ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

Published September 4, 2014.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 (submitted FY 2013)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Deputy Commissioner of the Division of Learning Services

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Deputy Commissioner of the Division of Learning Services

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryMargie Vandeven

Title of SignatoryDeputy Commissioner of the Division of Learning Services

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/19/2013

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2014No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) reviewed the state plan updates for the Title I and VI B programs. On behalf of the Council, Dennis Atkins, SRC chairperson, submitted the following comments and suggestions:

1. The SRC Planning Committee, acting for the SRC, had an opportunity to review and comment on the proposed amendments to your state plan. We are in support of your state plan amendments and attachments.

2. We would like to acknowledge Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation’s (MVR) work on the goals and priorities for FY2012. Results contained in Attachment 4.11(e)(2) demonstrate that though good faith effort was made, MVR was unable to achieve Goal 1: Improve the accountability and performance of service providers and Goal 3: Increase the percentage of transition-age consumers reaching employment outcomes by 2 percent.

We recognize that improving the accountability and performance of service providers is an ongoing process. We understand that the current economic situation creates challenges and impacts the achievement of goals such as increasing the number of employment outcomes of transition-age consumers. The SRC recommends MVR continue to work on the FY2012-2013 strategies to assist them in reaching the goals that were not met and provide an update on those goals at future Council meetings.

3. The SRC agrees that MVR’s goal of increasing employment outcomes for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is needed. We support your strategies to develop training in serving people with ASD as well as to collaborate with the Department of Mental Health and other agencies.

4. The SRC applauds the joint efforts made by MVR and the provider community in developing a new employment services (ES) outcome-based model along with a supported employment (SE) services outcome-based model that both emphasize quality employment outcomes and retention.

5. The SRC is pleased that MVR’s efforts to improve efficiency and cost effectiveness, coupled with additional federal funding through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), allowed the agency to currently eliminate its waiting list and place eligible applicants into services. The SRC recognizes the progress made on reducing the waiting lists. However, the SRC believes that any waiting list is undesirable and will force more individuals to become dependent on public assistance and increase the number of individuals who drop from the program before services are provided.

6. The SRC would like to commend MVR for meeting or exceeding the required performance for both standards in FY2012 and meeting two of the three required priority indicators. We acknowledge that all performance indicators were exceeded except indicator 1.5. The federal standard is .52, and MVR was at .50.

7. The SRC shares with MVR a concern that the continuing economic crisis makes MVR’s role in accessing employment opportunities for people with disabilities more challenging. SRC continues to support MVR’s efforts to find solutions by encouraging innovation and job creation and focusing on high quality employment outcomes.

The SRC had opportunities in the past year to provide input on other important matters with your agency. Some of these were reviewing and providing input to the FY2014 goals, priorities, strategies and state plan; the SRC FY2012 Annual Report; recommendations on policy revisions; collaboration with other disability-related councils; customer satisfaction survey results; the participation in and feedback from public hearings; having access to and reviewing, if desired, the results of redacted due process hearings and mediations; and reviewing MVR’s outcomes and performance indicators.

The SRC appreciates the opportunity to work with MVR on these matters of importance to persons with disabilities in the state of Missouri.

Response from Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation to the Recommendations of the State Rehabilitation Council

Response to SRC recommendation 1: MVR is pleased that the SRC is in support of the state plan and attachments.

Response to SRC recommendation 2: MVR appreciates the acknowledgment from SRC about meeting goals which were established for FY2012. MVR agrees to comply with SRC recommendations to continue working on the goals which were not met and update the SRC at quarterly meetings about the progress toward meeting those goals.

Response to SRC recommendation 3: MVR appreciates SRC’s support of the goal of increasing employment outcomes for persons with ASD and will keep the SRC informed about the continued progress toward reaching this goal.

Response to SRC recommendation 4: MVR welcomes the SRC support of the new models of employment services with community rehabilitation programs. MVR feels strongly that these models of service focus on employment and produce more quality employment outcomes for persons with significant and most significant disabilities. We will keep the SRC informed about the progress of this goal and the development of the tool to measure outcomes and success rates.

Response to SRC recommendation 5: MVR feels that the most important utilization of ARRA funds is to reduce the waiting list for eligible consumers and move them into active employment services. Most of the available ARRA funds have been utilized to reduce these waiting lists and provide services to eligible persons who exited the waiting lists. As of June 3, 2013, all priority categories were open without a wait list. Significant progress has been made, and MVR will continue striving to completely eliminate all priority category waiting lists now and in the future. MVR agrees with the SRC that waiting lists are undesirable and have many negative effects on persons with disabilities.

Response to SRC recommendations 6 and 7: MVR is pleased that the required performance for both standards was met in FY2012 and that two of three required priority indicators were met. While almost all performance indicators were exceeded, indicator 1.5 was missed by a small margin. The economic outlook for jobs is a significant concern and meeting FY2014 performance indicators will be challenging. MVR will strive to increase quality employment outcomes, develop and maintain strong partnerships with other agencies and provide effective employment services.

MVR expresses its sincere thanks and appreciation for the excellent assistance from the SRC this year. The SRC has been extremely active and helpful with the development of FY2014 goals and priorities. In addition, the Council reviewed consumer satisfaction information, reviewed new policy and procedural changes, attended 2013 public hearings and collaborated on other important issues. MVR looks forward to working with the SRC in the future to better serve persons with disabilities.

This screen was last updated on Jun 19 2013 3:04PM by Lisa Sone

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has not requested a waiver of statewideness.

This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2009 5:10PM by Timothy Gaines

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

Cooperation, Collaboration and Coordination

Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) has long-standing working relationships with partner agencies both inside and outside of the Statewide Workforce Development System (SWDS). The first part of this attachment will focus on those relationships and activities within the SWDS.

Cooperation with the Statewide Workforce Development System

The SWDS of services are provided through the Division of Workforce Development’s (DWD) 14 workforce regions in Missouri. Job training and skill development program services are offered through Missouri Career Centers in these 14 regions. MVR is a key partner and works closely with the career centers to provide vocational rehabilitation services to eligible persons with disabilities. MVR has appointed a VR state liaison to collaborate with DWD, and district supervisors serve as active members on 13 out of 14 local Workforce Investment Boards (WIBs). Currently, one of the WIBs has a vacancy, which should be filled with an MVR representative. MVR district supervisors participated in the development of Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) with all fourteen WIBs. These MOUs direct and explain how partners work together to deliver services to persons with disabilities in the local community.

Through the MOUs with career centers, MVR is the primary referral source from career center partners for people with disabilities. MVR counselors visit various Missouri Career Centers (both full service sites and satellites) frequently to provide services to consumers in a timely fashion. One Missouri Career Center location (where all partners, including MVR, are co-located) has an intra-building electronic linkage which has been effective. Career centers offer job training and skills development programs to all citizens who want assistance with finding employment.

MVR also provides ongoing cross-training and technical assistance to career center staff regarding assistive technology and accommodations in the workplace. Recently, MVR has engaged in a collaborative project with DWD, local WIBs and local Centers for Independent Living (CILs). Through this project, the CILs provide disability awareness and sensitivity training to all career center staff. An MVR supervisor works with partner agencies to facilitate collaboration with workforce development agencies and ensure that all federal regulations pertaining to Title IV of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 are followed.

MVR shares in DWD’s statewide case management system. Currently, every MVR office in the state has been given access to this system, known as Toolbox. This arrangement helps strengthen MVR’s and DWD’s partnership and improves the sharing of resources for individuals with disabilities.

Both MVR and DWD are using Missouri Connections as a vocational guidance tool for their clients. DWD and MVR have collaborated by integrating MVR offices into each of the 14 workforce regions and creating mutual login passwords to access Missouri Connections. This eliminates the duplication of clients’ records and allows for more efficient and effective services for mutual clients.

The former executive director of the Missouri Workforce Investment Board is a governor-appointed State Rehabilitation Council member who provides input on the coordination efforts between MVR and the statewide workforce investment system. She also chairs the Program and Evaluation Committee, which reviews and advises MVR on its policies and procedures.

Cooperation with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Public Institutions of Higher Education (IHE)

In collaboration with the Missouri Rehabilitation Services for the Blind, MVR has written cooperative agreements with all 34 public IHEs in Missouri. These agreements outline the responsibilities of each entity regarding the provision of services pursuant to the regulations specified in 34 CFR 361.53(d)(1).

Client Assistance Program

MVR and the Client Assistance Program (CAP) have a long and productive working relationship. MVR and CAP management staff meet on a quarterly basis to discuss important issues, such as order of selection, new policies, best case practices, due process hearings and mediation, performance indicators, joint training activities and public hearings. The CAP is a frequent participant and presenter at MVR-sponsored training sessions. The director of advocacy services with Missouri Protection and Advocacy Services, which CAP is a part of, is a governor-appointed member of the State Rehabilitation Council and sits on the council’s Planning Committee, which reviews the state plan, and also on the Impartial Hearing Officer and Program Evaluation Committees.

Missouri Department of Mental Health (DMH)

MVR has appointed a VR state liaison to collaborate with DMH and the governor’s office in a variety of projects and activities. The following project has active and cooperative participation with MVR, DMH, the governor’s office and other agencies:

• Missouri Developmental Disabilities Council

MVR has active participation in the following DMH programs:

• Division of Behavioral Health - Psychiatric Services State Advisory Council

• Division of Developmental Disabilities State Employment Leadership Network

• MVR/Division of Behavioral Health Individual Placement with Supports Evidence-Based Supported Employment Program implementation

• The Healthy Transitions Initiative (Transition Youth Behavioral Health)

• Show Me Careers: Missouri’s Transition to Employment Collaborative Grant (Transition Youth – Developmental Disability)

MVR works closely with the University of Missouri-Columbia through the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE).

