ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation State Plan for Fiscal Year 2012 (submitted FY 2011)

1.1 The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR)(DSU) is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Idaho State board of Education (DSA) through IDVR [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

The State Treasurer

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

The Administrator (IDVR)

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Trudy Anderson, Ph.D.

Title of Signatory
Interim Administrator

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/30/2011

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2012
Yes

Comments:

Form ED-80-0013 for Vocational Rehabilitation Program

Form ED-80-0013 for Supported Employment Program

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Trudy Anderson, Ph.D.

Title of Signatory
Interim Administrator

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/30/2011

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. Yes

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

Attachment 4.2(c)

SUMMARY OF INPUT FROM STATE REHABILITATION COUNCIL FOR FFY 2010

The responsibilities of the Idaho State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) are outlined in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended in 1998.

During quarterly SRC meetings in FFY2011, the SRC worked to identify three key areas where they will take the lead in an advisory capacity to the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR). These include the following:

• Establishment of a Finance Committee

The SRC established an on-going financial committee. Priorities will be set by the administrator through the SBOE. The SRC will develop a depth of understanding of the issues and potential solutions. Examples: o Sources of match and complexities of matching with any source other than State General Funds. o Third party agreements. o EES Program Vendors. o Balance of funding for Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Idaho Commission of the Blind and Visual Impaired (ICBVI).

• Creation of talking points

The SCR will assist by developing talking points for budget requests. The SRC with the VR administrator will develop strategies for communication with legislators statewide – prior to the start of legislative session. The SRC delegation will be in the audience for the VR administrator’s presentation to the Joint Finance and Appropriations Committee (JFAC). The SRC will follow-up with JFAC after the presentation to provide additional information regarding the key points.

• Monitoring of 107 Review and Corrective Action Plan

The SRC Finance Committee will monitor the progress and recommend action as needed regarding the 107 Review and Corrective Action. The key areas that have been identified are; 1)IESDB – 3rd Party agreement, 2)application for VR Services – 60 day period, 3)non-allowable match from CRPs, 4)monitoring of grant activities, 5)monitoring of carrying over non-match federal funds, 6)and spending program income before drawdown of federal funds. The SRC Finance Committee will play a major roll in advisory to the alignment of State STARS System, the Federal Drawdown, the Indirect Cost Calculation, and Financial Reports not supported by accounting records.

The SRC has recommended and VR has agreed to develop, fund, and staff a Business Liaison position. This individual will be responsible for networking with both the Chief Executive Officer and Human Resource Manager at companies throughout the State of Idaho. This will assist counselors in placing clients in internships, and in turn, higher paying jobs, while recovering SSI/SSDI funding for the Agency.

Additionally, at the recommendation of the SRC, the Agency has teamed together with the SRC and the University of Idaho to bring a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor undergraduate and graduate program to both Northern and Southern Idaho. The SRC was instrumental in presenting this business case to the State Board of Education for support of this initiative. The University of Idaho recently announced to the SRC that this program is funded, staff has been hired, and facilities are in place to begin this program in the fall of 2011. The State of Idaho will now have an undergraduate and graduate Vocational Rehabilitation degree program offered by the University of Idaho.

IDVR Agency central office staff, including the Administrator, attends SRC meetings that are held four times each year. Routine discussion items include:

> Major Events and Activities during the past Quarter

> Progress on State and Strategic Plan

> Quarterly Performance on Standards and Indicators for the Agency

> Personnel Development Report

> Changes in Policies Under Consideration

A constructive dialog ensues with the SRC asking for points of clarification and providing advice and feedback to VR staff.

Regional Managers make presentations at each quarterly SRC meeting highlighting the performance of regional offices’ regarding standards and indicators, client success stories, and challenges encountered in providing quality services to clients.

Former VR clients who have exited the program during the past twelve months are invited and encouraged to meet with the SRC during their quarterly meetings and share their experiences while served by VR. On occasion, the interaction with the SRC results in remedial action to assist the client in pursuit of their vocational goal.

The key practice the Council adopted in 2010 is to have all members complete the RSA web-based training modules (San Diego State Curriculum) by meeting the standards required to receive certification. All Idaho SRC members are certified.

The Council attended the Agency annual in-service training. This provided the Council with the opportunity to discuss information with all of the staff of the Agency and to be aware of the work and successes of the counselors.

