts; principles and practices sufficient to assist in evaluating, developing and recommending effective administrative and/or operational policies and procedures for the work unit; and various computer software including word processing, spreadsheet and database applications.

·              The DSU currently has four Management Analysts employed with the agency statewide.

                          

13.   The DSU hires or promotes Business Process Analysts (BPA). Business Process Analysts meet the minimum qualifications:

 

·              The BPA II must have a Bachelor’s degree and two years of professional level experience in a related program area analyzing, interpreting, and implementing program laws, regulations, policies and procedures, which include one year of experience applying recognized data processing concepts to business process planning or analyses or equivalent and have a working knowledge of system documentation principles; data processing concepts including general database, system security, data communication, and multiple platform strengths and weaknesses; and, business process planning and analysis

·              The BPA I must have a Bachelor’s degree and two years of professional level experience in a related program area analyzing, interpreting, and implementing program laws, regulations, policies and procedures, which includes one year of experience applying recognized data processing concepts to business process planning or analyses or equivalent and have a working knowledge of a variety of end-user tools and applications and DETR policies and procedures in relation to other departments, agencies, organizations and business customers.

 

·              The DSU currently has two Business Process Analysts employed with the agency statewide.

 

14.  The DSU hires or promotes Administrative Assistants (AA).  All AA’s meet minimum qualifications):

 

·              The AAIV must have graduated from high school or equivalent and have four years of progressively responsible relevant work experience which included experience in one or more of the following areas: providing administrative/program support to professional staff and management; performing secretarial duties in support of a manager; coordinating communications between the manager, staff and program clientele; supervision of subordinate staff; researching information from internal and external sources and sufficient working knowledge of software.  He/she must have a working knowledge of functions and operation of an administrative office and/or program area, principles of supervision and training if applicable to the assignment, maintenance of budget and financial records if applicable to the assignment.

·              The AAIII must have graduated from high school or equivalent and have three years of progressively responsible relevant work experience which included experience in one or more of the following areas: maintenance of complex records and files; public/customer relations including explaining detailed policies, regulations and requirements; preparation and processing of financial and statistical documents such as payroll, travel, claims and budgeting forms; and assisting staff and management with projects and activities.  He/she must have a working knowledge of functions and operation of an administrative assistant; operation and use of word processing; spreadsheet, database management and other associated business.

·              The AAII must have graduated from high school or equivalent and have two years of progressively responsible relevant work experience which included experience in one or more of the following areas; maintaining records and files; preparing a variety of materials using a personal computer or word processor; assisting customers in completing forms and applications; and or performing secretarial duties in support of professional staff. He/she must have a working knowledge of administrative support functions.

·              The AAI must have graduated from high school or equivalent and have one year of progressively responsible, relevant work experience which included experience in one or more of the following areas; maintaining records, answering telephones, and reviewing forms, documents and other written materials. He/she must have a working knowledge of standard office procedures, practices and methods; word processing software; data entry techniques; record keeping techniques; and telephone etiquette.

·              The DSU currently has seventeen Administrative Assistants employed with the agency statewide.

 

15.    The DSU hires or promotes Accounting Assistants who meet the minimum qualifications:

 

·              The Accounting Assistant III positions must have graduated from high school or equivalent education and three years of progressively responsible clerical accounting experience which included duties such as responsibility for accounts payable, accounts receivable, payroll and/or other accounting data; setting up computer spreadsheets to record, track, manipulate and report data; researching and interpreting financial data to prepare reports and respond to budget and account-related inquiries; and reconciling accounts. He/she must have a knowledge of clerical accounting principles, practices and techniques, budgeting and funding regulations, practices and procedures; payroll, accounts payable and accounts receivable functions sufficient to recognize discrepancies, inconsistencies and errors and complete the required documents and procedures to make corrections; computer spreadsheet techniques sufficient to record, track, manipulate and report data.

·              The Accounting Assistant II positions must have graduated from high school or equivalent education and three years of progressively responsible clerical accounting experience which included duties such as coding documents to distribute funds; preparing accounts payable and accounts receivable documents; using computer spreadsheets to record, track, manipulate and report data; balancing accounts; and identifying and applying established financial or record keeping procedures. He/she must have a working knowledge of accounting coding used to distribute funds in payroll, accounts receivable and accounts payable bookkeeping; use of computer spreadsheets to track, manipulate and record accounting related data, payroll accounts payable and accounts receivable functions; correct English usage, spelling punctuation and grammar sufficient to write standard memoranda, letters and report narratives; standard processes, procedures and methods used to reconcile accounts.

·              The Accounting Assistant I positions must have graduated from high school or equivalent education and one year of clerical experience, six months of which included accounts payable and/or accounts receivable responsibility; and the use of computer spreadsheets and a calculator by touch. He/she must have a general knowledge of clerical accounting and financial record keeping procedures; the use of accounting codes for the distribution of funds for payroll, accounts receivable and accounts payable bookkeeping; accounts payable and receivable procedures; computer spreadsheets used for bookkeeping and accounts maintenance.

·              The DSU currently has eight Accounting Assistants employed with the agency statewide.

 

All employees are provided Work Performance Standards evaluations by supervisors, at a minimum, of one time per year. Each Rehabilitation Counselor receives an annual employee appraisal of which 20% to 25% of their case load is reviewed. The review is conducted in order to monitor case management, federal and state performance indicators, vocational counseling services, eligibility and ineligibility determination, and management of case expenditures. During monthly budget meetings, discussions regarding vacant positions and projected funding for additional positions needed for the Division are addressed. At monthly and quarterly Management and Supervisory meetings, ideas regarding hiring projections, or in-process recruitments, are discussed to ensure that qualified persons are hired. This continues to be a priority topic. 

 

(1)   Educational opportunities are provided by the DSU to increase the technician’s capacity to effectively serve and interact with consumers and to provide technical support to the Rehabilitation counselor.

 

(2)   The DSU established a system for the continuing education of Rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals. It has maintained its comprehensive provision of educational assistance to ensure that all personnel who do not meet the personnel standards described previously are provided opportunities to achieve these standards.

The BVR/BSBVI Management Team and SDSU staff redesigned Nevada’s professional development model and anchors its training activities in competency-based training needs assessment.  A DSU team of Rehabilitation counselors researched the literature on effective Rehabilitation counseling practices, (e.g., Rehabilitation Skills Inventory by Michael Leahy and Pamela Shapson) and developed an inventory of competencies for Rehabilitation counselors in eleven major categories: ethical conduct; intake; preliminary assessment and eligibility determination; comprehensive assessment and service planning; service provision; placement preparation and monitoring; employer consultation; caseload management; office management; administration; and competencies specific to serving persons who are blind or visually impaired including orientation, assessment, adjustment, mobility and assistive technology.  Two other work teams developed similar competency inventories, based on skill clusters, for Rehabilitation technicians, orientation and mobility and orientation and adjustment instructors.

The DSU’s training priorities and educational strategies are driven by the counselor needs assessment data.  These needs assessments are collected from staff and supervisor; managers and administration review them for upcoming training needs.  Also, each staff are evaluated individually yearly for their work performance and are required to complete a Developmental Training Plan for the upcoming year. They can list training requests for assistance with role performance, professional maintenance and career development.  The DSU provides a training calendar and staff can request training through the DSU, DETR and/or the State of Nevada Department of Personnel. 

