ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

Published September 4, 2014.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Michigan Rehabilitation Services State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 (submitted FY 2013)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The Michigan Department of Human Services is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Michigan Department of Human Services [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Treasurer State of Michigan

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Director

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryMaura D. Corrigan

Title of SignatoryDirector

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/13/2013

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2014No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Michigan Rehabilitation Services

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

OVERVIEW:

In fiscal year (FY) 2012, the Michigan Rehabilitation Council (MRC or Council) worked diligently to uphold its mission and be successful in the achievement of our federal mandates as set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (the Act).

This attachment utilizes the nine primary State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) mandates to report the activities of the Council as it worked to provide the customer voice into the internal workings of our state unit, Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS). This attachment also provides an overview of our organizational structure and highlights our advocacy and educational efforts with our colleagues, partners, and the public about the public vocational rehabilitation (VR) system in Michigan.

1. To consult with the Workforce Investment Board on Council functions. The individual appointed to serve as the liaison member from Michigan’s Workforce Board – served the membership well as they shared information between the two organizations.

2. To review, analyze, and advise the general vocational rehabilitation program of its responsibilities under the Rehabilitation Act. This mandate was achieved through active participation in the following MRS activities/work teams: (1) Academy for Quality Management Fundamentals (2) Administrative Law Judge Interview (3) Budget/Operations (4) Budget/Strategy (5) Centralized Eligibility System Development (6) Consultation with the Customer Rights Representative/ Hearings Manager (7) Customer Input (8) Customer Satisfaction Survey (9) Enhanced Partnership (10) Executive Team Strategy (11) Idea Stream (12) Independent Living (IL) / MRS Working Alliance –Strategic Planning, Operational, and Implementation Teams (13) Leadership Councils (14) Marketing Team and subgroups related to creating a MRS Annual Report Calendar, forms, and publications (15) Meeting to discuss possible resource development opportunities with Indian Tribes (16) Meeting with Department of Human Services (DHS) with MRS presence (17) Meetings with MRS and Partners (18) Michigan Career and Technical Institute Graduation Event (19) Michigan Commission for the Blind (MCB)/MRS State Plan Meetings (20) Michigan Senate Appropriations Sub Committee – LARA Meeting (21) 4-day Motivational Interviewing Training (22) MRS Deputy Division Director Interviews (23) MRS State Plan Meetings (24) Order of Selection for Services (OSS) Statewide Teleconference Call (25) OSS Workgroup (26) Policy Unit Manager Interviews (27) Policy Unit OSS Pilot Training (28) Presented at Staff Trainings (29) Quality Assurance (30) Quality Management Systems Training (31) Quality Work Implementation Team (32) Representation at MRS Oakland District Office event and (33) Statewide Teleconference Calls.

3. In partnership with MRS develop, agree to, and review State goals and priorities in the State Plan and evaluate the effectiveness of the VR program. Meeting dates, times, and locations were planned for monthly meetings with the MRC Chairs, MRS State Director and MRC Liaison. The intention of this meeting is to discuss critical issues being faced by the Bureau, so that the MRC membership can strategize on the best method to utilize as they work to advocate on behalf of customers. The meetings help to enhance the communication and relationship between the Bureau and Council. As the MRS Long Term Plan (LTP) has entered its final year, the Council continues to be included in numerous work groups designed to meet the LTP goals.

4. To advise and assist MRS in the preparation of the State Plan, the strategic plan, reports, needs assessments, and evaluation. The Council was involved in all MRS State Plan processes, along with the update to Attachment 4.2. The Council engaged in the planning needs and details related to scheduling public meetings for the MRS State Plan. MRC Members and Staff attended four MRS Public Meetings around the state (Detroit, Lansing, Marquette, and Traverse City), which offered opportunities for input on two critical updates to the State Plan: establishment of OSS during FY 2013 and the transfer of MRS to Department of Human Services (DHS) beginning October 1st. Input received from Public Meetings was incorporated into the Council’s Attachment 4.2 and the other applicable attachments of the MRS State Plan.

5. To conduct a review and analysis of consumer satisfaction. Anecdotal customer satisfaction information was collected by the MRC through the following activities: (1) Worked with Project Excellence in the review, analysis, and update of the Customer Satisfaction Survey tool distributed at case closure (2) Dialogued with MRS on other modalities that could be utilized to increase customer input (3) Through public comment received at Business Meetings (4) Through a Success Story web form on the MRC website and (5) Through e-mails and phone calls received at the MRC office.

6. To prepare and submit an annual report to the Commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), the Governor, and the public. The Annual Report for FY 2012 was submitted to RSA.

7. To coordinate with other councils, as specified by the Rehabilitation Act.

Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC): Coordinated activities included (1) shared reports at Business Meetings with members appointed to represent the respective councils and (2) ongoing dialogue to determine the coordination of efforts for any emerging issues as they arise.

Special Education Advisory Council (SEAC): The MRC pursued plans for representation at SEAC meetings during FY 2012. Once new appointments are announced, the Council will determine a plan for SEAC representation during FY 2013.

Michigan Developmental Disabilities Council (MDDC): The MRC pursued plans for representation at MDDC meetings during FY 2012. Once new appointments are announced, the Council will determine a plan for MDDC representation during FY 2013.

State Mental Health Planning Council: The MRC pursued plans for representation at these meetings during FY 2012. Once new appointments are announced, the Council will determine a plan for representation at the Department of Community Health’s Advisory Council on Mental Illness (ACMI) during FY 2013.

Governor’s Workforce Development Board: Once appointments are announced for the Council, a coordinated partnership will be established.

8. To provide coordination between MRS, the State Independent Living Council (SILC) and independent living centers. In Michigan, the CIL trade association, Disability Network/Michigan and the Michigan SILC have both established a strong partnership with MRS. The MRC works to enhance the partnership by continually advocating on behalf of the independent living needs of the customers of MRS. Involvement with the MRC/CIL strategic working alliance teams furthers our efforts.

9. To perform other functions, consistent with the Rehabilitation Act, as the council determines appropriate.

MRC Activities:

Business Meetings / Work Teams

1st quarter - The MRC conducted one business meeting during the first quarter of FY 2012. The in-person meeting took place in Lansing over a two-day period. The first day was dedicated to activities to update the strategic plan and work team meetings for the membership, with the second day being for the business meeting. Members viewed a recently released SRC Online Training Module focused on SRC-VR Partnerships. During the business meeting, the Council passed two motions. The first was in support of MRS pursuing resource development opportunities through collaboration with Indian Tribes, and the second was in support of the MRS Order of Selection for Services Position Statement. The new Executive Team (ET) met during this quarter during in-person meetings designed to familiarize new ET members with their roles and responsibilities and also for work team chair training opportunities.

During in-person work team meetings, members made changes to the existing committee structure by finalizing the following 3 work teams: Customer Satisfaction/Input (CSI), Partners and Policy Makers (PPT), and Program Evaluation/Data (PED). Plans were revised, new goals were established, teleconference meeting schedules were determined, and discussion took place about next steps. A Special Projects Work Team will be convened to manage needs related to the State Plan and other topics on an as needed basis.

2nd quarter - The MRC conducted two business meetings during the second quarter of FY 2012. An in-person meeting took place in Lansing over a two-day period. The first day was dedicated to in-person work team meetings for the membership. During the in-person Executive Team (ET) meeting, members met with the MRS State Director and Deputy Director to have discussion about MRS’ current events, as well as the meeting to take place on the following day with members of the Appropriations Sub Committee at the Capitol. Data and other information was collectively updated for a MRS flyer to be distributed during that meeting.

The business meeting took place on the second day. Beforehand, a majority of MRC members were in attendance at the Capitol for the Senate Appropriations Sub Committee Meeting. The meeting’s focus was a recent MRS program audit, which raised a few irregularities. The MRC Chair, Carol Bergquist, provided opening comments on behalf of the Council, and praised MRS for the outstanding work they do on behalf of their Customers. During the business meeting, Council Members and guests viewed portions of online SRC training modules related to the State Plan, progress updates regarding Membership appointments were shared, and a motion was passed to approve a focus group report. A motion was also passed to amend the MRC Bylaws to continue the opportunity for ‘Community Resource Members’, who are included as a resource to the council based on their areas of expertise.

A second one-hour MRC business meeting took place via teleconference to update the membership about the current status of the newly issued Executive Order and status for membership appointments.

Along with teleconference meetings, outcomes for in-person work team meetings resulted in the following: the Customer Satisfaction/Input Team reviewed and discussed Customer Satisfaction Survey tools used by other state rehabilitation councils (SRCs), the Partners and Policy Makers Team had discussion about next steps for communicating with the legislature about MRS’ insufficient match funds to avoid sending money back to RSA, and the Program Evaluation/Data Team reviewed the newest online SRC training module focused on Program Evaluation. A State Plan Work Team was designated to manage needs related to the State Plan.

3rd quarter - A variety of factors contributed to MRC business meetings not being conducted during the third quarter of FY 2012. On February 24th, at the same time the first EO (2012-2) was issued, all voting Council members received letters from the Governor declaring that their terms as Members of the MRC had expired, with thanks for their dedication and service. During this time of transition, the ET members reached consensus that they were committed to continuing the work of the Council until the end of the fiscal year, so that MRS was in compliance with regard to their SRC requirement.

4th quarter - MRC business meetings were not conducted during the fourth quarter of FY 2012. The five ET members continued to represent customers of MRS at meetings and other MRS related events.

MRS Champion Awards

In October 2011 and September 2012, the MRC hosted the 3rd and 4th annual events at the Capitol. Champion Awards were presented to customers, employers, partners, and MRS employees from around the state who have demonstrated outstanding commitment to the MRS mission of partnering with individuals and employers to achieve quality employment outcomes and independence for people with disabilities. Legislators and their staff were present in record numbers to show support for the award recipients.

Statewide Activities: The MRC continued participation in the following Statewide activities: (1) MARO Day at the Capitol (2) MARO Leadership Academy (3) MARO Spring Conference (4) Michigan Rehabilitation Association Membership (5) Michigan Rehabilitation Conference and (6) re:con (formerly Michigan Rehabilitation Conference) Program Planning Committee.

MRC Staff: The staff of the Council has continued with three full-time employees: Executive Director (ED), Program Director (PD), and Executive Assistant. The PD attended the National Rehabilitation Association’s (NRA) Government Affairs Summit in Washington DC and participated in/graduated from the MARO Leadership Academy.

National Activities: Two MRC Staff Members are members of the NRA. The ED serves as Chair of the National Coalition of State Rehabilitation Councils (NCSRC), with meetings held biannually offering SRC training and networking opportunities in Chandler, Arizona and the first ever Leadership Training for SRCs and Saturday SRC Training opportunity in Bethesda, Maryland. Participation has also included teleconferences for national NCSRC meetings and monthly NCSRC Steering Committee meetings. The PD continues to offer expertise and technical services through management of the website and list serv as supported by the MRC. The ED also continues to serve on the Advisory Council for the Center on Effective Vocational Rehabilitation Service Delivery Practices Web Site Design Dialogue.

Michigan Rehabilitation Conference: At the November 2011 Conference in Grand Rapids, the Council hosted an exhibit for two days, with MRC Members in attendance. The MRC was presented with an “Exhibitor Excellence Award” for its ongoing support of the Conference through attendance, hosting an exhibit, and facilitating the Customers of MRS Leadership Program. A conference session was hosted by the MRC Executive Director, who presented content about Partnerships.

re:con (formerly known as Michigan Rehabilitation Conference): The MRC Program Director served on the program planning committee for the newly named and redesigned re:con Conference, which will take place in Traverse City in November 2012.

10. Customers of MRS Leadership Program (conference scholarships): The MRC hosted the Customers of MRS Leadership Program, which supported the attendance of 5 Customers of MRS and 2 Mentors, who were previous scholarship recipients, at the annual Michigan Rehabilitation Conference in Grand Rapids.

FISCAL MANAGEMENT:

FY 2012 MRC Budget: The MRC Budget for FY 2012 was approved by the membership and then negotiated with the state agency to ensure financial solvency for the MRC beginning October 1, 2011.

Fiscal Agent: A grant contract between MRS and MARO was renewed for FY 2012 which provided the mechanism for a fiscal agent to serve as the employer of record for MRC staff, along with accounting services for payroll and operational expenses. It is important to note that the outstanding accounting talents of the MARO staff have led to eight clean financial reviews and services provided in a manner which are highly professional, flexible, and provide immediate processing on payables.

CLOSING COMMENTS:

Fiscal Year 2012 has been a time of transition for the MRC and MRS as the enacting of Executive Order 2012-10 (issued June 27th) officially transferred the MRC and MRS to DHS, renamed the MRC to become the ‘Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services’ or MCRS (effective October 1, 2012), and designated the new Council to be the State Rehabilitation Council for both designated state units (DSUs).

As noted earlier, the ET provided guidance and ongoing management to the MRC staff through the end of the fiscal year. To ensure an active SRC, planning for fiscal and operational needs were negotiated with MRS in the summer of 2012. Discussion ensued with MRS with agreement reached that once members were appointed to the MCRS that resource planning would need to be revisited. It was anticipated that negotiations would take place with MCB and MRS to assure that the Council’s budget will support the additional staffing, programming, and operational needs required to meet the mandated requirements in the law.

MRS is to be commended for their efforts to effectively manage their resources, in spite of not being fully matched. The staffing shortages and loss of some agreements which provide match have moved MRS (as an Order of Selection State) precariously close to determining which service categories to close, resulting in a waiting list for customers. The State Rehabilitation Council in Michigan, now known as the Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS) looks forward to future opportunities to partner with MRS as we review, analyze, and advise them for the benefit of the customer experience.

