ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2012 (submitted FY 2011)

1.1 The New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the New Mexico Public Education Department [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Director of New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Director of New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Ralph Vigil

Title of Signatory
Acting Director of New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
07/01/2011

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2012
Yes

Comments:

The New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (NMDVR), in coordination with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), provides an assurance that it will complete the required triennial comprehensive needs analysis in FY 12. The NMDVR will work with the SRC to ensure compliance in getting this completed triennially as required.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Ralph Vigil

Title of Signatory
Acting Director of New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
07/01/2011

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

Mission Statement: The mission of the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is to encourage and assist the efforts of New Mexicans with disabilities to reach their goals for working and living in their communities. Vision Statement: Every New Mexican with a disability has the opportunity to contribute to the quality of life and the economic prosperity of the state. Attachment 4.2(c): Summary of Input and Recommendations of the State Rehabilitation Council; Response of the Designated State Unit; and Explanations for Rejection of Input or Recommendations The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) meets quarterly. The SRC reorganized in 2006 to better reflect and meet the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act by focusing on the specifics of SRC responsibilities. The SRC is comprised of three working committees in addition to the Executive Committee. The working committees are: Advocacy, Partnership, and Collaboration Committee (APC), Consumer Satisfaction, Agency Outcomes and Performance Committee (CSAOP), and the State Plan, Report and Outreach Committee (SRO). SRC members represent all geographical regions of the state, ethnicities, and most importantly, individuals with disabilities. The Council also enjoys a strong presence of the American Indian Rehabilitation Programs with two directors of four different 121 American Indian Rehabilitation Programs on the Council. The Council has provided recommendations to the Division on an on-going basis and as part of its annual reporting process. Regarding Training and Education of Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors: COMMENT: The State Rehabilitation Council continues to support a policy of advanced education and training of vocational rehabilitation counselors now employed by the Agency so they can meet the highest requirements in the State applicable to that profession. Currently, the highest requirement is licensure granted by the Public Education Department. RESPONSE: The Agency welcomes this support. The Agency implemented a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development to meet the license requirements for Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors. At this time, all VR counselors have met the state approved standards for licensure. In addition, each of the nine Field Program Managers and the Field Operations Director has been granted licensure. Regarding Licensing of Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors: COMMENT: The State Rehabilitation Council continues ongoing support of licensing of qualified VR counselors employed by the Agency through authority of the Public Education Department. RESPONSE: NMDVR has licensed all counselors. The highest licensure requirement is a master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling. All new hires into the counseling ranks are required to have a master’s degree. Those hired without a master’s degree or do not meet the license requirement are required to complete the necessary post-graduate work for licensure. The Agency will assist these employees in meeting the expense of this training. Of the licensed counselors, the Agency employs 27 individuals with Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) designation. All have master’s degrees. Fifteen of these individuals are caseload VR counselors located throughout the state providing direct services to NMDVR clients. Twelve individuals occupy other professional positions in the Agency such as working in the Director’s Office, Program Development and Support, and Administrative Services Unit. Though not a requirement by the Agency, five of the nine Rehabilitation Services Program Managers and the Field Operations Director have earned their Certified Rehabilitation Counselor designation. The Agency encourages acquisition of CRC certification and is pleased that each year individuals are added to these ranks. In addition, the Agency will help individuals defray the costs of acquiring continuing education credits and renewal fees for CRC. CRC certification meets the highest licensure requirement in New Mexico. COMMENT: In addition to licensing of qualified vocational rehabilitation counselors, the SRC continues to support appropriate salary analysis for continuous update of competitive salary for vocational rehabilitation counselors commensurate with the educational and licensure requirements of the profession. While the current economic conditions and hiring freeze have halted activities in this area, the SRC remains optimistic of the progress the Agency will continue to make in assuring competitive salaries for VR counselors. RESPONSE:  Because of the SRC’s comments and concerns regarding appropriate, competitive salaries for VR counselors, the agency continues to seek ways of addressing the salaries of VR Counselors. The Agency works with the State Personnel Office to restructure counselor pay to be in line with licensure, education, and competency standards. One compensation mechanism, In-Pay Band Adjustment, is a mechanism to reach and establish appropriate placement through demonstrated performance for those not already appropriately placed. This tool was utilized to provide pay increases in FY 07 and FY 08. NMDVR plans to use this again when the Agency has the authority to do so.  This is not expected to occur until the hiring freeze is lifted and economic conditions improve.  Prior to the hiring freeze (and halt to other personnel actions of this nature), NMDVR did provide In-Pay Band Adjustments to VR counselors and program managers coinciding with the agency’s pay plan to compensate key positions. The Agency continues to recruit and hire professional staff at newly established attractive salary levels. The Agency is proud that we are very close to having all VR counselors appropriately placed, in other words, the agency is "almost there". In addition, because of In-Pay Band Adjustment and open recruitment practices, the Agency has experienced a high number of qualified applicants for advertized vacant positions.  Regarding Counselor Performance Evaluation: COMMENT: The SRC is optimistic about the Agency’s approach to evaluate VR counselor job performance based on objective, measurable criteria. RESPONSE: A program policy instruction (PPI-05-01), Employee Development and Appraisal (EDA’s) Plans Standardized Criteria for Rehabilitation Services Staff remains in effect. This PPI provides clear expectations and equitable appraisal of staff job performance, standardized performance for all positions in the Rehabilitation Services Unit that perform essentially the same job functions. Job assignments, based upon the Agency’s mission and goals, reflect the team approach to case/caseload management and the rehabilitation process. Job assignments focus on completion of the individual job tasks that are essential to the achievement of team and Agency objectives. Specific to vocational rehabilitation counselors in the Rehabilitation Services Unit, job performance is rated on four main job assignments: 1) to assist participants in achieving a suitable employment outcome; 2) provide quality services to participants; 3) perform effective case/caseload management through timely service delivery; and 4) provide services to participants with significant/most significant disabilities resulting in quality outcomes. Each of the variables has specific criteria. A fifth job assignment can be added by the Program Manager to address specific caseloads (such as TBI, SDMI, Deaf, etc.) areas of specialty (such as Spanish speaking, transition, etc.), computer liaison responsibilities, Supervising Counselor responsibilities or other activities, which relate to the job and the overall goals and mission of the Agency. These measures also align with federal standards and indicators, and state performance measures. Regarding Recruitment and Retention of VR Counselors: COMMENT: The State Rehabilitation Council continues to support on-going recruitment of graduates from the rehabilitation counseling education program at New Mexico Highlands University. In addition to recruiting local graduates, the SRC also supports ongoing recruitment of qualified VR counselors from other states. RESPONSE: This is an on-going collaboration between the Agency and the SRC. The Agency welcomes this support and has successfully recruited a number of graduates from the rehabilitation counseling education program at New Mexico Highlands University. The Agency will continue to look forward to recruiting graduates from this program as well as make job offers with appropriate compensation to applicants who qualify from other states. It is noteworthy that the Agency has been successful in recruiting qualified counselors with a background in vocational rehabilitation. In addition, the Division has supported individual students by providing opportunities to complete required internships. Regarding Participant Satisfaction Surveying and Statewide Needs Assessments COMMENT: Some of the respondents to the last two consumer satisfaction studies requested follow-up from NMDVR staff, therefore, NMDVR will have to determine mechanisms to follow up with client/respondents who have asked to be contacted. RESPONSE: The Agency is committed to providing the highest quality rehabilitation services. Specific to this is an ability to respond to client concerns. At the caseload level, the ability to address client concerns is exemplary and supported by the results of the last two participant satisfaction surveys. However, the Agency will need to consider aligning resources outside of the caseload structure to address the specific nature of following up with survey respondents in a timely fashion. COMMENT: A significant accomplishment has been the collaboration of the CSAOP and SRO committees with NMDVR staff in the completion of two Participant Satisfaction Surveys and Statewide Needs Assessments within the past three years. The collaboration entailed a number of steps inclusive of contract development and implementation, design of the survey instruments, determination of parameters of random sampling, evaluation of findings, followed by publication and dissemination of the studies. RESPONSE: The Agency and its participants benefit from positive collaboration with the SRC. The efforts and results of the recent Participant Satisfaction Surveys and Statewide Needs Assessments attest to the good working relationship that exists between NMDVR staff with the SRC. Recommendations contained in the surveys will result in long-term joint efforts to improve direct services to NMDVR clients. The NMDVR, in coordination with the SRC, provides an assurance that it will complete the required triennial comprehensive needs assessment in FY 12. The NMDVR will work with the SRC to ensure compliance in getting this completed triennially as required. Regarding Other Issues Related to DVR Services: COMMENT: The State Rehabilitation Council continues to support the appointment of Agency representatives to each of the Local Workforce Development Boards. RESPONSE: The Agency has appointed a member to each of the Local Workforce Development Boards. Three local boards are represented by local Area Program Managers. One is represented by an administrative staff person in the Program Development and Supports Unit. The Division welcomes this support from the SRC. COMMENT: The SRC continues to support the Native American Liaison Program funded through NMDVR and administered through New Vistas. The SRC would like to see the NA Liaisons and the DVR Counselors and DVR Technicians interacting more collaborative. RESPONSE: Because of budgetary constraints, NMDVR will no lomger contract with New Vistas to support the Native American Program (NALP contract). When there is sufficient budget, this contract will likely be reconstituted. As noted, two of the Directors of the Section 121 American Indian Programs in New Mexico serve on the SRC. The Agency works with the 121 Programs to align resources, streamline service delivery, and increase employment outcomes.  COMMENT: The SRC expresses interest and concern about forging stronger interagency relationships between the NMDVR and the One-Stop Centers. The SRC desires to be fully supportive of the Navigator Program and recommends that the Navigator Program be an agenda item for discussion in a future quarterly meeting. The SRC is interested in learning more about the collaborative efforts of working interagency, providing seamless services, and tracking of successful outcomes. RESPONSE: The Agency welcomes SRC support of creating greater collaboration with One-Stop service delivery entities.  Unfortunately, the Navigator Program expired last year (grant was not funded). NMDVR will be working with One-Stop partners to identify more effective methods for serving people with disabilities in the One-Stops.  COMMENT: The SRC supports School-to-Work Transition services at the high school level and specifically coordinated efforts between the schools and NMDVR continue to be lacking resulting in increased difficulties of access for transition services. The SRC recommends a) NMDVR have a team of specialists with responsibility of reaching out to students, schools, and school transition specialists statewide to inform, instruct, and collaborate the coordination of transition services for students covered by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act; b) NMDVR create access to transition services to students 16 years of age. c) NMDVR Transition Coordinator, VR counselors specializing in transition caseloads, as well as VR counselors with transition students in their caseloads, collaborate with agencies that provide transition services to enhance and develop comprehensive transition services plans. RESPONSE: Indicated below are strides toward meeting concerns of the SRC: a) NMDVR has counselors assigned to every school district in the state. In most instances, VR counselors enlist the support of rehabilitation technicians to provide outreach and orientation activities. NMDVR trains VR counselors and instructs them to contact school districts early in the school year in order to provide information on services and to encourage early application for services by seniors and exiting students. It is important to note that VR staff must rely on public school staff to assist in the coordination of outreach activities. In some instances, this has been problematic. Additionally, Special Education (IDEA) students can be more easily identified as they are receiving services from school staff. This is not always the case with other students with disabilities (Section 504). b) Currently, there is a 21% vacancy rate in the RV counselor ranks (complement of 66 caseloads, three of which are transition VR counselors) which creates challenges to serving what has been in excess of 10,000 clients annually. Because of this, priority is given to serving seniors/exiting students. In many instances particularly with transition counselors, students age 16 and up received consultative services. Order of Selection will also create challenges in serving this population given that many individuals will not make it off the waiting list. The Division will continue to strive to serve more transitioning students. The maintenance (at least in the shortrun) of three transition caseloads in Albuquerque, Las Cruces, and Santa Fe is indicative of this effort. Limited resources influence the extent to which the Agency can expand service delivery. c) The Agency will continue to promote greater collaboration with agencies that provide transition services to expand the state’s service delivery capacity for transition services and maximize the use of resources. One activity that will promote planning and networking is the annual “Summer Transition Institute” which the Division plays an active role in coordinating. COMMENT: The State Rehabilitation Council continues to welcome Agency support for these on-going concerns to the Council, specifically: a) Development of a methodology for keeping eligible participants from dropping out of their program before completion to increase the number of participants successfully completing their program; b) Streamlining of the procurement process, both for consumer services and for grants to programs; c) Methods for improving relations with American Indian Vocational Rehabilitation Programs and the updating of the cooperative agreements; d) Informed consumer choice, e.g. individual service plans and service providers, including self-employment plans for eligible individuals served by the Agency; e) Agency/State Rehabilitation Council innovation and expansion; f) Monitor the implementation of an Order of Selection; g) Increase the Division’s involvement in planning for and providing services to students in transition from school to work or higher education, including Special State Supported Schools; one SRC member suggested that a percentage be identified in this statement to make it more measurable and quantifiable. h) Monitor activities related to Ticket to Work, Workforce Investment Act, Welfare to Work Legislation, and ADA Restoration Act; i) Work cooperatively and in partnership with the Agency to assist recipients of SSDI/SSI to receive technical assistance for appropriate training and supports to enable these individuals to retain, regain, or maintain employment including healthcare benefits, and other related services. j) Design, disseminate, review and report the Client Satisfaction Survey and Statewide Needs Assessment Instruments in a timely manner. RESPONSE: The Division will continue to work closely with the Council and support the Council in its work on these issues. Strategic planning and implementing activities of the State Plan will drive the allocation of Agency resources to address these long-term and very complex issues. Additionally, the Agency encourages collaboration with the Statewide Independent Living Council and the Centers of Independent Living (CIL) throughout the state to meet some of these objectives. Another consideration to increase collaboration is to establish a fee for services schedule with CIL. NMDVR would purchase services from the Centers of Independent Living based on the fee for services schedule for NMDVR participants to meet the objectives of their Individualized Plan for Employment.