 

The DSU has offered ongoing training on diversity issues, developing successful job placements, ethics, leadership development and the Rehabilitation technician series.  Annual in-service training with BVR, BSBVI and the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council has been productive. Planning will continue for another statewide in-service on selected training areas. With the results of TACE’s competency inventories, a work plan is regularly developed that identifies training needs.  The DSU also provides professional development training for all staff including specialized disability training, management techniques, provision of quality customer service, internal controls, development of regulations and policy and various Microsoft word applications.

 

One Supervisor and the Deputy Administrator for Operations are currently enrolled in the San Diego State University Interwork Institute’s National Rehabilitation Leadership Institute (NRLI) Executive Leadership Seminar.  This four-part course is offered over a period of eighteen months for State directors, senior administrators and emerging leaders.  Three of the courses are provided at the SDSU campus and one course is provided at The George Washington University in Washington DC.  The seminars build sequentially on one another and serve as a four-part developmental learning process.  The one-on-one executive coaching component, provided throughout the course of the NRLI experience, allows participants to customize their learning around the 360 degree feedback information and the goals identified in their Leadership Development Plan.  The Supervisor currently attending this training will complete the training in June, 2011.  The DSU will select two Rehabilitation Supervisors to be enrolled in the next eighteen month course.

 

The Chief of Program Services and the CAP Director are currently attending the Certified Managers Program offered through the State of Nevada, Department of Personnel.  This is a two year program to support and grow professional leadership in State employees through coursework and a cap-stone project which is designed to identify and create a process improvement that will save the State money.  The expected completion date is December 2011.

 

Two rehabilitation supervisors are enrolled in Post Employment Training-Rehabilitation Administration (PET-RA), PET-RA is a year-long, academically credited, continuing education program designed for rehabilitation professionals who are managing programs for consumers.  The content study areas included are: organization diagnosis and development, leadership, human resource management, fiscal management, program evaluation, legal and legislative developments, governance, policy development and program implementation.

 

Additionally, three rehabilitation counselors and one rehabilitation supervisor received training in Psychological First-Aid for First Responders put on by the Nevada Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services, to be able to serve their community in a disaster.

 

The DSU utilizes staff, and a variety of interpreters as the need arises, in order to translate documents to Spanish. The Northern and Rural District has a number of bilingual staff who provides service to the Northern region of Nevada.  The Northern District has a bilingual Rehabilitation Counselor stationed in the Reno Shopper’s Square office and a Rehabilitation Technician stationed in the main Corporate office. There is also a Rehabilitation Counselor who is stationed in Winnemucca who is bilingual along with a Rehabilitation counselor who is housed in the Reno Sparks office that is bilingual.  The Southern District has a number of bilingual staff who provides services to the Las Vegas Hispanic community.  The DSU provides services to Hispanic consumers in each of our BVR office locations. The Southern District has (3) bilingual staff stationed in the main southern field office this includes two administrative assistants and one accounting assistant.  The NLV JobConnect office has a bilingual Rehabilitation technician along with the West Charleston office which has one Rehabilitation counselor and one Rehabilitation technician who are bilingual. W hen needed, the DSU regularly contracts with bilingual interpreters when providing services.  The DSU has a total of nine Spanish employees Statewide.  Of the nine, there are six who expend at least 20% of their time assisting participants in a bi-lingual capacity Statewide.  However, the other three Spanish speaking employees who utilize less than 20% of their time in which that combination of bilingual staff represents all JobConnect partners, and are available statewide in the JobConnect offices to provide assistance to Hispanic clients who are seeking employment services.

The DSU has set requirements for field staff working with specific disability and/or minority groups to have skills in sign language, Braille, foreign languages or other modes of communication.  Requirements also include the ability to conduct outreach activities and knowledge and skills in the culture of the specific group served. If DSU personnel are unavailable, the services of vendors or volunteers from community agencies are purchased or contracted, as needed, to communicate in the native language(s) or to communicate via sign language, of applicants and eligible individuals.  Currently, the DSU has hired one Rehabilitation counselor who is deaf in the Southern District.  This counselor signs and he/ she works with a specialty caseload providing services to clients who are deaf or hard of hearing. 

Based upon guidance from the Office of Civil Rights, the agency is developing policy regarding communication with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.  The following is a policy draft for upcoming client Policy and Procedure revision and is not yet solidified: 

(a) Federal civil rights laws require that the Rehabilitation Division (Division) ensure that its communications with individuals with disabilities are as effective as its communications with others.  To this end, the Division will ensure that appropriate auxiliary aids and services are available at no cost to meet the disability related communication needs of each participant. 

(b) When the Division determines what type of auxiliary aids or services will be provided to a participant, the Division will give primary consideration to the communication requests of the participant.  The Division offers a wide range of services, specialized aids, and supports that enable participant to access, comprehend and respond to information that is being communicated.  These include the use of American Sign Language Interpreters (ASL), Certified Deaf Interpreters (CDI), Certified Hearing Interpreters (CHI), video relay, TTY, Relay Nevada, open and closed caption video, Braille, large print materials, simple language materials, augmentative communication devices, materials in electronic format, and other modes that may be identified by the individual, or as appropriate, his/her authorized representative.  Where a participant requests an interpreter, the Division will provide interpreters who are able to convey the communications effectively, accurately, and impartially both receptively and expressively, including the ability to convey any necessary specialized vocabulary.

(c) Participants will not be required to provide their own interpreters or other auxiliary aids and services. However, if a participant makes an informed choice to use his/her own interpreter or otherwise provide their own auxiliary aids and services, the Division will respect that request.  The Division will allow a participant who specifically requests to use his or her own interpreter only if the interpreter agrees to provide such assistance and reliance on the interpreter is appropriate under the circumstances.  The Division will work with the participant on that basis and will document the participant’s decisions in the file. 

(d) Participants will receive timely information regarding the steps for requesting and obtaining auxiliary aids and services from the Division. This includes the information needed from the participant, the name and contact information of the employee responsible for receiving and acting on requests for auxiliary aids and services, the timeframes applicable to such requests, and the Division’s complaint process for raising and resolving their concerns about provision of auxiliary aids and services. 

(e) The participant’s assigned vocational rehabilitation counselor will be the point of contact for the initial requests for auxiliary aids and services.  The counselor will be responsible for ensuring the participant receives appropriate auxiliary aids and services.  At the time of scheduling orientation, all prospective applicants will be informed of the availability of auxiliary aids and services, including their availability for all written and oral communications relating to the vocational rehabilitation program, such as scheduling, administering applications, conducting intake interviews and eligibility meetings and providing benefits and services. 

(f) If a participant wishes to seek further assistance or file a complaint about auxiliary aids or services, the Division will, in accordance with its procedures, promptly address and resolve the complaints and will ensure that a participant is provided the auxiliary aids and services he or she needs to participate effectively in the Division’s programs.  The chain of command responsible for receiving and addressing concerns about auxiliary aids and services is the vocational rehabilitation counselor, the supervising vocational rehabilitation counselor, the district manager, the bureau chief for programs, the deputy administrator for programs, and the administrator.  A participant may also contact the Client Assistance Program (CAP) at any time to pursue their concerns.