Missouri Reentry Process

MVR participates in the Missouri Reentry Process, which encourages collaboration between state and local agencies to improve the transition of offenders leaving prison and returning to Missouri communities and work. State and local agencies include the Departments of Corrections, Mental Health, Revenue, Social Services, Economic Development, Public Safety, and Health and Senior Services; Elementary and Secondary Education; Missouri Board of Probation and Parole; and Office of the State Court Administrator. Local community representatives include law enforcement, the faith-based community, crime victims, and service/treatment providers.

Centers for Independent Living (CILs)

There are 22 Independent Living Centers in Missouri. MVR and the CILs work together on a regular basis to routinely share referrals and provide services to mutual clientele. A number of the CILs have MVR district supervisors as active board members.

MVR continues to collaborate with the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) and the CILs to provide direct services to people with disabilities. The state plan developed by MVR and SILC details the tasks necessary to accomplish the delivery of independent living services that will assist consumers with disabilities to achieve their goals. MVR and SILC utilize an outcome-based measurement tool for the CILs. This tool measures consumer satisfaction using a telephone survey method rather than previously used mail-out surveys. MVR has also developed cross-trainings with the CILs to improve the provision of services. A transition toolkit was developed through the collaboration of MVR, the CILs and local education agencies.

Programs carried out by the U.S. Department of Agriculture

MVR works closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture-funded Agricultural Engineering Extension of UMC in the delivery of information and assistance for agricultural operators with disabilities.

MVR and the AgrAbility Project housed within UMC and Services for Independent Living has had a productive working relationship for more than ten years. The mutual goals of MVR and AgrAbility are a commitment of delivering vocational rehabilitation services, assistive technology, information, education and a safe environment for farm operators with disabilities. Operating under an MOU, MVR and AgrAbility completed a fee-for-service plan for rehab technology services.

MVR and AgrAbility staff set the following goals for future activities:

• Collaborate with the National AgrAbility Project on hosting joint training with partner agencies, MVR staff, CRP staff, consumers and AgrAbility staff.

• Participate in national conferences and forums on AgrAbility, MVR and assistive technology services for rural agricultural services for eligible persons with disabilities.

MVR does not participate in state-use contracting programs.

This screen was last updated on Jun 24 2013 11:23AM by Timothy Gaines

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Coordination with Education Officials

Transition services assist eligible transition-age consumers with disabilities, either in or outside the secondary school setting, to successfully prepare them for transitioning into postsecondary education, integrated employment (including supported employment) or vocational training. Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) continues to work closely with the Office of Special Education, local school districts and Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) in coordinating, planning and providing transition services.

MVR has a policy that outlines transition activities and services including the development and approval of an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for each eligible student prior to leaving high school. MVR will provide for the development of the IPE as early as possible during the transition planning process, but, at least, by the time the eligible student leaves the school setting. Since MVR is under an order of selection, the eligible student will be served pursuant to the order by the time the student leaves the school setting. If the student is receiving special education services, this plan should be coordinated with the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) in terms of goals, objectives, and services. If the counselor is not able to develop an IPE during high school, the counselor should document the reason(s) in a case note.

Interagency Cooperative Agreements

The DESE Cooperative Agreement is a written agreement within the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education between MVR and the Offices of Special Education and Career Education. The purpose of this agreement is to facilitate the coordination of transition services from school to post-secondary training and/or employment for individuals with disabilities who are enrolled in secondary education and are/or may be eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services. This agreement addresses the following:

a. consultation and technical assistance

b. transition planning

c. roles and responsibilities and financial obligations

d. outreach and identification

The Cooperative Work Experience Program (COOP) Agreement is an interagency state and local agreement between the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (Special Education, MVR and Career Education); Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB); and local school districts in the state of Missouri. The purpose of this agreement is also to facilitate the coordination of transition services from school to post-secondary training and/or employment, for students with disabilities who participate in special education programs and are eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services. This agreement outlines roles and responsibilities among participating agencies and school districts in the development of off-campus work experience programs in which students with disabilities who are receiving services through an IEP, can earn high school credit in accordance with Missouri high school graduation requirements for the number of hours they work in a paid, integrated, competitive employment setting. The intent is to integrate the activities of special education and vocational rehabilitation through a continuum of services. This agreement is signed at the state level and then each participating school district signs a local level agreement, which is reviewed/approved by the MVR assistant director of Transition Services.

As of October 1, 2012, 360 school districts with high schools in Missouri had signed the Cooperative Work Experience Program (COOP) Agreement. MVR counselors worked with 8,413 eligible transition-age consumers with disabilities in FY2012, and transition-age consumers represented an average of 33.3% of all MVR applicants in FY2012.

Special Education Advisory Panel

The Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) appointed an advisory panel for the purpose of providing policy guidance with respect to special education and related services for children with disabilities in the state. The advisory panel is appointed by the commissioner of DESE and includes MVR’s director of Transition Services. Other members include:

• parents of children with disabilities (ages birth through 26)

• individuals with disabilities

• representatives of other state agencies involved in the purchase or delivery of related services

• administrators of programs for children with disabilities

• state agencies’ representatives who provide services to children with disabilities including welfare and juvenile corrections

• representatives of private schools and public charter schools

• vocational, community or business organizations

Missouri Connections

Missouri Connections is a web-based career exploration tool to assist Missourians in determining their career interests, explore employment opportunities, set up career plans and establish job search strategies and resources. Sponsored by DESE and the Department of Economic Development (DED), Missouri Connections is free of charge to students, parents, guidance counselors, educators and job seekers. Through Missouri Connections, the Division of Workforce Development, under DED, Department of Higher Education, MVR and local school districts can utilize the same career planning tool with their clients/students. In addition to general career exploration/resource sharing, students/job seekers may also develop a career portfolio by creating a unique username/password that will allow them to login and save information regarding their specific career interests, job search, resume, etc. Students/job seekers who are receiving services through one or more of the above entities may also choose to share their login information thus eliminating the duplication of clients’ records and allowing for more efficient and effective services for mutual clients.

MVR Transition Ad-hoc Team

MVR’s assistant commissioner appointed an ad-hoc Transition Team, composed of MVR management and counselor staff as well as special education transition specialists and a representative from the Centers for Independent Living, to provide recommendations about transition-related activities and services for students with disabilities. The team is involved with: coordinating joint statewide training activities for special educators, rehabilitation counselors, providers, and MPACT; developing strategies to better measure and increase overall success rates of students with disabilities receiving transition services; increasing the overall participation and employment outcome of students with disabilities in cooperative work experience programs; developing strategies for increasing student engagement and decreasing the dropout rate for students with disabilities from Missouri high schools; and developing strategies for outreach/improving transition outcomes for students from underserved populations.

Missouri Interagency Transition Team (MITT)

The MITT was formed through the Office of Special Education and includes members representing state-level agencies, including MVR, across Missouri who have an interest in improving postsecondary outcomes for young adults with disabilities. The MITT meets to collaborate, break down service barriers, share resources, improve overall systems of service and improve data sharing among agencies.

The director of Transition Services works closely with other MVR management staff to disseminate information and provide technical assistance to improve transition services and outcomes in Missouri.

Missouri Parent Training and Information Center (MPACT)

MPACT is a statewide parent training and information center serving all disabilities. MVR’s director of Transition Services is an active member of the MPACT Board. In addition, a representative of MPACT is a member of the State Rehabilitation Council. MVR and MPACT collaborate on projects to assist students and children with disabilities to reach their full potential.

Community Transition Teams (CTTs)

CTTs are developed and supported in Missouri to elevate community awareness of and commitment to the improvement of post-secondary outcomes of youth with disabilities. CTTs are trained on transition planning, services and effective practices as well as implementing a strategic plan for transition in their respective communities. Since 2008-2009, approximately eight CTTs have been added each year, and an MVR counselor is a required partner on each local CTT.

Project Search and Other Employer-Based Transition Training Programs

Project Search is a one-year, employer-led internship opportunity for young adults with cognitive/intellectual disabilities. It provides employability skills training and workplace internships for individuals with the most significant disabilities particularly youth transitioning from high school to adult life. MVR is one of five required partners in the Project Search model. The other required partners are education, a community rehabilitation provider, a long-term provider (follow-along) and business. The first pilot Project Search site was in the St. Charles County School District. The Office of Special Education awarded funding to replicate the Project Search High School Transition Program in the following schools for FY2012/13 and FY2013/14: St. Louis City Public Schools, KC North School District, Epworth, Sedalia Smith Cotton High School, and the Independence School District. In addition to the Project Search programs, MVR is also partnering with the following school districts to provide similar employer-based transition training programs prior to high school graduation for eligible young adults with significant disabilities: Columbia School District and Special School District of St. Louis County. MVR district offices and counselors that serve each of these schools serve on an executive management team. MVR has made a commitment to assist with referrals and partial funding through supported employment for MVR-eligible youth to participate in these programs.

Hyatt St. Louis Regency Hands-On Education Hospitality Training Program

The Hyatt/Hands-On Education Hospitality Training Program is a two-week, on-site, reality-based training program to prepare MVR eligible individuals with disabilities for work in the hospitality industry. This training is made possible through a unique partnership between Hyatt Hotels and Resorts, Hands-On Educational Services, Inc., MVR, and Rehab Services for the Blind. Services include culinary/hospitality and employability skills training; lodging, if necessary for out of town clients; and limited placement assistance. Trainees are temporary employees of Hyatt and receive a minimum wage salary while enrolled in the two-week course. Upon graduation from the program, they receive certificates of completion, letters of recommendation from Hyatt staff and some graduates are offered positions of employment with Hyatt. Training is primarily funded through collaboration with MVR. While the program is open to both students and adults, the primary focus will be on young adults with disabilities who have exited high school.