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This agency has not requested a waiver of statewideness.

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Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) – Cooperation with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System The Division has developed and maintained interagency agreements with agencies which carry out activities and which do not carry out activities under the statewide workforce investment system. Some of the agencies not under the state workforce investment system are: The Veteran’s Affairs Administration, The New Mexico Commission on the Deaf and Hard of Hearing; The Developmental Disabilities Planning Council, The Department of Heath, and the Developmental Disabilities Support Services Division to provide supported employment services to individuals on the developmental disabilities waiver and Jackson case members. The Department also has a Memorandum of Understanding with the Public Education Department to further effect school-to-work transition services throughout the state. In addition, the Division coordinates and contracts services with the American Indian communities through a contract with New Vistas in Santa Fe called the Native American Liaison program. This is an outreach to all of the Native American people in New Mexico located in 19 pueblos and the Jicarilla and Mescalero Apache tribes for acquiring referrals and assisting, on an individual basis, eligible American Indians with disabilities in achieving an employment goal. The Division coordinates and contracts services with Community Outreach Program in Albuquerque to individuals who are deaf. These services include job seeking skills training, job placement, supportive services. The Division further contracts with the Centers of Independent Living in the state. Again the services include job seeking skills training, job placement and supportive services. The Division will seek out guidance from its Federal Cognizant Agency, in working toward a collaborative arrangement with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, entering into an appropriate Memorandum of Agreement. Currently, the Division does not participate in programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States. At this time, the Division does not have formal arrangements with other federal programs. In addition, the Division is in the formative stages after recent legislation to affect a State Use contract program. It is possible that a vendor may be identified this coming year and the State Use contracting system may become fully operative in the next several years.

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  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) – Coordination with Education Officials The Division is an organizational unit of and works with the Public Education Department to facilitate the transition of students who are receiving special education services from the provision of a free appropriate public education under the responsibility of an educational agency. The Division also works with local education agencies to coordinate student referrals to the Division field offices and provide for eligibility determination of the student for vocational rehabilitation services and the development and approval of the Individual Plan for Employment before the student leaves the school setting. Fortunately, the Division does not currently operate under an order of selection, thus all students with disabilities interested in pursuing employment are able to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. The Individual Plan for Employment must, at a minimum, identify the long-term vocational rehabilitation goal, intermediate vocational rehabilitation objectives, and goals and objectives related to enabling students with disabilities to live independently. These vocational rehabilitation goals and objectives are to be consistent with the student’s individual education plan. The Division makes every effort to develop and implement the transition student’s Individual Plan for Employment prior to leaving high school. The Division’s role and responsibilities are defined by a formal plan developed by the Public Education Department and, as appropriate, enters into memoranda of agreement with local educational agencies responsible for the free appropriate public education of students with disabilities receiving special education services. The memorandum of understanding with the Public Education Department serves to facilitate the integration and coordination of services to eligible secondary education students in providing a continuum of services that will meet the needs of all Individuals with Disabilities Education Act eligible students. The integrated continuum of services is to be flexible enough to meet the needs of all IDEA eligible students to qualify for DVR services within the available resources, maximize opportunity for students and eliminate limitations and obstacles. The MOU further outlines: A. Assure that all students with disabilities as defined by the IDEA and its implementing regulations receive appropriate services; B. Coordinate services to students with disabilities so as to maximize learner outcomes and provide for a successful transition to appropriate employment as specified in student Individualized Education Programs (IEPs); C. Formalize referral procedures with appropriate agency(ies) to ensure students with disabilities are provided with opportunities for services; D. Coordinate services delivery and follow-up/along with the education/rehabilitation services continuum; E. Establish joint trainings to provide staff development and other training activities for Local Educational Agency (LEA) transition specialists and other individuals involved in transition planning. The agreements with individual Local Education Agencies identify: 1) Policies, practices, and procedures that can be coordinated between the agencies, including definitions, eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services, policies and procedures for making referrals, procedures for outreach students receiving special education services and in need of transition service, practices and procedures also address time-frames for evaluation and follow-up with students; 2) The roles of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; 3) Procedures for providing training, consultation, and technical assistance to assist staff of State and local educational agencies as to the availability, benefits of, and eligibility criteria for vocational rehabilitation services; 4) Available resources, including sources of funds for the development and expansion of services; 5) The financial responsibility of each agency in providing services to students with disabilities who are receiving special education services consistent with State law; 6) Procedures for resolving disputes between the agencies that are parties to the agreement; and 7) All other components necessary to ensure meaningful cooperation among agencies, including procedures to facilitate the development of local teams to coordinate the provision of services to students with disabilities, sharing data, and coordinating joint training of staff providing transition services. Currently, Cooperative Agreements are in place between the Division and the following local education agencies: Albuquerque Public Schools Belen Public Schools Carlsbad Municipal Schools Cobre Consolidated Schools Deming Public Schools Gadsden Independent Schools High Plan Regional Center Cooperative Las Cruces Public Schools Lea Regional Center Cooperative Los Lunas Public Schools Northeast Regional Center Cooperative Region IX Center Cooperative Roswell Independent Schools Silver Consolidated Schools The Division works with local education agencies throughout New Mexico to provide school-to-work transition and maintains a School-to-Work Transition Specialist position in Albuquerque. In addition, the Division maintains three specialized caseloads in the state located in Albuquerque in Bernalillo County, Las Cruces in Dona Ana County, and Santa Fe in Santa Fe County providing services only to transition students. Division counseling staff and rehabilitation technicians are deployed on a regional basis. Area Division program managers and local counseling staff work with local education agencies to ensure that students with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to apply for vocational rehabilitation services. Referrals are made at the local level from local education agencies or schools to the Division’s field offices. High School-age Hispanic and American Indian youth with disabilities benefit from mentorship services to help them identify and work toward future professional goals. Mentoring Diverse Abilities encourages and assists students from Bernalillo High School, Gadsden School District and Tohajiilee Schools through mentoring, paid work experience, introduction to post-secondary educational opportunities, youth leadership training, parent education, job development and job coaching.

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 4:26PM by sanmbransfordd

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) – Cooperative Agreements with Nonprofit Organizations The Division ensures the appropriate use of community rehabilitation programs to the maximum extent feasible. The Division purchases a broad range of services for clients through local community rehabilitation programs. These services consist of but not limited to: a. Medical, neuropsychological; psychiatric, psychological, social, and vocational services; b. Testing, fitting, or training in the use of prosthetic and orthotic devices; c. Recreational therapy; d. Physical and occupational therapy; e. Speech, language, and hearing therapy inclusive of purchase of hearing aids; f. Psychiatric, psychological, and social services, including behavior management services; g. Assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs; h. Rehabilitation technology; i. Assistive technology; j. Job development, placement, and retention services; k. Orientation and mobility services for individuals who are blind; l. Extended employment; m. Psycho-social rehabilitation services; n. Supported employment services and extended services; o. Services to family members when necessary to the vocational rehabilitation of the individual; p. Personal assistance services; and q. Services similar to the services described above. Most services purchased from community rehabilitation programs are on an individualized basis addressing the specific barriers to employment as a result of an individual’s disabling condition. Where applicable, community programs must be accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). The Division requires services be purchased in conformance with State laws which regulate professional practices (ex.: psychologists, occupational therapists, speech therapists, etc.). When appropriate to the individualized needs of a participant of vocational rehabilitation services, community rehabilitation programs are utilized toward an employment outcome. Contractual agreements are frequently utilized with community rehabilitation programs. Recently, the Division has worked closely with a club-house model facility in the Santa Fe area to provide support services for persons with significant disabling mental illness addressing both vocational and independent living needs. This club-house model service delivery arrangement is still in the developmental phases with preliminary negotiations taking place for possible implementation in the next year or two. This example services to illustrate that the Division continually seeks creative ways to expand services to individuals with disabilities. Again, the Division has recognized another gap in services affecting New Mexicans with disabilities, i.e.: driving evaluations and driving lessons provided by qualified instructors no longer available anywhere in the state. In the past, there were few providers of these services in the state, mostly located in the Albuquerque area. Now those providers are non-existent. Preliminary joint negotiations with the Governor’s Commission on Disability, the Department of Transportation, and the Division are underway. It is hoped that funding can be secured and the details worked out to attract potential vendors to provide this service. Possible implementation of such services is expected in the next year or two.

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 4:26PM by sanmbransfordd

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) – Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services Supported employment services provided by the Division consist of case services made available through the Title VI-B funds of the Rehabilitation Act (earmarked by the federal government for this purpose). Title VI-B funds for Federal Fiscal Year equaled $244,500.00. Title I funds of the Rehabilitation Act (available for general, basic vocational rehabilitation services) are used for supported employment services upon depletion of Title VI-B funds. The Division experiences significant increased to total supported employment expenditure due to the ever-increasing cost of services. The Division procures supported employment services on a case-by-case basis from local rehabilitation programs that have committed long-term funding to the individual participants. Area supervisors conduct direct negotiations of fee for service procurement schedules of supported employment services. The local counselor and the State Office monitor the scope and quality of supported employment services available to DVR participants. Supported employment service providers are required to submit to the Division monthly reports to the local area supervisor of client progress and satisfaction, as well as demographic data. The review, compilation, and analysis of the monthly cumulative reports obtained from the contract vendor enable the Division to monitor the quality of job coaching. The DVR participant’s counselor reviews these reports with the contract provider to ensure that the scope of services comply with supported employment guidelines and are consistent with the vocational needs of the participant. Quality of supported employment services is measured in terms of integration achieved by the individual at the work-site along with the amount of wages earned. To increase the level of integration, the Division emphasizes the individualized placement model. This information is documented in the participant case files and monitored on a monthly basis. The scope and extend of services provided to clients under the Individualized Plan for Employment for supported employment continues to be the same as those available to individuals under the Title I program. This is in accordance with Division operating procedures. All services are provided on an equitable basis within the constraints of available funding. The Division does not target specific disability groups to provide supported employment services. However, long-term support funding by the State is currently available for those individuals who are either developmentally disabled or who have significant disabling mental illness. The Division continues to seek long-term funding for support for other disability groups. To this end, the Division seeks to negotiate with other state agencies and private non-profit organizations. Traditionally, cooperative agreements between the New Mexico Health Department Development Disabilities Services Division and the Mental Health Division facilitate the transition from Title VI-B funding to a long-term funding source. The transition occurs when the time spent by the job coach with the DVR participant in supported employment program decreases to an average of 8 hours (20%) per week or less. Another determinant is agreement by the client, employer, job coach and the NMDVR counselor that the transition to the long-term funding source is appropriate and consistent with the vocational needs of the client. It is noted that time limits are not defined in the Division’s Manual of Operational Procedures; rather each case is assessed in terms of individual needs for supported employment services. Memorandum of Agreement has been entered into between the New Mexico Health Department’s Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Mental Health Division to accomplish joint implementation for supported employment under: the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, 29 U.S.C 795(b)(1) and 721(a)(11); 8.314.5 New Mexico Administrative Code and Walter Stephens Jackson, et.al. vs. Los Lunas Center for Persons with Developmental Disabilities, et.al. CIV No.87-0839-JP/LCS. The MOU defines, eligibility for DVR services, DVR eligibility criteria for Supported Employment, Developmental Disabilities Support Division eligibility for the purposes of the MOU, methods of accomplishment outlining the responsibilities of the Developmental Disabilities Supports Division such as implementation and maintenance of a referral process, offer of long-term support, and implementation of additional responsibilities to carry out the agreement. The MOU outlines responsibilities of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, joint responsibilities of both DVR and DDSD, and targeted outcomes. The MOU defines Ongoing Support Services – Services that are: 1. Needed to support and maintain an individual with significant disabilities in supported employment, 2. Based on a determination by the designated State Unit of the individual’s needs as specified in an Individualized Plan for Employment; and 3. Furnished by the designated State Unit in 34 CPR 363.4(c)(3) and following transitions, by one or more extended services providers throughout the individual’s term of employment in a particular job placement or multiple placements if those placements are being provided under a program of transition employment. 4. Include, at a minimum, twice-monthly monitoring to assess employment stability at the work site of each individual in supported employment (unless the Individualized Plan for Employment provides for off-site monitoring), and based upon that assessment, the coordination or provision of specific services at or away from the work site, that are needed to maintain employment stability. If off-site monitoring is determined to be appropriate, there must be contact with the employer each month. It is noted that the Division partners with the Developmental Disabilities Services Division. The Developmental Disabilities Services Division was recently moved by legislative action from the Department of Health to the Human Services Division (legislation 2007). The Developmental Disabilities Services Division provided administrative support to and houses the Behavioral Health Collaborative to provide a long-term funding mechanism for Developmental Disabilities Medicaid Waiver recipients. Behavioral Health Services funding is a collaborative to provide comprehensive and vocational services to individuals with significantly disabled mental illness. Both mechanisms mentioned above are used to fund long-term supported employment services and extended services.