(g) The Division will not provide disability accommodations that are the legal responsibility of another party or service provider.  Also, the Division is not required to provide auxiliary aids or services that it can demonstrate would result in a fundamental alteration to the vocational rehabilitation program or in an undue financial or administrative burden to the Division.  Such a decision will be made by the head of the Nevada Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation, or his or her designee, after considering all the resources available for use in the funding and operation of the vocational rehabilitation program from the Nevada Department of Employment, Training, and Rehabilitation, and will be accompanied by a written statement of the reasons for reaching that conclusion.  If the Division demonstrates that the provision of an auxiliary aid or service would result in a fundamental alteration, or an administrative or financial burden, the Division will still provide any other auxiliary aids or services that would not result in such an alteration or such burdens but would nevertheless ensure that, to the maximum extent possible, participants receive the Division’s services.

 

The activities, which are carried out under this system of personnel development are coordinated with the provisions for personnel development required under the IDEA as evidenced by the following efforts:

  

·        The Nevada DSU and the Nevada Department of Education, Office of Special Education, Elementary and Secondary Education and School Improvement Programs have a cooperative agreement, which contains provisions for the joint training of vocational Rehabilitation staff and special education personnel.

    

·        The DSU currently is working with the School Districts to provide for joint in-service training coordinated by local vocational Rehabilitation offices.  The local offices work with special education departments and technical and career education programs for the establishment of pre-vocational coordinated activities.  Future plans include an increased effort for outreach to all students with disabilities, including students with disabilities who are not enrolled in special education.

 

·        BSBVI staff has provided ongoing assistive technology training statewide for special education teachers so that they can provide this training to students who are blind or visually impaired.

 

·        Statewide, BSBVI and BVR staff attend transition team meetings with local schools and school districts to provide ongoing orientation and education regarding vocational Rehabilitation services, as well as having co-located offices with school district personnel in Washoe and Clark Counties.

 

Clark County School District’s Transition staff offer a regional conference bi-annually to the community.  The conference is called “Students Talking About the Real World” (STAR).  STAR is a program that is designed to educate families, students and professionals about transition services available in Clark County.  BSBVI and BVR are one of many agencies that participate in this program.  Our transition counselors provide information about our services that help transition students transition from school to adult life. 

 

·        BSBVI and BVR Southern District office staff attend quarterly “Students Talking About the Real World” conferences with Las Vegas area school district special education staff to provide orientation and offer VR facility tours.  Students are given the opportunity to meet with agencies, vendors, and colleges to see what services are available to assist them in meeting their goals.

 

·        The DSU and the Nevada System of Higher Education mutually developed and implemented an inter-local contract designed to facilitate the delivery of higher education opportunities to eligible students.

                                  

·        The DSU is a member of the Interagency Transition Advisory Board (ITAB).  The Board provides information and research regarding issues relating to transition students in Nevada.  The DSU Administrator is a legislatively mandated member of this board.

 

·        The DSU is a member of the Nevada Department of Education’s Nevada Transition Advisory Committee.  Their mission is to educate legislators, provide awareness campaigns to the public regarding students with disabilities, assist with self-advocacy, train providers and employers, and network building. Members of the Committee are experts in transition services and provide recommendations around best practice/compliance in transition services.

This screen was last updated on Aug 4 2011 1:14PM by Heather Johnson

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

The DSU conducts a comprehensive, statewide needs assessment every three years.  During the Spring of 2009, the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation (DETR), Rehabilitation Division, the Designated State Unit (DSU), in conjunction with the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) entered into a contract with the San Diego State University (SDSU), Interwork Institute to perform a statewide

Needs Assessment.  This assessment will be used for the FY 2012, FY 2013 and FY 2014 State Plans.  The Needs Assessment was completed on June 28, 2010 and the results presented to the NSRC on September 14, 2010 with new goals incorporated into the FY 2012 State Plan.  Included in the scope of the contract was:

 

• An analysis of the DSU’s Consumer Data based on FFY 2008 data (October 1, 2007 through September 30, 2008);

• A review of Census Data and Available Data Sources and comparison with regional and national statistics;

• An analysis of Focus Group and Interview Data wherein consumers, rehabilitation counselors and community agency staff from southern, northern and rural areas discussed several issues including: outreach to employers; consistent delivery of VR services; mobility/reliability of public transportation; developing interviewing, communication, self care, interpersonal and work skills and work tolerance; lack of social services

• Conclusions drawn on the above-mentioned information as to the areas of need within the state as they relate to employment of individuals with disabilities particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities.

 

(A) Assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, including their need for supported employment.

It is important to note that for many of the identified underserved areas, the samples were very small and may not be statistically valid.  The following is a listing of general areas of concern identified by the Interwork Institute by category:

 

(i) individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment.

·        A need for individuals to learn to use public transportation; a need for shorter commute times and better reliability in public transit; and expansion of public transportation service routes.

·        A need for more/ better assistive technology to improve communication;

·        A need for enhanced self care, including life-skills instruction; budgeting, interpersonal skills;

·        A need for enhanced interpersonal skills, including developing interviewing skills, clubhouses and social opportunities; learning workplace expectations.

·        A need for work skills, including supported employment services and funding; college-based training; general work training; on-the-job training; and computer training.

·        A need for work tolerance, including a period of adjustment or transition to work; post-placement supports; assistive technology when beginning employment.

·        A need for additional transition services and better coordination between the public school special education system and adult service providers.

 

(ii) individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan:

·        Persons of Hispanic/Latino and persons of Asian descent are underserved when compared to statewide and regional census data.

·        A need to understand why White applicants for VR services declined compared to the percentage of White residents in the state.

·        Transition students are an underserved group.

·        Individuals with autism spectrum disorders are an underserved group.

·        Individuals with less severe disabilities were found to believe they receive fewer services than those more significantly disabled.  

·        A need for additional outreach to persons with cognitive impairments, persons with intellectual disabilities (previously known as mental retardation), and persons with depressive/mood disorders.

·        Additionally, the survey found that individuals were less likely to connect with the state VR system if they were not affiliated with other referral sources.

 

(iii) individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system;

Although the comprehensive needs assessment did not specifically review the workforce investment system, Nevada’s DSU is an active member in each of the ten Workforce Investment Act (WIA) One-Stop offices known as Nevada JobConnect.  Rehabilitation counselors work with WIA partners to provide outreach and services to individuals with disabilities.  The comprehensive needs assessment did, however, identify several systemic issues on which the DSU and its WIA partners should concentrate. These include:

·        A need for outreach to employers throughout the state.

·        A need for interagency education and shared funding of client services.

·        A need to eliminate barriers to other WIA employment services, such as meeting basic computer sills requirements,  resistance among WIA partners to collaborate with VR, and WIA mandates and rules that make it more difficult to place people with disabilities.

·        A need to better match employer needs with job seeker abilities and better job placement assistance.

 

 (B) the need to establish or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state:

The Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment recommendations were considered by the DSU and NSRC to be helpful in addressing service needs.  After discussing the matter fully, the following priorities or focus areas were established:

 

Conducting outreach to employers.

 

Focus group and interview participants in all three regions of the state described a need for rehabilitation personnel (state agency staff and community rehabilitation programs) to educate employers and establish partnerships with them. This need was mentioned in more focus groups and interviews than any other need reported in the qualitative data analysis.