Show Me Careers Grant – Missouri’s Transition to Employment Collaborative

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration on Developmental Disabilities, awarded the Institute of Human Development, University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC), a “Partnerships in Employment Systems Change” grant to fund the Show-Me-Careers project. These funds will be used to increase competitive employment outcomes for youth and young adults with developmental and intellectual disabilities and promote change efforts leading to the development of policies and practices that support competitive employment in integrated settings for youth and adults with developmental disabilities (DD). The MVR director of Transition Services served as a lead consultant in the development of this grant. MVR’s assistant commissioner, along with the MVR director of Transition Services, MVR director of Mental Health Services and the MVR assistant director of Workforce Development, continue to actively serve on the Missouri Leadership Consortium that will support a statewide structure through which to demonstrate evidence-based practices, revise and develop needed policies and practices and enhance statewide collaborations.

In order to scale-up or enhance evidence-based practices that support seamless transition, eight Missouri Pilot Communities were chosen through a competitive application process to test ideas on how to bring real and lasting change in the area of transition. Pilot communities developed plans tailored to their local needs and available resources. The Pilot Communities selected to receive funding, coaching, leadership training, and technical supports are: Access II (Gallatin), Bill and Virginia Leffen Center for Autism (Joplin), L.I.F.E. (Farmington), Northeast Missouri (LOQW), Platte County, Show-Me-Columbia, St. Charles County and United Cerebral Palsy (St. Joseph).

Add Us In-Kansas City Grant

The Office of Disability Employment Policy awarded the Institute of Human Development, UMKC, a grant to improve employment opportunities for minority youth and enhance employer engagement. The MVR director of Transition Services served as a lead consultant in the development of this grant, and the Transition Services Kansas City VR district supervisor continues to play an active role in the implementation of grant activities. The overall goal of Add Us In-KC is “to provide a continuum of career opportunities for minority youth with disabilities within the greater Kansas City area through a business-led network that creates jobs and markets workforce training and services to prospective employers.”

This screen was last updated on Jun 19 2013 3:32PM by Lisa Sone

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) enters into cooperative written agreements with nonprofit, private Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to provide services on a fee-for-service basis to individuals with disabilities. The CRP must be accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) or other approved accreditation entities as specified in the agreement. All CRPs must agree to the provisions of and sign the cooperative agreement with MVR prior to providing services to MVR consumers. CRPs provide services which may include job development, supported employment, employment skills training, employment services and employment transition services for individuals with disabilities.

MVR purchases services from local, nationally accredited, nonprofit CRPs and does not own or operate any of the programs. All CRP programs emphasize community integrated competitive employment.

Each MVR district office developed a partnering plan with local CRPs to outline joint activities to assist mutual consumers reach employment outcomes. MVR and CRP staffs both offer input on service delivery processes during partnering meetings and develop action plans to improve those processes. Other collaborative activities involve joint training programs on a regular basis and the CRP/VR Team, which is comprised of MVR staff and executives from the CRPs. The team meets regularly to improve services and outcomes for individuals with disabilities.

MVR and the CRPs developed a new outcome-based service model that emphasizes quality employment outcomes and retention. The new model was implemented fall 2012 and provides milestone payments after job placement and retention.

This screen was last updated on Jun 19 2013 4:06PM by Lisa Sone

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

As indicated in attachment 4.8(b)(3), Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) enters into cooperative written agreements with private nonprofit Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to provide services on a fee-for-service basis to individuals with disabilities. The CRPs must be accredited by CARF or other approved accreditation entities as specified in the agreement. All CRPs must agree to the provisions of and sign a cooperative agreement with MVR prior to providing services to MVR consumers.

The CRPs provide services which may include:

• community-based assessments

• job supports

• survey of businesses and assurance of potential community-based exploration, assessment and work sites suited to the needs of the clients

• analysis of all relevant job-related variables (e.g., transportation, job restructuring, tax credit for employers, etc.)

• provision of direct training at employment sites until employment standards have been achieved

• development of an internal advocacy system

• provision of long-term, extended services support with the individual or employer

As mentioned in attachment 4.8(b)(3), MVR and the CRPs developed a new outcome-based service model that emphasizes quality employment outcomes and retention. The new model was implemented fall 2012. The CRP/VR Team, which is comprised of MVR staff and executives from the CRPs, meets regularly to improve services and outcomes for individuals with disabilities who are receiving supported employment services.

Each district MVR office has developed a partnering plan with local CRPs to outline joint activities to assist mutual consumers reach employment outcomes. MVR and CRP staffs both offer input on service delivery processes during partnering meetings and develop action plans to improve those processes. Other collaborative activities involve joint training programs on a regular basis and membership on the CRP/VR Team.

This screen was last updated on Jun 19 2013 4:09PM by Lisa Sone

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD)

Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) developed a system of collecting and analyzing data annually to determine the needs of qualified personnel. This attachment describes the data system on the following: personnel/personnel development; recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel; standards; requirements for vocational rehabilitation counselor (VRC) positions; staff development activities; personnel to address individual communication needs; performance evaluation system; and coordination with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

In FY2012, MVR received 13,337 new applications, developed 8,409 Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs), placed 4,747 clients into successful employment outcomes and had 5,403 cases closed after eligibility but before services were received.

The VRCs, district supervisory positions and clerical staff are directly involved in providing services for individuals with disabilities (14 supervisors and assistant supervisors have a partial caseload). The number of individuals who had an open file with MVR as of May 15, 2013 was 17,707. The average number of cases per VRC is approximately 123 per counselor.

MVR’s management team reviews each vacancy to determine if the position should be filled, relocated or reclassified to a counselor position (if the position was a different one) based upon factors such as current need and expected population growth. The goal for MVR is to continually evaluate caseload sizes, office work load and staffing to maximize efficiency.

MVR anticipates approximately 17 VRCs per year will be needed to fill the vacancies from retirements, resignations, terminations, etc. The total VRCs needed for a five-year period is approximately 85.

Data System: MVR is made up of the following sections: Disability Determination, Independent Living and Vocational Rehabilitation (VR). There are approximately 660 FTE employees in all three sections. For this report, we will focus on the VR section. As of May 15, 2013, the breakdown of the VR Client Services Section needed for service delivery is as follows:

147 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors

6 Assistant Supervisors

24 District Supervisors (one also serves as regional manager, 14 have a partial caseload)

68 Clerical Support Staff Positions

MVR estimates that 13 new supervisors and 35 clerical support staff may be needed over the next five years to fill vacancies due to turnover and retirements.

Administrative Staff:

1 Assistant Commissioner

5 Coordinators (three are shared with all sections of MVR)

1 Field Operations Manager

5 Regional Managers

8 Program Directors

1 Human Resource Manager (shared with all sections of MVR)

1 Financial Manager

1 Mental Health Planner

3 Assistant Directors

3 Supervisors (are shared with all sections of MVR)

1 Human Resource/Payroll Benefit Specialist

5 Quality Assurance Specialists

3 Accounting Analysts

1 Executive Assistant

6 Administrative Assistants

2 Billing Specialist

1 Secretary

1 General Services Specialist

1 Procurement Specialist (shared with all sections of MVR)

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 VR Counselor 147 1 85
2 Assistant Supervisor 6 0 1
3 District Supervisor 24 0 12
4 Clerical Support 68 4 35
5 Administrative staff 50 0 15
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

There is one graduate rehabilitation counselor training program in Missouri. Maryville University in St. Louis, a private institution, offers a master’s level degree program in rehabilitation counseling. Graduates of this program are ready to take the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) certification test and also the Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) test upon graduation. Maryville University began offering a new program with a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling in September 1999. The program had 54 students enrolled in the fall 2012 semester, and 21 students are expected to graduate from Maryville University by summer 2013. MVR will continue to work closely with Maryville University to recruit and hire potential graduates of the program.

MVR is also working with other graduate counseling programs in Missouri and offers practicum or internship opportunities.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Maryville University 54 0 17 14
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

Plan for Recruitment, Preparation and Retention of Qualified Personnel: MVR works actively in recruiting new counselors with master’s degrees in rehabilitation counseling or other related areas specified in this attachment. As mentioned above, Missouri has one graduate level rehabilitation counseling program that, at this time, is not sufficient to produce the number of qualified rehabilitation professionals needed by MVR in all areas of the state. Even though graduate enrollment is high at Maryville University, many of the students are not willing to relocate from the St. Louis area. To address this issue, job announcements are sent to all Region VII universities that have master’s programs in rehabilitation counseling. In addition, vacancy notices are sent to the Rehabilitation Clearinghouse at Utah State University and other institutions of higher learning such as Southern Illinois University-Carbondale, Emporia State University, Arkansas State University, University of Arkansas and Missouri universities that offer graduate-level counseling, social work and/or psychology programs.

MVR advertises all openings with the Missouri Career Source web page, lists all openings on the agency’s website, and advertises in local newspapers as well as traditionally African-American and Hispanic newspapers.

MVR sends all job announcements to various historically black colleges and universities such as Lincoln University-Jefferson City, Missouri; Southern University-Baton Rouge, Louisiana; Fort Valley State College-Fort Valley, Georgia; and Mississippi State-Starkville, Mississippi.

MVR utilizes a diversity consultant to assist with ongoing staff development activities and outreach to underserved populations around the state. He and the MVR Diversity Team work with VR staff as well as Community Rehabilitation Provider (CRP) staff. The diversity consultant presented training sessions on diversity at all the district offices and to new counselors this past year.

At the end of FY2012, approximately 13% of all professional staff and 23% of support staff with MVR were persons from diverse backgrounds. MVR also actively recruits individuals with disabilities. District supervisors and VRCs in MVR district offices receive all VRC job notices. Other disability organizations, including Centers for Independent Living and CRPs, are consulted about recruiting persons with disabilities. At the end of FY2012, approximately 21% of all professional staff and 12% of support staff with MVR were persons with disabilities.

MVR continues to offer non-paid as well as paid graduate internships for potential employees. MVR also considers candidates who have completed their necessary coursework and need to complete their internship requirement for open positions with the agency. During FY2012, MVR provided four students with unpaid internships and practicum experiences to enable them to complete their graduate coursework. Those students will be considered for upcoming counselor vacancies.