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 4:26PM by sanmbransfordd

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

Mission Statement: The mission of the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is to encourage and assist the efforts of New Mexicans with disabilities to reach their goals for working and living in their communities. Vision Statement: Every New Mexican with a disability has the opportunity to contribute to the quality of life and the economic prosperity of the state. Attachment 4.10: Comprehensive System of Personnel Development:  Data System for Personnel and Personnel Development.  In preparation for its budget request, the Division annually assesses the supply of qualified professionals and paraprofessionals available to the Division to ensure an adequate staffing base. The Division maintains professional vocational rehabilitation counselors to provide direct client services. These counselors manage individual caseloads. The total number of counselors employed corresponds with a ratio of approximately one counselor per 30,000 of the general population, the number of positions filled as allowed by the State Personnel Office, and the available budget as approved by the State Legislature and Congress. Under this current methodology with 66 caseloads available, but not filled, the Division has enough counselors, with full capacity, to serve a population base of 1,980,000.  Creating additional challenges to realizing an ideal ratio is the current state hiring freeze. In fiscal years 2010 and 2011, the Division has experienced approximately a 20-23 percent vacancy rate in the VR counselor ranks, creating a shortage of 13-15 counselors. Given the current economic recession, it is not anticipated that the hiring freeze will be lifted in FY12. The division submitted an exception to fill some key positions, with the goal to reduce the vacancy rate to 15 percent or less.  Ideally, the Division would like to decrease the ratio to one counselor per 25,000 of the general population with prevalence of disability and geographic variables factored into the ratio. Under this new formula with an estimated general population of 1,984,356 (U.S. Census 2008 estimated population), the Division has determined that 13 new counselor positions would be necessary to adequately meet the growing population needs in five years, for a total of 79 counselor positions. Reducing vacancies by 15 percent and using the new service formula NMDVR needs 16-18 counselors to meet the new service ratio by 2017.  The 2008 Disability Status Report, Cornell University provides the following disability statistics specific to New Mexico (Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 www.disabilitystatistics.org): Prevalence of disability among non-institutionalized people ages 21 – 64 in New Mexico (Working Age) - • Overall percentage of working-age people with a disability was 12.4% • Disability Type Any Disability 12.4% Visual 2.5% Hearing 3.2% Ambulatory 6.4% Cognitive 5.3% Self-Care 2.4% Independent Living 4.4% • Employment rate for working-age people with disabilities was 41.2% • Actively looking for work among people with disabilities who were not working was 6.5% • Working people with disabilities working full-time / full-year was 24.5% • Median annual earnings of working people with disabilities working full-time / full-year was $37,200 • Median income of households that include any working-age people with disabilities was $36,200 • Poverty rate for working-age people with disabilities was 25.2% • Working-age people with disabilities receiving SSI payments in NM was 20.5% • Educational Attainment of working-age people with disabilities in NM o High school diploma or equivalent 32.1% o Some college or an associate degree 31.3% o Bachelor’s degree or more 14.7% These disability population statistics do not indicate the number of individuals eligible for, available for, or in need of vocational rehabilitation services. However, the numbers suggest that as disability prevalence increases and as age-disability prevalence increases along with an increasing need for older workers in the workforce, the demand for vocational rehabilitation services will continue to increase in New Mexico.  The Division employees 121 direct service positions consisting of Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors, Rehabilitation Technicians, and Caseload Secretaries in the Rehabilitation Services Unit (RSU). There are 66 vocational rehabilitation counselor positions for the 66 caseloads located throughout the state. The Division also employs 34 rehabilitation technicians and 21 caseload secretaries providing direct services to DVR clients (per RSU organizational chart revised December 05, 2008). The ratio of counselor to rehabilitation technician and caseload secretaries varies throughout the state given the available resources. A typical ratio is one caseload secretary and one rehabilitation technician to two vocational rehabilitation counselors. In some offices in rural locations, DVR staff is usually one counselor and one rehabilitation technician.  The Division employs 27 counselors with Certified Rehabilitation Counselor credentials: all have Masters’ degrees and two with PhDs. Fifteen of these individuals are caseload rehabilitation counselors located throughout the state providing direct services to clients. Another twelve individuals occupy other professional positions located in the Division as follows: Administrative Services Staff Development = Two Positions Director’s Office = One Position Program Development And Support = Two Positions  RSU Field Operations Directors = One position RSU Program Managers = Five positions RSU State Office Positions = One position The Division encourages and assists eligible staff to attain CRC designation.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 0 0 0
2 0 0 0
3 0 0 0
4 0 0 0
5 0 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

Institutions of higher education in New Mexico: New Mexico Highlands University (NMHU), Las Vegas, New Mexico has 28 students currently enrolled in the RSA counselor training grant, and vocational evaluation grant. The number of recent graduates by academic year is as follows: Summer 2006 = two graduates Summer 2007 = seven graduates Summer 2008 = Data Not Available Summer 2009 = five graduates (all eligible to sit for the CRC exam) Summer 2010 = two graduates Summer 2011 = three graduates this academic year thus far, with seven anticipated at the end of July 2011.  Instrumental in developing the rehabilitation counselor program, the Agency remains committed to supporting and maintaining NMHU’s agenda. The NMDVR director, field managers, and Staff Development Unit (SDU) personnel sit on NMHU’s curriculum advisory council to ensure that coursework aligns with Agency goals. Additionally, individuals from within the Agency have taught courses in Foundations of Rehabilitation, Transition, and Job Placement in NMHU’s Rehabilitation Counselors Masters program.  The Agency continues to work with NMHU’s students to complete their internships, which enhance opportunities to hire NMHU graduates. NMHU applied for and received a three-year accreditation in July 2008 from the Counsel on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) accreditation.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

Plan for Recruitment, Preparation and Retention of Qualified Personnel:  Implementation of a master’s degree standard for employment under the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) initially attributed to the high turnover rates in vocational rehabilitation counselor positions. This rate has been as high as 32%. In response, the Division has implemented strategies to reduce the turnover rate. The Division began to realize a significant reduction in the turnover rate. The turnover rate for VR counselors in FY 10 was 7%. In FY 09, it was down 12%, down from 17% from FY 08. The Division continues to strive to reduce the turnover rate, excluding retirement of staff. Six factors are considered to contribute to maintaining reduced counselor turnover: 1) Employees of the Division are covered by the State Personnel Act: 2) The Division has committed to hiring and compensating staff at competitive salaries (appropriate placement). 3) New Mexico offers employees an extremely competitive employment benefits package, including premium health care coverage. Employees have the option to retire with 25 years of service (75% of average of top three years salary); 4) State Personnel Board Rules allow NMDVR to pay VR Counselors a supervisory differential for assuming supervisory responsibilities, and training staff in effective case management and best practices. 5) The Division offers training opportunities not available with other state agencies. 6) Leadership provides staff with recognition for performance, including awarding administrative leave. As of May 2011, direct service positions as a complement of the Division included the following positions:  • 66 vocational rehabilitation counselor positions with eleven vacancies. • 34 rehabilitation technician positions with eleven vacancies and two additional vacancies based on potential retirements through FY 11. • 21 caseload secretary positions with eight vacancies.  Effective November 15, 2008 the state implemented a hiring freeze for those agencies under the control of the Governor. All new hiring and/or selection transactions for vacant positions must have an appoved "Exemption to the Hiring Freeze" before filling a vacant postion. People estimate the hiring freeze will be in effect at least through FY 12. Agency staff currently works with the Governor’s Office to justify filling vacant positions, during the hiring freeze, as mission-essential.  The Agency created "Program Policy Instruction PPI 02-02", in an effort to reduce counselor turnover. The policy addressed and provided guidlines related for creating and implementing Supervising Counselor position for RSU. This PPI decreased the workload for area managers, improved training, mentoring, staff coaching, and supported quality case management. Additionally, VR counselors and program managers received pay increases addressed competitive, attractive entry-level salaries, and appropriate pay placement.  The Agency continues to seek ways of addressing the salaries of VR counselors to reduce turnover.  The Agency works with the State Personnel Office to restructure VR counselor pay to be in-line with licensure, education, and competency standards. One compensation mechanism, an In-Pay Band Adjustment, is a  mechanism to reach and establish appropriate placement through demonstrated performance, for those not already appropriately placed. This tool was utilized to provide pay increases from FY 06 through FY 08. Plans were to implement the In-Pay Band Adjustment again through FY 11, pending approval of Department of Finance and Administration, and the State Personnel Office. The agency continues to attempt to recruit and hire professional staff at competitive salary levels.  While the Agency remains committed to this initiative, it is currently on hold given the hiring freeze referenced above. When the hiring freeze is lifted, the Agency will revisit reauthorizing In-Pay Band Adjustments.  The Agency experiences barriers to hiring qualified staff particularly in isolated work locations. The state personnel director, pursuant to the direction of the State Personnel Board, establishes, maintains, and in conjunction with state agencies, administers a pay plan for all positions throughout the classified service. The state personnel director conducts an Annual Survey of the Total Compensation (means of all forms of cash compensation and the dollar value of the employer-sponsored benefit package).  The comparison market is comprised of private and public entities within New Mexico, regional state goverment employers, Central, Western, and Southwestern state governments, and federal employers. The pay plan offers many compensation tools for agencies to utilize and help management attract qualified applicants, retain employees who contribute to the overall success of the organization, motivate employees to maintain high standards of productivity and service, and reward employees for their specific contributions to the achievement of organizational goals and objectives.  The Agency has committed funds for training, and continuing education to ensure that all personnel, particularly VR counselors, meet professional standards for ethical service provision. In providing ongoing training, the Agency considers meetig the standards of practice, succession planning, capacity building, and includes evolving issues such as amendments to the Rehabilitation Act, the Workforce Investment Act, Ticket-to-Work, consumer informed choice, and State issues. The Agency has been largely successful in recruiting individuals with disabilites and minority groups. Naturally, the Agency seeks to hire qualified individuals with disabilities. Job accommodations for individuals with disabilities are routinely provided to attain or maintain employment.  NMDVR advertises jobs on the Agency website and on the State Personnel Office website, assuring job postings are available nationally to anyone with Internet access.  The Agency uses the state personnel automated data system to account for the number of employees, status of individual employees ( probationary, permanent, temporary, or term ) and related information such as salary, earned leave balance,etc. Vacancies are reported on a routine basis and used to monitor hiring activities. All new hires , promotions, and tranfers require the approval of the agency  director. The Agency continues to provide training and experience to all staff interested in increasing their job skills. The SDU responds to Agency initiaitives such as case management software and Microsoft training. SDU financially supports training, which offers continuing education credits in a variety of training formats to assist all NMDVR staff to meet and maintain the highest qualifications . SDU also supports baccalaureate programs for degree programs that support Agency goals. NMDVR has a number of staff who currently attend masters degree programs in rehabilitation counseling to advance within the Agency.  The Agency’s strategic planning includes a goal of Career Development Succession Planning (CDSP) for all staff. Not only is there a shortage of well-qualified staff, but the Agency must plan for an increasing loss of senior employees with valuable skills and "agency knowledge". Mechanisms such as post-retirement, re-employment, job-sharing, telework and alternative work schedules are considerations to offer opportunities for these valuable staff to remain employed or return to work. The Agency is currently collaborating with the University of Arkansas TACE Program to address a comprehensive analysis of career development and succession planning as part of strategic planning efforts.  The Agency has completed a survey of staff demographics in terms of education background, years of experience, expected time to retirement, and any staff with disabling conditions who want to advance their careers over the long-term and/or return to employment after retirement. This data allows the Agency to assess the staff plans regarding future career development, advancement, and the means to compare these plans wit NMDVR needs. This addresses shortages of workers and inparticular workers with long-term experience or critical skills. 