 

  • The DSU will renew efforts to collaborate and coordinate efforts with agency and community partners to reach out to employers to learn what employers need and want in terms of job-ready applicants and then tailor client training to better meet those needs.  The Rehabilitation Division is an active partner in the Silver State Works (SSW) initiative which was envisioned by the Governor to address Nevada’s economic and unemployment crisis.  The partners in Silver State Works will include the Employment Security Division and the Rehabilitation Division of DETR, the Division of Welfare and Support Services of the Department of Health and Human Services, the local workforce investment boards and many others who will combine forces to provide seamless service to employers and job seekers with a “no wrong door” philosophy. SSW will target Nevadans with disabilities, people who are receiving unemployment insurance benefits, those UI recipients whose benefits have expired, other unemployed individuals, recipients of public assistance and those at risk of becoming eligible for public assistance, re-entry individuals, and others who wish to find new or better employment.

  • The DSU will work with  and share resources with state, private, non-profit agencies to leverage resources and coordinate benefit opportunities in order to maximize the overall employment outcomes. 

Improving transition from school to work and school to post-secondary education.

 

·        The DSU will emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities, serve more transition students by developing referral mechanisms with secondary schools and post-secondary institutions, increased communication between Vocational Rehabilitation counselor, special education teachers and 504 coordinators, and educating teachers and parents regarding the Vocational Rehabilitation process, programs and referral services.

 

Extending outreach efforts toward diverse populations.

 

·        The DSU will continue marketing efforts with Mental Health hospitals, Mental Health service providers, SSI, the state Department of Health and Human Services, Community Rehabilitation Training Centers (CTC’s), State commissions, etc., to reach eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities.

 

Emphasizing Supported Employment.

 

·        The DSU will emphasize the employment potential of applicants and eligible persons receiving services and Supported Employment, expand communication and training to staff, State Rehabilitation Council members and consumers on Supported Employment, and identify and support best practices that encourage Supported Employment opportunities.

 

In all areas of emphasis, the DSU will attempt to utilize assistive technology where appropriate to achieve the goals set forth by the Council.

This screen was last updated on Aug 4 2011 1:14PM by Heather Johnson

The DSU projects it will increase the number of individuals determined eligible for vocational rehabilitation services in proportion to the State’s population growth as detailed below. These statistics were obtained from StateData.info which is a project of the Institute for Community Inclusion at UMass Boston, supported in part by the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services with additional support from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research of the U.S. Department of Education.

  

Number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order.

 

The number of eligible individuals to be served with funding from Vocational Rehabilitation (Title I, Part B) and Supported Employment (Title VI, Part B) under the State Plan is shown in the tables below. The tables contain data based on the State Demographer projections of population growth.  The last column includes all clients at the time of application whether eligible or ineligible. The DSU is not under an Order of Selection at this time.

 

Costs of the services described in subparagraph (b) (1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

 

The actual client service expenditures for FFY 2010 needed to serve eligible individuals, are provided in the table below.  The DSU expended a total of $9,504,286 for all client services in FFY 2010. These client service expenditures were paid from:

  Title I, Part B      $9,048,222

  Title VI, Part B   $   456,064

     Total                $9,504,286

 

Other:

 

Of particular note is the high unemployment rate the state of Nevada has experienced in the last couple of years, as follows:

 

              Month                        Washoe County            Clark County                   Balance of State

            And Year                     (Reno / Sparks)            (Las Vegas)                 (All Other Counties)

 

            January 2008                      6.61%                         5.61%                                   7.11%

            February 2008                   5.95%                         5.13%                                   6.47%

            March 2008                       5.92%                         5.24%                                   6.29%

            April 2008                          5.61%                         5.07%                                   5.84%

            May 2008                          5.96%                         5.63%                                   6.02%

            June 2008                          6.34%                         6.35%                                   6.48%

            July 2008                           6.64%                         6.97%                                   6.72%

            August 2008                       6.70%                         7.15%                                   6.80%

            September 2008                 7.43%                         7.83%                                   7.56%

            October 2008                    7.45%                         7.79%                                   7.47%

            November 2008                 7.82%                         7.88%                                   7.86%

            December 2008                 9.03%                         9.09%                                   8.88%

 

              Month                        Washoe County            Clark County                   Balance of State

            And Year                     (Reno / Sparks)            (Las Vegas)                 (All Other Counties)

 

            January 2009                     11.02%                       10.25%                                10.65%

            February 2009                  11.20%                       10.32%                                10.93%

            March 2009                      11.21%                       10.58%                                10.67%

            April 2009                         10.83%                       10.48%                                10.34%

            May 2009                         11.06%                       11.33%                                10.38%

            June 2009                         11.59%                       12.42%                                10.99%

            July 2009                          11.75%                       12.95%                                11.01%

            August 2009                      11.70%                       13.00%                                10.88%

            September 2009                12.35%                       13.51%                                11.43%

            October 2009                   12.08%                       13.08%                                11.21%

            November 2009                11.64%                       12.46%                                11.00%

            December 2009                12.52%                       13.01%                                12.06%

            January 2010                     13.44%        

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
2010: Actual Title I $9,048,222 6,357 $1,423
2011: Projected Title I $9,048,222 6357 $1,423
2012: Projected Title I $9,319,669 6547 $1,423
2010: Actual Title VI $456,064 122 $3,738
2011: Projected Title VI $456,064 122 $3,738
2011: Profected Title VI $469,746 126 $3,728
Totals   $28,797,987 19,631 $1,466

This screen was last updated on Aug 4 2011 1:14PM by Heather Johnson

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

In FFY 2011 and effective October 1, 2011, the DSU in partnership with the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC), revised the goals as a result of the Statewide Needs Assessment.  The Needs Assessment was comprised of focus groups consisting of Current and Past Program Participants, Program Services Staff, VR Counselors group, Service Providers, Advocacy Groups and Other Programs and Agencies that interact with VR Programs.  A thorough analysis of Program Electronic Case File Data was conducted as part of the Needs Assessment to determine trends and recommendations.  Comparative analysis was also performed to reflect Nevada’s demographics against states with similar size and population (CO, AZ, ID, WY, NM) as well as National trends.  The Needs Assessment prompted the DSU and NSRC to develop a Strategic Plan focused on four major areas in response to the Needs Assessment results in FFY 2008 that indicated potential un-served and underserved populations.  The DSU and NSRC also based their analysis on the DSU’s successful performance in meeting the standards and indicators in developing the strategic plan, goals and priorities.

 

Goal 1:

Emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities, and improve transition from school to work and school to post-secondary education.

 

Goal 2:

Extend outreach efforts toward diverse populations, specifically, eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities.

 

Goal 3:

Extend outreach efforts toward ethnically diverse populations, specifically minority populations with disabilities represented in Nevada’s workforce.

 

 

 

Goal 4

Work together and share resources with state, private, non-profit agencies to leverage resources and coordinate benefit opportunities in order to maximize the overall employment outcomes.

 

Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B funds.

 

The NSRC and the DSU  jointly agreed to retain its supported employment goal based on the results of the Statewide Needs Assessment as follows:

 

Goal 5:

Emphasize the employment potential of applicants and eligible persons receiving services and Supported Employment.

 

 

 

This screen was last updated on Aug 3 2011 4:49PM by Heather Johnson

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on Jun 22 2009 1:12PM by Heather Johnson

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

The NSRC and the DSU jointly agreed to the following revised goals in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs:

 

Goal 1:

Emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities, and improve transition from school to work and school to post-secondary education.

 

Goal 2:

Extend outreach efforts toward diverse populations, specifically, eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities.

 

Goal 3:

Extend outreach efforts toward ethnically diverse populations, specifically minority populations with disabilities represented in Nevada’s workforce.