The Agency provides the Council with updates on compliance with CSPD requirements and other human resource actions.

The Council is given the opportunity to provide guidance on issues. Examples include direct input in the clarification of the roles of a Vocational Rehabilitation Assistant, the content of the Agency’s external public website, training protocol to be utilized for new Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Vocational Assistants, and guidance in regard to defining categories under an order of selection. The Agency accepted and incorporated all suggestions of the SRC. The Council has a “Planning Committee” that works directly with Agency staff in the development of the state plan and will provide ongoing monitoring of annual state plan progress.

Members of the Council were able to make direct contact with the Congressional Delegation in Washington D.C., and the local legislature to advocate for the Agency budget request.

The leadership of the Council attends CSAVR bi-annual conferences to become aware of issues that face the Agency at the national level.

The leadership of the Council attends quarterly State Independent Living Council (SILC) meetings to become abreast of SILC issues on a state level.

Members of the Agency management team give presentations to the Council in their area of stewardship to help keep members of the Council up to date on issues and policies.

The Agency administrator initiates and maintains contact with the SRC Chair to share ongoing issues.

This screen was last updated on Jul 27 2011 12:48PM by saidthorsenh

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

Attachment 4.7(b) (3)

STATEWIDENESS AND WAIVER OF STATEWIDENESS

The Division provides services in one (1) or more political subdivisions of the State that increases services or expands the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan and:

(1) The Division verifies in the specific Memoranda of Agreement (MOAs) that the contributions of these political subdivisions are certified as non-federal dollars attached for services, including funds contributed to a local Agency by a private Agency, organization or individual, and

(2) The Division ensures that the services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments, and

(3) The Division ensures that all services administered are in full agreement with the rules and regulations governing General Vocational Rehabilitation Programs as well as State Plan requirements and that the designated state unit (DSU) is in full agreement with the provision of those services.

(4) The Division obtains written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service utilizing Agency funds prior to service delivery.

Juvenile Offenders:

The Division in concert with the Idaho Department of Juvenile Corrections (IDJC) entered into a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to provide comprehensive vocational services to juvenile offenders both in the IDJC institution and within the community. The goal of this MOA is to provide IDVR eligible clients/offenders located within the Treasure Valley area the opportunity to prepare for re-entry into the community by providing the full spectrum of IDVR services. IDJC will contribute $42,173 of certifiable non-federal monies toward the case service costs encumbered.

Transitioning Student Population:

Due to the rural nature of Idaho and the increased travel time associated with serving the School/Work (transition) population, additional resources are necessary in certain areas of the state to ensure the needs are met. In collaboration with Special Education and IDEA, as well as federal initiatives, the Division has developed cooperative agreements with school districts in various areas throughout the state to provide comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services to students with disabilities to prepare these individuals for transition to work. A designated VR counselor and staff member are assigned to a consortium affiliated facility to better serve clients in the respective areas. The school districts will pay a total of $191,090 in certifiable non-federal monies to IDVR to be used expressly for allowable costs incurred by IDVR in the implementation of the cooperative agreement. All parties have agreed to and signed the memoranda agreements. The memoranda agreements cover the following areas of the state:

Region I Coeur d’Alene - Two Projects

Region II Lewiston - One Project

Region III Treasure Valley Special Programs - Five Projects

Region IV Twin Falls - One Project

Region VI Idaho Falls - One Project

It is worth contrasting the services in the regions of the state covered by the MOUs versus those not covered. The majority of the state high schools are covered by the transition agreements in the state. Those not covered by this approach tend to be smaller school districts or out of the way communities, although this is not always true. First of all, any individual school district might participate in the arrangement. IDVR counselors are located or reside in high schools participating in the project. This provides an easy access to the transition age students eligible for IDVR services. The office space, phones and utilities are provided by the various schools where our counselors are located. These counselors carry a full caseload of transition students and are not dedicated to the general population eligible for IDVR services. The counselors keep the students on the caseload until they are closed by a successful rehabilitation or from failure to successfully complete the rehabilitation process. An important aspect of this agreement that is not feasible for a general counselor is the creation of a close working relationship with school personnel, more timely referrals, better support throughout the rehabilitation process, easy access to pertinent school staff, and the expertise that comes with specialization. The arrangement has proved important in developing an excellent working relationship between IDVR staff and school districts across the state.