RECOMMENDATIONS – STATE PLAN FY 2014:

The MCRS has confirmed the following recommendations that were presented in the previous fiscal year and believe that these areas of focus should continue. In our role of serving as the “Customer Voice”, one additional recommendation has been made to the Department of Human Services, with regard to the MRS system needs of Michigan’s Citizens with disabilities.

1 – We recommend that MRS publish an annual report on the outcomes of their agreements.

2 – As a result of our previous recommendation related to ‘centralized eligibility’, we acknowledge that MRS has implemented pilots in field offices to determine the policy compliance, statewide consistency and efficiency (bringing quality tools and systems to the process) of eligibility determination. The Council’s primary concern with eligibility was related to what appeared to be the need for enhanced statewide equity in the determination of each customer’s eligibility. We anticipate learning of the findings and subsequent decision making with regard to the incorporation of a statewide model for MRS Customers.

3 - We recommend that MRS offer their OSS Partner Trainings as soon as possible. In addition, we anticipate being included as a member of the work team assigned the task of reviewing MRS financial and service data, so that time sensitive decisions can be made with regard to whether service categories need to be closed.

4 - We urge the Department of Human Services to provide an exception to their current hiring freeze, so that MRS can fill the staff vacancies in the field that are needed assuring that all customers coming through their doors can be served. The current state of MRS resources, though challenging, would greatly benefit from the filling of the 17 vacancies, so that service categories can remain open, thwarting the possibility of closing some or all of these categories which would result in the creation of statewide waiting lists for customers.

MRS RESPONSE:

The past year has been one of turbulence and transition for Michigan Rehabilitation Services and perhaps for the Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS) as well. Throughout the turbulence, the Council has remained strong in its advocacy for individuals with disabilities and in its support for the mission of MRS. The Council has been essential to the strategic and program planning and evaluation of MRS. MCRS’ advocacy, based on direct customer input, has informed and influenced the decision-making of MRS. This combination of collaboration and advocacy, done through a professional working alliance and built over a period of years, has become a national best practice for SRC – DSU cooperation. It has enabled both partners to grow in knowledge regarding challenges, opportunities, and needs faced by each party. The partnership continues to be based on a foundation of respect, trust, and open and timely communication; including effectively resolving differences. Whenever MRS has faced a serious challenge, the MCRS has been eager to assist with problem resolution.

Fiscal Agent: MRS has contracted with MARO for several years to provide the mechanism for a fiscal agent to serve as the employer of record for MCRS staff, along with accounting services for payroll and operational expenses. MARO continues to provide comprehensive and timely monthly financial reports. MRS supports contracting with MARO due to the outstanding accounting talents of the MARO staff that led to eight clean financial reviews and services that were provided in a professional, flexible manner. It is MRS’ plan to contract with MARO in FY 2014.

MRS finds the summary of the MCRS activities to be accurate. The extensive list of activities demonstrates the level of partnership enjoyed by MRS with the Council and the degree of impact the Council has on MRS operation.

MRS’ response to the MCRS recommendation is as follows:

1) MRS agrees with value of transparency including reporting on Inter-agency Cash Transfer of Funds Agreements (ICTA) and Third Party Cooperative Arrangements (TPCA) and the program outcomes for these agreements. MRS is developing the review and reporting process and will provide the Council with a report in the first quarter of FY 2014.

2) MRS agrees with statewide consistency in the determination of each customer’s eligibility and has several activities in place to improve policy compliance and consistency across the state. Training has been provided on a consistent approach to establishing priority categories and eligibility determination; a new case review policy has been developed to improve consistent application of policy; and quality improvement tools are being piloted in districts to improve the efficiency and accuracy of eligibility determination. MCRS will be involved in the evaluation and review of these methods and to assist MRS in implementation of practices which prove to be effective.

3) MRS agrees with the MCRS recommendation related to the Partner Trainings and welcomes Council representation on the MRS work team which will review MRS financial, staffing, and caseload data related to the potential opening or closing of service categories.

4) MRS agrees with the MCRS’ final recommendation relative to the need for adequate staffing to ensure customers have access to the full range of vocational rehabilitation services without waiting for services under the Order of Selection for Services. MCRS has worked with MRS to streamline practices, to improve the timeliness of Orientation to services, and in implementing cost reductions. Providing consultation to MRS on the implementation of an Order of Selection for Services and the closing of categories with subsequent waiting lists is within the requirements of a State Rehabilitation Council and MRS appreciates the proactive stance MCRS takes on such issues. MRS will work with the Council and the Designated State Agency related to the resources needed to keep all priority categories open to the fullest extent possible within federal regulations and will involve MCRS in deliberations if it becomes necessary to close categories due to MRS’ inability to provide the full range of vocational rehabilitation services. Michigan Rehabilitation Services values and appreciates the time and effort the MCRS conscientiously devotes to fulfilling its responsibility under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. We regard the Council as accomplished advocates for MRS customers and look forward to the continued partnership in improving outcomes for customers of MRS.

This screen was last updated on Jun 17 2013 10:34AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

Identification of the Types of Activities to Be Carried out under a Waiver of Statewideness.

Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) will continue to develop and maintain specific targeted agreements with local agencies in fiscal year 2014 to match federal funds and augment state General Fund/General Purpose (GF/GP) funds.

MRS has taken various approaches to educate the Legislature on the impact of MRS’s lack of local and state match needed to fully access available federal funding. MRS has participated on an enhanced partnership team with various partners including the Independent Living (IL) network, the Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS) and MARO Employment and Training Organization, and has developed educational brochures focused on budget and return on investment for the public and Legislature. All these efforts are designed to capture full federal funding and decrease MRS’ reliance on inconsistent local agreements, which require a waiver of statewideness and challenges to equitable service delivery. In 2013-2014 the Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) Marketing Committee will continue working with the Designated State Agency to formulate a plan to educate the Legislature about how MRS provides successful employment outcomes for individuals in their districts as well as how local and state match is needed to fully access available federal funding.

MRS has developed a policy for the development of activities to be carried out under a waiver of statewideness, which is applied when the nonfederal share of the cost of the services is met from funds provided by an interagency cash transfer agreement or as part of a third party cooperative arrangement. This policy is based on Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.26 and 361.28 regulations. The MRS state policy includes the following criteria:

(1) The nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization, or individual;

(2) The goal of the provision of services is to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments or from particular ethnic populations that have traditionally been underserved by the Bureau, and other target populations identified in the Rehabilitation Act (for example, students with disabilities needing transition services);

(3) MRS requests a waiver of statewideness on an annual basis in order to provide services to such target groups as described above.

MRS policy requires each agreement to:

- describe the services to be provided to individuals

- contain written assurances signed by the local public agency that it will make available to MRS the non-federal share of funds

- contain written assurance that MRS approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect

- contain written assurance that the agreement will comply with all State Plan requirements for services approved under the waiver, including the state’s Order of Selection for Services (OSS) requirements

Services under the waiver of statewideness, used to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers, may include any of the following services:

- Assessment for determining eligibility, and determining vocational rehabilitation needs, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

- Vocational rehabilitation counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice;

- Information and referral and other services necessary to assist applicants and eligible individuals to secure needed services from other agencies;

- Vocational and other training services, including personal and vocational adjustment training, books, tools, and other training materials;

- Maintenance;

- Transportation in connection with the rendering of any vocational rehabilitation service;

- Interpreter services, including sign language and oral interpreter services, for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing;

- Job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

- Supported employment services;

- Personal assistance services in accordance with the definition of that term in Sec. 361.5(b)(39);

- Post-employment services;

- Occupational licenses, tools, equipment, initial stocks, and supplies;

- Rehabilitation technology including vehicular modification, telecommunications, sensory, and other technological aids and devices;

- Transition services;

- Services for self-employment or telecommuting or establishing a small business operation as an employment outcome;

- Other goods and services determined necessary for the individual with a disability to achieve an employment outcome.

1. School District Agreements

These Interagency Cash Transfer Agreements and Third Party Cooperative Arrangements* provide coordinated vocational rehabilitation and special education services to eligible youth with disabilities, especially significantly disabled youth, from the intermediate school district (ISD) or with the local school district. Emphasis is placed on students in need of transition service planning. The agreements provide for a variety of rehabilitation services, as needed. Referrals are from local high schools or ISDs.

The following school agreements will continue to be in effect during FY 2014. Based on RSA monitoring findings and subsequent guidance, they were reviewed and modified to meet required standards.

MRS District and Intermediate/Local School District

Ann Arbor, Hillsdale ISD

Ann Arbor, Jackson ISD

Ann Arbor, Lenawee ISD

Ann Arbor, LESA - Special Ed, WSC-Wash, WSC-Liv

Ann Arbor, Washtenaw ISD - Special Ed

Ann Arbor, Washtenaw ISD - Young Adult Pilot

Detroit Renaissance, Detroit Public Schools Summer Youth Transition

Detroit Renaissance, Gross Pointe High Schools

Detroit Renaissance, Wayne County RESA

Eastern Michigan, Genesee ISD

Eastern Michigan, Huron County ISD

Eastern Michigan, Lapeer County ISD

Eastern Michigan, Sanilac County ISD

Eastern Michigan, St. Clair RESA

Eastern Michigan, Tuscola County ISD -- SCL

Grand Rapids, Ionia ISD

Grand Rapids, Kent ISD Transitions

Lansing, Clinton County RESA

Lansing, Eaton ISD

*Lansing, Eaton ISD

Lansing, Ingham County ISD

*Lansing, Ingham ISD

Lansing, Shiawassee RESD

Macomb, Armada Schools

Macomb, Center Line High Schools

Macomb, Chippewa Valley Schools

Macomb, Clintondale Schools

Macomb, Compass Point Learning Center

Macomb, Fraser Schools

Macomb, L’anse Creuse Schools

*Macomb, MISD

*Macomb, MISD/Lutz

Macomb, MISD/Lutz School for Transition

Macomb, Mt. Clemens Schools

Macomb, New Haven Schools

Macomb, Richmond

Macomb, Romeo Schools

Macomb, Roseville High School

Macomb, Warren Consolidated Schools

Marquette, Consolidated Community Schools Services

Marquette, Delta-Schoolcraft ISD

Marquette, Dickinson-Iron Intermediate School District

Marquette, Eastern UP ISD

Marquette, Gogebic-Ontonagon ISD

Marquette, Marquette-Alger ISD

Marquette, Menominee ISD

*MCTI, Delton Kellogg Schools

MCTI, Delton Kellogg Schools

MCTI, Barry County ISD

Mid-Michigan, Bay-Arenac ISD

Mid-Michigan, Farwell Schools

Mid-Michigan, Midland ESA

Mid-Michigan, Saginaw ISD

*Mid-Michigan, Saginaw ISD

Northern Michigan, Cheboygan Schools

Northern Michigan, ESD-AMA

Northern Michigan, ESD-COP

Northern Michigan, Gaylord Schools

Northern Michigan, ISD Charlevoix - Emmet

Northern Michigan, ISD COOR

Northern Michigan, ISD Wexford - Missaukee

Northern Michigan, ISD-TBA Special Education

Northern Michigan, ISD-TBA Vocational Education

Northern Michigan, Manistee ISD

Northern Michigan, RESA Iosco

Oakland, Berkley Schools

Oakland, Bloomfield Hills Schools

Oakland, Bloomfield Hills Schools--Deaf Program

Oakland, Holly Schools

Oakland, Oakland Schools ISD

*Oakland, Oakland ISD

Oakland, Rochester Schools

Oakland, Southfield Schools

Southwest Michigan, Barry ISD

Southwest Michigan, Berrien ESA

*Southwest Michigan, Berrien RESA

Southwest Michigan, Branch ISD

Southwest Michigan, Branch ISD-SCI

Southwest Michigan, Calhoun ISD

Southwest Michigan, KRESA

Southwest Michigan, Lewis Cass ISD

Southwest Michigan, St. Joe ISD

Southwest Michigan, Van Buren ISD

Wayne, Crestwood High School

Wayne, Dearborn Public Schools

Wayne, Monroe Internship

Wayne, Monroe ISD

Wayne, Plymouth Canton High Schools

Wayne, WRESA

West Central, Allegan CO ISD

West Central, Baldwin Community Schools

West Central, City of Holland

West Central, Montcalm ISD

West Central, Muskegon ISD

West Central, Newaygo ISD

West Central, Ottawa Co. ISD

West Central, West Shore Educational Service District

The following school agreement(s) are new for FY 2014.

MRS District and Intermediate/Local School District

West Central, Mecosta ISD

2. Community Mental Health Agreements

These joint rehabilitation and mental health programs operate under an umbrella agreement with separate local contracts. The umbrella agreement is between the Michigan Rehabilitation Services and Department of Community Health. The purpose of the umbrella agreement is to permit MRS district offices and local community mental health centers to (a) provide for the continuance of cooperative programs; (b) expand current program activities; and/or (c) respond to rehabilitation needs of individuals with mental illness and developmental disabilities in communities where integrative programs are limited or do not exist.

The individual local agreements are for funds and services between MRS district offices and community mental health (CMH) boards or centers. Customers must be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services.

The CMH boards provide state and local matching funds, coordination, diagnostic and clinical information, and therapy. MRS assigns needed staff and provides the full range of rehabilitation services according to customer needs.

The following CMH agreements will continue to be in effect during FY 2014. Based on monitoring findings by RSA, they were reviewed and modified to meet required standards. Included in these agreements are Third Party Cooperative Arrangements*.