 

Goal 4

Work together and share resources with state, private, non-profit agencies to leverage resources and coordinate benefit opportunities in order to maximize the overall employment outcomes.

 

Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B funds.

 

The NSRC and the DSU  jointly agreed to retain its supported employment goal based on the results of the Statewide Needs Assessment as follows:

 

Goal 5:

Emphasize the employment potential of applicants and eligible persons receiving services and Supported Employment.

 

This continues to align the Supported Employment Goal with the recommendations and information revealed through the comprehensive statewide needs assessment and sentiments expressed in the NSRC meetings.  Beginning in FFY 2012, the DSU intends to put substantial funding into the RAISON case management system to facilitate service delivery to supported employment clients by rehabilitation counselors in the field. This is in support of new and expanded initiatives to reach and serve supported employment clients.  These initiatives include a new co-location with the Washoe County School District- Transition Services Office, an expansion of the Vocational Rehabilitation-Clark County Transition Services relationship, continuation of the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) Summer Camp Supported Employment youth outreach programs, delivery of new and expanded Autism specific training to field level counselors/staff North and South, development of fee for service relationship with High Sierra Industries for improved aptitude and interest testing of clients with autism spectrum disorders and intellectual disabilities for plan development and fruition of the inter-local between the DSU, UNR and Sierra Regional Center (SRC) to provide specialized community based evaluations, job carving/job development services to specific referred SRC clients.

 

In FFY 2010 and 2011, the DSU Administration and Program Services participated in attendance with the Department of Health and Human Services, Mental Health and Developmental Services Division, Nevada Center for Excellence in Disabilities, Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities with each of these community partners representing The Employment Summit Steering Committee.  These planning sessions culminated in three Employment Summits in the North, South and Rural regions of the state that envisioned developing Statewide Policy toward gaining competitive, integrated employment for individuals with significant disabilities.

 

The DSU will continue to assess potential funding opportunities for on-going employment supports in the revised regulations of the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act.

This screen was last updated on Aug 3 2011 4:49PM by Heather Johnson

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

The DSU developed the following State strategies to address identified needs and determine how Title I funds will be used. 

Goal 1:

Emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities, and improve transition from school to work and school to post-secondary education.

 

Strategies:

o       Explore the utilization of social and Web-based media as a communication tool.

o       Improve special outreach efforts to Transition Students, i.e. camps, Transition Summit Leadership trainings.

o       Encourage participation of successful transition students in the referral and outreach activities of other students (peer support mechanism).

o       Serve more Transition Students by developing referral mechanisms with secondary schools and post-secondary institutions.

o       Comparison to states with similar population and demographics, and in accordance with the recommendations of the Needs Assessment.

o       Identification of students that have fallen out of Vocational Rehabilitation programs

o       Creative marketing to schools and students.

o       Continue Statewide “Transition Connect” Expansion Project.

o       Increased communication between Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor, Special Education Teachers and 504 Coordinators.

o       Educating teachers and parents regarding the Vocational Rehabilitation process, programs and referral services.

o       Vocational rehabilitation representatives to participate with parent/teacher Individualized Educational Plan (IEP) conferences.

o       Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal.

 

Indicators:

o       Increase enrollment by Transition Students in the Program Services of the Division.  The Division’s performance regarding increased enrollment in FFY 2012 will equal or exceed FFY 2011 performance levels.

o       Increase competitive employment outcomes for Transition Students. The Division’s performance regarding increased competitive employment outcomes in FFY 2012 will equal or exceed FFY 2011 performance levels.

o       Increase post-secondary educational services for Transition Students. The Division’s performance regarding increased post-secondary educational services in FFY 2012 will equal or exceed FFY 2011 performance levels.

 

Goal 2:

Extend outreach efforts toward diverse populations, specifically, eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities.

 

Strategies:

o       Continue marketing efforts with Mental Health hospitals, Mental Health service providers, SSI and State Welfare.

o       Partner with Mental Health service providers and Community Rehabilitation Training Centers (CTC’s).

o       Partner with Department of Health and Human Services, State commissions related to populations concerned with autism, developmental disabilities, cognitive and mental health disabilities.

o       Partner with advocacy groups.

o       Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal.

 

Indicators:

o       Increase enrollment by eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities. The Division’s performance to increase enrollment by eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities in FFY 2012 will equal or exceed FFY 2011 performance levels.

o       Report indicators by region.

 

Goal 3:

Extend outreach efforts toward ethnically diverse populations, specifically minority populations with disabilities represented in Nevada’s workforce.

 

Strategies:

o       Recruit bilingual and/or bicultural staff.

o       Increase marketing and participation efforts with ethnically diverse populations and media.

o       Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal.

 

Indicators:

o       Increase enrollment by minority populations representative of Nevada’s minority workforce. The Division’s performance regarding increased enrollment by minority populations in FFY 2012 will equal or exceed FFY 2011 performance levels.

o       Collaborate with minority groups with program development and program referrals.

 

Goal 4:

Work together and share resources with state, private, non-profit agencies to leverage resources and coordinate benefit opportunities in order to maximize the overall employment outcomes.

 

Strategies:

o       Document dollars utilized as comparable benefits.

o       Identify sources of benefits on the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE).

o       Identify federally matched dollars.

o       Formalize third-party In Kind match.

o       Strengthen relations to maximize matching fund opportunities.

o       In-service opportunity in-house on matching funds and In Kind Funds.

o       Work with youth with disabilities, the Nevada Department of Education, local education authorities, parent organizations and families to encourage early discussions with students about the expectations of employment and their skills, abilities, and talents that will empower them to achieve self-sufficiency.  

 

Indicators:

o       Document dollars captured in collaborative efforts and document that the training is held.

 

Goal 5:

Emphasize the employment potential of applicants and eligible persons receiving services and Supported Employment.

 

Strategies: 

o       Partner with other public and private State entities that provide Supported Employment.

o       Expand communication and training to staff, State Rehabilitation Council members and consumers on Supported Employment.

o       Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal.

o       Identify and support best practices that encourage high-wage/career track employment.

 

Indicators:

o       Increase the number of supported employment consumers that close successfully, earning at least the federal minimum wage.  The Division’s performance regarding an increase in the number of supported employment consumers that close successfully in FFY 2012 will equal or exceed FFY 2011 performance levels.

 

Assistive Technology

The DSU provides assistive technology assistance on a statewide basis. The DSU’s Southern District Office has an on-site assistive technology staff position.  This position is responsible for providing evaluations, assessments and support services to participants to assist them in getting and maintaining employment.  Counselors also have the option of referring participants to Easter Seals of Southern Nevada or Innovative Rehabilitation Technology Inc. to provide assistive technology equipment and/or services unavailable internally. 

 

The DSU’s Northern and District Offices, in collaboration with the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), have received a grant for assistive technology services.  The DSU has developed this new program to expand assistive technology services to northern and rural Nevada clients. Currently, the DSU referred seventy participants to UNR in order to conduct an assistive technology assessment.  The DSU purchased a number of assistive technology devices that are housed in the Northern District office Resource Center, to use as models for participants.

 

The vocational rehabilitation counselor takes into consideration the need for assistive technology assistance at each stage of providing assistance to participants.  Specifically, consideration for assistive technology assistance is provided during the assessment process. The participant’s physician may recommend assistive technology assistance at any stage of the process.  The counselor refers the participant to the appropriate assistive technology specialist.