 

 

In 2011, all NMDVR counselors (58 of 66 positions), all program managers (8 of 9 positions), and all fie;d operation directors (1 of 3 positions) are fully licensed. Note that 48.3% of NMDVR counselors have a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling. Two NMDVR counselors have doctorate degees.  In 2001, NMDVR included the master’s degree as the academic standard for the Job Related Qualifications Standard to meet the requirement of § 361.18 CSPD of the Rehabilitation Act. Persons seeking licensure in rehabilitation counseling shall meet the requirements of Subsections A, B, C, D, or E: A. Valid certification as a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor issued by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification, 1699 E. Woodfield Rd, Suite 300, Schaumberg, IL 60173. Phone: 847.944.1325, www.crccertification.com. B. Master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from a regionally accredited college or university. This requirement shall be satisfied by meeting the requirements of Subsection B(1) or B(2) below. 1. A master’s degree awarded by a New Mexico college or university must incorporate the New Mexico Public Education Department’s approved competencies in rehabilitation counseling. 2. A master’s degree awarded by a college or university outside of New Mexico must be in a rehabilitation counseling program approved by the New Mexico Public Education Department. C. Master’s degree in school counseling, vocational counseling or other related field and the provisions of Subsection C(1) or C(2) below. 1. One (1) year of experience in rehabilitation counseling, or 2. Fifteen (15) semester hours of credit in the rehabilitation counseling competency areas of vocational/transition assessment, medical aspects of disability, psychosocial and/or psycho-cultural aspects of disability case management in rehabilitation counseling, issues and practices in rehabilitation counseling, or placement aspects of rehabilitation counseling. D. Bachelor’s degree in rehabilitation counseling from a regionally accredited college or university and one (1) year of experience in public or private facility in which direct vocational rehabilitation counseling is the primary job responsibility. The degree requirement shall be satisfied by meeting the requirements of Subsection D(1), or D(2) below. 1. A bachelor’s degree awarded by a New Mexico college or university must incorporate the New Mexico Public Education Department’s approved competencies in rehabilitation counseling. 2. A bachelor’s degree awarded by a college or university outside of New Mexico must be for a rehabilitation program approved by the New Mexico Public Education Department. E. Bachelor’s degree in a related field and the provisions of Subsection E(1) or E(2) below. 1. Two (2) years of experience in a public or private Facility in which direct vocational rehabilitation counseling is the primary job responsibility, or 2. Fifteen (15) semester hours of credit in the rehabilitation counseling competency areas of vocational/transition assessment, medical aspects of disability, psychosocial and/or psycho-cultural aspects of disability, case management in rehabilitation counseling, issues and practices in rehabilitation counseling, or placement aspects of rehabilitation counseling.  All NMDVR counselors applied for state licensure by December 2002. Counselors who were not eligible for the highest level of state licensure participated in training leading to licensure. Currently, all NMDVR counselors have applied for and been granted licensure. New counselors have 90 days to apply for their license. Licensure application includes a criminal background check and the application is monitored for compliance. If new NMDVR counselors do not meet the experience requirement for state licensure, they may re-apply upon gaining the necessary experience.  State licensure is identified in policy as a top priority and required for continued employment. Identified documents submitted in the credentials package for licensure include: • Official college transcripts of all degrees received; • Copy of Certified Rehabilitation Counselor certification, if applicable; • Work history in a rehabilitation field; • Copies of course syllabi from courses related to counseling and guidance; vocational counseling; disability; psycho-social or psycho-cultural aspects of disability; case management in rehabilitation counseling; and placement aspects in rehabilitation counseling. • Criminal background information • Fingerprints  Each VR counselor renews his or her license each year.  Importantly, now if not most, all new hires for VR counselor positions have masters degrees. However, rarely NMDVR hires a person without a masters degree, especially in rural areas of the state. Such a new hire must immediately begin working toward their masters degree to meet the highest standards of the state. Counselors without advanced degrees are required to enroll in the NMHU graduate program or in an accredited distance learning graduate program.  NMDVR may purchase vocational evaluations, rehabilitation engineering services, accessibility studies and job modifications, essential job function studies for employers and employees from qualified vendors. The Agency also employs staff with the professional capabilities of performing these services.

 

Staff Development  Unit:  The Agency continues to work cooperatively with the New Mexico Public Education Department to issue state licensure for rehabilitation counselors. The Agency coordinates with the State Personnel Office to devlope pay equity that reflects the skills and qualifications of licensed counselors. Counselors are encouraged to submit their credentials when they meet the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) designation, a nationally recognized acceditation. The Staff Development Unit (SDU) will support graduate level course work which, when completed, will allow counselors to sit for the CRC examination. The SDU provides for professional and paraprofessional development of all staff from division, state sponsored, institutions of higher education, private vendors, professional organizations, or any training that would enhance job performance. SDU provides and monitors a series of required training that is available to all new employees. NMDVR policy requires these courses on a regular basis. Prevention of Sexual Harassment, Preventing Employment Discrimination, Workplace Violence Prevention, and Mileage and Per Diem. Counselors and Rehabilitation Technicians also complete on-line courses in Orientation to Rehabilitation and VR 101: Determining Eligibility and Writing the Individualized Plan for Employment. SDU also offers Rehabilitation Academy to new counselors and rehabilitation technicians (rehabilitation secretaries are highly encouraged to attend). Participants from the Native American partner agencies and community based programs are invited to attend Rehab Academy. The academy is taught over a three week period focusing on assessment, eligibility, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology. A "sample case" allows new staff to make appropriate eligibility decisions and suitable vocational goals. Attendees may practice with the case management software, AWARE, use training games and activities which reinforce the learning. SDU makes good use of technology as participants give the academy high marks in terms of content and learning satisfaction. The Awards Webinar replaced the annual Statewide Staff Meeting to contain costs. In a similar effort, the New Employee Webinar may be viewed at employees desks to eliminate the travel and associated costs to direct all available resources to direct service delivery.  The Agency uses a customized software application called the Training Administration System (TAS) to track employee training progress and CSPD compliance. This software provides the information necessary to summarize the training requested and completed on an individual basis. It provides the data necessary to analyze overall progress of individuals and groups of employees toward obtaining and retaining required credentials and job skills. The system offers the Agency the ability to track all employees’ training and allow employees to request training seamlessly by computer. The SDU routinely transmits new training opportunities via electronic mail and Agency Intranet. The SDU conducts annual needs assessments to provide the resources necessary to ensure personnel receive appropriate training. SDU offers workshops and seminars in various topics related to rehabilitation counseling, geared to sharpen counselors’ skills and abilities in serving participants. Recently, SDU facilitated internal training for staff: Comprehensive Assessment, Comparable Benefits, Office 2001, AWARE 5.6 Case Management System, Fraud Prevention and Prevention of Sexual Harassment Refresher. The training topics are always based on expressed needs, whether by management or by committees such as the agency’s Health and Safety Committee.  Recently, SDU staff developed and presented training about the Agency’s implementation of an order of selection.  As part of the Division’s overall strategic planning efforts and in spite of these times of difficult budget decisions, NMDVR is proactively working toward the future in terms of career development and succession planning. The Career Development Team developed a plan which will benefit staff, the Agency, and the participants served by the Agency. The goals of this group are to help staff develop skills that may help them advance or become more effective in their jobs. Titled the Leadership Institute for Tomorrow (LIFT), the program has leadership approval.  LIFT includes the following components: Leadership Foundations, Supervisor Academy, Degree Advancement, Individual Career Development Plans, Mentoring, Job Shadowing. LIFT was rolled out in July 2010 and this first cohort of staff participants is schdued to complete project activity in fall of 2011. A steering committee of 12 individuals representing a cross section of the agency is working in collaboration with the Region 6 Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Center. A Supervisory Academy is intended to develop the available talent pool within the agency, promoting a learning culture and develop networks of future leaders.

 

Personnel to Address Individual Communication Needs:  In New Mexico, there are large portions of the general population whose first language is Spanish or an American Indian dialect. When necessary, the Agency obtains the services of interpreters of Spanish and other languages. However, Agency staffing, which is consistent with the percentage of minority population and the general population, includes many individuals who are able to communicate in Spanish and native languages. This is most beneficial in terms of providing services to applicants and eligible individuals with limited English speaking ability. Although not a requirement, the Agency may give preference to individuals who are bilingual or multilingual in applying for Agency’s jobs. Many of the Division’s field offices have at least one individual who can speak Spanish or an American Indian dialect. The Agency’s EEO Plan reflects the state’s diversity. The Agency successfully recruits graduates of New Mexico Highlands University’s vocational rehabilitation masters program. Many of these graduates are from various minority groups. In addition, the Agency employs several individuals skilled in communicating in American Sign Language. When necessary, interpreters are hired to fulfill communication needs.  Telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices may be used to assist individual applicants and clients to participate in and benefit from the rehabilitation program. The Agency may purchase, lease, or utilize equipment from loan banks to meet these needs, as appropriate. Agency staff may consult experts in rehabilitation technology and assistive devices to address client needs.

 

Coordination of Personnel Development Under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act:  The Agency is organizationally placed under the Public Education Department, as is the Special Education Unit, which administers state services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). In developing its Comprehensive System of Personal Development (CSPD) plan, the Agency will continue to coordinate with the Special Education Unit and will coordinate its CSPD activities with those provided under IDEA. This activity will be implemented under the auspices of the Secretary of Education.  The licensure rules for Rehabilitation Counselors in New Mexico are in agreement with the Public Education Department requirements and competencies applicable to both the school systems to effect school-to-work transition in the high schools and the Agency.  These activities for developing a distinct plan and maintaining a CSPD incorporates methodology to ensure cooperation and coordination with the personnel development under IDEA.