MRS District and Community Mental Health Agency

Ann Arbor, Genesis House - Livingston CMH

Ann Arbor, Jackson Lifeways (CMH)

Ann Arbor, Livingston CMH

Ann Arbor, Washtenaw CMH

Ann Arbor, Washtenaw CMH – Fresh Start

Detroit Renaissance, Wayne County CMH Agency

Eastern Michigan, Genesee CMH

Eastern Michigan, Lapeer County CMH

Eastern Michigan, Sanilac Community Mental Health

Eastern Michigan, St. Clair County CMH

Lansing, Clinton-Eaton-Ingham CMH (DD)

Lansing, Clinton-Eaton-Ingham CMH (MI)

Lansing, Shiawassee CMH

Macomb, Community Mental Health

*Macomb, Macomb CMH

Marquette, Copper Co. CMH

Marquette, Dickinson-Iron CMH/Northpointe Beh. Healthcare

Marquette, Gogebic Co. CMH

Marquette, Hiawatha Behav. Health (Schcrft-East UP CMH)

Marquette, Pathways (Alger, Delta, Luce & Mqt. Co.)

Mid-Michigan, Bay-Arenac CMH

Mid-Michigan, Central Michigan CMH

Mid-Michigan, Gratiot CMH

Mid-Michigan, Saginaw CMH

Northern Michigan, CMH AuSable Valley

Northern Michigan, CMH Manistee-Benzie

Northern Michigan, CMH North Country

Northern Michigan, CMH Northeast

Oakland, Oakland County CMH Authority

Southwest Michigan, Barry County CMH

Southwest Michigan, Berrien CMH - Riverwood

Southwest Michigan, Branch CMH

Southwest Michigan, Calhoun County CMH

Southwest Michigan, Cass CMH Woodlands

Southwest Michigan, Kal CMH SA

Southwest Michigan, Kal CMH/SAS

Southwest Michigan, St. Joe CMH

Southwest Michigan, Van Buren CMH

West Central, Allegan County CMH

West Central, Ottawa Co. CMH

The following CMH agreement(s) are new for FY 2014.

MRS District and Community Mental Health Agency

West Central, Muskegon CMH

West Central, CMH for Central Michigan

3. Multi-entity Interagency Cash Transfer Agreements

These agreements represent collaborative programming between MRS, CMH, and ISDs. The purpose of these types of agreements is to promote efficient coordination of comprehensive services necessary for youth with developmental and mental/emotional disabilities to achieve vocational/career preparation while in high school and more efficiently transition into suitable employment following education. The collaboration of these three entities promotes more cost-effective use of limited funds to serve more individuals from a targeted population (school youth). Referrals are made from either local CMH or ISD.

The following Interagency Cash Transfer Agreements will continue to be in effect during FY 2014 and are renewed annually.

MRS District and Agency

Marquette, Copper Country ISD (CCISD-CMH)

Southwest Michigan, Calhoun ISD & CMH

West Central, Mecosta ISD/CMH

West Central, Muskegon CMH/ISD

West Central, Ottawa CMH/ISD

4. Other Agreements

Rehabilitation program agreements have been jointly developed with county departments of the Department of Human Services (DHS) and other agencies to expand the delivery of rehabilitation services to special populations who meet MRS eligibility requirements (for example American Indians, welfare recipients, etc.).

MRS District and Agency

Ann Arbor, Lenawee DHS

Ann Arbor, U of M Work Connections

Ann Arbor, Washtenaw-Livingston County Sub Abuse

Eastern Michigan, Mott Community College

Grand Rapids, Network 180

Grand Rapids, Network 180 Pinerest

Grand Rapids, Network 180 Substance Abuse

Grand Rapids, GVSU

Lansing, Ingham County

Lansing, Mid-South Substance Abuse Commission

Lansing, Delhi Township

Macomb, Macomb Academy

Macomb, Macomb Community College

Macomb, Macomb County Office of Substance Abuse

Marquette, Bay Mills Indian Community

Marquette, Hannahville Indian Community

Northern Michigan, NMD COG

Northern Michigan, Northern Michigan Substance Abuse Services, Inc.

Oakland, Oakland Community College - BOLD

Southwest Michigan, Berrien Human DHS

Southwest Michigan, Berrien MPRI

Southwest Michigan, HIRE

Southwest Michigan, Pokagon Band

Southwest Michigan, Youth Build (MI Works)

Southwest Michigan, YWORK

Wayne, Schoolcraft College LAC

West Central, City of Holland

West Central, Muskegon Community College/West Shore CC

The following rehabilitation program agreement(s) are new for FY 2014.

MRS District and Agency

Ann Arbor, Saline/Milan Area Schools

Detroit Renaissance, Behavior Health Professionals, Inc.

Program Innovation, Michigan State University

Program Innovation, Eastern Michigan University

Southwest Michigan, VanBuren-Cass County Health Dept.

This screen was last updated on Sep 6 2013 4:06PM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) cooperates with federal, state, and local public agencies that are not a part of the statewide workforce investment system to provide comprehensive services related to the rehabilitation of individuals and groups of individuals with disabilities.

Such cooperative relationships include the following:

A) A cooperative agreement with the state entity responsible for the Medicaid program, the Medical Services Administration, to coordinate the utilization of Medicaid and vocational rehabilitation (VR) services for individuals who are eligible for both Medicaid and MRS services. This agreement includes roles and responsibilities of each party for the provision and funding of services, reciprocal referral procedures, methods for resolving disputes, and reimbursement arrangements.

B) Cooperation with Michigan Department of Community Health, and other disability advocacy organizations to carry out the Ticket To Work/Work Incentives Improvement Act (TTWWIIA).

C) Cooperation with Social Security Administration (SSA) regional and local district offices to establish and improve the use of work incentives for Social Security disability recipients returning to work. Each MRS office has a dedicated Champion to address special needs of SSA recipients. As a result of the loss of the SSA Work Incentive Planning and Assistance (WIPAs), Work Incentives Liaisons (WILs) are the only option in place at local SSA offices to provide benefits planning. Availability to serve MRS customers is limited. As such, the MRS Champions also collaborate with fee for service vendors to provide comprehensive benefits planning to assure accurate information for SSA customers entering the workforce. MRS has a formal agreement with SSA to act as an Employment Network under the Ticket-to-Work program. MRS will continue to explore further opportunities to collaborate in the delivery of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals who have a “Ticket-to-Work” from SSA.

D) MRS continues a collaborative agreement with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Rural Development that promotes enhanced employment and housing opportunities for persons in rural areas. MRS remains available to conduct disability awareness training and accessibility site reviews for Rural Development facilities in Michigan to facilitate the participation of individuals with disabilities in USDA services. MRS also receives notice of employment opportunities from USDA.

E) MRS continues involvement in State use (Set Aside) contracting programs to support employment of persons with disabilities. An MRS representative is a participant on the State’s disability set-aside committee to ensure that Community Rehabilitation Programs identified by MRS are given priority in certain types of contracts set aside for such organizations under State law.

F) MRS has a Letter of Agreement that establishes the principles, terms, and conditions under which the United States Department of Labor-Employment and Training Administration, Apprenticeship Training, and Employer & Labor Services develop, promote and coordinate strategies that lead to increased career opportunities for individuals with disabilities in the skilled trades.

G) MRS continues two contracts for university-based research and evaluation. The first addresses the Bureau’s need for comprehensive needs assessments and continuous improvement measures. The second is for the management and continuous improvement to an on-line learning and knowledge system (“E-Learn”) to provide staff with training and development.

H) MRS maintains an agreement with the Michigan Student Financial Aid Association to facilitate maximum use of student financial aid resources for MRS customers who will attend post-secondary education. The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) describes the roles and responsibilities of financial aid officers in Michigan’s institutions of higher education and MRS counselors in coordinating student financial aid for MRS customers while avoiding financial aid over-awards. It provides for the use of common forms in communicating financial need and financial aid awards offered to student-customers by each of the parties, consistent with the requirements of the Higher Education Act and the Rehabilitation Act.

I) MRS continues the memoranda of understanding (MOU) with all public institutions of higher education (IHE) in the State. This MOU provides for the coordination of services for students of a public IHE who are also eligible customers of MRS. It addresses the responsibilities of each party under the laws that condition services for each. It stipulates that MRS is responsible for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the Section 103 (a) of the Rehabilitation Act as amended, and that the IHE is responsible for the determination of what constitutes reasonable accommodation to its programs, and for the provision of the same. The agreement addresses financial responsibilities of the parties, and sets forth methods of resolving interagency disputes, consistent with the requirements of Section 101(a)(8) of the Act.

J) MRS continues the agreement with the Veterans Administration to provide coordinated services to returning veterans with disabilities. The agreement stipulates that services not be duplicated, but are complimentary in assisting eligible veterans achieve meaningful employment, in accordance with the laws and regulations governing each entity. Bureau liaisons are identified to assist in coordinating cooperative employment plans. Cross training has been provided to ensure understanding of both federal programs.

K) MRS continues the agreement with The Michigan Department of Education/Office of Special Education, to support the seamless transition of students from school to adult life that facilitates the development and completion of their Individualized Education Program (IEP) under section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The agreement addresses key items identified in IDEA and the Rehabilitation Act and includes information about the purpose, the authority and scope, foundations of the partnership, roles and responsibilities, confidentiality, student documentation, student eligibility, MRS attendance at IEP team meetings, seamless transition services, coordination of resources, resolution of differences, data reporting, 504 students and termination and changes.

L) MRS has a Strategic Alliance Plan with Disability Network of Michigan (representing Centers for Independent Living), the Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS), and the Michigan Statewide Independent Living Council to transform our service delivery systems into a holistic approach for the employment and independence of individuals with disabilities throughout Michigan.

M) MRS continues the agreement with the Department of Community Health and the Bureau of Services for Blind Services (BSBP) to coordinate and improve services to customers with cognitive impairments and mental illness, including those requiring supported employment.

N) MRS continues the MOU with the Hannahville Indian Community Vocational Rehabilitation Program’s Project Vision. The Project Visions and MRS MOU provide rehabilitation services under section 121 of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act, of 1973 as amended, and Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, respectively. This MOU represents the cooperation, coordination, and collaboration necessary to create an effective service delivery partnership designed to increase employment opportunities for those served by both our programs. MRS expects to continue to collaborate with the Consortia of Administrators for Native American Rehabilitation (CANAR) to promote this MOU as a best practice.

This screen was last updated on Jun 17 2013 8:52AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) will continue to collaborate with education officials to provide a coordinated set of activities to facilitate a seamless transition of students with disabilities from school to work or postsecondary training and education.

On November 1, 2011, Michigan Department of Education/Office of Special Education (MDE/OSE) and MRS Interagency Agreement was updated and signed. This agreement states the relationship between MRS and MDE/OSE in the provision of a continuum of coordinated education and vocational rehabilitation services that prepare youth with disabilities for a seamless transition from secondary education into employment. The agreement focuses on the mandates for transition services described in the Rehabilitation Act, as amended in 1998 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA 2004) including how MRS and MDE/OSE work together to fulfill those mandates. Key elements of the partnership are stated in the agreement and include: the purpose, authority and scope; foundations of the partnership; roles and responsibilities; confidentiality; student documentation; student eligibility; MRS attendance at Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team meetings; seamless transition services; coordination of resources; resolution of differences; data reporting; 504 students; and termination and changes. The MDE/OSE and MRS Interagency Agreement is designed to act as a template or guide for the subsequent development or strengthening of agreements between local MRS district offices and local education agencies (LEAs). Local interagency agreements specify target populations; identify goals and objectives; describe roles and responsibilities and state expectations for data sharing in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to transition youth.

MRS is implementing a research project called, Michigan Transition for the 21st Century Project (MT-21). MT-21 will identify, document and disseminate promising and effective transition practices throughout Michigan. The primary emphasis will be to build a systemic, working base of knowledge and promising practices that will be utilized to create job aids, influence policy, identify programs or initiatives to promote increased employment outcomes. MRS staff are working with Michigan State University Project Excellence to implement this project. MRS has implemented new definitions for Transition Youth and Young Adult customers as a result of extensive data analysis and other findings carried out during the project’s initial discovery phase. Presently and for the remainder of this year, the MT-21 project is in the data collection phase. The next phase will be decimating findings to MRS staff as well as education partners and to make changes to systemically reinforce effect practices.

MRS develops the student’s Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) at the earliest possible time during the transition planning process that MRS services are appropriate. Through early involvement and coordination of student transition activities with education, MRS is able to develop student Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs) prior to the students exit from secondary education.

A) Consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including vocational rehabilitation (VR) services.

The Department of Education is engaging in a continuous improvement process designed to obtain input from stakeholders in the targeted area of transition and has sought participation and input from MRS. In turn, MRS has assigned staff to provide technical assistance and consultation at the state level on two groups: the Michigan Transition Outcomes Project (MI TOP) and the Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC).

MI TOP is led by a diverse group of transition professionals comprised of state and local leadership from education, families and community agencies and develops and supports the implementation of policy and practice that improves the quality and effectiveness of Transition services across the state for students with disabilities. Priority activities include implementing researched-based transition practices; improving outcomes data collection for the state performance plan indicators and planning for improvement; monitoring state data on graduation rates, dropout rates and post-school outcomes; and addressing the impact of the new Michigan Merit Curriculum (MMC) and the Personal Curriculum option on students with disabilities.

The Special Education Advisory Committee (SEAC) is a mandated advisory council that consists of 25 governor appointed delegates representing 25 organizations and 8 at-large appointments. A MRS representative participates in this group as an ex-officio member providing regular updates regarding the bureau.

B) Transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs.