 

The Nevada State Rehabilitation Council in partnership with the DSU established a strategy relative to assistive technology:  “Support Assistive Technology services that enhance employability.”  This strategy is part of Goal 4.

 

This screen was last updated on Aug 4 2011 1:14PM by Heather Johnson

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

In FFY 2008, the DSU in partnership with the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) revised the goals to better meet the objectives of the state. The goals were effective on October 1, 2008. With this in mind, in FFY 2009, 2010, and 2011, the DSU continued to implement the strategies jointly developed by the NSRC and the DSU.  The goals and outcomes for 2009 and 2010 are outlined below.

 

Goal 1:  Emphasize the employment potential of students with disabilities and improve transition from school to work and school to post-secondary education.

 

 

Federal Fiscal Year

Total All Participant Applications

Total Transition Students

Percent of Students

2009

4,236

671

16%

2010

3,554

647

18%

  Data Source:  RAISON Data Warehouse – Application Date

 

Federal Fiscal Year

Total All Student Closures

Students Closed - Rehabilitated

Percent of Students

2009

500

144

29%

2010

639

142

22%

  Data Source:  RAISON Data Warehouse – Closure Date

 

Federal Fiscal Year

Total All Students

With Authos

Students With Post - Secondary Ed

Percent of Students

2009

713

  89

12%

2010

719

109

15%

  Data Source:  RAISON Data Warehouse – Warrant Date

 

Post Secondary Education includes occupational, vocational, college and university training.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mental Health Impairments are defined as cognitive, psychosocial and other mental disabilities.  This data also includes clients with Autism.

 

Federal

Fiscal Year

Autism as Source / Cause

of Disability

2009

43

2010

58

    Data Source:  RAISON Data Warehouse – Closure Date

  

 Federal Fiscal Year

Developmental Disabilities

Cognitive Disabilities

All Other Mental

Health Disabilities

2009

186

1,196

1,014

2010

206

 

Goal 2:  Extend outreach efforts toward diverse populations, specifically eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities.  

Federal Fiscal Year

All Closed Clients

Participants With Mental Health Disabilities

Percent With Disability

2009

3,451

1,924

56%

2010

3,869

2,291

59%

  Data Source:  RAISON Data Warehouse – Closure Date

 

Evaluation:

The DSU met the goal of increasing the percentage of transition students served from 671 (16%) in 2009 versus 647 (18%) in 2010. This increase is due to the division’s concerted efforts to promote our program services to parents, students and the school districts. The DSU did not meet its goal of increasing the percentage of students with disabilities closing successfully with an employment outcome. The employment outcome numbers are influenced by many factors, including the overall economic climate in the State of Nevada. Unemployment in Nevada increased during 2009, rising to 13% with a significant loss of jobs from the gaming and hospitality industries. The effect was an increased supply of skilled workers available to employers due to these job losses, job seekers with disabilities, especially youthful individuals with disabilities were at a distinct disadvantage.

 

The DSU met the goal for improving the transition from school to post-secondary education. Additionally, the DSU saw the number of students receiving post secondary education increasing from 89 in 2009 to 109 in 2010 with a percentage increase of 3%. The DSU has been committed to serving youth with disabilities by promoting youth summer camps designed to enhance youth’s knowledge of college as well as extensive interaction with Clark County, Washoe, Nye and Douglas counties transition coordinators.

 

The DSU is aware that Nevada’s Millennium Scholarship was utilized as a funding source for college and that these qualified individuals used these resources prior to availing themselves of our services. The DSU also saw a larger number of students that were looking at the financial needs of their families and they sought employment services rather than post secondary service so that they could assist their families economically.  The DSU encouraged students statewide to attend the 4th Annual Nevada Student Leadership Transition Summit sponsored by the Nevada Department of Education held on November, 2010 in UNR.  The purpose of this Summit is to increase graduation rates and improve postsecondary outcome through a greater focus on college/postsecondary preparation and to cultivate student leaders and adult ally teams ( teacher/counselors) who will take the information back to their schools sites to facilitate system change in transition   The DSU was an active partner in this Summit.  Also, the DSU is planning several summer youth transition programs to assist youth in a greater awareness of the world of work, job preparation and education opportunities. The DSU along with the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), Clark County School District and Rebuilding All Goals Efficiently (RAGE) and the Department of Education will be partners in this 3rd annual collaborative effort. Also, the DSU, along with the University of Nevada Reno and the Washoe County School District

 

Goal 4

Assist individuals to transition into work by the provision of quality employment outcomes, increased retention of competitive employment, self-sufficiency through accessible and equitable services and opportunities to all consumers who need supported employment services.

 

Federal Fiscal Year

All Closed

Clients

All Supported Employment Clients

Percent of

SE

2009

3,451

130

4%

2010

3,869

123

3%

  Data Source:  RAISON Data Warehouse – Closure Date

Federal Fiscal Year

Supported Employment

Closed – Rehab

Supported Employment Closed – Other

Total SE Clients

2009

65

65

130

2010

70

53

123

  Data Source:  RAISON Data Warehouse – Closure Date

 

Note:  Supported Employment is determined at the time of Plan.  Therefore, all Supported Employment clients have an IPE.

Federal

Year

Closed Rehab

(All Clients)

Closed Rehab

With A/T

Closed Other

(All Clients)

Closed Other

With A/T

Total Closures

2009

901

71

2,550

  72

3,451

2010

947

87

2,922

100

3,869

  Data Source:  RAISON Data Warehouse – Closure Data

Assistive Technology Device is any item, piece of equipment or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified or customized, that is used to increase, maintain or improve the functional capabilities of an individual with a disability.

 

Assistive Technology Service is any service that directly assists an individual with a disability in the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device.  Services may include:

 

a)  evaluating the needs of an individual with a disability, including a functional evaluation of the individual in his/her customary environment;

 

b)  purchasing, leasing, or otherwise providing for the acquisition by an individual with a disability of an assistive technology device;

 

c)  selecting, designing, fitting, customizing, adapting, applying, maintaining, repairing, or replacing assistive technology devices;

 

d)  coordinating and using other therapies, interventions, or services with assistive technology devices, such as those associated with existing education and rehabilitation plans and programs;

 

e)  training or providing technical assistance for an individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the family members, guardians, advocates, or authorized representatives of the individual; and

 

f)  training or providing technical assistance for professionals (including individuals providing education and rehabilitation services), employers, or others who provide services to, employ, or are otherwise substantially involved in the major life functions of individuals with disabilities to the extent that training or technical assistance is necessary for an individual with a disability to achieve an employment outcome.

 

Evaluation:

The DSU had no significant statistical difference between 2009-2011. However, the DSU did meet the goal in terms of improving quality employment outcomes for consumers who need supported employment services.  In 2009, the DSU successfully closed 65 consumers as Rehabilitated compared to 70 in 2010. This reflects the changing demographics of the state.  While in the past Nevada had one of the fastest growing populations in the United States, during 2010, Nevada experienced a decline in population. Nevada experienced and continues to experience a significant increase in its unemployment rate, currently the second highest in the country at 13.2%.  In addition, Nevada has led the nation in the number of housing foreclosures. Due to the economic downturn, over-qualified individuals are applying for open position leaving less financially desirable positions available to our clients seeking supported positions.