In school districts not covered by the interagency agreements, students are referred by school counselors, special education teachers, or by word of mouth to IDVR. In such cases all of the normal and appropriate activities and services are provided by the DSU. In these regions of the state the counselor carries a general caseload with some transition age students. There is no service offered under the MOUs not also made available by the counselors providing services in the areas not covered by the MOUs. One difference however, must be mentioned. The counselors with full time caseloads of transition age youth typically become experts in providing services to this specialized caseload. At one time our Agency believed this caseload would not be as productive as general caseload counselors, but the notion was proved wrong by several of the transition specialist counselors in recent years.

Mental Health Population:

Individuals with mental health issues have been historically underserved in Idaho. To ensure that the needs of this population are adequately met, the Division has developed an MOA with the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Behavioral Health, Adult Mental Health to provide vocational rehabilitation services to Idahoans experiencing severe and persistent mental illness who are eligible for vocational rehabilitation services. A designated VR counselor and staff member are assigned to a consortium affiliated facility to better serve clients in the respective areas. The Department of Health and Welfare pays IDVR $229,518 in certifiable non-federal monies for services executed under this interagency agreement. Both parties have agreed to and signed the memorandum. This interagency agreement covers the following areas only:

Region I Coeur d’Alene

Region II Lewiston

Region III Boise/Caldwell/Nampa

Region IV Twin Falls

Region V Pocatello

Region VI Idaho Falls

Idaho continues to develop a system of mental health courts modeled after drug courts for those with persistent and severe mental illness (SPMI) disabilities. So far all of the mental health courts are located in geographic areas covered by our interagency agreements. The new system in conjunction with our counselor’s efforts is proving useful in the rehabilitation process for consumers for whom success is most elusive.

In the regions of the state not covered by the interagency agreements SPMI consumers meet with general case load counselors and begin the normal rehabilitation process from application, to eligibility, plan development, service provision, placement, and eventual closure. In such cases the consumer is provided all the normal individualized services, however, is not able to access the counselors with the greatest expertise and specialization for MI. Additionally, the specialized counselors have developed a close working relationship with their respective regional mental health providers which encourages more timely referrals and better support throughout the rehabilitation process.

Department of Labor (IDOL) -Targeted Job Club

Due to financial and economic conditions in the state, most state agencies are operating on reduced and/or limited resources. This significantly impacts the ability to create new programs or expand existing programs. In collaboration with Idaho Department of Labor (IDOL), the Division has developed a cooperative agreement that will provide specialized job search assistance to clients in the Treasure Valley area. At this time, available funding will only support the creation of a job club in this designated area of the state. However, due to the concentration of people within the Treasure Valley, the job club will be able to reach a significant portion of the population in the state.

The purpose of this agreement is to provide a facilitated job club strategy targeted to the unique needs of individuals who are applicants for or recipients of VR services. IDOL will continue to offer the traditional job clubs throughout the state and no change will be made in this program. The services provided in the VR Job Club will not be the usual and customary services provided in a traditional IDOL job club, but will be new, modified, expanded and/or re-configured to have a vocational rehabilitation and disability focus. The customized services provided in the VR Job Club are only available to applicants for, or recipients of VR services.

The DOL will pay certifiable non-federal monies for services executed under this interagency agreement. The agreement covers Boise, Nampa, Caldwell, and Meridian areas. In the regions not covered by this agreement, a traditional job club continues to be available to all consumers through the DOL.

This screen was last updated on Sep 9 2011 1:10PM by saidthorsenh

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

Attachment 4.8(a)

COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH AGENCIES CARRYING OUT ACTIVITIES UNDER THE STATEWIDE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM

The Workforce Development Council is the sole workforce investment board in the state to oversee a statewide regional planning area. This requires the Council to exercise special responsibility for development and oversight of the state’s workforce development infrastructure and program. As a result of this consolidation, there is a single memorandum of understanding (MOU) that includes all Workforce Investment System partners. The purpose of this MOU is to establish the framework for operation of the One Stop system in a manner that maximizes services to system customers while making efficient use of public resources.

The following statement from the agreement summarizes the intent and purpose of this statewide partnership:

"This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is entered into in the spirit of cooperation and collaboration by the Workforce Development Council, hereafter referred to as "the WDC" and the One Stop delivery system signatory partners, hereafter referred to as the "One Stop partners" or "partners" to describe how their various funding streams and resources will be utilized to better serve their mutual customers, both job seekers and employers, through an integrated system of service delivery operated at comprehensive sites known as Idaho Works Career Centers and satellite sites, called Idaho Works Career Connection sites. It is understood that the development and implementation of these Centers will require mutual trust and teamwork among the One Stop partnering agencies and the WDC, working together to accomplish the shared goals."