School personnel work closely with MRS counselors to ensure the development and completion of IEPs. Transition planning occurs between the student/family/guardian, education staff and MRS staff that enhances the development of IEPs. MRS staff do not complete the IEP; the IEP Team, which includes education staff, completes the IEP. The MDE/OSE and MRS Interagency Agreement as well as local interagency agreements encourage the participation of MRS staff in the IEP process. School staff are required by IDEA 2004 to invite rehabilitation counselors to participate in IEP meetings if they anticipate that MRS is likely to provide or pay for vocational rehabilitation services for a student to obtain or maintain employment. Schools are required to obtain parental consent or consent from the student if they are 18 or older and their own guardian (as applicable), to allow an agency representative to attend the student’s IEP team meeting. This legislation has led to improved MRS attendance at IEPs.

C) Roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services.

Training and technical assistance regarding the role, function and requirements of the vocational rehabilitation program in coordinating transition services with schools is an ongoing process. The MDE/OSE and MRS Interagency Agreement clarifies the roles and responsibilities of each party including that parties will convene annually to assess, review, address and facilitate progress and resolution of concerns relating to the terms of the Interagency Agreement; assign staff to be responsible for implementing the Interagency Agreement; establish structures and mechanisms for communication, coordination and collaboration between statewide, regional, and local participating agencies; advocate for the rights and interests of students with disabilities in all education, human service, and workforce reform initiatives implemented at the state level including access into Career and Vocational Technical Education programs and Michigan Works! and outreach to any underserved populations; and support systems for collection and use of meaningful data that include demographics, service delivery patterns, and outcomes resulting from the provision of services and support.

Meeting the individual needs of youth dually eligible for special education services and MRS services requires resource sharing and coordination. This will drive alignment of local policies, programs, and practices which support a seamless transition system. MDE/OSE and MRS agree that quality student-centered planning requires shared responsibility and coordination of resources. When MRS resource sharing options are utilized, they are not to be used to replace services that are the responsibility of MDE/OSE as directed by the IDEA. Personnel and financial resources are shared among MRS and LEAs to address the transition employment needs of youth with disabilities under three defined options:

Transfer of Funds (Cash Match) Agreements - Established using non-federal local dollars as contribution for the purpose of capturing additional federal vocational rehabilitation funds to expand and enhance vocational rehabilitation services to students with disabilities. These agreements must include assurances required by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services and the Rehabilitation Services Administration;

Third Party Cooperative Staffing Arrangements (Certified Expenditures) -Agreements which entail the use of cooperating agency staff provided by the partner as a contribution to MRS. The partner documents that specific expenditures have been incurred, such as wages for cooperating agency staff or supplies and MRS uses that value for match. The vocational rehabilitation services provided by this arrangement must not be the statutory obligation of the partner; and

Donations and Gifts - Contributions received by MRS from private individuals or organizations. These funds are used by MRS for cost sharing or matching. Donations and gifts cannot use in-kind contributions as an allowable source of matching funds and carry certain stipulations regarding conditions for use.

Student transition services are sometimes provided by LEAs, sometimes jointly funded, and sometimes funded by MRS. Local agreements between LEAs and MRS often involve identifying specific funds for local vocational rehabilitation services to specific students. Agreements between LEAs and local MRS districts may specify target students, goals and objectives, and data sharing activities. Efforts are being made by MRS to improve the quality, consistency and clarity of these agreements and to better articulate the return on investment to educational partners. The ISD/LEA provides services as required under IDEA and MRS provides services to eligible student as required for the student to participate in the rehabilitation process and services specified in their IPE.

MRS and the educational agency will continue to provide statewide training to promote the legal mandates for transition services. This training will include key stakeholders both as trainers and as learners and will also be conducted at independent statewide conferences and at MRS sponsored workshops designed to meet the training needs of MRS rehabilitation counselors.

Partnerships at the state level between MDE/OSE and MRS are critical. In addition to the Interagency Agreement, MDE/OSE provides grant funding to Intermediate School Districts (ISDs) to support transition activities, and it is anticipated that this funding will continue. MI TOP is funded through MDE/OSE and works with community partners, including MRS, to build capacity at the community level. Data is collected as required by the U.S. Department of Education - Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) and is part of the State Performance Plan (SPP) and the Annual Performance Report (APR) that is reported back to OSEP. Results are compiled and used to improve transition provisions in Michigan.

Both LEAs and MRS will continue to establish strong relationships with employers to support the employment of individuals with disabilities. The Career Preparation system links not only schools, MRS and workforce investment agencies, but also routinely includes employers in the planning and implementation of the Career Preparation system.

MRS continues to create partnerships, resources and capacity to support the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in postsecondary training when appropriate for students. An innovative model to support joint customers of MRS and Michigan State University (MSU) is being developed to increase postsecondary employment outcomes for students with disabilities.

D) Procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

While special education and 504 students are still connected to secondary education they are given information about MRS through a variety of ways such as, informational meetings, one-on-one meetings and the IEP process. MRS coordinates with school personnel to identify students that meet the MRS eligibility criteria. After students are determi

This screen was last updated on Sep 5 2013 11:33AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

In establishing cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational services providers, the State Unit, consistent with 34 CFR 361.31, 361.32 and 361.51 requires accessibility of facilities, personnel standards, and the prevention of fraud, waste and abuse.

Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) continues to establish relationships with private non-profit and for profit entities that are community rehabilitation providers, medical services providers, and providers of other services and supports that are required by MRS customers to achieve the goals in their Individualized Plans for Employment. MRS district staff develops relationships in the community to meet the needs of their customers and to provide choice of providers to their customers. Any cooperative agreements MRS establishes with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers will take into consideration the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA).

Services provided by the community rehabilitation providers include medical and psychological assessments and services, job development and employer services, job coaching and facilitation, accommodations and ergonomics, independent living services to support employment goals, follow up services, and other services especially for individuals with significant disabilities. The agreements vary from information and referral relationships to fee-for-service relationships.

MRS follows State of Michigan contractual processes when establishing cooperative agreements. Usual, customary and reasonable rates of payment are applied.

This screen was last updated on Jun 17 2013 8:53AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

In 2009 the Bureau of Services for Blind Persons (BSBP), the Michigan Department of Community Heath (MDCH) and Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) entered into a state level interagency agreement for the purpose of endorsing and promoting competitive integrated employment of people with disabilities, served jointly by vocational rehabilitation (BSBP or MRS) and MDCH. The agreement states guiding principles and goals and objectives that include: jointly define integrated setting and develop key data indicators that can be utilized by all parties; manage referrals for employment related services by reviewing the referral process and determining improvements to the referral process to increase effectiveness; increase employment outcomes (quantity and quality) for persons served jointly by the parties; and .improve interagency collaboration by the local units of the three parties.

In 2010 BSBP/MDCH/MRS entered into a Data Sharing Agreement to measure progress of the goals and objectives of the BSBP/MDCH/MRS Interagency Agreement by sharing data. Obtaining current and accurate data has been a challenge. BSBP, MDCH and MRS continue to work on methods to collect reliable employment outcome data.

To implement the BSBP/MDCH/MRS Interagency Agreement a Joint Operation Team (JOT) meets monthly. The JOT is in the process of summarizing accomplishments since the implementation of the agreement and making recommendations for the future. In addition, the JOT has created a Supported employment Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document that will be distributed to field staff.

In 1998, the MDCH and MRS jointly issued a set of guidelines for the provision of supported employment services. In brief, the agreement stipulates that MRS is responsible for time limited supported employment services, and community mental health providers are responsible for extended supported employment services. The policies and collaboration were reconfirmed in FY 2000 to staff and providers. Guidelines were jointly developed and distributed to assist communities in the development and expansion of supported employment services.

Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) has maintained a long-standing relationship with the MDCH for the provision of extended follow-along services for individuals with the most significant disabilities. The relationship includes persons with developmental disabilities and mental illness and is operationalized at local levels through the implementation of specific local partnership agreements between Community Mental Health Service Providers (CMHSPs), Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) and may also include community rehabilitation organizations and local school districts. These agreements often include funds from CMHSP to MRS which allow MRS to capture federal funds which are used to provide supported employment services to the specific population served by the CMHSP. These agreements include goals and objectives, roles and responsibilities often including expectations about extended services.

With the move by the DCH to managed care contracts with local community mental health boards, there has been substantial change in the funding structure and eligibility criteria for mental health consumers. Agreements between local Community Mental Health and MRS district offices have had to adapt which have had the effect of shifting some of the costs for supported employment from local mental health entities to MRS. MRS continues to address these changes by engaging local mental health entities in dialogue, in order to stop a decline in supported employment extended support services for customers with most significant disabilities.

MRS continues to be a “signatory” on the Michigan Department of Community Health Medicaid Infrastructure Grant with the expressed goals of: increasing the number of people with disabilities who are working in Michigan; improving competitive employment for persons with disabilities; and addressing systemic barriers to employment for persons with disabilities.

This screen was last updated on Jun 17 2013 10:38AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

Replacement of vacancies have been prioritized through the use of a resource allocation model, which calculates the number of work aged individuals with disabilities estimated to be in a given area and assigns staff accordingly. Consideration is then given to Bureau need. The Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) Executive Team regularly reviews caseload size and other triggers to target filling open counselor positions. MRS prioritizes filling counseling positions over other vacancies, whenever possible. Recently, MRS reduced its staff FTE count by 20 positions due to budget constraints.

The following table illustrates the number of anticipated vacancies for the period of FY 2012 through 2017. MRS has had 60 staff departures since 10/01/2012, including 24 rehabilitation counselors. This includes retirements, transfers, resignations, medical layoffs and reduction in force. The last rehabilitation counselor was hired on 7/23/2012. It is impossible to predict the turnover rate as no new staff have been hired since that time, and MRS is unsure about when that will change. The ratio of counselors to customers is 1:100 (this number was achieved by dividing the number of open cases [23,782] in 2012 by the total number of counselors [236]). The staff ratio of 1 counselor to 101 customers is anticipated in FY 2013-2014, if there is no State government reduction-in-force initiative, and MRS is able to hire the expected number of new counselors in FY 2013-2014. A ratio of 1 counselor to 115 customers in any district could result in the implementation of a waiting list for services.

*Rehabilitation Coordinators are bachelor-level counselors who are targeted in the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) plan to attain their master’s degrees. If MRS combines the counselors, coordinators and site managers, then MRS has 295 potential case carrying staff.

Current/Projected Vacancies FY 2013-14 Table

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Rehabilitation Coordinators* 1 0 0
2 Rehabilitation Counselors (masters degree) 265 14 100
3 Rehab Educators (voc. tech. center instructors) 29 0 8
4 Site mgrs -- may carry a caseload (masters deg.) 29 9 15
5 0 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

MRS is committed to employing staff with CSPD qualifications. When MRS recognized that the current pool of candidates from Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) rehabilitation counseling programs was insufficient to meet the need for new counselors, the following were established:

• An excellent relationship with CORE rehabilitation programs and general counseling programs to offer internship placements to their students where feasible.

• A statewide recruitment program for outreach to students in both general counseling and rehabilitation counseling programs. Recruitment materials include a DVD, information packet and talking points for presenters.

• A process to hire candidates with alternative human services degrees (such as Social Work or Special Education) who are lacking one or two classes needed for the rehabilitation counselor designation and to assist in payment for classes to fulfill these qualifications.

• An extensive training program for new counselors to develop and maintain the highest standards. Topics include: MRS policy, casework practices, specific disabilities, job development and motivational interviewing.

Despite MRS’ considerable effort to recruit, employ, and retain qualified rehabilitation counselors, the current pay and benefits for staff has fallen behind that of community colleges, Veterans Administration and other state Vocational Rehabilitation programs, and some positions in public school systems. Partially due to our extensive training of staff, MRS counselors are prime candidates for openings in other organizations. This has resulted in the steady attrition of counseling staff.

The following table documents the current enrollment at the three CORE accredited rehabilitation counseling programs in Michigan in FY 2012-2013, the most current information available.

Table Two: Enrollment from CORE Accredited Rehabilitation Counseling Programs

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Western Michigan University 20 13 1 1
2 Michigan State University 31 2 5 12
3 Wayne State University 99 0 0 14
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

MRS, in collaboration with Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS), values, embraces and cultivates a culture of diversity and inclusion, including personnel from minority backgrounds and persons who are individuals with disabilities. MRS recruitment and marketing materials honor these values. While the state of Michigan does not collect disability data on individuals in our employ, an informal survey of MRS employees from April 2011, from which more than half of the staff responded, reflects that 36.4% of MRS civil servants considered themselves to be persons with a disability.

The following recruitment and retention activities are ongoing:

Assess and monitor the enrollment at the higher education institutions within the State with an emphasis on the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) funded master’s programs.

Facilitate the visibility of the State Unit at the institutions of higher education by:

• Convening regular meetings with the CORE universities’ faculty members for joint planning and recruitment.

• Allowing MRS personnel to serve on university curriculum committees and as adjunct faculty and guest lecturers.

• Continuing to be the most utilized placement and intern sites by the institutions of higher education; all employment opportunities with MRS are posted on the Internet.

• Until the beginning of FY 2013, MRS had maintained paid internship opportunities for students in the rehabilitation counseling programs, particularly students with disabilities and of minority backgrounds. That program was terminated due to budget constraints.

The recruitment team will maintain consistent and statewide recruitment activities by:

• Continuing to use an integrated recruitment packet including PowerPoint presentation and a facilitator’s guide. Specially trained field office personnel present these materials to potential candidates in a variety of educational programs and partner organizations. The recruitment packet describes employment opportunities and benefits of working for MRS and of residing in Michigan.

• Continuing to encourage MRS counselors to explore employment in rehabilitation counseling with customers.

• Distributing recruitment brochures to attendees at the National Conference of Rehabilitation Educators, Michigan Rehabilitation Conference, the Multicultural Rehabilitation Concerns Division of the National Rehabilitation Association, and other appropriate events.