MVR has a close working relationship with graduate rehabilitation counselor programs at Maryville University, University of Arkansas, University of Southern Illinois-Carbondale and Emporia State University. MVR representatives sit on the advisory councils of the above programs or make regular contacts and visits to recruit students from the above master’s level rehabilitation programs. Staff development needs and important future training/recruiting issues are discussed at these advisory meetings.

 

Personnel Standards: The State of Missouri has requirements for licensure of psychologists, professional counselors and social workers listed in Chapter 337 of the Revised Statutes of Missouri (RSMo 337). Each of these areas specifically reference practices of vocational rehabilitation counseling within the definitions of the statutes. Each of the areas also indicate the requirement of a master’s degree in psychology (primarily psychological in nature), counseling (or its equivalent) and social work respectively. It should be noted that the RSMo 337 continues to allow the licensing of psychologists with a master’s degree; however, new applicants must now have a doctoral degree.

MVR acknowledges that RSMo 337 is the standard in Missouri for the highest degree required for VRCs. The acceptable degrees under this statute include master’s degrees in rehabilitation counseling, counseling or related areas, clinical psychology, counseling psychology or clinical social work.

MVR is pleased that two VRCs completed CSPD requirements for their master’s degree in counseling during FY2012. MVR has identified five VRCs who need supplemental coursework, certification or licensure to meet the requirements for CFR 361.18 and RSMo 337. At the end of FY2012, MVR had 142 VRCs who met the CSPD requirements. As stated earlier, there are a total of 147 VRC positions (including part-time positions).

MVR continues to prioritize the CSPD funding of the VRCs mentioned above who are involved in university coursework, certification (CRC) and licensure (LPC). RSA grants have been funding the coursework for four current staff at West Virginia University, Maryville University, and at Utah State. MVR is committed to ensuring that VRCs’ tuition, fees and books are funded to obtain necessary coursework to meet the above requirements.

The Human Resource Manager (HRM) for MVR develops an individualized plan with each newly hired staff member to identify/evaluate specific staff development needs, required courses, available resources and timelines necessary to achieve the standards in RSMo 337 or the appropriate CRC requirement. The HRM also monitors each staff development plan to ensure that all objectives are met. As necessary, the HRM consults with the state licensing boards and CRC officials. All staff is required to submit updated transcripts to the HRM to ensure compliance with the objectives of the standards.

MVR has not been significantly affected by shortages of qualified personnel. However, MVR does experience difficulty recruiting in some rural areas of the state. In a few offices, MVR needed to recruit individuals who did not fully meet the standards mentioned above due to a shortage of qualified applicants. Individuals who do not meet the initial minimum standards must have a bachelor’s degree or a master’s degree in a non-related area. They are informed about the CSPD requirements and must agree to comply with supplemental coursework. All counselors placed under CSPD are expected to complete this requirement within a five-year period from the date of hire. Even with these challenges and the need to require staff to take courses to meet CSPD requirements, MVR does not feel that there will be significant problems that inhibit the ability to recruit and hire qualified staff. To enhance its hiring process, MVR is exploring technological methods to interview long-distance applicants.

The above plan is non-discriminatory and encourages the retraining and recruitment of persons with disabilities and from diverse backgrounds.

Annually MVR reviews the performance evaluations for rehabilitation staff to determine if they are consistent with the actual job functions, agency values and the Rehabilitation Act mandates. A part of this evaluation assesses their levels of performance based on the RSA performance standards and indicators.

 

Staff Development: MVR has a comprehensive program for in-service training and staff development for all positions. Staff at all levels will attend training in new employee orientation, cultural diversity training, sexual harassment prevention and customer service. Supervisory staff and upper management personnel are required to attend training in leadership, supervision, interviewing and other training offered through the state or other private sources. MVR is invested in its leadership training program for supervisors and emerging MVR leaders. Through collaboration with the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center (TACE) at University of Missouri-Columbia, leadership training is developed. MVR also contracts with the Missouri Training Institute to provide leadership training presentations to supervisory and management staff. Many MVR employees have graduated from, and some are currently participating in, the National Rehabilitation Leadership Institute. MVR utilizes an internal training consultant who assists in leadership training.

All new counselor and paraprofessional staff, together with their district supervisor, completes the New Counselor Training Manual or New Administrative Staff Training Manual, which assists in the development and understanding of the rehabilitation field and the agency’s goals, priorities and responsibilities in serving individuals with disabilities under the federal/state VR program. MVR has an ad hoc team that continually evaluates staff development needs.

In addition to New Employee Orientation, new counseling staff receives training specific to vocational counseling/career development, job development/job placement and case management techniques from MVR staff and TACE.

MVR supports staff attendance on an annual basis to the Power-Up Conference, which promotes the use and understanding of assistive technology and rehabilitation technology services and resources across the state. This conference is sponsored by the Missouri Assistive Technology Project. MVR has an ad hoc assistive technology team, which assists the agency in staff development activities for assistive technology.

Staff development needs are established in a number of ways. A survey of training needs is administered annually to all counseling and paraprofessional staff to ascertain the needs and interests of all MVR staff. MVR also monitors employee performance and has incorporated RSA standards and indicators into staff evaluations. Other methods to determine staff development needs are: Quality Assurance Reviews, TACE center surveys, evaluation of consumer satisfaction studies, feedback and recommendations from the State Rehabilitation Council and Individual Staff Development/Leadership Plans.

Results of the training needs survey are shared with members of the administrative team and regional managers. MVR works to provide training in a variety of ways to accommodate staff needs. Staff members regularly participate in both in-person and web-based trainings.

The nature and scope of the staff development program is tied to MVR’s overall goals and priorities. MVR is committed to improving staff competencies to ensure that the Rehabilitation Act, as amended, will be fully implemented and the philosophy embraced. MVR training supports the goals and priorities that have been established in the comprehensive statewide needs assessment.

MVR is in the third year of a five-year grant from RSA for in-service training to assist with staff development. The following are the goals under this grant, which are supportive of MVR’s goals and priorities:

1. Effective recruitment and retention of qualified rehabilitation professionals

2. Effective succession planning

3. Effective leadership development and capacity building

MVR continues to participate and has collaborative relationships with research programs, partner agencies and the TACE Center for region VII. MVR worked with the Missouri Department of Mental Health (DMH) and the Institute for Community Inclusion from the University of Massachusetts-Boston on a National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) grant on the Missouri Mental Health Employment Project. As a result of this grant, they were able to secure grant funding from Johnson and Johnson-Dartmouth College Community Mental Health Program to implement evidenced-based supported employment for persons with serious mental illness. Emphasis is placed upon training MVR and DMH staff and provider networks. MVR has also received an additional grant from Institute for Community Inclusion from the University of Massachusetts-Boston to assist with activities related to leadership development and succession planning.

Other training areas which MVR frequently sponsors or staff participates in are:

• Motivational Interviewing

• Legal and Ethical Issues in Rehabilitation

• Medical and Psychological Aspects of Disability

• Autism Spectrum Disorders

• Vocational Counseling/Assessment

• Americans with Disabilities Act

• Sexual Harassment Prevention

• Cultural Diversity

• Job Development/Job Placement/Supported Employment

• Transition from School to Work and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA issues)

• Workforce Investment Act/Workforce Development Initiatives

• Rehabilitation Technology

• Missouri Rehabilitation Association Annual Conference

• Leadership Training

• Individual training requests pertinent to the field of rehabilitation.

• Attendance at conferences/workshops related to MVR (e.g. Traumatic Brain Injury, APSE-MO, Power Up, Assistive Technology)

 

Personnel to Address Individual Communication Needs: MVR employs eight vocational rehabilitation counselors for the deaf (VRCDs) located throughout Missouri who are skilled in manual communication for the deaf and hard of hearing. Each year, they gather for training to discuss services and meet with students at the Missouri School for the Deaf. MVR will send representatives to the Missouri Association for the Deaf Biannual Conference, which is scheduled for August 2013. Five of the VRCDs are deaf or hard of hearing. Each of these counselors met CSPD requirements.

MVR staff work with several assistive technology projects located at various Centers for Independent Living in the state, which has demonstration centers for exploring, reviewing and demonstrating various assistive technology devices, services and resources that are available to individuals with alternative communication needs. The agency has developed an ad hoc assistive technology team and has identified two assistive technology specialists to assist staff with any assistive technology-related needs regarding services for individuals with disabilities.

Applicants and eligible individuals who have limited English-speaking skills are provided interpreters funded by MVR. MVR has all brochures and many forms translated into Spanish so that individuals and families who speak Spanish have access to information in their native language. At this time, MVR has counselors who are fluent in Spanish in the following areas: Cape Girardeau, Springfield and Jefferson City. These counselors have assisted with staff development and Hispanic liaison activities in the Kansas City and Central Missouri areas. MVR also has staff bilingual in Japanese and Romanian. The state has a contract with an over-the-telephone foreign language interpretation service, which MVR has utilized upon occasion for translation.

 

Coordination with personnel development under Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA): MVR works closely with the Office of Special Education and school districts to coordinate staff development activities and services for students with disabilities.

During FY2012, the Transition Team, composed of MVR staff and special education personnel from both the state and local level, focused on participation in special education transition-related trainings/professional development activities. Examples of these activities include attendance and presentations at the DESE Summer Transition Institute, attendance at the Missouri Department of Higher Education 2012 Fall Workshop and attendance at the Missouri School Counselor Association Conference.

The Cooperative Work Experience Program (COOP) Agreement is an interagency state and local agreement between the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (Special Education, MVR and Career Education); Rehabilitation Services for the Blind (RSB); and local school districts in the state of Missouri. The purpose of this agreement is also to facilitate the coordination of transition services from school to post-secondary training and/or employment, for students with disabilities who participate in special education programs and are eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services. This agreement outlines roles and responsibilities among participating agencies and school districts in the development of off-campus work experience programs in which students with disabilities who are receiving services through an IEP, can earn high school credit in accordance with Missouri high school graduation requirements for the number of hours they work in a paid, integrated, competitive employment setting. There are 360 school districts participating in the COOP program. MVR continues to disseminate the agreement to local school districts in an effort to obtain additional agreements. Additionally, MVR continues to work collaboratively with providers and local school districts to meet transition needs of students.