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 4:26PM by sanmbransfordd

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Mission Statement: The mission of the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is to encourage and assist the efforts of New Mexicans with disabilities to reach their goals for working and living in their communities. Vision Statement: Every New Mexican with a disability has the opportunity to contribute to the quality of life and the economic prosperity of the state. Attachment 4.11(a): Statewide Assessment, Results of Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of the Rehabilitation Needs of Individuals with Disabilities and Need to Establish, Develop, or Improve Community Rehabilitation Programs: The Agency jointly conducts with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) continuing statewide studies to determine the needs of individuals with disabilities within the state and the best methods to meet those needs. The Agency periodically conducts surveys through its programs, projects and activities to ensure that the annual evaluation of effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program meets the goals and objectives set forth in the State Plan, and does not impede the accomplishments of the purpose and policy of federal funding. As part of the development of the State Plan, the continuing statewide studies include: 1) A triennial comprehensive assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with significant disabilities who reside in the state, 2) A triennial review of the effectiveness of outreach procedures used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who are unserved and under-served by the vocational rehabilitation system; and 3) A triennial review of the broad variety of methods to provide, expand, and improve vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with the most significant disabilities, including individuals receiving supported employment services. The Agency has historically conducted an annual evaluation of the effectiveness of the State’s Vocational Rehabilitation program in providing vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services, especially to individuals with the most significant disabilities. Recently, this has been interrupted due to budgetary restraints. The NMDVR, in coordination with the SRC, provides an assurance that it will complete the required triennial comprehensive needs assessment in FY 12. The NMDVR will work with the SRC to ensure compliance in getting this completed triennially as required. The evaluation analyzes the extent to which the Agency has achieved the goals and priorities established in the State Plan and annual amendments to the plan, and that the Agency is in compliance with the evaluation standards and performance indicators established by the Rehabilitation Services Administration.  The number of individuals in New Mexico with disabilities is difficult to estimate. The U.S. Census 2008 estimated the general resident population for the State of New Mexico is 1,984,356 (Annual Disability Statistics Compendium 2009, Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics). The 2008 Disability Status Report, Cornell University provides the following disability statistics specific to New Mexico (Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Demographics and Statistics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 www.disabilitystatistics.org):  Disability statistics among non-institutionalized people ages 21 – 64 in New Mexico (Working Age) - • Overall percentage of working-age people with a disability was 12.4% • Disability Type Any Disability 12.4% Visual 2.5% Hearing 3.2% Ambulatory 6.4% Cognitive 5.3% Self-Care 2.4% Independent Living 4.4% • Employment rate for working-age people with disabilities was 41.2% • Actively looking for work among people with disabilities who were not working was 6.5% • Working people with disabilities working full-time / full-year was 24.5% • Median annual earnings of working people with disabilities working full-time / full-year was $37,200 • Median income of households that include any working-age people with disabilities was $36,200 • Poverty rate for working-age people with disabilities was 25.2% • Working-age people with disabilities receiving SSI payments in NM was 20.5% • Educational Attainment of working-age people with disabilities in NM o High school diploma or equivalent 32.1% o Some college or an associate degree 31.3% o Bachelor’s degree or more 14.7% Specific to identifying statewide needs of individuals with disabilities in New Mexico, findings from two Participant and Stakeholder Satisfaction and Statewide Needs Assessments were reported in April 2007 and August 2008. (Participant and Stakeholder Satisfaction and Statewide Needs Assessment, sponsored by the New Mexico State Rehabilitation Council and the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, April 2007, Contract Number 07-644-1000-0058, and December 2007, Contract Number 08-0035 Michael D. O’Brien, Ed.D., CRC, CVE).   Major findings in the 2007 study indicated the following needs by New Mexicans with most significant disabilities with the greatest frequency: 1) 40% of clients did not feel like they could get needed training in the community where they lived 2) Only half of the consumers surveyed reported having an adequate number of providers to choose from in their community 3) The One-Stop service delivery system is clearly not a meaningful provider of services to individuals with disabilities working with NMDVR. It is noted that over 33% of respondents to the survey did not answer the questions related to One-Stop Centers. Many marked “NA” or placed a “?” by the question indicating that they did not know what a One-Stop is. Many respondents specifically asked the question, what is a One-Stop? 4) Local One-Stop centers are not meeting the needs of individuals with disabilities or that individuals with disabilities are not aware of One-Stop services 5) Participants overwhelmingly did not feel that the support they got for medical needs from NMDVR was a primary contributor to their success. 6) Some participants indicated it was difficult to get medical needs met. 7) Most consumers were satisfied with their current transportation and living situation.   Findings from the 2008 study indicate the following needs by New Mexicans with disabilities: 1) Access to public transportation, accessible housing and access to local training opportunities were reported as issues of concern. 2) Only 52% of the participants reported they were satisfied with the vendor assigned to them to help with job placement. Only 36% reported that they had multiple vendors to choose from when they began their job search. This raises questions about the vendors being used or the number of available vendors. This concern is consistent with previous surveys and is indicative of the challenges in recruiting vendors. 3) Only 11.6% reported that they received any services from a One-Stop. Only about 13% of those who visited reported that the One-Stop was able to understand their disability needs; this is perhaps more disturbing. Similar results were discovered in the 2007 survey.  The Agency also assesses the needs of New Mexicans with disabilities utilizing reports generated by other entities in the state. Dr. Anthony Cahill in a preliminary study "Barriers to Access to Healthcare for People in New Mexico" reported that a greater percentage of people with disabilities, particularly those requiring assistance, responded that they sometime or always had a problem getting access to healthcare compared to people with no disability. Another telling finding of this study was that providers’ perceptions of barriers faced by people with disabilities were generally limited to physical access issue and the use of certified American Sign Language (ASL) interpreters at primary and public healthcare offices was mostly unheard of. These types of resource issues provide challenges to NMDVR.  The New Mexico Developmental Disabilities Planning Council (NMDDPC) conducted several public forums in the latter part calendar year 2009. These forums were specific to garnering the public’s perception of need as related to Developmental Disabilities. Although the findings were not obtained by scientific methodology, but rather delivered by the public at the forums, the findings do illustrate rehabilitation needs in New Mexico and again are indicative of the resource challenges in the state. Select findings were specific to Childcare, Formal and Informal Community Supports, Education and Early Intervention, Employment, Health, Housing, Recreation, Transportation, and Quality Assurance. Listed below are those findings which more directly impact vocational rehabilitation in New Mexico (language provided by NMDDPC): • “Need career support for Persons with Disabilities (PWD) who have educational degrees” • “Need re-employment and job change support services” • “Need help for families of PWD to get employment” • “Need to address employer misconceptions” • “Inadequate transition services at college and between HS and employment” • “Need job generation and development” • “Need employer training” • “Need DVR services and working relationship with them” • “Teachers do not know what is required for transition” • “Need community-based centers” • “Need a one-stop shop for services” • “Need services for adults with Autism” • “Need training on education, benefits, legal assistance, guardianship” • “Training needs to be culturally competent” • “There is no driver training for PWD”  The New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation adresses the vocational rehabilitation service needs of individuals with disabilities of various ethnic and minority groups.  The 2008 Disability Status Report for New Mexico from Cornell University provides the following Quick Statistics: • The overall percentage (prevalence rate) of disability among people of Hispanic/Latino origin ages 5 and older was 12.6% • The overall percentage of disability among people of non-Hispanic/Latino origin ages 5 and older was 14.5 • Disability prevalence rate among non-institutionalized working-age New Mexicans (21 to 64) by rate category: o 12.2 % of persons who were White reported a disability o 14.2% of persons who were Black/African American Reported a disability o 13.5% of persons who were Native American reported a disability o 3.7% of persons who were Asian reported a disability o 13.2% of persons who were some other race reported a disability.  NMDVR recognizes the need to address the vocational rehabilitation needs of minorities. One such measure is to work toward the improvement of community rehabilitation programs within the state to address rehabilitation needs of minorities, especially those in remote rural communities is obvious. Geographically, New Mexico is a large state in land mass with many areas of the state sparsely populated. Many rural areas have few, if any, community rehabilitation providers (CRPs). Along with Rio Grande corridor from Taos in the northern part of the state to Las Cruces in the south, is a concentration of community rehabilitation providers in the larger communities of the Greater Albuquerque Metropolitan area, Socorro, and Las Cruces. The northeast quadrant, southeast quadrant, and the southwest quadrant are the areas most affected by the lack of service providers.  Case in point, the town of Raton in the northeast quadrant has only one CRP available to provide supported employment services. DVR also has a two person office in Raton. However, it is noted that before supported employment services can be agreed upon with the CRP, the individual must be on the Developmental Disabilities Medicaid Waiver for the long-term funding. This service provider is capable of offering services to the communities of Cimarron (41 miles) and the community of Angel Fire (80 miles) one way. Other communities served by the NMDVR office, such as Clayton (83 miles), Eagle Nest (65 miles), Springer (38 miles), Maxwell (about 23 miles), and Ute Park (about 50 miles) do not have the benefit of CRP services. Note: all mileage is one-way distance and the listed communities are not all inclusive of northeast New Mexico served by the NMDVR Office. The same holds true for southeastern New Mexico in Lea County. There are two community rehabilitation providers in the town of Hobbs where NMDVR has a four person office. Both of these community rehabilitation provides are available only to individuals who live in Lea County to such places as Tatum (50 miles north) and Eunice (50 miles south). One provider specializes in mental health while the other provider specializes in developmental disabilities. All recipients of these services must have long-term funding in place before supported employment services are rendered. In southwestern New Mexico, NMDVR has a two person office in Silver City where there are two community rehabilitation providers. Both providers make services available to residents in Silver City and Deming (50 miles) but not to the other communities served by the NMDVR office such as Mimbres (30 miles), Lordsburg (50 miles), Animas (80 miles), and Reserve (85 miles). Note: all mileage is one-way distance and the listed communities are not all inclusive of northeastern New Mexico served by the NMDVR Office. Central western New Mexico is a very large territory inclusive of Indian Reservation land. American Indian populations have access to four community rehabilitation providers through their local tribal affiliations when resident on Indian land. However, for non-American Indian populations access to community rehabilitation programs is more limited to one provider and again funding is an issue relative to acquiring supported employment services. There are four staff in the Gallup NMDVR office serving a geographic community of almost 80 miles to the east, 25 miles to the Arizona state line, not less than 80 miles to the south, and not less than 50 miles to the north. Outside of Gallup and the services available to American Indian populations, there is not much available in terms of community rehabilitation programs in central western New Mexico. There are other rural locations throughout the state where population is scare and distances vast from community to community with few rehabilitation community providers. These rural locations are itinerantly served by NMDVR offices in larger communities with many community rehabilitation services providers stretching their resources as best they can to extend services. Below are examples of how the Agency addresses expansion of services to underserved and unserved populations with disabilities in the state.  The Agency continues to explore ways to improve services to American Indian Populations as well as increasing staff competency with respect to cultural differences. Agency resources will determine priority and further development of these broad general goals of Career Development, Successful Employment Outcomes, and NMDVR-SRC Collaboration. 1) Career Development - a. Develop, create, increase, improve specific training at Rehabilitation Academy specific to / incorporating Native American issues such as: - cultural competency issues, - identifying / listing statewide community service providers specific to Native Americans and making this information available to all counseling staff / teams - best practices in developing professional relationships with the 121 Programs in the state (who’s who, where located, 121 Program Strengths, and their employment outreach activities) - the array of services 121 programs offer (what they actually offer / provide and not what is specified by law, to learn how best to dovetail NMDVR services / strengths with 121 Program services / strengths - dual participation of Native Americans in both 121 Programs and State VR, citing the laws / rules that govern this - have 121 Program Directors participate and/or do the topic presentations / training at Rehabilitation Academy - identifying best practices already employed by NMDVR counseling staff / teams that could be shared with attendees of Rehabilitation Academy  b. Develop specific on-going training for NMDVR staff accessible through TAS with the focus of Native American issues as they relate to vocational rehabilitation services,  c. Project Leadership Institute for Tomorrow (LIFT) – offer a career track (module) specific to working with Native American populations. If such career development was identified and targeted as one of the overall goals for and needs of the Division specific to Project LIFT, 2. Successful Employment Outcomes – a. Target increased successful employment outcomes of Native American participants as a strategic goal of the Division. This will help give focus and direction to achieving such a goal. b. Explore self-employment opportunities with Native American NMDVR participants who have expressed desire to remain in their community with their business and / or those who want to locate their business in both their community and in the larger community.  c. Develop working collaborative partnerships with statewide community service providers with outreach and /or specific services to Native American populations, such as Zia Chapter Paralyzed Veterans of America, Inc.; Abrazos Family Support Services: Education for Parents of Indian Children with Special Needs; Native American Disability Las Center, Inc.; and of course, the Independent Living Centers throughout the state. d. Many NMDVR counselors and staff with special skills and networks service Native American populations in Gallup, Farmington, Taos, Rio Rancho and other areas with their expertise, networking connections, and best practices should be garnered and made available to all NMDVR counseling staff / teams. 3. DVR – SRC Collaborative - Participant and Stakeholder Satisfaction and Statewide Needs Assessment Surveying - There has been considerable discussion by the SRC CSAOP / SRO subcommittee that a “study within a study” could be done specifically focusing on Native American populations. To this end, the study sample could include all NMDVR participants with Native American race/ethnicity coding as well as the random sampling of identified demographics for the overall, larger study that would take place. In essence, we would be conducting a “study within a study” with specific reporting reflecting the findings of the larger, whole study and the “study within a study.” This feature in the study will be incorporated while developing a contract for the service.  Ticket to Work: The Social Security Administration’s Ticket to Work program is designed to provide a network of providers for Social Security beneficiaries to obtain employment outcome services. NMDVR is an Employment Network under the Ticket to Work program and received 182 ticket assignments total at the end of fiscal year 2006.  NMDVR and Behavioral Health Services: NMDVR is a member of New Mexico’s Behavioral Health Purchasing Collaborative. During the past four year, work continued toward intra-agency collaboration specifically dealing with behavioral health services among all 17 agencies/divisions of the BHPC. Under the terms of an agreement reached with the Behavioral Health Services Division (BHSD), NMDVR continues to facilitate and monitor employment services for people within the BHSD system and to assist others in making connections with that system. Coordination of services among BHSD, NMDVR, regional employment providers, and mental health providers can increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.  The New Mexico Cultivando Habilidades/Cultivating Abilities (NMCHCA): The NMCHCA program has been providing services to migrant and seasonal farm workers with disabilities since 2002. Services include educational opportunities, translation or interpretive services, help with job readiness and job search, client follow-up, and advocacy to an often-marginalized population. NMCHCA targets a broad range of agriculture-related activities, including food processing, ranching, produce delivery, dairy, orchard, and field work. NMCHCA is a federally funded project.  

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 4:26PM by sanmbransfordd

Mission Statement: The mission of the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is to encourage and assist the efforts of New Mexicans with disabilities to reach their goals for working and living in their communities. Vision Statement: Every New Mexican with a disability has the opportunity to contribute to the quality of life and the economic prosperity of the state. Attachment 4.11(b): Annual Estimates of Individuals to Be Served and Costs of Services: The total number of New Mexicans with disabilities who could potentially be eligible for services and who may or may not apply for vocational rehabilitation services is unknown. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates New Mexico’s general population in 2008 at 1,984,356. According to the 2008 Disability Status Report, Cornell University the prevalence of disability in New Mexico for all ages is 13.6%. The following estimates are for FFY 2012: • Number of eligible individuals in the state who will receive services provided with funds under Part B Title I: FFY 2012 Estimate = 7,000. • Number of eligible individuals in the state who will receive services provided with funds under Part B Title VI: FFY 2012 Estimate = 280. • Number of eligible individuals in the state who achieve a suitable (consistent with client’s skills, aptitudes, and interests) employment outcome for a minimum of 90 days: FFY 2012 Estimate = 950. • Number of eligible individuals in the state who are significantly disabled persons achieving a suitable (consistent with clients skills, aptitudes, and interests) employment for a minimum of 90 days: FFY 2012Estimate = 836. Estimated costs of services: FFY 2012 budgeted approximately $7,490,191. The Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is under an Order of Selection. The table below provides estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Most Significantly Disabled Title I $2,621,567 1,120 $2,340
Most Significantly Disabled Title VI $244,500 280 $873
Significantly Disabled Title I $4,494,114 5500 $817
Non-Significantly Disabled Title I $374,510 100 $3,745
Totals   $7,734,691 7,000 $1,104