Focus will continue on retention and engagement of qualified staff through various activities including:

• Encourage staff involvement in professional and disability advocacy associations and their respective conferences to foster networking, professionalism, and leadership development.

• Utilizing a statewide employee engagement survey to assess the overall culture of the work environment at MRS; i.e., workplace attitudes, reactions, activities and mindsets. Continue a program to enhance the MRS district office culture and improve customer service. At this time, 50 percent of our district offices have engaged in this process. As a result, employees are reporting improved teamwork, better inter-office relationships, and more positive customer feedback. This project has several phases and will be offered statewide.

• Investing in staff growth and development by providing training opportunities through various teaching modalities.

• Engaging all counseling staff and managers in extensive Motivational Interviewing training, which has been shown to improve staff satisfaction as well as customer outcomes in other state VR programs. MRS is currently receiving a Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) Quality Award for Motivational Interviewing and job placement.

• Offering structured management and leadership development activities to all staff as part of succession planning.

LEADERSHIP AND CAPACITY BUILDING

MRS continues leadership and capacity building through the following major endeavors:

• In the past, the MRS annual School for Leadership has engaged 35 diverse MRS staff members from all levels of the organization, in a broad range of leadership development activities over a 12 month period. Due to budget constraints, it has not yet been held in FY 2013 and is likely to be modified. A series of training programs are offered for newly promoted managers.

• All managers are encouraged to participate in leadership training offered by MRS and Civil Service, using resources from Region V Technical Assistance & Continuing Education (TACE) Center whenever possible.

• MRS staff can attend statewide conferences related to the rehabilitation profession. Subject experts present sessions on a variety of rehabilitation topics which develops staff skills. Staff have the opportunity to facilitate and provide content for sessions. Conferences offered include the Michigan Rehabilitation Conference, MARO Employment and Training Spring Management Conference, Michigan Transition Conference, Michigan Conference of Rehabilitation Educators, the Multicultural Rehabilitation Concerns Division of the National Rehabilitation Association, and other appropriate events. Attending sessions presented by experts in the rehabilitation field develops staff skills.

SUCCESSION PLANNING (Strategic Workforce Development)

The purpose of succession planning efforts by MRS is to preserve the integrity and sustain the viability of public vocational rehabilitation, which results in quality customer services and outcomes. Succession planning is integrated into all staff development, CSPD and retention strategies. MRS is:

• Expanding current succession planning strategies and building a comprehensive approach that ranges from onboarding new staff. Onboarding is defined as a process of getting new employees oriented, integrated and delivering results as efficiently, effectively and energetically as possible. It goes beyond the typical employee orientation and involves helping new hires become fully acclimated to an organization’s values, mission and culture.

• Implementing a counselor training academy.

• Minimizing program disruptions due to staff departures and reassignments through cross training.

• Continuing fair and equitable practices in selection.

• Promoting diversity in staff, ideas and approaches.

• Encouraging personal responsibility of all staff to access and participate in developmental opportunities.

• Collecting and analyzing data regarding potential retirements, key positions and skills.

• Developing training (department, bureau, Civil Service, etc.) to address the specific succession planning needs identified.

• Using cross-functional bureau teamwork to offer expanded opportunities.

• Properly employing back-ups when managers are away from the office.

• Recruiting statewide work team members to involve more diverse participation from MRS.

• Committing to provide individualized coaching and job shadowing to staff interested in preparing for future promotional opportunities.

• The centralization of MRS staff to the Designated State Agency (DSA) has created unique challenges for succession planning. MRS will be working with the DSA to develop new models of collaborative planning.

 

Civil Service, through MRS, has established the following standards for a qualified rehabilitation counselor or vocational technical teacher:

• A qualified rehabilitation counselor is defined as a counselor with a minimum of a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling, counseling, or a counseling related field such as psychology, social work, or special education. Newly employed counselors with a master’s degree in counseling or a counseling related field who do not have documented graduate level coursework with a primary focus in theories and techniques of counseling must complete such coursework/training during their 12 month probationary period. The above courses must be provided by an accredited University (through on-line or classroom training). The cost is covered by MRS. MRS standards remain consistent with national standards for rehabilitation counselors and have been approved by RSA and Michigan Civil Service. MRS will continue to monitor licensure and certification trends in other state VR agencies.

To assure that qualified staff are hired or current staff attain required qualifications, MRS has taken the following steps for staff who need additional coursework:

1) Implemented a comprehensive system for tracking and funding the required course, Theories and Techniques of Counseling.

2) Provided funding for existing staff seeking to take needed coursework to attain the level of qualified counselor. Although the RSA long-term training grant is no longer available, in-service training dollars continue to support staff to meet CSPD standards.

3) Provided ongoing training to all district managers and site managers on appropriate hiring procedures.

MRS counselors currently meet all CSPD standards.

The CSPD project begun in 1999 has ended, and staff have either gotten degrees, retired, or have decided to remain at a coordinator level, with manager completing all core activities.

Newly employed counselors with a master’s degree in counseling or a counseling related field who do not have documented graduate-level coursework with a primary focus in theories and techniques of counseling must complete such coursework/training during their 12-month probationary period through an accredited University (on-line or classroom training) to remain employed.

• A vocational technical teacher or instructor employed by MRS at Michigan Career and Technical Institute (MCTI) must demonstrate they are qualified in their respective field by having the appropriate educational degree or work experience, teaching methodology course work or seminar as required by Civil Service and the state technical school’s accrediting agencies. Also, such teachers must attend, at least every five years, an in-service training program on disability sensitivity, informed choice and acquisition of needed reasonable accommodations or modifications.

 

MRS staff development unit consultants are rehabilitation professionals qualified to analyze, design, develop, implement and evaluate Title I training activities which meet the needs of the MRS workforce, CSPD standards, and Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) standards.

MRS receives federal long-term training grant funds which are supplemented with the Title I budget. As part of an overall effort to respond to a budget shortfall, Title I funds dedicated to training has been reduced by more than $100,000 in FY 2013. With dwindling resources, MRS has had to re-prioritize training activities.

According to the state of Michigan’s Civil Service Strategic Plan, the state of Michigan has continued its commitment to having a well-trained and effective workforce in state government.

A systemic approach to staff development has been established by MRS to:

• Analyze needs of professional and paraprofessional staff, particularly with respect to core competencies through a comprehensive training needs assessment

• Develop materials that appeal to a variety of learning styles and accommodation needs.

• Implement training.

• Evaluate the impact of training on the knowledge, skills and performance gaps using Kirkpatrick’s four levels of evaluation (these levels are: reaction, learning, behavior and results).

MRS provides integrated learning systems to disseminate significant knowledge from research and other sources. This is accomplished through classroom learning, distance education, teleconferencing, printed materials and video conferencing. MRS may experiment with other modalities, such as offering just-in-time training. Learning resources include the Institute on Rehabilitation Issues, information from the National Clearing House and TACE.

In preparation for Order of Selection for Services (OSS), MRS has completed training for all field staff so that MRS can accurately apply recently revised policies including eligibility, disability priority categories and functional limitations. This training was held during FY 2012 and will continue through FY 2013. In addition, MRS is conducting follow-up webinars to further support staff in this topic area.

Corresponding to the 2009 Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for the FY 2009 RSA Monitoring Review, MRS developed and conducted extensive training on topics related to the CAP, including residency criteria for establishing a presence in the State, completion of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for transition students prior to graduation, and discontinuing use of a financial needs test for SSI/SSDI recipients.

In the Federal In-Service Grant, ‘Core Functions’ were determined for specific classifications within MRS. Training topics relate to core functions and reflect MRS’ further commitment to ensure all personnel receive appropriate and adequate training.

Program Enhancement

MRS is engaged in a system change project which is expected to improve rehabilitation outcomes, as well as staff satisfaction and retention. The two-pronged approach focuses on customer motivation and job development. The project is largely funded by an RSA Quality Award and supplemented with Title I and TACE 5 support.

Job placement training has been completed at MRS, and internal trainers are in place in the districts. Managers are required to report on implementation progress as part of their district operational plans.

MRS managers have been trained in motivational interviewing. A two-day ‘Refresher’ course of Motivational Interviewing (MI) was offered and provided to MRS agency field-staff counselors and managers. As there was a change in vendor, this course was designed to provide a general overview of MI, while at the same time, serving as a pre-requisite for individuals nominated to attend MI Skill Building. Seventy-two staff participated, two of which were managers.

MI Skill Building is designed to assist counselors in incorporating MI in their everyday work. Designed as small cohort groups (no more than 15/group) groups meet monthly with Casey Jackson of the Institute for Individual and Organizational Change (IFIOC) for 4 consecutive months, and individually, participants may submit up to 3 audio tapes for the purpose of receiving feedback related to demonstrated MI adherence. Out of a maximum of 80 participants, 79 staff are currently registered in E-Learn, 2 of which are MRS managers, with the remaining being counseling staff. Sessions began January 24, 2013, across 3 of the 4 site locations thus far.

This is followed by coding of audio tapes with feedback and skill building classes over a six month period. Motivational interviewing research supports this coding method for integrating motivational interviewing skills into the counseling process. With the support of TACE 5, rehabilitation assistants participated in training on the spirit of Motivational Interviewing to ensure a positive experience for customers from their first contact with MRS.

Additional training activities are funded through the RSA in-service training grant supplemented by Title I dollars. Funds allocated from Title I dollars have been drastically reduced because of budgetary constraints. Staff is also encouraged to take advantage of training opportunities offered by their respective professional organizations and with their community partners.

MRS is consistently researching the latest updates on disabilities, best practices and treatment options. This research is distributed to staff through internal and external training, webinars, E-Learn and rehabilitation articles and journals. Disability-related training includes general medical aspects and implications concerning functional capacity and/or ergonomics and assistive technology. Training modules placed into MRS E-Learn routinely utilize the findings gained from research and other credible sources.

 

Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) hires qualified counselors who are bi-lingual in American Sign Language, Spanish or Arabic if the local community has a large population of ethnic groups who require them in order to receive services. Each office has also posted MRS information in English, Spanish, or Arabic, clarifying which bilingual counselors and program materials are available in customer’s native language. Materials are available in Braille and other accessible forms, as requested by customers. Qualified sign language interpreters are contracted on an as needed basis.

 

MRS has a long standing partnership with the Michigan Department of Education/Office of Special Education (MDE/OSE) including a formalized interagency agreement between the MDE/OSE and MRS. This interagency agreement was recently revised, updated and signed on March 1, 2011.

MRS has operationalized transition services to youth and has continued to work on improving the quality of those services. To support this, the MRS Consultant assigned to Transition from the Program Innovation Unit and the Staff Development Unit partner to develop and deliver training to MRS counselors. Some of this training is done in collaboration with the Michigan Transition Outcomes Project (MI-TOP) and the Michigan Transition Services Association (MTSA).

The MT-21 project [see Attachment 4.8(b)(2)] will provide MRS with information about best and emerging transition practices that will be utilized by the Staff Development Unit to identify training needs related to strengthening the provision of transition services to youth. It will also identify areas of focus for joint training opportunities for staff from MRS, Bureau of Services for Blind Persons (BSBP), educators, and other youth services providers.

Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA)

These are the following trainings that are being conducted as a result of the CSNA:

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Because of the gradual increase in MRS customers with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), MRS has provided specific training on providing vocational rehabilitation services to this population. MRS is continuing to research information and training for MRS counselors to increase employment success of this population by: identifying best and emerging practices leading to successful employment outcomes for individuals with ASD; possible collaborative partners such as the Statewide Autism Resource and Training (StART) project, MI-TOP and the Department of Community Health (MDCH); and emerging evidence-based models.

As a result of relationship building with StART and the outcome of three pilot sites last year, some MRS staff have been invited to participate in training conducted by StART (and therefore free to MRS) as a part of a community team that is designed to improve employment opportunities for transition youth with ASD.

Underserved Racial and Ethnic Populations

Through our on-line learning system, E-Learn, MRS offers a wide range of options designed to increase staff’s awareness of cultural differences in an effort to help counselors become more effective in working with individuals from various backgrounds. Content is relevant to various cultural groups including, African Americans, American Indians, Asians, Hispanic/Latinos and Middle Eastern cultures.

MRS is developing a comprehensive approach to diversity training based on the CSNA. This is consistent with the MRS multicultural values. The purpose of this training is to enhance counselors’ skills and knowledge to work effectively and ethically with diverse populations. Strategies will include development of an internal design team, collaboration with the Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS) and possibly hiring an external consultant.

Older Workers

The following training programs are available to all MRS staff: “How to Work Effectively with Older Workers,” “Aging with Disability,” “Accommodations for An Aging Workforce,” “The New Definition of ‘Older’ Worker” and the “New Dilemmas in the Workplace for the Older Worker.” Staff worked jointly with Michigan Civil Service to host trainings to increase awareness of the dynamics of multi-generational work environments and will continue to make available to staff.

Assistive Technology

MRS’ Assistive Technology (AT) Consultant is developing an AT consideration framework to be adopted as a standardized approach for use throughout the vocational rehabilitation process. This undertaking is in partnership with Michigan Integrated Technology Supports (MITS) and Michigan Disability Rights Coalition (MDRC). Key framework components for MRS will include:

• Consideration Model: Adopt a valid model for AT Consideration.

• Electronic AT Consideration Tool: Develop and implement an electronic AT Consideration tool for use by vocational rehabilitation counselors and aligned with the aforementioned model.

• Training: Deliver training to promote and teach the AT Consideration Framework to MRS staff.

The bureau’s Business Network Unit (BNU) will provide technical guidance, training and evaluations to MRS customers, field staff and employers on AT and accommodations. The BNU will continue to explore how technology can be used most effectively to enhance employee skills. BNU staff will model technology options for all customers and stakeholders (i.e., Dragon Naturally Speaking, Tablets, etc.).