In FY2012, a total of 8,413 transition-age consumers with disabilities worked with VR counselors. Of all the eligible transition-age consumers who received VR services and exited the program, 1,556 obtained a successful employment outcome.

MVR, the Office of Special Education, school personnel and CRP staff are involved in partnership activities, joint training and technical assistance activities. The director of Transition Services is a member of the Missouri Interagency Transition Team. The assistant director is an active member of the state’s Special Education Advisory Panel and an active member of the MPACT Board. MPACT is a statewide parent training and information center serving all disabilities.

State Rehabilitation Council: The State Rehabilitation Council reviews and comments on the development of the CSPD plan and related policies.

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2013 10:41AM by Lisa Sone

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Results of a Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of the Rehabilitation Needs of Missourians with Disabilities

Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) jointly conduct a comprehensive, statewide assessment of the rehabilitation needs of Missourians with disabilities, annually over a three-year period. MVR submits the results of the needs assessment to the Rehabilitation Services Administration on an annual basis. This attachment pertains to the first of a three-year statewide assessment period and illustrates all areas of need. The conclusions and recommendations of these assessments are incorporated into MVR’s goals and priorities for the purpose of improving services to individuals with disabilities.

MVR uses the following methods to collect, in aggregate, information on the rehabilitation needs of Missouri individuals with disabilities:

a. Consumer Satisfaction Surveys

MVR routinely surveys a random sample of clients throughout various stages of open cases and case closures to obtain feedback on VR services and to determine how to better serve the needs of individuals with disabilities.

b. Public Hearings

Annually, MVR conducts public hearings throughout the state to obtain input on the state plan, its key goals and priorities, plan changes and any other topic related to VR services. In FY2013, MVR and the SRC jointly held public hearings in Cape Girardeau, Jefferson City, Kansas City, Springfield and St. Louis, Mo.

c. Input from the State Rehabilitation Council

During quarterly meetings, the SRC provides input to MVR on the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities.

d. Strategic Teams

MVR utilizes both ad hoc and on-going teams, such as the Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP)/VR Team, Transition Team, and Cultural Diversity Team, to gather data from its partners, school districts and underserved individuals with disabilities. At a minimum, teams meet two times a year.

e. Analysis of Standards and Indicators

On a quarterly basis, MVR management reviews data to ensure the Standards and Indicators are being met or exceeded. The SRC annually reviews and analyzes this information with MVR.

f. During FY2011, MVR conducted a telephone survey of randomly-selected closed cases prior to IPE to identify how well their needs were met. MVR is still using data collected with this tool.

g. MVR used an on-line questionnaire to survey its staff in FY2011 on the rehabilitation needs of Missourians with disabilities and continues to use the results in its decision-making processes along with feedback from its annual training needs assessment.

Additional assessment methods include:

• quality assurance case reviews

• quarterly reviews of case management data

• census data annually or as data is available

• data from the American Community Survey

• data from other state and federal agencies

• data from state and community boards and commissions

• due process hearings and mediations--annually MVR analyzes feedback from hearings

Feedback from the public hearings cited that a lack of transportation was a barrier to services. MVR will review this issue for possible resolutions. An SRC member offered a suggestion to invite a member from a transportation agency to apply for membership on the rehab council as a way to gather possible solutions to the problem.

1. The following is a summary of the comprehensive statewide assessment results in response to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly the service needs of:

(a) Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities (MSD) Including Their Need for Supported Employment (SE) Services

Based on MVR data from the last two years and the current rate of individuals entering each priority category, the projected number of eligible individuals with MSD who will receive VR services in FY2014 will be approximately 9,700. Of that number, approximately 3,600 individuals will need SE services.

From the comprehensive statewide assessment, MVR identified the following services as necessary to meet the key needs of the MSD:

• SE Services -- The nature of the service itself requires intensive one-on-one job training. Services are provided by accredited CRPs and include job development, job coaching, natural supports, task analysis and assessment, counseling and advocacy services. Usually, SE services will not exceed nine months but may be provided for up to 18 months.

• Assistive Technology and Rehabilitation Engineering Services -- Services include assessment and recommendations for accommodations, assistive devices and assistive technology necessary to improve the quality of work and/or increase work productivity. Services are usually provided over a four-week period by accredited CRPs and qualified rehabilitation engineers.

• Self-Employment Services -- Individuals with MSD will need assistance in setting up approved business plans for self-employment. These services may include required business equipment, various supplies, rental fees or start-up costs for the plan. Services will be provided by MVR counselors and business consultants as needed.

(b & c) Individuals with Disabilities Who Are Minorities and Individuals Who Have Been Unserved or Underserved by the Vocational Rehabilitation Program

An analysis of the comprehensive statewide assessment revealed that other than individuals on the waiting list, there are no populations in Missouri that are unserved. MVR counselors refer individuals on the waiting list to Missouri Career Centers and other resources to assist with employment, housing, food and clothing needs.

The needs assessment identified underserved individuals with disabilities as minority populations of Hispanics and African-Americans, individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

Hispanic Population:

Based on MVR data from the last three years, the projected number of eligible individuals with disabilities who are Hispanic that will receive VR services in FY2014 will be approximately 500. After analyzing data from the census and the American Community Survey, MVR feels these individuals are significantly underserved when compared to the total number of Hispanics in Missouri.

From the comprehensive needs assessment, MVR identified the following services as necessary to meet the key needs of Missouri’s Hispanic population with disabilities:

• Interpreter Services -- These services depend upon the specific needs of clients and are provided by MVR’s bilingual VR staff and state-contracted interpreters. The duration of interpreter services mirrors the length of other services.

• Translated forms-- Many of MVR’s translated forms and brochures are now available in offices and on the MVR website.

• Job Placement Services -- Services involve specialists who identify and cultivate job placement possibilities in the community. These services offer short-term follow-up support and can last between three and nine months. VR counselors and accredited CRPs provide job placement services.

• SE Services (see description above)

• Assistive Technology and Rehabilitation Engineering Services (see description above)

In addition, MVR has a diversity consultant who provides cultural diversity training to all VR staff. The consultant delivers training specific to each office’s population area and assists with developing office plans to address diversity.

African-American Population:

Based on MVR data from the last three years, the projected number of eligible individuals with disabilities that are African-American who will receive VR services in FY2014 will be approximately 6,300. MVR data reveals that, as a percentage, there are fewer Caucasians dropping from services than African-Americans; therefore, a percentage of African-Americans receiving services are underserved. In addition, MVR reviewed data from the census and the American Community Survey and feels these individuals are underserved when compared to the total number of African-Americans in Missouri.

From the comprehensive needs assessment, MVR identified the following services as necessary to meet the key needs of Missouri’s African-American population with disabilities:

• Follow-Up Services -- MVR established the need for follow-up services for individuals at risk of dropping out of services. Key MVR staff, MVR intake counselors and CRPs assist with follow-up services and activities. Clients are contacted to uncover reasons for leaving or barriers to receiving services. Key MVR personnel and CRP staff work with community resources to alleviate any barriers. These follow-up services are implemented before clients’ cases are closed and can last between three and nine months. In addition, MVR has a diversity consultant who provides cultural diversity training to all VR staff. The consultant delivers training specific to each office’s population area and assists with developing office plans to address diversity.

Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD):

Based on MVR data from the last three years, the projected number of eligible individuals with ASD who will receive VR services in FY2014 will be approximately 1,200. Other variables could have an effect on this estimate such as the economy and the number of applicants coming into the system. MVR reviewed information and recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC); the “Prevalence of Autism in Missouri: Changing Trends and the Effect of a Comprehensive State Autism Project” by R. Hillman, MD; N. Kanafani; T.N. Takahashi; and J Miles, MD, PhD.; “The Current State of Services for Adults with Autism” by Peter F. Gerhardt, Ed.D., January 2009; Missouri Autism Spectrum Disorder Study and Recommendations on Employment and Vocational Rehabilitation; the “Fact Sheet on Autism Employment,” by Scott Standifer, PhD.; and MVR data. Based on this information and additional research, MVR concludes these individuals are underserved.

From the comprehensive statewide assessment, MVR identified the following services as necessary to meet the key needs of individuals with ASD:

• SE Services (see description above)

• Assistive Technology and Rehabilitation Engineering Services (see description above)

• Job Placement Services (see description above)

• Transition Services -- Transition services assist eligible transition-age consumers with disabilities to successfully prepare them for transitioning into post-secondary education, vocational training or integrated employment. Services can be provided by MVR and coordinated with the Office of Special Education, local school districts and CRPs. Services are provided for the duration of the case.

• Workplace Modifications -- Individuals with ASD may experience difficulties in modulating sensory input. Environmental assessments can be provided to identify distractions such as noise levels, lighting, high traffic areas, etc. Services are provided by accredited CRPs and can overlap SE services usually lasting nine months but can extend up to 18 months.

• Other training appropriate to need such as vocational technical school, community college or college.

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI):

Based on MVR data from the last three years, the projected number of eligible individuals with TBI who will receive VR services in FY2014 will be approximately 500. MVR reviewed data from the CDC, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, the Brain Injury Associations of America and Missouri, “2011 Missouri Traumatic Brain injury Needs Assessment Report,” by the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services and the University of Missouri Kansas City-Institute for Human Development, and the Missouri Head Injury Advisory Council. Research revealed that Missourians with TBI exceed 13,000. Based on this information and the number of clients with TBI, MVR concludes these individuals are underserved.