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 4:26PM by sanmbransfordd

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Mission Statement: The mission of the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is to encourage and assist the efforts of New Mexicans with disabilities to reach their goals for working and living in their communities. Vision Statement: Every New Mexican with a disability has the opportunity to contribute to the quality of life and the economic prosperity of the state. Attachment 4.11(c)(1): State’s Goals and Priorities: Rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities Working with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), the  New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (NMDVR) set the following goals by order of priority to coincide with the state fiscal year of July 1, 2011 to June 30, 2012. The SRC and the Agency jointly reviewed the results reported in this Attachment taking into account Standards and Indicators and input from the SRC. Goals and priorities identified by the Agency also take into account the results of comprehensive statewide needs assessment reports of April 1, 2007 and August 12, 2008, addressed later in this text. State Goals and Priorities align with Federal Standards and Indicators. For purposes of this Attachment, the reported figures are Federal Fiscal Year. Provide at the appropriate level quality services to increase the number of individuals with disabilities, as stipulated by the data sets below, while assisting them to gain, regain, preserve, or develop their ability to pursue employment. A. Projected number of clients served for FFY 2012 / 7000.  2005 Projected/Actual 10,100/11,300 2006 Projected/Actual 10,100*/11,400 2007 Projected/Actual 11,400/11,168 2008 Projected/Actual 11,400/11,619 2009 Projected/Actual 11,500/12,459 2010 Projected/Actual 10,500/12,701 2011 Projected 10,500  2012 Projected 7,000   B. Increase the number of persons achieving an employment outcome consistent with the client’s skills, abilities, aptitudes, and interests. Employment outcomes will be for a minimum of 90 days, FFY 2012 Projection = 950.  2005 Projected/Actual 1,695/1,705 2006 Projected/Actual 1,695/1,942*  2007 Projected/Actual 1,695/1,705 2008 Projected/Actual 1,706/1,692 2009 Projected/Actual 1,750/1,545 2010 Projected 1,750/1,541 2011 Projected 1,700  2012 Projected 950  C. Increase the number of clients with significant disabilities served (coded significant disability at eligibility), FFY 2012 Projection = 5,600 2005 Projected/Actual 6,300/9,379 2006 Projected/Actual 6,300/8,370 2007 Projected/Actual 6,300/8,697 2008 Projected/Actual 6,300/9,155 2009 Projected/Actual 6,400/9,948 2010 Projected/Actual  6,400/10,251 2011 Projected 5,100 2012 Projected 5,600  D. Increase the number of persons with significant disabilities achieving an employment outcome consistent with their skills, abilities, aptitudes, and interests, FFY 2012 Projection = 836 2005 Projected/Actual 1,075/1,556 2006 Projected/Actual 1,075/1,764* 2007 Projected/Actual 1,075/1636 2008 Projected/Actual 1,032/1,612 2009 Projected/Actual 1,050/1,463 2010 Projected/Actual  1,050/1,493 2011 Projected = 1,500 2012 Projected = 836       * Note: Consider the actual figures for 2006 an anomaly, from expected figures. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, include their need for supported employment services. The following goals and activities for supported employment are planned during 2011 – 2012: Continue to provide Title VI-B services to clients in active status in pursuit of goals established in Individualized Plans for Employment. Approximately 280 clients will be provided Title VI-B services during the 2011 - 2012 Federal Fiscal Year. However, this estimate may be adjusted upwards because the Agency has entered into an agreement with the Long Term Services Division and Behavioral Health Services Division of the Department of Health to identify individuals in need of vocational rehabilitation services.  2005 Projected/Actual 550/582 2006 Projected/Actual 550*/571 2007 Projected/Actual 571/508 2008 Projected/Actual 580/526 2009 Projected/Actual 580/532 2010 Projected/Actual 580/508 2011 Projected 500 2012 Projected 280.      *Note: Consider the actual figures for 2006 an anomaly, from expected figures.  Strategies to effect Title VI-B services: 1. Continue to use Title VI-B funds for case services exclusively. Allocate funds to the Area Offices where the direct delivery of services takes place. These funds will be monitored quarterly and reallocated to the Area Offices based on need. Title I funds will also be used for supported employment services once Title VI-B funds are exhausted. 2. For clients with the most significant disabilites, continue to purchase supported employment services from programs on either a fee-for-services basis or through milestone payments developed regionally and/or through specific Memorandum of Understanding with other state agencies. 3. Continue to seek long-term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. 4. The Agency continues to work with other state agencies under memoranda of understanding focusing on serving individuals with the most significant disabilities under supported employment plans. 5. Individual placements in integrated work settings at wages comparable to non-disabled peers performing similar work continue to be emphasized. 6. The Agency has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. 7. The Agency has established statewide liaisons in supported employment to assist the statewide Supported Employment Coordinator in technical assistance and conducting staff training relevant to supported employment policy and service provision. Agency liaisons are active participants and attendees in supported employment trainings provided by experts at the local, regional, and national level. Division liaisons participate regularly in regional quarterly meetings held between collaborating agencies and the Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health. 8. The Agency has a devoted staff person who provides guidance and technical assistance to staff, service providers, and other stakeholders. This individual also compiles information and data, and tracks Supported Employment activities. 9. The Agency continues to support and promote strategies to assure employment opportunities for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. Overarching Agency strategies addressing rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities and individuals with the most significant disabilities, include their need for supported employment services.  The primary strategy directly related to addressing rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities and those with signiicant disabilities including supported employment needs is to reduce turnover in vocational rehabilitation counselor positions. Turnover in these ranks has been as high as 32%. The turnover rate for FY 10 was 7% for VR counselors. The vacancy rate for FY 11 is 18% despite a statewide hiring freeze. The Agency is addressing both career development and succession planning in our long-term strategic planning goal of having an operational, comprehensive Career Development/Succession Planning system capable of meeting the expansion needs and inovation needs of the rehabilitation services delivery system, inclusive of administrative supports to reinforce the rehabilitation services delivery system. The Agency has surveyed staff in terms of eligibility for retirement, whether staff are interested in returning to employment after retirement and the career enhancement needs of staff so that they can prepare themselves for potential movement into leadership roles.  Statewide Needs Assessment:  Goals and priorities identified by the Agency are based on an analysis of the comprehensive statewide needs assessment reports of April 2007 and August 2008. Some of the findings from the Statewide Needs Assessment are as follows: • Most consumers were satisfied with their current transportation and living situations. • Over 40% of consumers did not feel that they could get needed [vocational] training in the community where they lived. • Only half of consumers reported having an adequate number of service providers to choose from in their community. • One-Stop centers without the services provided by NMDVR Navigators do not appear to be a meaningful provider of services to individuals with disabilities. • NMDVR increases focus on consumer’s choice in developing job goals, training programs, and agreement at closure. • Develop mechanisms for advising consumers of community services when NMDVR cannot provide the service. It appears that the Agency will need to implement strategies to assist consumers in identifying and making accessible to the consumer training and other services available from local service providers and One-Stop centers. One such strategy has been to comprehensively market and utilize NMDVR navigators located in One-Stop centers around the state. They have proven to be effective for timely job placement. The Agency will be looking at strategies to increase reported income of eligible individuals at the time of successful case closure of their IPE. The finding in the Statewide Needs Assessment report of April 2007 regarding overall median income at the time of successful closure appears to be a critical issue related to overall satisfaction with rehabilitation services and level of appropriate living wages. The Agency wants to monitor this issue realizing that effectively addressing this issue may take resources and effort for many years. Another finding of the 2007 Statewide Needs Assessment and which is a critical component of overall satisfaction with regard to rehabilitation services is completion of Individualized Plans for Employment within three months of eligibility determination. The Agency will be looking at internal practices to address reducing the time between eligibility and implementation of the Individualized Plan for Employment. Some of the findings from the Statewide Needs Assessment of August 2008 are as follows: • Over 90% of respondents reported that they had access to transportation to make DVR appointments, training and medical appointments. • About 56% reported access to public transportation. Of significance Area 1 (Santa Fe) reported only 42% had access and Area 4 (Roswell) reported only 48% had access. • Most participants reported they were satisfied with their current housing, but about 31% reported difficulty with rent or house payments • Access to training appears to be a concern. About 58% reported they had access in their community • Only 52% of the participants reported they were satisfied with the vendor assigned to them for help with job placement. Only 36% reported that they had multiple vendors to choose from when they began their job search. This raises concerns about the vendor service quality or the number of available vendors. This concern is consistent with previous surveys. • Only 11.6% reported that they received any services from a One-Stop Center. Only 13% of individuals visiting a One-Stop Center reported that staff could understand their disability needs; this may be more disturbing. The One-Stop Centers are essentially not involved in services for NMDVR participants. Individuals reported similar results in the 2007 survey.  Note that the State’s Goals and Priorities outlined in this Attachment align with the Standards and Indicators as detailed in Attachment 4.11(e)(2). However, the State Rehabilitation Council has recommended adjustments to the State’s Goals and Indicators to reflect the following: • Poverty issues of individuals with disabilities and assurances of placing NMDVR participants in jobs above poverty level • Migrant farm workers be identified in the categories of goals and priorities • Dual cases of Native American 121 Program participants who are also NMDVR participants be tracked and reported in the goals and priorities.

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 2:10PM by sanmbransfordd

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

Mission Statement: The mission of the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is to encourage and assist the efforts of New Mexicans with disabilities to reach their goals for working and living in their communities.  Vision Statement: Every New Mexican with a disability has the opportunity to contribute to the quality of life and the economic prosperity of the state.  Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection: Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services; Identify the justification for the order; Identify the service and outcome goals; Identify the time within which these goals may be acheived for individuals in each priority category within the order; Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.  Justification for order of selection: Budget reductions realized during fiscal years 09, 10 and 11 have resulted in limited financial and personnel resources. Analysis of available resources resulted in projection that by February, 2011, NMDVR lacked sufficient resources to provide services to all eligible individuals. As a result, the Agency, in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Counsel (SRC), determined the necessity of implementation of an order of selection which ensures service delivery to eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities as of February, 2011.  NMDVR received a state general fund appropriation of $4,410,900.00 which was reduced in August 2010 by 3.24%. This reduced the state match to $4,267,931.00. This also reduced the amount of federal funds that NMDVR can match to $15,769,303.00. The case service budget was established at $7,895,777.00 for state fiscal year 2011. August budget reductions decreased the budget by $212,708.00, leaving a balance of $7,683,069.  From 7/10 to 12/10, NMDVR was able to realize $760,058.00 in program income. This was budgeted directly to case service to offset budget reductions. Additionally, ARRA stimulus dollars were utilized to offset budget reductions experienced during the past two years. For state fiscal year 2011, $610,514.00 was used to supplement the case service budget. As of this date, approximately $92,994.00 remains available for expenditure. It is anticipated that 95% to 100% of all ARRA dollars will be expended by 6/11.  There remains a significant budget revenue shortfall in the state. As such, state agencies have been instructed to plan for possible additional reductions. Should that occur, the NMDVR state match will be further reduced. While there has been no official directive related to such a decrease, it is possible that another budget reduction will be experienced during the federal fiscal year 2012. Revenue projections conducted quarterly will be a determining factor on whether further cuts a re applied. Currently, the agency case service budget for fiscal year 2012 is $7,490,191. Program income is projected at $400,000.  As indicated in the table below, it is estimated that NMDVR will serve 7,000 individuals for federal fiscal year 2012. The breakdown by priority group is as follows: Most Significantly Disabled - 1,400, Significantly Disabled - 5,500, Non-Significantly Disabled - 100. This projection could decrease depending on whether additional cuts are applied to the NMDVR. The table also provides detail on the projected cost of services per priority group. This includes a projection of Titles 1 and 6 service costs and program income costs. These projections could also be impacted by additional budget cuts. 

 

Description of Priority categories

Description of priority categories: It is the policy of NMDVR to provide vocational rehabilitation services to eligible individuals under an order of selection. Under the order of selection, the Agency has established three priority groups. Every individual determined to be eligible for services is placed in the appropriate priority group based upon the documentation used to determine eligibility and/or vocational rehabilitation needs. Selection and placement in a priority group is based solely upon the significance of the eligible individual’s disability and is not based upon the type of disability, geographical area in which the individual lives, projected type of vocational outcome, age, sex, race, color, creed, religion or national origin of the individual. The priority groups are: (1) Priority Group 1. Eligible individuals with a most significant disability are persons: a. who have a severe physical or mental impairment which seriously impedes the individuals functional capacities in two or more areas (such as mobility, communication, self care, self direction, interpersonal skills, cognitive abilities, or work tolerance or attendant factors) in terms of an employment outcome and; b. whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require multiple and intensive vocational rehabilitation services in order to result in an employment outcome. (2) Priority Group 2. Eligible individuals with a significant disability are persons: a. who have a severe physical or mental impairment that seriously limits one or more functional capacities (such as mobility, communication, self care, self direction, interpersonal skills, cognitive abilities, or work tolerance or attendant factors) in terms of an employment outcome and; b. for whom vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time. (3) Priority Group 3. Eligible individuals with a non-significant disability who do not meet the definition of a significant or most significant disability.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order: NMDVR shall continue to plan  for and provide services to all participants being served under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) prior to and at the time of implementation of the order of selection, irrespective of the severity of the participant’s disability. Participants shall be placed in priority categories at the time of eligibility determination. Depending upon Agency resources, the categories shall be closed for services in ascending order beginning with Category 3 and proceeding to Categories 2 and 1. Services shall be provided only to those individuals in an open category. Individuals with the most significant disabilities (priority category 1) will be selected for services before all others. NMDVR will inform each participant on their caseloads: (1) of the priority groups in the order of selection; (2) if eligible, of the individual’s assignment to a priority group; (3) of the individual’s right to appeal that assignment; (4) if eligible and in a priority group not being served, that they can remain on a waiting list until such time that the priority group is served; and (5) of information and referral services available to all applicants.  Cases in eligible status within a closed priority group wil be placed in delayed status and remain on a waiting list until such time resources allow for the release of cases to be served. No IPE will be written for cases on the waiting list. Staff will continue to take applications, diagnose and evaluate all applicants to determine eligibility and assign a priority group. When analysis of resources indicates the ability to open a priority group, the staff will receive notice along with a list of participants on their caseload who can be removed from delayed status.  Eligible participants will be released from delayed status based on priority assignment and their application date, releasing those with the earliest application date. Staff will contact identified participants to develop and implement their IPE.  Any participant with an IPE that existed prior to the date an order of selection was implemented, irrespective of their priority group, will continue to receive services as planned. Such an IPE may be amended if the changes are necessary for the individual to continue progress toward achieving an appropriate employment outcome, or are otherwise necessary within policy. Persons requiring post employment services will also be provided the necessary services regardless of priority group assignment. Information and referral services will remain available to eligible participants who are not in an open priority group. These participants will be given information and guidance, using appropriate means of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and will be appropriately referred to Federal and State programs (other than the vocational rehabilitation program) including other components of the statewide workforce investment system. No IPE will be written to provide such services to these individuals.    

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be acheived: NMDVR’s case management system, AWARE, is designed to assure that individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all others.