Assessment and Training Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities

MRS will work with the Business Network Unit and the Innovation Unit to increase counselor understanding of non-traditional means to acquire job-related skills in addition to college training. Counselors will understand the role of apprenticeships, on-the-job evaluations and on-the-job training opportunities to assist customers in achieving competitive employment.

This screen was last updated on Jun 17 2013 10:42AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS), in collaboration with the Bureau of Services for Blind Persons (BSBP) (formerly Michigan Commission for the Blind) and Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS) (formerly Michigan Rehabilitation Council), contracted with the Michigan State University (MSU) Office of Rehabilitation and Disability Studies, to perform the 2011 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment, which is performed every 3 years. MRS is addressing the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities, which were identified in the Assessment as follows:

1. Rehabilitation Needs of Individuals with Disabilities Residing Within the State

A. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services:

In 2011 91% of MRS customers determined to be eligible for services were consistently those significantly or most significantly disabled; 63% were most significant. The majority of the individuals with most significant disabilities were referred and provided services by Community Mental Health and Community Rehabilitation Organizations (CROs).

B. Individuals with disabilities who are minorities

Hispanic/Latino residents specifically in the mid- and southwestern section of Michigan; Native Americans in the Upper Peninsula and Northern Michigan; and Asian or Pacific Islanders specifically Arab and Arab Americans and Hmong residents in the southeastern part of the state. African American residents apply for MRS services at higher rates than their proportion in the population, but are statistically less likely to be determined eligible for services. White and Asian customers are statistically more likely to close with an employment outcome while Native Americans were least likely to have a successful outcome.

In FY 2011, Michigan served 7,887 minorities who exited the VR program. This represents a service rate of .859 to individuals with disabilities from minority backgrounds as a ratio to the service rate for all individuals with disabilities from non-minority backgrounds, which exceeds the .80 federal requirement. Michigan ranked 37th out of 56 for this indicator.

C. Individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program.

In 2011, the CSNA did not identify any unserved populations. No group, based on disability, was unserved in Michigan. The CSNA did identify numerous underserved populations.

Michigan adult residents with mental illness who need mental health services and supported employment services were the number one population identified as underserved. Although the proportion of Michigan residents with mental illness served by MRS has remained relatively stable over the last three years, the availability of services from CMH has continued to diminish over the state over the last five years. Due to the ongoing reduction in CMH funding, Michigan continues to struggle with a failing economy and high unemployment. CMH does not have the resources necessary to provide mental health services and/or supported employment services to individuals with severe diagnoses unless the person presents as a risk to self or others.

Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) are the primary emerging population reported as either currently or to be an underserved population. Although the number of youth with ASD applying for MRS services has been slowly but steadily increasing, the 2009 IDEA data indicates that the number may drastically increase annually over the course of the next three years as higher numbers of students begin to reach age 14 to 16. Concern was expressed at all levels about the job readiness preparation this group will have as they exit school, the preparedness of the adult vocational rehabilitation agency staff to provide services, and the availability of supported employment services for this population.

Transition Youth with severe disabilities are another potentially (re)emerging underserved population based upon how the newly implemented Michigan Merit Curriculum (MMC) will impact graduation rates, dropout rates, and the employability of students with disabilities.

D. Other components of the workforce investment system:

The extant data (i.e., Workforce Investment Act (WIA) State Annual Report, Wagner-Peyser Act data) indicated that non-vocational rehabilitation WIA related programs (e.g., Michigan Works!) are providing services to a very limited population of people with disabilities in Michigan. This finding may indicate that people with disabilities are not disclosing their disability status to Michigan Works! when they are applying for services and/or that Michigan Works! is underserving Michigan residents with disabilities.

The needs assessment analyzed outcomes for Adults, Dislocated Workers, and Youth with disabilities that exited WIA in Program Year (PY) 2007 to 2009. During PY 2009, 148 adults with disabilities of all exiters (184) entered new employment, resulting in an employment rate of 80.4%. Retention and Employment/Credential Rates were consistent with the Entered Employment Rate. The 2009 rate of earnings change in six months was $9,026 (=$1,200,515/$133). A comparison of the 2009 WIA outcome rates by special population groups shows the outcome rates of individuals with disabilities and public assistance recipients were generally low.

As part of the One-Stop services delivery system, Wagner-Peyser employment services focuses on providing a variety of employment-related labor exchange services including job search assistance, job referral, and placement assistance for job seekers, re-employment services to unemployment insurance claimants, and recruitment services to employers with job openings.

During PY 2009, 24,196 (3.2% of a total 766,846 job seekers) individuals with disabilities received employment services with funding under the Wagner-Peyser Act.

This screen was last updated on Jun 17 2013 10:43AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

1) Michigan estimates 30,000 individuals will be eligible for services in FY 2014. Michigan is estimating that it will be able to serve 24,360 individuals in FY 2014 as outlined in Section 4.11(c)(3).

2) The estimated number of eligible individuals who will receive services in FY 2014 under Part B of Title I is 24,000 and Part B of Title VI is 360.

3) The estimated cost in FY 2014 to serve all eligible individuals is $43,800,000. MRS expects to have available $35,526,000 to serve approximately 24,360 eligible customers.

See Attachment 4.11(c)(3) for more details regarding Order of Selection.

Definitions for Table below:

Order of Selection for Services (OSS)

Most Significantly Disabled (MSD)

Significantly Disabled (SD)

Not Significantly Disabled (NSD)

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
OSS Category 1 -- MSD Title I $25,316,400 17,340 $1,460
OSS Category 1 -- MSD Title VI $526,000 360 $1,461
OSS Category 2 -- SD Title I $8,168,700 5595 $1,460
OSS Category 3 -- NSD Title I $1,514,900 1065 $1,422
Totals   $35,526,000 24,360 $1,458

This screen was last updated on Jun 17 2013 10:45AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

In 2013, Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS), in collaboration with Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS) developed a 3-year strategic plan based on a multitude of data including the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA), customer satisfaction feedback, assorted state audits, environmental scanning with partners and advocacy groups, program evaluation studies, and other state and federal research.

Current MRS Strategic Plan Goals and Priorities

GOAL 1 – Build organizational capacity to uphold the integrity of the MRS mission.

GOAL 2 – Enhance and support MRS working alliances to improve service delivery.

GOAL 3 – Improve customer success and satisfaction.

GOAL 4 – Develop and implement a Quality Assurance System to align and improve Bureau performance management.

PRIORITIES

In addition to these strategic plan activities, MRS will focus on the following additional priorities necessitated by emerging circumstances;

Priority 1: Continue to actively seek resources to capture full federal award, including: (1) educate and inform the Designated State Agency (DSA) and the Michigan legislature (2) efforts to increase match and private contributions consistent with Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) criteria and guidance.

Priority 2: Effectively manage resources to prevent OSS implementation; implement Order of Selection for Services (OSS) if required based on Federal criteria and approval.

Measure: Cost reduction strategies are approved and implemented. OSS is implemented timely and orderly with supporting rationale and infrastructure (as required).

Priority 3: Promote and maintain a culture of quality innovation that stimulates continuous program improvements.

Measure: At least 2 major quality projects will be undertaken using the new MRS quality methodology and quality tools resulting in improved efficiency and/or effectiveness as defined by the Aim of the projects.

At least 2 major innovation projects/pilot tests launched with evaluation design and related resources.

MRS resources and processes will align with these priorities.

Priority 4: MRS will continue to demonstrate program effectiveness and substantial compliance in the provision of its State Plan; Title I Evaluation Standards/Performance Indicators; and the Strategic Plan.

This screen was last updated on Aug 12 2013 11:08AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) implemented an order of selection in August of 2012, in anticipation of projected funding and staffing reductions. MRS experienced a reduction in our work force, increased program costs as well as the loss of a major interagency cash transfer agreement. MRS has a significant reliance on local match through interagency cash transfer agreements, third party cooperative agreements and private contributions.

The loss of the major cash transfer agreement along with the other budget and staffing impacts required MRS to prepare for closing categories and restricting services. This action was headed off with a one time infusion of state funds by the Designated State Agency. The increased funding allowed MRS to match the funds federally and delay the closing of priority categories. In fiscal year 2014, MRS once again anticipates reduced funding and reduced ability to fill all staff vacancies. This will impact the ability to serve all eligible customers and could necessitate the closure of priority categories. MRS must continue to seek interagency cash transfer agreements, third party arrangements and private contributions as appropriate to secure the full federal award. It is anticipated that MRS will continue to experience decreases in local match as well as increases in operational expenses. It will require close monitoring of program indicators to arrive at an appropriate decision concerning the closure of categories and the restriction of services.

A ratio of 1 counselor to 115 customers in any district could result in the implementation of a waiting list for services.

 

Description of Priority categories

Individuals are assigned to the highest priority category for which they are eligible at the time eligibility is decided.

The Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) priority categories are as follows:

Category 1 -- Most Significantly Disabled (MSD):

A) Individuals with a severe physical or mental impairment that seriously limits three or more of the seven functional capacities in terms of an employment outcome and

B) Whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require three or more vocational rehabilitation services over at least six months.

Category 2 -- Significantly Disabled (SD):

A) Individuals with a severe physical or mental impairment that seriously limits two of the seven functional capacities in terms of an employment outcome and

B) Whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require three or more vocational rehabilitation services over at least six months.

An eligible SSDI or SSI recipient is automatically considered to be, at least, an individual with a significant disability. An SSDI or SSI recipient could be considered most significantly disabled, if MRS receives medical documentation that indicates the individual is eligible for Category 1.

Category 3 -- Not Significantly Disabled (NSD):

A) An individual with a physical or mental impairment that seriously limits one of the seven functional capacities in terms of an employment outcome and

B) Whose vocational rehabilitation does not require multiple services over six months.

The codes to be used for priority categories are as follows:

1. Most Significantly Disabled

2. Significantly Disabled

3. Not Significantly Disabled

Written notification will be provided to all individuals who are placed on the waiting list for vocational rehabilitation services. The notification will include information about available resources and services the individual may contact for assistance with locating employment, including information about the nearest Michigan Works! office established per the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

The Order of Selection was established to ensure that individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected first for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services. Those with significant disabilities are selected second and not significantly disabled is the third priority.

The determination to establish and implement the Order of Selection is based on a reduction in projected funding for the fiscal year. The Order of Selection is statewide and does not select one disabling condition over another disabling condition.

The order is not based on age, sex, marital status, religion, race, color, national origin, political affiliation, or the vocational goal of the individual with a disability. Factors that relate to the significance of the disability are the only factors used in the order.

The following factors are indicators that would signal the need to consider closing priority categories:

• A reduction in available case service funds that exceeds 5%.

• An increase in counselor caseload average size that exceeds 115 cases.

• The inability of MRS to fill position vacancies that extends beyond 60 days.

• An increase in days that it takes customers to move from referral to orientation that exceeds 30 days.

• An increase in the number of days it takes customers to move from application to eligibility that exceeds 45 days.

• An increase in the number of days that it takes customers to move from eligibility to plan that exceeds 90 days.

• A significant increase in the average amount of eligible customers served by MRS exceeding 30,000 eligible customers.

• An increase in customer complaints that focus on the inability to access vocational rehabilitation services.

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 17,700 3,406 6,552 FY 2014 $25,842,400
2 5,595 2,246 2,484 FY 2014 $8,168,700
3 1,065 288 108 FY 2014 $1,514,900

This screen was last updated on Jun 17 2013 10:49AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) plans to continue to offer supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities throughout the state. Agreements with schools and community mental health service providers form the basis of most MRS supported employment services.

The entire Title VI-B award for FY 2013 will be distributed to district offices in the form of case service funds. The funds will be used primarily to purchase job coaching and transitional employment related services from private, non-profit community rehabilitation programs and psychosocial programs.

The size of Title VI-B awards to individual MRS district offices is based on the percentage of work aged individuals with disabilities in each community. The MRS goal is to achieve equity in resource and program availability throughout the State based on this work aged disability population. This is complicated by the lack of sufficient partner resources or commitment for long term supports. MRS is collaborating with partners, especially the Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) in resource sharing and development, and program improvements to assure equitable access across the state to Supported Employment options. A recent agreement with MDCH has generated increased collaboration at local levels to expand services to individuals with chronic illnesses, including supported employment. The size of a local supported employment program is largely dependent upon consumer demand for the service, as well as the community’s ability to fund the long-term supports necessary to maintain consumers in supported employment. As budgets are reduced at state and local levels, creative resource sharing options are being explored.

The agreement with MDCH includes measurable goals and objectives for increased supported employment services and outcomes as follows:

1) Jointly define integrated setting and develop key data indicators that can be utilized by all parties.

2) Manage referrals for employment related services.

3) Increase employment outcomes (quantity and quality) for persons served jointly.

4) Improve interagency collaboration. Identify and share activities to support and monitor local collaboration.

Since the development of the Interagency Agreement in 2009, most of the goals and objectives of the agreement have been accomplished. Examples of activities that have been achieved include: regional forums; development of tools to improve the referral process; and the development of a Supported Employment Frequently Asked Questions document.

In addition, baseline data was gathered for the FY 2009-FY 2010 regarding joint customers from MRS and MDCH. Gathering accurate yearly information that identifies outcome data for joint customers has been an ongoing challenge. MRS has been able to pull Accessible Web-based Activity and Reporting Environment (AWARE) data on customers that are identified as receiving Supported Employment (SE) services. This data shows that local Interagency Cash Transfer Agreements (ICTAs) have been in flux over the past several years, but overall the amount of funds available has remained approximately the same. The numbers of MRS customers that are identified as receiving SE services have gradually increased between 2009 and 2012 however the successful employment outcomes for this group has gradually decreased.