From the comprehensive statewide assessment, MVR identified the following services as necessary to meet the key needs of individuals with TBI:

• SE Services (see description above)

• Job Placement Services (see description above)

• Assistive Technology and Rehabilitation Engineering Services (see description above)

• Transition Services (see description above) (data indicated that one of the highest risk groups for TBI was ages 15 to 24)

(d) Individuals with Disabilities Served Through Other Components of the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Based on information from the Missouri Division of Workforce Development, the projected number of individuals with disabilities that will be served through Missouri’s workforce investment system for FY2014 is 6,200.

From the comprehensive needs assessment, MVR identified the following services as necessary to meet the key needs of individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system:

• job search assistance

• labor market information

• resume assistance

• case management

• assessment

• individual planning and referral

• educational attainment

• skills development and training

• computer skills training

• transportation assistance

Individuals providing the services are representatives from the Division of Workforce Development and other Workforce Investment Act program partners. These services vary in length and could last up to 18 months.

2. The Need to Establish, Develop, or Improve Community Rehabilitation Programs within the State

a) Establish new CRPs: MVR does not believe that there is a need to establish new CRPs.

b) Expand/develop current network of CRPs: No, MVR does not believe that there is a need to expand or develop the current network of CRPs.

c) Improve CRPs: Yes, MVR has identified the following strategies to improve CRPs within the state:

• The CRP/VR Team will continue to make recommendations to improve services.

• MVR has developed and will implement in FY2013 an outcome report for CRPs to evaluate outcomes and improve informed choice.

• Staff from MVR and CRPs has developed an outcome-based model that was implemented at the beginning of FY2013 to improve SE services. They will continue to meet throughout the year to look at improving extended evaluation-related services.

• A team has also been established to review customer satisfaction with CRPs and accreditation requirements.

This screen was last updated on Jun 24 2013 11:25AM by Timothy Gaines

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

Annual Estimates of Individuals to Be Served and Costs of Services

The number of individuals in Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) who were eligible for services as of June 3, 2013 was 17,601.

The total estimated number of eligible individuals in Missouri who will receive services from MVR in FY2014 is 29,175. The estimated number of eligible individuals who will receive services in FY2014 in Part B Title I is 25,575 and Part B Title VI Program is 3,600.

The estimated cost in FY2014 for serving the above individuals in the Titles 1 and VI programs is approximately $53,500,000.

As described in Attachment 4.11(c)(3) of this state plan, MVR is currently in an order of selection.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Category 1 Title I $21,800,000 9,706 $2,246
Category 2 Title I $29,000,000 17119 $1,694
Category 3 Title I $2,700,000 2350 $1,148
Totals   $53,500,000 29,175 $1,833

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2013 11:17AM by Lisa Sone

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Goals and Priorities

Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation’s (MVR) goals and priorities for FY2014 are based upon the following:

• RSA monitoring feedback from the Section 107 Monitoring Review

• comprehensive statewide needs assessment

• performance on standards and indicators

• State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) input and recommendations

• other sources, e.g., Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) legislative input, consumer satisfaction surveys, input from the Client Assistance Program, public hearings, etc.

Based upon the above, MVR and the SRC developed FY2014 goals, priorities and strategies in order to focus on improving accountability and performance for service providers, increasing employment outcomes for persons with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), and increasing the number of employment outcomes for transition-age consumers.

The following FY2014 goals and priorities for vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs have been continued from the prior year. Goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed upon by MVR and the SRC, as described in Attachment 4.2(c) of this state plan.

Goal 1

Improve the accountability and performance of service providers.

Baseline: Evaluate the new outcome report for CRPs, implemented during fall 2012 that measures quality employment outcomes and success rates for MVR-referred consumers.

Objective 1

Increase quality employment outcomes for consumers served through CRPs as measured by quality incentive payments.

Strategies

1. Monitor and evaluate the revised payment-for-performance system of employment services implemented in FY2011 emphasizing clear expectations and performance measures.

2. Review effectiveness of quality incentive payments to providers.

3. Implement training on how to review and utilize the data in the new case management system.

4. Continue to monitor performance of providers by utilizing the data in the system.

5. Integrate fiscal services with case services to improve accountability.

Goal 2

Increase employment outcomes for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Objective 1

Increase the percentage of employment outcomes for individuals with ASD by 5%.

Baseline: The number of employment outcomes in FY2012 for individuals with ASD was 136.

Strategies

1. Develop and maintain close working relationships with state and local partners (e.g., Department of Mental Health, Workforce Development partners, Independent Living Centers, CRPs, etc.) to maximize resources and develop appropriate services and support systems.

2. Work with the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) program to develop projects with CRPs to expand and improve services and outcomes to clients with ASD.

3. Coordinate joint training activities with TACE for MVR counselors and direct services CRP staff to improve services and outcomes for clients with ASD.

4. Develop capacity of regional specialists.

Goal 3

Increase the number of employment outcomes of transition-age consumers.

Objective 1

Increase the percentage of employment outcomes for transition-age consumers by 2%.

Baseline data: The number of transition-age consumers reaching employment outcomes in FY2012 was 1,556.

Strategies

1. The ad hoc Transition Team will develop joint training activities with MVR, school and CRP staff. Training will be focused on improving services and outcomes for students with disabilities.

2. MVR will continue to promote the development of partnering activities with school districts and CRPs to provide community-based transition services and opportunities for students with disabilities.

3. Continue emphasizing transition students entering postsecondary education programs.

4. Increase the utilization of Missouri Connections with transition consumers.

5. Identify current practices through our surveys and data.

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2013 11:29AM by Lisa Sone

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

Justification

MVR continues to experience an increase in the cost of providing services to persons in all categories. Due to this increase in the cost of services and the insufficient financial resources, MVR is not able to provide services to all eligible individuals. MVR estimates that there will be 29,175 eligible individuals in FY2014 who will receive services.

 

Description of Priority categories

Services shall be provided based upon the eligible individual’s placement in one of the following priority categories:

Priority Category I: An individual with the most significant disability as defined below.

Priority Category II: An individual with a significant disability as defined below.

Priority Category III: An individual with a disability as defined below.

Definitions:

Individual with the Most Significant Disability: An individual who is seriously limited in three or more of the following functional areas: self-care; communication; mobility; self-direction; work tolerance; work skills; and/or interpersonal skills, and

a. whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time; and

b. who has one or more physical or mental disabilities resulting from amputation, arthritis, autism, blindness, burn injury, cancer, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, deafness, head injury, heart disease, hemiplegia, hemophilia, respiratory or pulmonary dysfunction, mental retardation, mental illness, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, musculo-skeletal disorders, neurological disorders (including stroke and epilepsy), spinal cord conditions (including paraplegia and quadriplegia), sickle cell anemia, specific learning disability, end-stage renal disease, or another disability or combination of disabilities determined on the basis of an assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs to cause comparable substantial functional limitation.

Individual with a Significant Disability: An individual who has a severe physical or mental impairment that seriously limits one or two functional capacities (such as mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; and

a. whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time; and

b. who has one or more physical or mental disabilities resulting from amputation, arthritis, autism, blindness, burn injury, cancer, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, deafness, head injury, heart disease, hemiplegia, hemophilia, respiratory or pulmonary dysfunction, mental retardation, mental illness, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, musculo-skeletal disorders, neurological disorders (including stroke and epilepsy), spinal cord conditions (including paraplegia and quadriplegia), sickle cell anemia, specific learning disability, end-stage renal disease, or another disability or combination of disabilities determined on the basis of an assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs to cause comparable substantial functional limitation.

Individual with a disability: all other eligible individuals.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

MVR will serve eligible consumers with the most significant disabilities (Priority Category 1) first. Eligible consumers with significant disabilities (Priority Category 2) will be served next following with eligible consumers with disabilities (Priority Category 3).

The following procedures will be followed in the implementation of the order of selection:

1) An eligible individual will be placed in the appropriate priority category and receive written notification of the assigned priority category. The eligible individual’s date of application will be used to determine the order of services within a priority category.

2) Individuals will be notified of their right to appeal their category assignment.

3) An eligible individual’s placement in a priority category may be changed under justifiable circumstances.

4) Rationale for placement will appear in the individual’s case file.

5) The order of selection shall in no way affect the provision or authorization of diagnostic and evaluation services needed to determine eligibility.

6) Services authorized or provided to any eligible individual shall not be disrupted as a result of an order of selection or the closing of a priority category.

7) Order of selection priority categories do not apply to post-employment services.

8) All funding arrangements for providing services, including any third-party arrangements and awards by MVR, shall be consistent with the order of selection. If any funding arrangements are inconsistent with the order of selection, MVR shall renegotiate these funding arrangements so that they are consistent with the order of selection.

9) The order of selection shall in no way affect eligible individuals’ access to services provided through MVR’s information and referral system.

10) Eligible individuals who are in a priority category that is not open, shall be provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication to assist them in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment. These individuals will also be referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including the statewide workforce investment career centers.

11) Individuals being referred to appropriate programs, as mentioned above, shall be provided the following:

(A) a notice of the referral to the agency carrying out the program

(B) information identifying a specific point of contact within the agency to which the individual is being referred

(C) information and advice regarding the most suitable services to assist the individual to prepare for, secure, retain or regain employment

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

Estimated Timelines for achieving the Outcome Goals

As of June 3, 2013, all categories are open and do not have a waiting list.

The timeline to reach an employment outcome varies significantly with each individual. It is estimated that the average number of months to reach an employment outcome for category I is approximately 21 months, category II is approximately 24 months, and category III is approximately 18 months.

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 9,706 1,759 3,518 21 months $21,800,000
2 17,119 3,102 6,204 24 months $29,000,000
3 2,350 426 852 18 months $2,700,000

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2013 11:41AM by Lisa Sone

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

The FY2014 goal and priority for the distribution of funds from section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act are:

• Monitor and evaluate the new supported employment outcome-based model that was implemented at the beginning of FY2013.