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 1,400 190 290 09/30/12 $2,621,567
2 5,500 710 850 09/30/12 $4,494,114
3 100 50 230 09/30/12 $374,510

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 4:25PM by sanmbransfordd

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

Mission Statement: The mission of the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation is to encourage and assist the efforts of New Mexicans with disabilities to reach their goals for working and living in their communities. Vision Statement: Every New Mexican with a disability has the opportunity to contribute to the quality of life and the economic prosperity of the state. Attachment 4.11(c)(4): Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds: The following goals and activities for supported employment are planned during 2010 – 2011: Continue Title VI-B services to clients in active status in pursuit of goals established in Individual Plans for Employment. Previous estimates of total individuals served under supported employment plans were low. The projection for FFY 2011 remains 580. 2004 Projected/Actual 544/525 2005 Projected/Actual 550/582 2006 Projected/Actual 550*/571 2007 Projected/Actual 571/508 2008 Projected/Actual 580/526 2009 Projected/Actual 580/532 2010 Projected 580 Strategies to effect Title VI-B services: 1. Continue to use Title VI-B funds for case services exclusively. Funds will be allocated to the Area Offices where the direct delivery of services takes place. These funds will be monitored quarterly and reallocated to the Area Offices based on need. Title I funds will also be used for supported employment services once Title VI-B funds are exhausted. 2. Continue to purchase supported employment services from programs on either a fee-for-services basis or through milestone payments developed regionally and/or through specific Memorandum of Understanding with other state agencies, for clients with the most significant disabilities. 3. Continue to seek long-term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, New Mexico Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. 4. The Division continues to work with other state agencies under memoranda of understanding focusing on serving individuals with the most significant disabilities under supported employment plans. 5. Individual placements in integrated work settings at wages comparable to non-disabled peers performing similar work continue to be emphasized. 6. The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. 7. The Division has established statewide liaisons in supported employment to assist the statewide Supported Employment Coordinator in technical assistance and conducting staff training relevant to supported employment policy and service provision. Division liaisons are active participants and attendees in supported employment trainings provided by experts at the local, regional, and national level. Division liaisons participate regularly in regional quarterly meetings held between collaborating agencies and the Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health. 8. The Division has a devoted staff person who provides guidance and technical assistance to staff, service providers, and other stakeholders. This individual also compiles information and data, and tracks Supported Employment activities. 9. The Division continues to support and promote strategies to assure employment opportunities for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment.

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 4:26PM by sanmbransfordd

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

Attachment 4.11 (d) – State’s Strategies and Use of Title I Funds for Innovation and Expansion Activities The Division addresses identification of innovational and expansion activities through several means: 1. Strategic Planning Framework for 2004 – 2010. This strategic framework has been in effect for almost three years. This is a living document supported by aggressive team work specific to Goal Areas of the Strategic Plan. The Goal Areas of the Strategic Planning Framework are: • Successful Participant Outcomes; • Comprehensive Employment Networks; • Positive Organizational Climate; • Career Development/Succession Planning; and • Participant and Stakeholder Satisfaction. The Strategic Planning Framework for 2004 – 2010 has as its Vision Statement: “Every New Mexican with a disability has the opportunity to contribute to the quality of life and the economic prosperity of the state.” The Division devotes considerable amounts of resources to our strategic planning efforts to achieve its goals and priorities, support Title 1 innovation and expansion activities 2. Collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Council in conducting Consumer Satisfaction and Statewide Needs Assessment Surveys. 3. Conducting Public Hearings; and 4. Continual assessment of federal regulations for the vocational rehabilitation program for necessary changes in agency policy and procedures. Strategies that contributed to the achievement of goals and priorities are varied as indicated below: 1. Rehabilitation Academy is available to less experienced staff 2. Training provided throughout the year by the Staff Development Unit inclusive of relevant topics to vocational rehabilitation and continuing education opportunities 3. Case and caseload reviews are conducted by field program managers routinely utilizing standardized instruments and monthly data reports 4. Coaching and mentoring are provided by field program managers and lead counselors to promote quality service delivery and consistent practice 5. Memoranda of Understanding developed jointly with the Public Education Department, local school districts, the Developmental Disabilities Supports Division, the Behavioral Health Division, and the Governor’s Commission on Disability to promote collaboration and create systemic improvements 6. Performance appraisal measures have been standardized to enable cumulative performance reflective of agency goals 7. Awards for performance (in the form of approved leave) applied to promote an additional incentive to exceed agency goals 8. Attainment of CSPD standards 9. Attracting higher qualified staff 10. Reducing ratio of staff to Program Managers allowing more time to managers to focus on Area needs, promote staff development, services to clients, and continuous quality improvement 11. Factoring in Participant Satisfaction and Statewide Needs Assessment recommendations for improved best practices Methods used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities flow from the processes mentioned above distilled into specific creative strategies to increase the number of caseloads, more effective cost benefit of caseload budgets, use of grant fund and contract arrangements to carry out programs, projects, and activities designed to improve the overall function of the vocational rehabilitation service delivery system while working toward improving collaboration and working relationships with other state and local agencies, the business community, community rehabilitation programs, and centers of independent living throughout the state, the Statewide Independent Living Council, DVR stakeholders inclusive of close collaboration with the State Rehabilitation Council. An area of expansion within the Division which has experienced continued growth is the Program Development and Supports Unit. The Program Development and Supports Unit assumes a leadership role in the development and supervision of federally funded grant projects and partnerships that expand opportunities for people with disabilities, whether or not they qualify for Title I vocational rehabilitation services. Unique programs utilize new assistive technologies, reach out to help the under-served, provide education and counseling, assist individuals with disabilities to secure low-interest loans, seek transportation and other solutions to problems faced by New Mexicans with disabilities. Itemizing some of the Program Development and Support include: New Mexico Technology Assistance Program including a technology loan bank available to New Mexicans with disabilities as well as caseload counselors and their clients; Whatever It Takes Program New Solutions in Transportation; Transition into Registered Apprentice, Careers and Employment; Leveraged Integrated Networks of Consumer Supports; Benefits Information Centers; Working Individual’s Medical Program, Social Security Reimbursement, Medicaid Adjudication Services. A very important and highly successful function of the Program Development and Supports has been the implementation of Navigators, a specialized team advising and advocating for people with disabilities who are seeking employment at the New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions One-Stop Career Centers. The Navigators facilitate seamless and comprehensive services to persons with disabilities, access to programs and services and linkages to the employer community while also service a broad range of diverse needs of individuals with disabilities. The Division also expands collaborative activities with the Public Education Department to further increase and expand School-to-Work Transition activities and services for students with disabilities, the Native American Liaison projects, Centers for Independent Living, and the Community Outreach Program for the Deaf. The Division has also enjoyed improved working relationship with New Mexico Highlands University to promote internship and employment opportunities for students and graduate of their rehabilitation education program. The New Mexico Technology Assistance Program mentioned above is but one way how assistive technology is made available to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis. In addition, counselors and their clients have access to and utilize a cadre of assistive technology service providers and professional to address the client’s specific assistive technology needs. To this end, the Division continues to groom potential vendors to make available their products and services to underserved and unserved areas of the state. Based on the demographics of Division clients served as of June 30, 2006, outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities include those with the most significant disability. One of the many specific projects to reach minorities is the New Mexico Division of Vocational Rehabilitation/Office of African American Affairs collaboration to educate the African American Community about Division services. The community outreach coordinator maintains efforts and rapport with various state agencies and governmental agencies, businesses, and faith-based organizations to support and market DVR services. The coordinator also works with schools, churches, social and civil groups to overcome obstacles to employment for people with disabilities. Outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program include supporting legislation to expand independent living services to counties in the state where there are non-existent services; expansion of services to migrant workers mostly in southern New Mexico, and outreach to the hearing impaired populations as well as Native Americans through the New Vistas liaison project. The State of New Mexico is mostly a rural, sparsely populated state except for pockets of dense population within the greater Albuquerque metropolitan tri-county Rio Grande corridor, inclusive of Santa Fe and Las Cruces and including outlining areas such as Farmington, Las Cruces and Roswell. The vast remainder of the state is underdeveloped and economically depressed when compared to neighboring states and other states across the union. As the fifth largest state geographically, the Division strives to be most efficient and judicial in providing Title I services statewide. The Division works to establish, develop, and improve community rehabilitation programs by direct outreach activities of the Division’s direct serve staff prioritizing positive working relationships in every community with local service providers. This is necessitated by the limited resources made available by community rehabilitation providers. It is not uncommon that where the resources are most limited, the relationship between DVR staff and the community rehabilitation service providers are close net based on years of mutual collaboration, trust, and shared experiences of both successes and failures. The Division continually assesses strategies to improve the performance of the Division with respect to the evaluation standard and performance indicators. Program managers throughout the state, with the support of leadership within the Rehabilitation Services unit, continually support their staff to meet these challenges as well as the leadership of Rehabilitation Services Unit Fortunately, in the past two years, the Division’s established milestones of achievement have experienced an all time high rate of success with exceptional outcomes while exceeding all federal standards and indicators. The Division’s leadership team and strategic planning efforts for continuous quality improvement by all staff have resulted in increased levels of professionalism as evidenced by increased productivity in all aspects of standards and indicators. In addition, the Division’s efforts to increase the educational qualifications of all vocational rehabilitation counselors to meet the standards for licensure in vocational rehabilitation have resulted in improved professionalism and competency among all counseling staff. Strategies of assisting components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities by the Division are impressive. The Assistant Secretary for Vocational Rehabilitation sits on the state workforce board. The local workforce boards each have prominent DVR staff as fully engaged board members with delegated authority to make decisions and act on behalf of improving and making available to individuals with disabilities the services of the workforce investment system inclusive of determining performance measures as well as monitoring commitments to provide services to individuals with disabilities and improve both physical and program accessibility for individuals with disabilities. In addition, the Division administers the United States Department of Labor navigator program in all one-stop centers across the state. It is noted that the navigator program has been recognized as the most effective service delivery component for individuals with disabilities in the One-stop system. The Rehabilitation Services Unit and field staff have initiated activities to promote One-stop integration for people with disabilities into the One-stop system achieved through memoranda of understanding. This collaborative effort and resulting in placement activity with the local one-stop facilities and is one instance, the local one-stop is located within the rural DVR office. The Division also launched initiative in Albuquerque to access TANF and difficult to place job seekers with disabilities with specialized programs to address these individuals’ needs in job placement resulting in successful outcomes with competitive salaries for individuals who are traditionally very difficult to place. To achieve state’s goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1), the Division places a priority in terms of resources and activity. These goals directly relate to service delivery system of the Division addressed by strategic planning as directed by the Leadership Team of the agency. Leadership has aligned resources with these goals and priorities in mind. Continuous quality improvement initiative within the Division has resulted in the alignment of more resources to innovation and expansion of state’s goals and priorities. Barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the vocational rehabilitation service delivery system and the state supported employment service delivery system are periodically reviewed and analyzed through formal assessment and continual collaboration with the Division’s stakeholders. The Division’s stakeholders provide information which is valuable as a source outside of the Division. The Division is committed to and actively engaged in monitoring and providing quality services. The client satisfaction formal surveys are valuable to providing an assessment of how well the Division meets these objectives. The Division also is committed to maximize the state’s mandate of meeting the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act by working with the New Mexico legislature to secure state general funds to draw down all available Title I funding that can be made available to the Division. Strategies to effect Title VI-B services: 1. Continue to use Title VI-B funds for case services exclusively. Funds will be allocated to the Area Offices where the direct delivery of services takes place. These funds will be monitored quarterly and reallocated to the Area Offices based on need. Title I funds will also be used for supported employment services once Title VI-B funds are exhausted. 2. Continue to purchase supported employment services from programs on either a fee-for-services basis or through milestone payments developed regionally and/or through specific Memorandum of Understanding with other state agencies, for clients with the most significant disabilities. 3. Continue to seek long-term funding support from agencies providing supported employment. The Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health, provides long term funding for supported employment to provider agencies under the Developmental Disabilities Waiver and Mi Via Waivers. The Division works collaboratively with the Behavioral Health Services Division, Department of Health, New Mexico Department of Human Services, and the NM Behavioral Health Collaborative to assure ongoing support services for individuals with severe disabling mental illness served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. 4. The Division continues to work with other state agencies under memoranda of understanding focusing on serving individuals with the most significant disabilities under supported employment plans. 5. Individual placements in integrated work settings at wages comparable to non-disabled peers performing similar work continue to be emphasized. 6. The Division has increased its collaboration through participation with provider agencies; as well as independent and statewide entities to promote “Employment First” principles for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. 7. The Division has established statewide liaisons in supported employment to assist the statewide Supported Employment Coordinator in technical assistance and conducting staff training relevant to supported employment policy and service provision. Division liaisons are active participants and attendees in supported employment trainings provided by experts at the local, regional, and national level. Division liaisons participate regularly in regional quarterly meetings held between collaborating agencies and the Developmental Disabilities Support Division, Department of Health. 8. The Division has a devoted staff person who provides guidance and technical assistance to staff, service providers, and other stakeholders. This individual also compiles information and data, and tracks Supported Employment activities. 9. The Division continues to support and promote strategies to assure employment opportunities for individuals with the most significant disabilities served under supported employment Individualized Plans for Employment. Overarching Division strategies addressing rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities and individuals with the most significant disabilities, include their need for supported employment services. The Division has identified two overarching strategies with are designed to keep the rehabilitation field program efficient and adequately staffed with qualified vocational rehabilitation counselors. The first overarching strategy is the restructuring of Rehabilitation Services Unit to improve the Division’s direct service delivery system. The restructure was effective July 1, 2009. Some of the highlights of the changes include: • Nine Areas as compared to the previous seven. • Two new central Area offices – Las Vegas and Rio Rancho. • Two new program manager positions – one in Las Vegas and one in the South Valley office, resulting in more opportunities for advancement into management. • Two administrative secretary positions - Las Vegas and Rio Rancho. • A more logical geographical distribution of the Areas. • Fewer satellite offices for all Areas • A reduced ration of staff to managers • A reduction in the agency’s overall lease expenses. • A more “level field” which will enable future growth to occur. • More time for managers to focus on Area needs to promote staff development, services to clients, and continuous quality improvement. The second overarching strategy directly related to addressing rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities and those with significant disabilities including supported employment needs is to reduce turnover in vocational rehabilitation counselor positions. Turnover in these ranks has been as high as 32%. The turnover rate for FY 09 was 12% for Rehabilitation Counselors. The turnover rate for FY 08 was 17%, and the turnover rate for FY 07 was 14% down from 19% in FY 06. The Division is addressing both career development and succession planning in our long-term strategic planning goal of having an operational, comprehensive Career Development/Succession Planning system capable of meeting the expansion needs and innovation needs of the rehabilitation services delivery system inclusive of administrative supports to competently reinforce the rehabilitation services delivery system. The agency has surveyed staff in terms eligibility for retirement, whether staff are interested in returning to employment after retirement, and the career enhancement needs of staff so that they can prepare themselves for potential movement into leadership roles. New Mexico is unique in that the potential barriers identified in Section 427 of GEPA: gender, race, national origin, color, disability, or age; are virtually non-existent in New Mexico. The Land of Enchantment is proud of our heritage and diversity of mixed and integrated cultures. Although there are population groups in the general population which are few in number, they are proportionately represented as recipients of vocational rehabilitation services.