 

The DSU has developed several strategies to increase our number of applicants that are eligible to receive Supported Employment services.  These include partnering with other public and private State entities that provide Supported Employment, development of a brochure for Supported Employment and expanding communication and training to staff, State Rehabilitation Council members and consumers who are eligible for Supported Employment services.  The DSU will also provide additional services such as assessments, job selections, job development and stabilization services that are needed to bring about successful employment outcomes for individuals with the most severe disabilities by maximizing supported employment grant funding through an increase focus on developing community resources to assist in providing supported employment services.

 

Information related to the DSU meeting the Federal Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators established in Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act follows:  In agreement with Title I, Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as Amended 1998, the DSU seeks to improve services to and employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities, to ensure equal access to all individuals from minority backgrounds, and to meet or exceed prescribed Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators.  To the maximum extent practicable, the VR program standards and indicators shall be consistent with the core indicators of performance established under Section 136 (b) of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.

 

In FFY 2010, all three of the primary performance indicators (1.3, 1.4 and 1.5) were met by the DSU. 

 

The DSU also exceeded the performance level for Evaluation Standard 2 – Equal Access.

Federal Evaluation Standards 1:  Employment Outcomes

The DSU met Performance Indicator 1.1 for the number of successful employment outcomes. In FFY 2010, the DSU achieved 947 employment outcomes as compared to a total of 901in FFY 2009, an increase of over 5%.

 

The DSU did not meet Performance Indicator 1.2 requiring 55.8% of the individuals who, after receiving VR services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), were closed successfully. In FFY 2010, the DSU achieved a 54.33% rating versus the 57.17% rating in 2009.

 

Performance Indicator 1.3 requires 72.6% of the people who exit the vocational rehabilitation program in competitive employment, self-employment, or a Business Enterprise Program (BEP) (in Nevada termed Business Enterprises of Nevada) to earn at least the minimum wage.  In FFY 2010, the DSU achieved a 99.68% rating.

 

Performance Indicator 1.4 requires that at least 62.4% of individuals with disabilities who enter competitive employment, self-employment or a Business Enterprise Program earn at least the minimum wage. In FFY 2010, the DSU attained a 95.87% rating compared to 95.29% in FFY 2009.

 

The DSU exceeded Performance Indicator 1.5. This indicator requires all individuals exiting the VR program in competitive employment, who are self employed or are employed in a BEP facility to earn at least a .52 ratio of the statewide hourly average of all individuals employed in the state (as derived from the most recently available Bureau of Labor Statistics report entitled “State Average Annual Pay”). The most recent report indicates an hourly average wage of $21.27 per hour for Nevada’s workforce. In FFY 2010, the DSU achieved an average hourly wage of $11.17. This finding results in a .53 performance ratio.

 

The DSU met Performance Indicator 1.6 which requires that a minimum of 53% of all individuals who earn at least the minimum wage when they exit the VR program in competitive employment, self-employment or in BEP employment report their own income as their largest single source of economic support at exit compared to the percentage of applicants who reported their own income as the largest source at application. In FFY 2010, 65.89% of people exiting the VR program with such employment outcomes reported being self-supporting.

 

Federal Evaluation Standard 2:  Equal Access to Services

The evaluation standard in Performance Indicator 2.1 requires the DSU to provide equal access to services for all people with disabilities from minority backgrounds. Equal access is determined by comparing the “Service Rate” for people with a disability from a minority background to the service rate for all non-minority people with disabilities. A ratio of .80 or greater is required to achieve Evaluation Standard 2. In FFY 2010, the DSU exceeded the required .80 ratio by achieving an equal access to “Service Rate” ratio of .980.

 

 

Nevada State Rehabilitation Council

Summary of Expenditures for Innovation and Expansion Activities for SFY 2010

 

Personnel

Liaison, Management Analyst and Administrative Assistant to provide support to the Council

17,988.00

Out of State Travel

NSRC Chair CSAVR Conference Attendance

1,185.16

In State Travel

Travel expenses for Council members and staff to attend meetings (NSRC, By-Laws, State Plan etc.) held in Nevada

2,706.76

Presenters

Robert’s Rules of Order   (Bill Hamilton)

193.39

SRC Training

RSA recommended training intended to address the needs of SRC members, increase knowledge of the VR program and to improve understanding of SRC responsibilities

3,302.01

In Service Training

VR In Service Training In Las Vegas

480.03

Operational Costs

Cost of basic operational supplies, annual report, printing, insurance, contractual services, postage legal notices and equipment

13,564.07

Satisfaction Survey

Consumer satisfaction survey and supplies by UNR Center for Research, Design and Analysis

28,871.26

Needs Assessment

Needs Assessment survey by San Diego State University

27,050.00

 

 

 

TOTAL

Expenses designated specifically for activities of the Council

$95,340.68

 

The NSRC strategies and guidance were instrumental in the DSU’s success in meeting most of the agency goals as detailed above and the RSA Evaluation Standards as detailed below.

 

The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

 

Development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a)

 

The State Plan Goal developed jointly by the Nevada State Rehabilitation Council (NSRC) and the DSU in FFY 2011 in response to the Comprehensive Needs Assessment, that encompasses outreach to individuals with disabilities including individuals with the most significant disabilities is outlined below:

 

Goal 2:

Extend outreach efforts toward diverse populations, specifically, eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities.

 

Strategies:

·        Continue marketing efforts with Mental Health hospitals, Mental Health service providers, SSI and State Welfare and assign counselors as liaisons.

·        Partner with Mental Health service providers and Community Rehabilitation Training Centers (CTC’s). Consider co-location and specific fee-for-service contracts.

·        Partner with Department of Health and Human Services, State commissions related to populations concerned with autism, developmental disabilities, cognitive and mental health disabilities

·        Partner with advocacy groups.

·        Consider Assistive Technology in relation to this goal.

 

Indicators:

·        Increase enrollment by eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities. The Division’s performance to increase enrollment by eligible individuals with autism, developmental, cognitive and mental health disabilities in FFY 2012 will equal or exceed FFY 2011 performance levels. 

·        Report indicators by region.

 

DSU Identifies Program Service Needs

 

Various DSU and State Rehabilitation Council documents were researched in order to identify unmet needs.  These include:

·        The 2010 Needs Assessment Survey

·        The 2010 Customer Satisfaction Survey

·        The 2011 State Plan

·        The 2008 RSA Monitoring Review Report (most recent RSA Monitoring Review for NV)

 

Summary of Identified Needs from the Nevada Needs Assessment

 

Analysis of Consumer Service Data:

 

·        There are differences among the three regions of Nevada with regard to how applicant disability severity ratings are assigned. Also, the regions differ in their profile of disability severity ratings compared to the CY 2005. There is a need to examine the reasons for the differences among the regions with respect to their disability severity ratings of applicants.

 

·        Case expenditures for White participants were higher than almost all other race-ethnic groups. This finding suggests a need to assist consumers from all racial and ethnic backgrounds to navigate the rehabilitation system and secure the services they need to be successful.

 

·        Provision of intensive work supports was associated with higher than average case costs. These types of supports were often associated with successful case closures. There is a need to ensure a sufficient number of providers who deliver intensive work-related supports and future planning should accommodate the high costs associated with these supports.

 

·        While the number of services provided to consumers was generally consistent, the average plans costs for all service types increased substantially from FY 2005 to FY 2008. Future planning should accommodate the likely increased costs that the Rehabilitation Division will incur during the next three year period.