Title VI, Part B funds are utilized for supported employment, job development and individual and group placement models of supported employment. All Title VI, Part B funds for supported employment services are utilized through a fee-for-service as established in Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation’s (MVR) supported employment cost analysis. Title I funds are also utilized for the provision of supported employment services.

In FY2012, a total of 712 individuals with the most significant disabilities obtained employment outcomes after receiving supported employment services through MVR. Of the individuals that exited the program and received supported employment services during FY2012, 62 percent were successfully employed in competitive jobs. These individuals averaged $8.07 per hour and worked an average of 23 hours per week.

It is estimated that approximately 3,600 individuals with the most significant disabilities will receive supported employment services in FY2014. It is also estimated that in FY2014, MVR will spend approximately 3.7 million dollars in Title VI, Part B funds and Title I funds in supported employment services. These services will be provided through nonprofit, accredited community rehabilitation programs.

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2013 11:42AM by Lisa Sone

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

State’s Strategies and Use of Title I Funds for Innovation and Expansion Activities

I. All strategies identified to achieve goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities and overcome barriers to accessing services in vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs in FY2014 are listed below. The following strategies have been continued from FY2013 and reviewed by Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) and the State Rehabilitation Council:

Goal 1

Improve the accountability and performance of service providers.

Strategies

1. Monitor and evaluate the revised payment-for-performance system of employment services implemented in FY2011 emphasizing clear expectations and performance measures.

2. Review effectiveness of quality incentive payments to providers.

3. Implement training on how to review and utilize the data in the new case management system.

4. Continue to monitor performance of providers by utilizing the data in the system.

5. Integrate fiscal services with case services to improve accountability.

Goal 2

Increase employment outcomes for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).

Strategies

1. Develop and maintain close working relationships with state and local partners (e.g., Department of Mental Health, Workforce Development partners, Independent Living Centers, CRPs, etc.) to maximize resources and develop appropriate services and support systems.

2. Work with the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) program to develop projects with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to expand and improve services and outcomes to clients with ASD.

3. Coordinate joint training activities with TACE for MVR counselors and direct services CRP staff to improve services and outcomes for clients with ASD.

4. Develop capacity of regional specialists.

Goal 3

Increase the number of employment outcomes of transition-age consumers.

Strategies

1. The ad hoc Transition Team will develop joint training activities with MVR, school and CRP staff. Training will be focused on improving services and outcomes for students with disabilities.

2. MVR will continue to promote the development of partnering activities with school districts and CRPs to provide community-based transition services and opportunities for students with disabilities.

3. Continue emphasizing transition students entering postsecondary education programs.

4. Increase the utilization of Missouri Connections with transition consumers.

5. Identify current practices through our surveys and data.

II. Strategies to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities:

All of the above strategies will be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities in FY2014. In addition, strategies from recent years will be utilized.

1. MVR will develop a quality assurance review process to assess CRP outcomes.

2. MVR will evaluate the effectiveness of providers and the quality assurance process twelve months following implementation and on an ongoing basis thereafter.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

III. Strategies describing how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process:

Specific strategies for the above area are listed as follows:

1. MVR will work jointly with CRP and other partnering agencies, including Workforce Investment Act partners, to develop and sponsor on-going training in assistive technology services.

2. At any time during the rehabilitation process, MVR’s statewide assistive technology specialists will provide technical assistance to VR counselors throughout the state.

3. MVR staff will participate in activities, training programs and conferences sponsored by the Missouri Assistive Technology Project (MATP).

4. MVR’s coordinator for deaf services will meet with all Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf on an annual basis to discuss new strategies, resources and issues for deaf and hard of hearing consumers.

IV. Strategies describing how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis:

See the above strategies on assistive technology. These same strategies will be used to identify and serve individuals receiving assistive technology devices and services on a statewide basis. In addition, MVR employs an assistive technology specialist who will continue to help staff in areas of mobility, work accommodations and home and van modifications. The VR assistant director of rural services will continue to work with the assistive technology needs of farm operators with disabilities and consults with staff statewide. MVR has an assistant director of deaf/hard of hearing services who will continue providing statewide support for staff with assistive technology services for clients with hearing impairments.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

V. Outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities including those with the most significant disabilities:

Specific strategies that will be used to reduce cultural barriers and identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities are:

1. MVR will recruit rehabilitation counselors from culturally diverse backgrounds to better serve individuals with significant disabilities from underserved populations.

2. MVR will utilize state-contracted interpreters to reduce communication barriers.

3. MVR will continue to translate forms and brochures in Spanish for the Hispanic community.

4. MVR’s diversity consultant will provide cultural diversity training to all MVR staff and deliver training specific to each office’s population area. The consultant will assist with developing office plans to address diversity. In addition, the consultant will continue to lead the Diversity Team, which includes MVR and CRP staffs.

5. Key MVR personnel and CRP staff will work with community resources to alleviate any cultural barriers.

6. The Diversity Team will partner with the Transition Team to develop strategies that will improve services and outcomes to high school students with disabilities from diverse backgrounds.

7. Utilize the strategies under FY2014 Goal 2 as mentioned under section I above.

VI. Strategies to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program:

The above strategies listed under section V above will be used to identify and serve individuals who are underserved populations.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

VII. Strategies for improving community rehabilitation programs:

The specific strategies that will be used to improve CRPs are the FY2014 goal 1 with strategies 1 through 5, goal 2 with strategies 1 through 4, and goal 3 with strategies 1 and 2 listed above in section I. In addition, MVR and CRP staffs offer input on service delivery processes during partnering meetings and develop action plans to improve those processes. The CRP/VR Team, which is comprised of MVR staff and executives from the CRPs, meets regularly. This effort, along with joint training activities, is beneficial to improving both the CRP and MVR programs.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

VIII. Strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators:

All strategies listed above should have a positive effect on MVR’s performance with the standards and indicators. These strategies focus on improving quality outcomes, improving accountability, improving partnerships with providers and other agencies and expanding services to underserved populations.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

IX. Strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting persons with disabilities:

Specific strategies that will be used to improve and assist other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting persons with disabilities are taken from the following:

From the FY2014 goal 2, strategy 1 as mentioned above in section I. MVR is a key partner and works closely with the Division of Workforce Development (DWD), which provides the statewide workforce development system services through the Missouri Career Centers in 14 workforce regions in Missouri. MVR has appointed a VR state liaison to collaborate with DWD, and MVR district supervisors serve as active members on 13 of the 14 local workforce investment boards.

Through Memoranda of Understanding, MVR is the primary referral source from career center partners for individuals with disabilities. MVR counselors visit various Missouri Career Centers (both full service sites and satellites) frequently to provide services to consumers in a timely fashion. One Missouri Career Center location (where all partners, including MVR, are co-located) has an intra-building electronic linkage which has been effective. Career centers offer job training and skills development programs to all citizens who want assistance with finding employment.

MVR also provides ongoing cross-training and technical assistance to career center staff regarding assistive technology and accommodations in the workplace. Recently, MVR has engaged in a collaborative project with DWD, local workforce investment boards (WIBs) and local Centers for Independent Living (CILs). Through this project, the CILs provide disability awareness and sensitivity training to all career center staff.

The former executive director of the Missouri Workforce Investment Board is a governor-appointed State Rehabilitation Council member who provides input on the coordination efforts between MVR and the statewide workforce investment system. She also chairs the Program and Evaluation Committee, which reviews and advises MVR on its policies and procedures.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

X. How MVR uses strategies to achieve goals and priorities identified in state plan attachment 4.11(c)(1):

MVR obtains input on goals and priorities from the comprehensive statewide assessment of need, which includes the SRC, public hearings and consumer satisfaction surveys. This information is given to the administrative and strategic teams to develop strategies. MVR utilizes a variety of teams to assist with the development and implementation of many of the strategies identified in this section. Team members include MVR staff, management, providers, former consumers and school personnel. Quality assurance reviews are also used to assess the progress of the strategies toward the targets. MVR’s Management Team monitors outcomes and progress toward goals on a regular basis.

XI. How MVR uses strategies to support innovation and expansion activities:

Goals, priorities and strategies were developed from the statewide assessment of need. Strategies to assist with improving services to clients and families with ASD were established. In addition, MVR will use Strategy 2 from FY2014 Goal 2 as mentioned above in section I.

In FY2012, MVR supported innovation and expansion activities by utilizing Careerscope as a career assessment tool to decrease CRP-purchased vocational assessment costs. MVR has been and will continue to support innovation and expansion activities through its participation in the Hyatt/Hands-On Education Hospitality Training Program. This is a two-week, on-site reality-based training program that prepares MVR eligible individuals with disabilities for work in the hospitality industry. MVR partners with Hyatt Hotels and Resorts, Hands-On Educational Services, Inc., and Rehab Services for the Blind.

To support innovation and expansion activities, MVR has purchased instructional manuals for staff to help grow the Individual Placement and Support model that it has implemented in order to help individuals with disabilities reach competitive employment.

XII. How MVR uses strategies to overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the State Supported Employment Services Program:

These strategies are identified in sections III, IV, V, VI and XI above and help provide equitable access to vocational rehabilitation and supported employment services.

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 10:55AM by Lisa Sone

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

The Goals and Priorities for FY2012 established by Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) were as follows:

Goal 1: Improve the accountability and performance of service providers.

Evaluation of Progress: Not yet achieved.

Factors that impeded the achievement of the above goal in FY2012:

This goal is part of MVR’s continuous improvement process. MVR will always strive to improve the performance and accountability of Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) for the benefit of MVR consumers. After the implementation of the AWARE case management system, MVR initiated a reporting program that will aid in tracking performance.

Goal 2: Increase employment outcomes for individuals with ASD.

Evaluation of Progress: Goal met.

The number of employment outcomes for individuals with ASD at the end of:

FY2010: 84, FY2011: 121, and FY2012: 136.