 

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 4:26PM by sanmbransfordd

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

Attachment 4.11(e)(2): Evaluation and Report of Progress in Achieving Identified Goals and Priorities and Use of Title I Funds for Innovation and Expansion Activities: The Agency continues to expand and improve services to individuals with the most severe disabilities, to individuals who are minorities, or individuals who have been unserved or under-served. Client data is examined to determine increased utilization of services in specific areas. Additionally, testimony received in public hearings that supports this data is considered. When an expansion request is requested, final approval of such action by the Public Education Department, the Legislature and the Governor validates the decision. Specific outcomes/data will not be available for the 2010 – 2011 federal fiscal year until sometime after October 1, 2011 after submission of this State Plan. However, the following data represents achieved goals as outline in Attachment 4.11(c)(1): State’s Goals and Priorities for the Federal Fiscal Year 2010 (October 1, 2009 – September 30, 2010): A. Number of clients served = 12,701 B. Number of persons achieving a viable employment outcome consistent with the client’s skills, abilities, aptitudes, interests, and a minimum of 90 days = 1,54 C. Number of clients with most significant/significant disabilities served (coded significant disability at eligibility) = 11,103 D. Number of persons with significant disabilities achieving a viable outcome consistent with their skills, abilities, aptitudes, interests, and a minimum of 90 days =1,493 E. Number of Title VI-B served clients in active status = 508 Strategies that contributed to the achievement of goals and priorities are varied as indicated below: 1. Rehabilitation Academy is available to new and less experienced staff 2. Training provided throughout the year by the Staff Development Unit and the University of Arkansas TACE program inclusive of relevant topics to vocational rehabilitation and continuing education opportunities 3. Case and caseload reviews are conducted by field program managers routinely utilizing standardized instruments and monthly data reports 4. Coaching and mentoring are provided by field program managers and lead counselors in field program to promote quality service delivery, support and guidance, and consistent practice 5. Memoranda of Understanding developed jointly with the Public Education Department, local school districts, the Developmental Disabilities Supports Division, the Behavioral Health Division, to promote collaboration and create systemic improvements 6. Performance appraisal measures have been standardized to enable cumulative performance aligned with agency goals 7. Awards for performance (in the form of approved leave) applied to promote an additional incentive to exceed agency goals 8. Attainment of CSPD standards 9. Attracting higher qualified staff 10. Reducing ratio of staff to Program Managers allowing more time 11. For managers to focus on area needs, promote staff development, services to clients and continuous quality improvement 12. Factoring in Participant Satisfaction and Statewide Needs Assesments reccomendations for improved best practices.  Comprehensive strategic planning with seven major focus areas: 1. Comprehensive Employment Networks 2. Effective Use of Resources – Contracts Management 3. Effective Use of Resources – Executive Services Public Information Initiative 4. Effective Use of Resources – Rehabilitation Services Unit Restructuring 5. Effective Use of Resources – Social Security Reimbursement and Ticket-to-Work 6. Participant and Stakeholder Satisfaction 7. Positive Organizational Climate – Career Development Leadership Institute for Tomorrow Project (LIFT) The Agency did not meet three Standards and Indicators in FFY 09, the number of achieved employment outcomes numerical (1.1), achieved employment outcome percentage (1.2), and percentage closed competitive, self-employed or business enterprise program reporting own income as largest single source of economic support reported at closure as reported by applicant (1.6). Related factors are discussed below: While vocational rehabilitation counselor turnover decreased from over 30% in recent years, it did average 7% last year. Turnover creates a disruption in service delivery. This is compounded by the state’s hiring freeze and the increased time it takes to fill vacant positions as well as not having a full complement of vocational rehabilitation counselors affects production. There are a number of less experienced counselors on a learning curve. FFY 2008 involved a NMDVR Rehabilitation Services Re-organization which affected every direct delivery service staff person within the Agency. Staff in one office in Albuquerque was integrated into other office locations. In addition there was a redistribution of staff and program managers throughout the state. While significant benefits will result from the re-organization in the long-term, preparation for such an event takes its toll. The initial impact of the changes and moves as well as the decline in the economy including an 9% unemployment rate and a (-3%) growth rate had a direct affect on productivity.  The Agency is currently on a Performance Improvement Plan aimed at increasing successful employment outcomes and other standards and indicators.

 

 

 

Innovation and Expansion: Reserved Title I funds were used to support innovation and expansion operations and activities of both the State Rehabilitation Council and the Statewide Independent Living Council for FFY 2007 -2008. This support will continue. The Agency is collaborating with the Governor’s Commission on Disability on two initiatives: 1) increase direct services and support personnel services to deaf - blind individuals through existing community providers and 2) adaptive driving for persons with disabilities. In fact, an adaptive driving program has recently been established in New Mexico.  BENCHMARKING - The NMDVR measures products and services against standards set by the federal government and its own past performance. For the Rehabilitation Services Program, the agency uses Federal Standards and Indicators, set by regulation, which do not require the Rehabilitation Services program to achieve all of the performance measures. See Standards and Indicators on the following page.

 

 

Standards & Indicators

 

INDICATOR

 

FFY

2006

FFY

2007

FFY

2008

FFY

2009

FFY

2010

1.      Employment Outcomes

 

 

 

 

 

1.1    Achieved Employment Outcomes Numerical 

(Indicator must exceed or equal 

previous performance period)

1,942

1,705

1,692

1,545

1,541

1.2    Achieved Employment Outcomes Percentage

 

(Indicator must = 55.8%)

63.6%

60.5

60.2

55.2

52.3

1.3    Percentage Closed Competitive, Self Employed or Business Enterprise Program

 

(Indicator must = 72.6%)

97.6%

97.5

98.3

97.9

98.2

1.4    Percentage Closed Competitive, Self Employed or Business Enterprise Program Who Where Significantly or Most Significantly Disabled

 

(Indicator must = 62.4%)

94.7%

96.0

95.2

94.7

96.9

1.5    Average Hourly Earnings Competitive, Self Employed or Business Enterprise Program Ratio of Least Minimum Wage to Average Hourly Earning of all Employed New Mexicans 

 

(Indicator must = [0.52 Ratio])

0.66

0.63

0.64

0.65

0.65

1.6    Percentage Closed Competitive, Self Employed or Business Enterprise Program Reporting Own Income as Largest Single Source of Economic Support Reported at Closure as Reported at Application

 

(Indicator must = 53.0  [Mathematical Difference])

53.9

54.4

54.2

49.7

51.6

2.      Equal Access To Services

 

 

 

 

 

2.1    Individuals with Disabilities from Minority Background as ratio to all Non-minority Individuals with Disabilities.

 

(Indicator must = 0.80)

0.84

0.88

0.89

0.88

.85

 

 

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 4:26PM by sanmbransfordd

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Attachment 6.3 – Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services Supported employment services provided by the Division consist of case services made available through the Title VI-B funds of the Rehabilitation Act (earmarked by the federal government for this purpose). Title VI-B funds for Federal Fiscal Year equaled $244,500.00. Title I funds of the Rehabilitation Act (available for general, basic vocational rehabilitation services) are used for supported employment services upon depletion of Title VI-B funds. The Division experiences significant increases to total supported employment expenditure due to the ever-increasing cost of services. The Division procures supported employment services on a case-by-case basis from local rehabilitation programs that have committed long-term funding to the individual participants. Area supervisors conduct direct negotiations of fee for service procurement schedules of supported employment services. The local counselor and the State Office monitor the scope and quality of supported employment services available to DVR participants. Supported employment service providers are required to submit to the Division monthly reports to the local area supervisor of client progress and satisfaction, as well as demographic data. The review, compilation, and analysis of the monthly cumulative reports obtained from the contract vendor enable the Division to monitor the quality of job coaching. The DVR participant’s counselor reviews these reports with the contract provider to ensure that the scope of services comply with supported employment guidelines and are consistent with the vocational needs of the participant. Quality of supported employment services is measured in terms of integration achieved by the individual at the work-site along with the amount of wages earned. To increase the level of integration, the Division emphasizes the individualized placement model. This information is documented in the participant case files and monitored on a monthly basis. The scope and extend of services provided to clients under the Individualized Plan for Employment for supported employment continues to be the same as those available to individuals under the Title I program. This is in accordance with Division operating procedures. All services are provided on an equitable basis within the constraints of available funding. The Division does not target specific disability groups to provide supported employment services. However, long-term support funding by the State is currently available for those individuals who are either developmentally disabled or who have significant disabling mental illness. The Division continues to seek long-term funding support for other disability groups. To this end, the Division seeks to negotiate with other state agencies and private non-profit organizations. Traditionally, cooperative agreements between the New Mexico Health Department Development Disabilities Services Division and the Mental Health Division facilitate the transition from Title VI-B funding to a long-term funding source. The transition occurs when the time spent by the job coach with the DVR participant in supported employment program decreases to an average of 8 hours (20%) per week or less. Another determinant is agreement by the client, employer, job coach and the NMDVR counselor that the transition to the long-term funding source is appropriate and consistent with the vocational needs of the client. It is noted that time limits are not defined in the Division’s Manual of Operational Procedures; rather each case is assessed in terms of individual needs for supported employment services. Memorandum of Agreement has been entered into between the New Mexico Health Department’s Developmental Disabilities Supports Division and the Mental Health Division to accomplish joint implementation for supported employment under: the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, 29 U.S.C 795(b)(1) and 721(a)(11); 8.314.5 New Mexico Administrative Code and Walter Stephens Jackson, et.al. vs. Los Lunas Center for Persons with Developmental Disabilities, et.al. CIV No.87-0839-JP/LCS. The MOU defines, eligibility for DVR services, DVR eligibility criteria for Supported Employment, Developmental Disabilities Support Division eligibility for the purposes of the MOU, methods of accomplishment outlining the responsibilities of the Developmental Disabilities Supports Division such as implementation and maintenance of a referral process, offer of long-term support, and implementation of additional responsibilities to carry out the agreement. The MOU outlines responsibilities of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, joint responsibilities of both DVR and DDSD, and targeted outcomes. The MOU defines Ongoing Support Services – Services that are: 1. Needed to support and maintain an individual with significant disabilities in supported employment, 2. Based on a determination by the designated State Unit of the individual’s needs as specified in an Individualized Plan for Employment; and 3. Furnished by the designated State Unit in 34 CPR 363.4(c)(3) and following transitions, by one or more extended services providers throughout the individual’s term of employment in a particular job placement or multiple placements if those placements are being provided under a program of transition employment. 4. Include, at a minimum, twice-monthly monitoring to assess employment stability at the work site of each individual in supported employment (unless the Individualized Plan for Employment provides for off-site monitoring), and based upon that assessment, the coordination or provision of specific services at or away from the work site, that are needed to maintain employment stability. If off-site monitoring is determined to be appropriate, there must be contact with the employer each month. The Developmental Disabilities Services Division was recently moved by legislative action from the Department of Health to the Human Services Division (legislation 2007). The Developmental Disabilities Services Division provides administrative support to and houses the Behavioral Health Collaborative to provide a long-term funding mechanism for Developmental Disability Waiver recipients. Behavioral Health Services funding is a collaborative to provide comprehensive and vocational services to individuals with significantly disabled mental illness. Both mechanisms mentioned above are used to fund long-term supported employment services and extended services.

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 4:26PM by sanmbransfordd

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on 07/12/2011 at 4:26 PM

Last updated by sanmbransfordd

Completed on 07/12/2011 at 4:26 PM

Completed by sanmbransfordd

Approved on 07/13/2011 at 11:29 AM

Approved by rscoisbisterf

Published on 09/27/2011 at 10:52 AM

Published by jack

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