 

·        Persons who achieved employment outcomes demonstrated consistent increases in hours worked and wages earned. This finding provides evidence of the continued need to assist more consumers to reach their desired employment outcomes.

 

Review of Census Data and Available Data Sources:

 

·        Persons with disabilities in Nevada may be less likely to connect with the Division if they are not affiliated with other referral sources. Therefore, they may need more information about offer them.

 

·        The general population and the population of persons with disabilities in the state are expected to increase over the next twenty years. Therefore, there is a need for the Division’s future planning to anticipate increased personnel, programmatic, and vendor service demands.

 

·        A pattern of increasing numbers of applicants is evident in the south and north, while the rural areas have demonstrated no growth despite an increase in the population. This finding suggests a need to explore the reasons applicant growth has not taken place in the rural region.

 

·        Three disability groups were identified that were under-represented when compared to regional or national statistics. These included (a) persons with cognitive impairments, (b) persons with mental retardation, and (c) persons with depressive/mood disorders. These findings suggest a need for outreach to these populations.

 

·        Two racial/ethnic groups were identified that were under-represented when compared to statewide Census and regional data. These groups were (a) Hispanic/Latino persons and (b) Asian individuals. These findings indicate a need to draw more persons of Hispanic/Latino and Asian background into the Division.

 

·        There was a large decrease in the proportion of White applicants compared to the percentage of White citizens in Nevada and to the number served in FY 2005. This finding indicates a need to understand the reasons for this shift.

 

·        Differences in the racial/ethnic composition of the Division’s applicant pool were observed. These differences suggest a need for a planning process tailored to the diversity-related needs of applicants in each region of Nevada.

 

Analysis of Focus Group and Interview Data:

 

·        Conducting outreach to employers (north, south, rural)

·        Consistent delivery of vocational rehabilitation services (north, south)

·        Reliability of public transportation (south, rural)

·        Developing interviewing skills (south, rural)

·        Lack of social services (north, south, rural)

·        Employers willing to hire workers with disabilities (south, rural)

 

Within differing regions of the state, the following themes of need were evident:

 

Mobility

North, south and rural

·        Learning to use public transportation 

 

This screen was last updated on Aug 4 2011 1:15PM by Heather Johnson

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Supported Employment in Nevada is an important component in the DSU’s services to people with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive Supported Employment services.  Services provided will vary and are individualized, based on the kind of support needed by each individual. The DSU vocational rehabilitation counselors provide assistance to find a job, learn the job and provide ongoing support to maintain the job. The client becomes integrated with co-workers who do not have disabilities in a business that is typical and representative of the whole community. Employment opportunities are based on the client’s abilities and interests.

 

Our service delivery system is based on collaboration with statewide community rehabilitation programs, secondary and post secondary educators and counselors, physicians, ophthalmologists, clients, parents, advocacy organizations, the Nevada Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services (MHDS), private vocational rehabilitation counselors, and other representatives.

 

The Title VI, Part B, supported employment grant funding is supplemented by the use of Title I, Part B funds, Social Security Administration reimbursements and in-kind funding from the supports provided by MHDS. The DSU provides supported employment services through all of its offices and expands services by:

 

·        Co-location of rehabilitation counselors at the Southern Nevada Adult Mental Health Center Psycho-Social Rehabilitation program.

 

·        Collaboration of the DSU with San Diego State University and Nevada’s community colleges for job coach training and job development.

 

·        Establishment, coordination, and funding of a multi-year collaborative project or projects between the DSU and community rehabilitation programs to provide jobs for people with the most significant disabilities. In Nevada, this project is called the Nevada State Use Preferred Purchase Program.

 

Quality

Supported employment services must provide competitive work in integrated work settings with extended support services. Services are provided for clients with the most significant disabilities who have a documented need for supported employment, including extended support services.  The job can be a full-time or a part-time job. The client and the counselor establish the IPE (Individualized Plan of Employment), including a goal for the number of hours to work each week. The work must be in an integrated setting with coworkers who do not have disabilities.  Wages must at least be at the Nevada minimum wage amount.  In addition to the standard contents of the IPE, the following must be included for any participant for whom Supported Employment services are planned:

 

·        A description of the Supported Employment services to be provided.

·        The identification of the provider of extended services.

 

The quality of Supported Employment outcomes is assessed individually, taking into account: client satisfaction with their work, the level of earnings, the benefits provided by the employer, transportation, work environment, and support services that are needed. The vocational rehabilitation counselor completes the assessment.

 

Extent

Supported Employment will be considered as a possible vocational outcome for individuals with the most significant disabilities as a part of the eligibility determination process.

 

In addition to the full scope of services provided by the DSU under Title I, Part B, individuals may receive the following support services:

 

·                    An assessment of the need for supported employment;

·                    Development of and placement into jobs; and,

·                    Intensive services at or away from the worksite that are needed to maintain employment stability including:

 

o     The provision of skilled job coaches who accompany the client for intensive job skills training at the worksite;

o     Social skills training;

o     Independent community travel and transportation system training;

o     Job seeking skills training;

o     Job retention skills training;

o     Regular observation and supervision of the client;

o     Follow-up services consisting of regular contact with the client, employers, parents, guardians, or representatives of the client, and other professional and informed advisors to reinforce and stabilize the job placement;

o     Facilitation of natural supports at the worksite;

o     Identification and coordination of extended follow along services to ensure job stability and retention such as the DSU’s use of the inter-local agreement with MHDS, use of community rehabilitation programs and the increased utilization of natural supports; and,

o     Post employment services targeted for the retention and advancement in employment.

 

Extended services are specific ongoing support services that are provided, organized and made available in such a way as to assist the participant to maintain integrated competitive employment or employment in integrated work settings in which individuals are working towards competitive work, such as an enclave.  Extended services are provided once the time-limited services of assessment, job development, placement and intensive job skills training at the work site are completed. Extended services are provided, at a minimum, twice monthly at the work site of the participant, or more often if requested by the participant or work site. 

 

Title I and Title VI, Part B, funds may not be used for the provision of extended services. The specific method used to provide extended services may vary according to the employment setting, the funding source and resources available. Sources may include interagency agreements with other agencies, such as the Division of Mental Health and Developmental Services, or natural supports such as family members, supervisors or coworkers at the work site or residential care givers.

 

Validation:  The DSU’s Program Services Chief will routinely audit and report on a representative sample of cases involving supported employment, in order to validate outcomes.

 

Below is a summarization of our Supported Employment participants.

 

Federal

Fiscal Year

Total SE

Clients Closed

Total SE Cliets Closed

With Employment

Percent of

Outcomes

2007

174

119

68.39%

2008

123

89

72.36%

2009

129

65

50.39%

2010

122

70

57.38%

 

Evaluation:  The DSU has developed several strategies to increase our number of applicants that are eligible to receive Supported Employment services. These include partnering with other public and private State entities that provide Supported Employment, development of a brochure for Supported Employment and expanding communication and training to staff, State Rehabilitation Council members and consumers who are eligible for Supported Employment services.

This screen was last updated on Aug 4 2011 1:15PM by Heather Johnson

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on 08/04/2011 at 1:17 PM

Last updated by sanvjohnsonh

Completed on 08/04/2011 at 1:17 PM

Completed by sanvjohnsonh

Approved on 09/01/2011 at 9:05 AM

Approved by tasue

Published on 09/01/2011 at 10:48 AM

Published by kschelle

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