Strategies that contributed to the achievement of Goal 2 in FY2012:

1. Developed and maintained close working relationships with state and local partners (e.g., Department of Mental Health, Workforce Development partners, Independent Living Centers, CRPs, etc.) to maximize resources and develop appropriate services and support systems.

2. Worked with the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) program to develop projects with CRPs to expand and improve services and outcomes to clients with ASD.

3. Coordinated joint training activities with TACE for MVR counselors and direct services CRP staff to improve services and outcomes for clients with ASD.

Goal 3: Increase the number of employment outcomes of transition-age consumers.

Objective 1

Increase the percentage of transition consumers reaching employment outcomes by 2%.

Evaluation of Progress: Goal not met.

The number of transition-age consumers reaching employment outcomes in:

FY2010: 804, FY2011: 1,636, and FY2012: 1,556.

Factors that impeded the achievement of the above goal in FY2012:

Though the number of applications decreased, the number of transition-age consumers either exiting the system unsuccessfully after services or dropping out of the program before services has also decreased.

Staff feedback from a recent transition survey revealed that in Missouri there is a trend for schools to keep students in the school environment rather than allowing them to participate in the COOP Work Experience program. Rather than encouraging work experience, the schools are focusing more on academic rigor and MAP testing. This trend is making it difficult for MVR counselors to gain access to the students. MVR is trying to address this issue through better communication and collaboration with school administrators, counselors and nurses to obtain referrals. Additionally, MVR counselors are working to provide summer work activities for students. Another strategy is to have better direct parent contact as opposed to relying on the schools to initiate the meeting.

MVR has also noticed that more students without work experience are in need of prevocational skills, such as soft skills. MVR provides vocational as opposed to prevocational services.

 

FY2012 Goals for the Supported Employment Program were as follows:

Goal 1: To expand services for individuals with severe and persistent mental illness receiving Individual Placement and Support services.

Goal 2: Review current system of supported employment service practices and processes to evaluate feasibility of an outcome-based model.

Evaluation of Progress: Goals met.

MVR has produced extensive work through the CRP/VR Team, which is comprised of MVR staff and executives from the CRPs, in order to maximize benefits for supported employment (SE), which includes the Individual Placement and Support services. MVR and the CRPs developed and implemented a new outcome-based SE model fall 2012. Statewide training for MVR and the CRPs was provided.

MVR also revised its cooperative agreement with CRPs to align with the new outcome-based model. This agreement includes service provision, authorization, billing, compliance and verification processes.

 

Evaluation of MVR performance on standards and indicators in FY2012:

MVR met the required performance for both standards in FY2012; exceeding all performance indicators except indicator 1.5. MVR also met two of the three required priority indicators. The evaluation revealed the following areas of need and priority:

MVR needs to continue to increase the number of employment outcomes. A new model of employment services was implemented in fall 2010. This has significantly reduced the number of vocational assessments and focuses on the milestones of job placement and 30- and 90-day retention. In addition, MVR implemented a new outcome-based model for SE services fall 2012 that emphasizes quality employment outcomes and 30- and 90-day retention.

MVR needs to continue to focus on and improve quality employment outcomes. By a small margin, MVR did not meet Performance Indicator 1.5, which compares client average wages with Missouri average wages. MVR implemented quality incentives on April 1, 2010 with CRPs to provide a monetary incentive for the following employment outcomes for clients:

-- Hours worked over 35 hours per week

-- Earnings at or above 55% of the Missouri State Average Wage

-- Health care benefits provided through employer

-- Placement of an underserved population

Certain populations, such as individuals with ASD, continue to be underserved. Joint training with MVR and CRPs has been developed to improve services and employment outcomes.

Standard 1: EMPLOYMENT OUTCOMES

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 1.1: The number of individuals exiting the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program who achieved an employment outcome during the current performance period compared to the number of individuals who exit the VR program after achieving an employment outcome during the previous performance period.

Required standard: Equal to or greater than previous year

FY2011: 4,528 FY2012: 4,747 Difference: +219

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 1.2: Of all individuals who exit the VR program after receiving services, the percentage that are determined to have achieved an employment outcome.

Required Standard: 55.8% FY2012: 62.7%

*PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 1.3: Of all individuals determined to have achieved an employment outcome, the percentage who exits the VR program in competitive or self-employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage.

Required Standard: 72.6% FY2012: 98.7%

*PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 1.4: Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive or self-employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage, the percentage who are individuals with significant disabilities.

Required Standard: 62.4% FY2012: 97.5%

*PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 1.5: The average hourly earnings of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive or self-employment with earnings levels equivalent to at least the minimum wage as a ratio to the state’s average hourly earnings for all individuals in the state who are employed (as derived from the Bureau of Labor Statistics report, “State Average Annual Pay,” for the most recent available year).

Required Standard: .52 FY2012: .50

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 1.6: Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive or self-employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage, the difference between the percentages who reported their own income as the largest single source of economic support at exit and the percentage that reported their own income as the largest single source of support at application.

Required Standard: 53% FY2012: 64.6%

Standard 2: EQUAL ACCESS TO SERVICES

PERFORMANCE INDICATOR 2.1: The service rate for all individuals with disabilities from minority backgrounds as a ratio to the service rate for all non-minority individuals with disabilities.

Required Standard: .80 FY2012: .92

* INDICATES A PRIMARY INDICATOR

 

Evaluation and Reports of Progress of Innovation and Expansion Activities to Expand and Improve Services to Individuals with Disabilities and to Support the SRC and Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC)

One of MVR’s goals is to reduce the amount of purchased vocational assessments. A method that MVR utilizes to decrease this expense is by contracting assessment services through Careerscope. Rather than pay CRPs to perform vocational assessments, MVR has been assisting consumers with this tool and is charged a nominal fee for each assessment.

Funding Utilized for SRC and SILC Activities

In FY2012, MVR utilized Part B, Title I funds for the SRC and Part B, Title VII funds for the SILC quarterly meetings. These funds are primarily used to pay for council members’ travel, meeting expenses and supplies.

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2013 12:17PM by Lisa Sone

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

Missouri Vocational Rehabilitation (MVR) maintains cooperative, written agreements with nonprofit, private Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to provide services on a fee-for-service basis. All supported employment fees authorized by MVR are a uniform, flat rate as recommended by the RSA 107 Monitoring Review.

Title VI, Part B funds are used to secure Supported Employment (SE) services for consumers. Some of the services may include:

• Discovery and exploration

• community-based assessments

• job supports

• surveying businesses for potential community-based exploration, assessments and work sites suited to the needs of the consumers

• analysis of all relevant job-related variables, (e.g., transportation, job restructuring, tax credit for employers, etc.)

• providing long-term, extended services support with the consumer or employer; a minimum of twice per month

MVR is committed to providing greater access to SE services. The scope of SE services reaches throughout the state. All counties in Missouri are being served by CRPs that provide SE services.

During FY2012, 3,129 MVR consumers with the most significant disabilities received SE services. Sixty-two percent of the SE consumers who exited the program were successfully employed in competitive jobs. SE consumers worked an average of 23 hours per week and earned an average of $8.07 per hour.

Each MVR district office developed a partnering plan with CRPs outlining joint activities. The goals of the partnering plans are to foster strong working relationships and improve services for consumers.

One of the methods that MVR uses to continuously improve SE services and the service delivery process is through the use of a strategic team. The CRP/VR Team, comprised of management and staff from MVR and CRPs, meets several times a year to improve services, review feedback and monitor progress.

MVR and the CRPs developed a new outcome-based service model that emphasizes quality employment outcomes and retention. The new model was implemented fall 2012.

The Department of Mental Health (DMH), Division of Behavioral Health Services (formerly the DMH Divisions of Alcohol and Drug Abuse and Comprehensive Psychiatric Services) and MVR have been working collaboratively since 2009 on a supported employment grant funded by the Johnson & Johnson-Dartmouth Psychiatric Research Center project. The mission of the Johnson & Johnson-Dartmouth Community Mental Health Program is to increase access to evidence-based supported employment, also known as Individual Placement and Support (IPS), for adults with serious mental illnesses who are interested in improving their work lives. This national program systematically works with states to implement supported employment following the evidence-based guidelines, initially in a small number of sites (typically three to four) and expanding statewide over time. The program is administered in each participating state through the collaboration between the state mental health authority and the state vocational rehabilitation administration. This funding has ended, moving beyond a pilot to sustaining current sites and expanding statewide.

Missouri has nine Community Mental Health/Treatment Centers (CMHCs) participating in this implementation collaborative. Ongoing technical assistance and fidelity reviews to the evidence-based practice are provided by a state trainer and a team consisting of members from MVR and DMH. Three sites have improved to “exemplary” fidelity and have increased the number of people successfully employed in competitive jobs. The partnership between DMH and MVR includes a training format, that is offered to interested CMHCs statewide, in adopting IPS as well as improve existing employment activities within their community mental health treatment services.

To assist in determining the quality and effectiveness of SE services, MVR surveys its consumers. The FY2012 Customer Satisfaction Survey results indicated that 82 percent of SE clients, who left services both successfully and unsuccessfully, felt MVR treated them with respect and felt they were involved in choices regarding their rehab plan.

Transition to Extended Services

MVR can provide up to 18 months of community-based job training. During the provision of assessment, job development and job coaching, the need for services is reviewed in three-month increments by the MVR counselor, the CRP and the SE consumer. Transitioning from supported employment to extended services occurs when the consumer requires job supports for 25 percent of the work time or less. In cases where consumers have serious and persistent mental illness, the 25 percent level does not apply; instead, the benchmark is the successful achievement of goals and objectives as outlined in monthly progress reports.

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2013 12:23PM by Lisa Sone

System Information

System information

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on:06/24/2013 11:26 AM

Last updated by:samogainest

Completed on: 06/24/2013 11:26 AM

Completed by: samogainest

Approved on: 07/31/2013 5:26 PM

Approved by: readonly