MRS was an active partner in Michigan’s Medicaid Infrastructure Grant which also targets increased employment outcomes for people with significant disabilities, especially chronic mental illness. This grant has ended; however MRS is collaborating with MDCH to determine ways to sustain the employment focus this grant has initiated.

This screen was last updated on Jun 17 2013 10:07AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Rehabilitation program agreements have been jointly developed with county departments of the Department of Human Services (DHS) and other agencies to expand the delivery of rehabilitation services to special populations who meet Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) eligibility requirements (for example Native Americans, welfare recipients, adjudicated youth with disabilities, foster care youth with disabilities aging out of the foster care system, etc.).

MRS is expanding partnerships with Community Rehabilitation Organizations (CROs) and Centers for Independent Living (CILs) to improve effectiveness of services through performance based services. MRS is also developing and implementing methods to prioritize the needs of underserved populations such as: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Developmentally Disabled as relates to supported employment and long term follow along, chronic mental illness, older adults with disabilities, Transition, Arab/American, Hispanic/Latino, Hmong, Native American, and individual with a disability and felony record. In addition, strategies to improve services and include local projects to increase intern and other work experience activities are being developed. Increased collaboration with the Autism Society of Michigan and Tribal Governments is underway to increase services to these groups.

MRS is also working with the Department of Human Services and with the Workforce Development Agency to improve services to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients with disabilities in the Partnership, Accountability, Training, Hope (PATH) program with a demonstration project being planned for Ingham County.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

The bureau’s Assistive Technology (AT) Consultant is developing an AT consideration framework to be adopted as a standardized approach for use throughout the vocational rehabilitation process. This undertaking is in partnership with Michigan Integrated Technology Supports (MITS) and Michigan Disability Rights Coalition (MDRC). Key framework components for MRS will include:

• Consideration Model: Adopt a valid model for AT Consideration.

• Electronic AT Consideration Tool: Develop and implement an electronic AT Consideration tool for use by VR counselors and aligned with aforementioned model.

• Training: Deliver training to promote and teach the AT Consideration Framework to MRS staff.

The bureau’s Business Network Unit (BNU) will provide technical guidance, training and evaluations to MRS customers, field staff and employers on AT and accommodations. The BNU will continue to explore how technology can be used most effectively to enhance employee skills. BNU staff will model technology options for all customers and stakeholders (i.e., Dragon Naturally Speaking, Tablets, etc.).

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

The 2011 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) has identified the following underserved populations: Autism Spectrum Disorder, Developmentally Disabled as relates to supported employment and long term follow along, chronic mental illness, older adults with disabilities, Transition, Arab/American, Hispanic/Latino, Hmong, Native American, and individual with a disability and felony record. With the assistance of consultants, MRS is developing and implementing methods to prioritize the needs of the underserved populations and strategies to improve services and include local projects to increase intern and other work experience activities. Increased collaboration with the Autism Society of Michigan Tribal Governments is underway to increase services to these groups. Participation rates and services to Arab/American, Hispanic/Latino, African American males, individuals with a disability and felony record are being reviewed.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

The 2011 CSNA did not include any need for further establishment, development, or improvement of community rehabilitation programs beyond MRS’ current relationships.

MRS has held regular “Enhanced Partnership Meetings” with community rehabilitation programs to discuss various issues of importance to the partners including but not limited to Order of Selection, Designated State Agency (DSA) changes for MRS and Bureau of Services to the Blind, joint conferences/trainings, employment first concept and national and state legislative issues. Additionally, local meetings have taken place to strengthen local partnerships with community rehabilitation providers, including Centers for Independent Living. Meetings are scheduled to discuss vendor/partner performance measures, improvements to service authorization and service delivery.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

MRS continues to work to improve Indicator 1.2 – the percentage of individuals exiting the program during the performance period who have achieved an employment outcome after receiving services. MRS is doing so by evaluating populations of customers significantly below the standard (urban minorities, transition age youth); implementing new approaches including Motivational Interviewing, new approaches to placement, and expanding the use of quality improvement methods.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

MRS is meeting with the Department of Human Services and with the Workforce Development Agency to improve services to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients with disabilities in the Partnership, Accountability, Training, Hope (PATH) program with a demonstration project being planned for Ingham County. MRS continues its partnership with the state’s One-Stop system (i.e. Michigan Works!) and the state’s administrators of the One-Stop system (i.e. the Workforce Development Agency), despite a declining presence in Michigan Works! sites due to budget saving efforts.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

1) Describe how the agency’s strategies will be used to achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1):

GOAL 1 – Build organizational capacity to uphold the integrity of the MRS mission.

Strategy 1: Continue to actively seek resources to capture full federal award, including: 1) educate and inform the legislature 2) efforts to increase match and private contributions consistent with Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) criteria and guidance.

Strategy 2: Effectively manage resources to prevent Order of Selection for Services (OSS) implementation. Implement OSS if required, based on Federal criteria and approval.

Measures:

MRS will --

• Meet or exceed bureau goals for Match acquisition

• Provide quarterly reports to Michigan legislature to meet legislative requests and to demonstrate fiscal accountability

• Implement approved cost reduction strategies

• Implement OSS in a timely and orderly manner with supporting and infrastructure

GOAL 2 – Enhance and support MRS working alliances to improve service delivery.

Strategy 1: Set consistent expectations for performance in alliance: statistical, budget, customer service.

Strategy 2: Regularly evaluate alliances for return on investment -- make adjustments when and if appropriate.

Strategy 3: Train staff in negotiations, motivational interviewing, and mutual gains. Support use of those skills, through mentoring, skill building, and the development of district and regional cohort groups.

Strategy 4: Have dialogues with partners that describe in detail the core values, principles and priorities of both partners in the working alliance. Create a mutual understanding of where both entities intersect. Discuss mutual gains and how to braid resources to maximize service delivery to MRS customers.

Measures:

MRS will regularly evaluate --

• Alliances for return on investment (performance statistics, demographic information, budget, and satisfaction surveys) for both 2.1 and 2.2

• Percentage of staff successfully completing mutual gains, negotiation and Motivational Interviewing training (successfully completed = demonstration of knowledge and application)

• Percentage of partners engaged in identified dialogue points

GOAL 3 – Improve customer success and satisfaction.

Strategy 1: Improve customer satisfaction

Strategy 2: Increase the Adjusted Rehabilitation Rate

Strategy 3: Increase the percentage of employment outcomes for priority customer groups, including minority populations, SSA Recipients, Transition Youth, Autism Spectrum, Veterans, Developmental Disability, Mental Illness, Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

Measures:

MRS will evaluate the --

• Percentage of customers indicating overall success

• Decrease in customer appeals and hearings

• Adjusted Rehabilitation Rate of 55.8%

• Percentage of individuals in target populations who are receiving services under an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE)

• Percentage of employment outcomes for individuals in target populations who have received services under an IPE

GOAL 4 – Develop and implement a Quality Assurance System to align and improve Bureau performance management.

Strategy 1: Develop/improve an accountability process to improve bureau compliance with federal and state laws, regulations and policy.

Strategy 2: Develop/improve practices and process which promote quality services and outcomes.

Measures:

MRS will --

• Develop an MRS balanced scorecard to measure organizational performance: (QIP) MRS Scorecard will include indicators for compliance with state and federal regulations, national productivity measures, customer satisfaction, and service access (number of customers, timeliness of service), and financial performance (revenue, ROI, cost reduction)

• Conduct case reviews and evaluate the degree to which AWARE reports demonstrate improved compliance

• Establish a baseline of vendor cost, outcomes, timeliness and quality

PRIORITIES

In addition to these strategic plan activities, MRS will focus on the following additional priorities necessitated by emerging circumstances;

Priority 1: Continue to actively seek resources to capture full federal award, including: (1) educate and inform the Designated State Agency (DSA) and the Michigan legislature (2) efforts to increase match and private contributions consistent with Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) criteria and guidance.

Priority 2: Effectively manage resources to prevent OSS implementation; implement Order of Selection for Services (OSS) if required based on Federal criteria and approval.

Measure: Cost reduction strategies are approved and implemented. OSS is implemented timely and orderly with supporting rationale and infrastructure (as required).

Priority 3: Promote and maintain a culture of quality innovation that stimulates continuous program improvements.

Measure: At least 2 major quality projects will be undertaken using the new MRS quality methodology and quality tools resulting in improved efficiency and/or effectiveness as defined by the Aim of the projects.

At least 2 major innovation projects/pilot tests launched with evaluation design and related resources.

MRS resources and processes will align with these priorities.

Priority 4: MRS will continue to demonstrate program effectiveness and substantial compliance in the provision of its State Plan; Title I Evaluation Standards/Performance Indicators; and the Strategic Plan.

2) Describe how the agency’s strategies will be used to support innovation and expansion activities.

MRS is working with the Department of Human Services and with the Workforce Development Agency to improve services to TANF recipients with disabilities in the PATH program. Policy implications, service delivery models, joint training and referral and tracking processes are being developed. It is anticipated that one or more demonstration projects will be done in the first half of FY 2014 with general expansion of the PATH – MRS projects beginning the second half of FY 2014 are contingent on available resources for the project (funding and staffing).

MRS will reserve and use a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the support of the funding of the State Rehabilitation Council, Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS), through a contractual arrangement between MRS and a statewide trade association for community rehabilitation programs, MARO, which serves as the fiduciary to the Council, consistent with the resource plan developed by the Designated Status Unit (DSU) and the Council. The MCRS and MARO have an Operations Agreement for this arrangement.

MRS will reserve and use a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the support of the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC) through a contractual arrangement between MRS and the Michigan Statewide Independent Living Council (MiSILC), a 501(c)(3) corporation which serves as the fiduciary to the Council, consistent with the resource plan developed by the DSU and the Council. The SILC and MiSILC have an Operations Agreement for this arrangement.

3) Describe how the agency’s strategies will be used to overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

MRS will work with MCRS to review the Bureau’s Interagency Cash Transfer Agreements and their outcomes to determine the impact of overall program integrity and equitable participation and funding. In conjunction with Michigan State Universities’ Project Excellence, MRS will review access, participation and outcomes of individuals across: disabilities, geography, minority/ethnicity, gender, age and other characteristics to evaluate and improve program services.

 

This screen was last updated on Aug 26 2013 11:50AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

The following goals and strategies are included in the 2008-2013 Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) Long-Term Plan (Strategic Plan). This plan describes MRS’ mission, vision, internal values, principles, goals, strategies, and expected outcomes for fiscal year 2008 through fiscal year 2013. Regular discussion of progress and adjustments were completed by MRS with the Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services (MCRS) (formerly Michigan Rehabilitation Council). In FY 2013, MRS will fully evaluate plan achievement and develop its next strategic plan.

This section describes the progress achieved and impediments encountered in achieving these goals.

GOAL 1 – EMPLOYMENT-FOCUSED OUTCOMES

Ensure people with disabilities served by MRS will compete successfully for jobs in the 21st Century, exercising informed choice consistent with their individual abilities, capabilities, interests, and rehabilitation needs.

Objective 1: Realign MRS policies, procedures, practices, services, and internal and external expectations to ensure primary focus on actions that achieve employment outcomes for people with disabilities.

Objective 2: Ensure customers have essential accommodations, soft and technology skills, and assistive technology to be competitive.

Objective 3: Provide state-of-the-art information and linkage to current and emerging job opportunities, consistent with customer goals.

Completion Status: This goal has been completed.

Progress:

Objective 1 and 2 relative to Goal 1 have been completed. In summary, the related strategies included developing policies, templates for measuring, developing work plans to ensure alignment along with training related activities. Objective 3 strategies related to Labor Market Information (LMI) have been completed. Providing updated strategies and tools to implement the LMI is an ongoing process.

GOAL 2 – CUSTOMER EMPOWERMENT AND SELF ADVOCACY

Empower customers to access complete, accurate information to make informed choices and self-assuredly seek employment and employment-related services.

Objective 1: Create a virtual orientation in a variety of formats for applicants to improve access to information about vocational rehabilitation services.

Objective 2: Provide tools and resources for customers to obtain current information on labor market trends through Internet access and a variety of other means.

Objective 3: Collaborate with Centers for Independent Living (CILs) to ensure individuals have a comprehensive knowledge of available resources in support of employment outcomes.

Objective 4: Promote customer self-advocacy through increased collaboration with CILs.

Completion Status: This goal has been completed.

Progress: The virtual orientation is operational statewide. The customer handbook has been updated to be compatible with the virtual orientation.

A MRS/IL Strategic Alliance, containing timelines and milestones was developed and has been implemented. The focus of the strategic alliance is to enhance the inclusion of IL services for MRS customers as they work to achieve employment goals. Phase I and Phase II of the plan are complete and/or ongoing. Phase III, reflect and look ahead, has not been initiated. Loss of key staff to retirement and/or promotion and the lack of a dedicated MRS consultant has delayed this phase. We have realigned team membership and a consultant is now in place. We anticipate Phase III implementation to begin prior to the end of FY 2012.

The following strategies contributed to the achievement of this goal:

* developed and coordinated with interested CILs other aspects of their involvement to increase customer knowledge and access to available resources.

* established timelines and milestones and implemented in participating districts/CILs.

* discussed with CILs their interest and capacity for increased collaboration on self advocacy services for customers of MRS.

* developed and coordinated with interested CILs, other aspects of their involvement.

GOAL 3 – BUSINESS/COMMUNITY COLLABORATION

Collaborate and partner with targeted employers, agencies and organizations to maximize quality employment and independence for persons with disabilities.

Objective 1: Prioritize bureau partnerships by reviewing and evaluating current relationships to find ways of improving return on investment, consistent with bureau mission, vision, and values.

Objective 2: Develop new strategic partnerships with targeted employers, emphasizing innovative ways to increase employment opportunities for people with disabilities and addressing disability management needs of employers.

Objective 3: Collaborate with community agencies and organizations to identify, create, and use innovative approaches to access community supports and services needed by customers for quality employment and independence.

Objective 4: Focus collaboration to improve services and outcomes for target populations.

Completion Status: This goal has been completed.

Progress:

MRS used the following strategies:

1. MRS established a definition for strategic partnerships and has identified existing strategic partnerships.

2. MRS has determined how each type of strategic partnership should be evaluated.

3. Strategic partnerships with targeted organizations and employers have been implemented.

Results:

• Improved customer outcomes

• Strengthened partnerships through state and local collaborations

• Implemented Enhanced Employment Outcomes model strengthening partnerships with employers, agencies and organizations.

• Improved customer service and outcomes for targeted populations achieved through Innovation Projects and local initiatives that target deaf, autism, Michigan Prisoner ReEntry Initiative (MPRI), youth and others.

• American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded On-the-Job Training (OJT) partnerships resulted in new employer contacts.

• The Business Network Unit was instrumental in strategically developing targeted partnerships through local and federal employer and business connections. On the local level, MRS participated in various employer based training programs. The employers included Adams Electronics, Shape Corporation, City of Battle Creek, the State of Michigan, and Title Source.

• On the federal level, employer/business contacts were established through the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) National Employment Team. Key Business/Employer partners included Sodexo, Manpower, United States Forest Services, and TJX companies.

GOAL 4 – VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION/INDEPENDENT LIVING RELATIONSHIPS

Promote quality employment outcomes and independence for persons with disabilities by building stronger relationships with independent living communities.

Objective 1: Convene and sustain joint planning activities with independent living communities at local, regional, and state levels.

Objective 2: Engage in shared community education and advocacy that improves access to resources, services, and employment outcomes.

Objective 3: Collaborate with independent living communities to promote better understanding and use of community supports and services by customers, employers, and partners.

Completion Status: This goal has been completed.

Progress: An IL Strategy Workgroup was convened in the fall of 2009. In 2010 this workgroup developed a structure for implementation including Leadership, Operations, and Evaluation Teams. In Phase I, statewide forums were held to engage partners and communicate the vision, values and desired outcomes. These forums were highly successful, setting the stage for the next phase. Phase II has begun and involves local MRS and CIL offices working collaboratively to develop service strategies to accomplish the vision, values, and desired outcomes. These strategies build on current relationships and incorporate knowledge of evidence-based promising practices.

Regular state level meetings are continuing, initial regional meetings were held, and local community of practice meetings are under way. Planning for follow-along and regional meetings is beginning. The Evaluation Team developed a plan to collect and analyze data to evaluate implementation in one year’s time.

The following strategies contributed to the completion of this goal:

1. Identify “effective and promising planning practices”. Develop a tool for self-assessment of practices to assist MRS and CILs for initiating and sustaining joint planning activities.

2. Obtain self-assessment, share model practices, and update self-assessment tool as appropriate.

3. Implement the practice guidelines at all levels as part of business planning for the upcoming year.

4. Evaluate the first year’s implementation, make appropriate revisions to the practice guidelines and disseminate revised guidelines for use in the next business planning cycle.

GOAL 5 – QUALITY PROFESSIONAL VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES

Improve delivery of professional vocational rehabilitation services to achieve quality employment outcomes and customer satisfaction.

Objective 1: Set clear expectations for counselors to demonstrate the “core conditions of counseling” when serving customers.

Objective 2: Develop counselor skills in vocational assessments and the use of labor market information in developing Individualized Plans for Employment (IPEs), inclusive of local employer contacts and community partner involvement.

Objective 3: Improve comprehensive vocational rehabilitation counseling, and career-planning, inclusive of informed customer choice delivered by qualified rehabilitation personnel.

Objective 4: Ensure that counselors develop and demonstrate a level of “competency in job placement and retention services” that is required to appropriately address the needs of individual customers throughout the comprehensive vocational rehabilitation process.

Objective 5: Better utilize existing information within the MRS Accessible Web-based Activity and Reporting Environment (AWARE) electronic case management system to improve caseload management and achieve MRS accountability standards.

Completion Status: This goal has not yet been completed.

Progress: This goal and objectives have not been completed. The scale of work was not anticipated and as a result, some of the deadlines have not been fully accomplished.

Therefore, we have moved forward with training and other interventions out of sequence of the original strategies.

With the exception of assessment by an outside organization, Objectives 1, 4 and 5 are completed.

Some training is still being conducted on Objectives 2 and 3. A major initiative of training in motivational interviewing (MI) will be completed by the end of FY 2014. By FY 2015, trainers and support mechanisms will be in place.

Numerous demands on resources for assessment has jeopardized the completion of the final strategy. However, internal evaluation measures have been instituted to assess staff skills and employer and customer satisfaction.

FY 2012 PRIORITIES WERE:

Priority 1: Actively seek resources to capture full federal award; including match and donations, consistent with Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) criteria and guidance.

Measure: Increase in resources necessary to reduce unmatched federal dollars.

Priority 2: Prepare for implementation of Order of Selection for Services (OSS) should budget and/or staffing reductions occur as projected and pending RSA approval.

Measure: OSS Work Group determination of implementation requirements developed by October 15, 2010. State Plan amended as needed and timely RSA approval sought.

Priority 3: Enhance leadership development and staff development for anticipated significant staff departures.

Measure: Career goals were identified for all staff by October 30, 2010 and strategy developed for succession in all employment categories.

Priority 4: Obtain approval and implement Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for RSA Section 107 performance review findings within approved timelines and continue program adjustments as required.

Measure: CAP developed consistent with due date, approved by RSA and implemented.

Priority 5: Improve rehabilitation rate and employment outcomes for transition youth and minority customers, including expansion of MCTI East to improve services and outcomes for southeast Michigan (with highest unemployment rates).

Measure: MCTI East is expanded to include 1-2 vocational training programs. MRS adjusted rehabilitation rate is increased for all customers served, transition youth and minorities.

Priority 6: Improve referrals, orientation, and intake processes to assure all practices are customer friendly, provided in a timely and professional manner and are consistent with policies and procedures.

Measure: Reduced complaints from Client Assistance Program (CAP), MCRS and customers regarding inconsistent ineffective front end referral, orientation, and intake procedures. All policy and office practices are consistent with law and regulations.

PRIORITY UPDATES:

Priority 1 MRS still lacks the state resources to capture its full federal award. However, during FY 2012, MRS efforts to gain additional match resulted in returning $1.95M less of its federal award than in FY 2011. Unfortunately, these were one-time resources so this effort will continue in future fiscal years

Priorities 2, 3, 4, and 6 from the FY 2012 State Plan have been achieved.

Priority 5 was not achieved, due to insufficient resources and staff/community support to expand MCTI East. The overall adjusted rehab rate has increased, but is not yet at the 55.8% standard. The adjusted rehab rate increased for African Americans and for youth.

 

1) Jointly define integrated setting and develop key data indicators that can be utilized by all parties.

Goal 1 was achieved. A cross-agency team from Bureau of Services for Blind Services (BSBP), Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) and MRS (Joint Operations Team (JOT)) worked on the definition of integrated setting and policies were aligned in all three agencies. As a result, an integrated setting is now defined as a setting typically found in the community at which the individual with the most severe disabilities interacts with non-disabled individuals, other than non-disabled individuals who are providing services to that individual, to the same extent that non-disabled individuals in comparable positions interact with other persons.

2) Manage referrals for employment related services.

Goal 2 was partially achieved. The JOT reviewed the referral process for each agency and received input from field staff from all agencies. Two forms were revised for the purpose of improving the referral process: the RA-24, Authorization to Release Personal Information, and the RA-2738, Mental Health Report, to be used by BSBP and MRS that aligns with MDCH terminology.

The goal was to maintain the number of customer referrals from the previous year from MDCH to MRS. MRS used AWARE data to track customers that were identified as having received supported employment services at case closure. Using this strategy, customers receiving supported employment services increased from 771 in FY 2011 to 855 in FY 2012.

3) Increase employment outcomes (quantity and quality) for persons served jointly.

Goal 3 was not achieved. Data comparison challenges impacted collecting accurate data for this goal. Using MRS AWARE data, the number of MRS customers that received supported employment services and were successfully rehabilitated essentially remained the same from FY 2011 to FY 2012.

In addition to this challenge, long-term follow-along services are not often provided to customers that need extensive supports. Community Mental Health Agencies are quick to close cases in Michigan when customers have achieved employment.

Measuring improvement in the quality of employment outcomes has proven to be a challenge as well. Numerical measures are easier to track than a customer’s satisfaction with the quality of their employment.

4) Improve interagency collaboration. Identify and share activities to support and monitor local collaboration.

Goal 4 was achieved. Data gathered from regional fact finding meetings including field staff from MDCH and MRS were used to strategize activities and supports promoting collaboration. The JOT serves as a barrier buster group assisting local supported employment teams. The, “Supported Employment – Frequently Asked Questions” document was created as a communication tool regarding supported employment. Interagency Cash Transfer Agreements between local CMH and MRS have increased over the past three years which is a promising sign of collaboration. In addition, MRS has provided technical assistance to local communities struggling to identify mutual interests in the area of supported employment.

 

The Federal Performance Measures were substantially achieved. MRS met or exceeded all but one of the seven federally mandated performance measures for FY 2012. MRS attained the following performance measures:

(3 column table)

Performance Measure -- Number of Employment Outcomes

Goal for FY 2012 -- 7,704

MRS Attainment in FY 2012 -- 7,671

Performance Measure -- Percent Employed

Goal for FY 2012 -- 55.8

MRS Attainment in FY 2012 -- 51.8%

Performance Measure -- Employed Competitively

Goal for FY 2012 -- 72.6

MRS Attainment in FY 2012 -- 99.6%

Performance Measure -- Significant Disability

Goal for FY 2012 -- 62.4

MRS Attainment in FY 2012 -- 94.7%

Performance Measure -- Earnings Ratio

Goal for FY 2012 -- .52

MRS Attainment in FY 2012 -- 0.59

Performance Measure -- Self-Support

Goal for FY 2012 -- 53.0

MRS Attainment in FY 2012 -- 61.3%

Performance Measure -- Minority Ratio

Goal for FY 2012 -- .80

MRS Attainment in FY 2012 -- 0.84%

These performance measures include individuals who received supported employment services. MRS considers this achievement to be notable as Michigan has one of the highest unemployment rates in the country.

 

FY 2012 Innovation and Expansion (I&E) Expenditures consistent with our Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment and Long Term plan were:

MARO (Michigan Council for Rehabilitation Services) $372,744.00

State Independent Living Council (SILC) 205,719.00

Business Network Unit (BNU) 716,694.91

Motivational Interviewing 146,962.36

Total I&E Expenditures $1,442,120.27

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2013 8:51AM by Geraldine Moore

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Michigan Rehabilitation Services (MRS) offers a variety of supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities throughout the state. Agreements with MRS and local Community Mental Health Service Providers (CMHSPs) form the basis of most supported employment services but may include school partners and community rehabilitation organizations.

Person-centered planning is used to assist individuals referred by mental health programs in selecting an employment goal; needed services and supports; and service providers that are needed to reach the supported employment goal. Services that are provided include, but are not limited to individual community-based placement; psychosocial rehabilitation via clubhouse programs; job coaching; job referral; job development; job placement; and long-term follow along (including natural supports). Some programs include other options such as short-term trial work experiences to assist the consumer in making an informed choice in selecting a vocational goal.

The Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment has confirmed that people with mental illness and significant cognitive impairments are underserved populations. Bureau of Services for Blind Persons (BSBP), Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) and MRS have a state level interagency agreement designed to increase and improve services for these populations. BSBP, MDCH and MRS, have an agreement for the purpose of endorsing and promoting the competitive employment of individuals with disabilities, served jointly by the organizations. BSBP, MDCH and MRS also have a data sharing agreement. The Michigan Department of Technology Management and Budget (DTMB) is assisting in acquiring and exchanging aggregate data.

MRS provides extended services (not to exceed 18 months) until the customer has stabilized on their job. Following job stabilization, MRS closes the customer file and the local CMHSPs or natural supports are utilized to provide extended services.

Michigan Department of Education/Office of Special Education (MDE/OSE), MDCH, and MRS will continue to collaborate to improve supported employment resources and services for youth at the state and local levels. Specific strategies and support services are used for students with the most significant disabilities, such as longer job coach utilization; assistive technology; specific job development approaches; and implementation of effective employment models such as Project SEARCH (PS). PS is an employer driven model that offers a year of work-based learning experiences for transition students prior to their exit from secondary education. The goal of PS programming is employment at the host employer or at another employer consistent with the student’s interests, strengths and abilities. At the present time there are eight PS programs in Michigan. All of the programs have MRS, education and business as collaborative partners. Some of the programs also have Bureau of Services for Blind People (BSBP) and CMH as additional partners.

MRS has developed a commitment letter to be used with PS partners. The goal of this letter is to promote consistency around the state in PS contracts, in implementation of practices (including fees) and in measuring outcome data/return on investment. Another goal of the letter is to clarify MRS’ interests, roles and responsibilities in PS programs. Existing PS programs and future programs will use this letter with PS partners in lieu of PS contracts.

This screen was last updated on Jun 17 2013 10:24AM by Geraldine Moore

System Information

System information

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on:09/06/2013 4:06 PM

Last updated by:samimooreg

Completed on: 09/12/2013 3:41 PM

Completed by: samimooreg

Approved on: 09/23/2013 8:52 AM

Approved by: rscodobakc