4.8(b) (1) COOPERATION AND COORDINATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES AND ENTITIES

The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation does not engage in any programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) and the following entities have entered into formal agreements, which outline the specific activities expected of each partner. The agreements outline goals, planning processes, information sharing and confidentiality, technology, continuous improvement and accountability, service delivery support, cost sharing, annual action plans, duration, amendments, and termination/conflict resolution. These entities include:

CAP - Idaho Client Assistance Project:

This agreement outlines the interaction between IDVR staff and CAP staff for the improvement of services to people with disabilities in Idaho served under the VR program.

Idaho Department of Health & Welfare - Division of Health –Children’s Special Health Program:

The Idaho Children’s Special Health Program was formally known as Cripple Children’s Services with the Shriner’s Hospitals. The agreement facilitates the referral of children ages 16 to 18 with significant disabilities to the IDVR program. It indicates we will work together to ensure appropriate transition to adult life to eligible youth. It further agrees that those needed and allowable services not covered by the existence of comparable benefits or other resources (as defined by the Act’s implementing regulations) will be covered by IDVR.

Idaho Industrial Commission:

This agreement outlines the relationship between IDVR and the Industrial Commission with regard to persons injured on the job who may also have other non-work related injuries. The Industrial Commission will be the lead Agency for injured workers in Idaho and will refer them to IDVR when they are unable to return to previous or similar employment due to the work related injury.

Idaho Department of Health & Welfare, Division of Behavioral Health, Adult Mental Health (Yearly updated agreement):

The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, Division of Behavioral Health, Adult Mental Health enter into this agreement for the express purpose of better serving Idahoans experiencing severe and persistent mental illness. A team approach will be used to ensure that the Idahoans served by this agreement will benefit as to remaining de-institutionalized and successfully integrated into their respective communities from a psychological, psychosocial, and employment perspective. Those consumers who have a severe and persistent mental illness deemed not eligible for this program will be referred to the general IDVR program. Those consumers who have a severe and persistent mental illness deemed ineligible for this program or IDVR services will be referred to appropriate resources for assistance.

Tribal VR (Nez Perce Tribe, Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Shoshone/Bannock Tribe, Shoshone/Paiute Tribe):

The intent of these agreements is to develop and implement a cooperative system for providing vocational rehabilitation services to eligible American Indians with disabilities and to promote and enhance to the greatest extent possible vocational rehabilitation services like that of those provided by the State of Idaho. The IDVR has the basic responsibility to provide rehabilitation services to all eligible individuals of Idaho. The Nez Perce Tribe, Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Shoshone/Paiute and Shoshone/Bannock Tribe, through a Federal Section 121 grant, will work cooperatively with IDVR.

Idaho Department of Labor /Data Sharing:

This agreement provides for disclosure of employment security information by the Idaho Department of Labor to IDVR for the purpose of evaluating participants’ acquisition and retention of employment and earnings. The agreement also enables IDVR to meet federal reporting requirements under Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act as amended by Title IV of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998.

State Use Contracting Programs:

The State of Idaho has a 1973 statute referred to as the "Use Law." A Council appointed by the governor facilitates the sale of goods and services from thirteen (13) Community Rehabilitation "Not for Profit" Programs. A cooperative agreement is not necessary.

Community Rehabilitation Programs:

IDVR does not have contracts with Community Rehabilitation Programs as services through these entities are provided on a fee for service basis.

Idaho Department of Correction (IDOC):

This agreement establishes guidelines to provide comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services to adult, felony clients/offenders both exiting from an IDOC institution and in the community. In addition, IDVR and IDOC have entered into an MOA that provides for the purchase of training equipment to enable eligible offenders to complete certified training in heavy equipment operation.

Idaho Department of Juvenile Corrections (IDJC):

This agreement established the guidelines to provide comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services to juvenile offenders, both in an IDJC institution and in the community.

Idaho Department of Corrections (IDOC):

This agreement describes the partnerships and responsibilities between the Idaho Department of Correction and the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. The intent is coordinate with College of Western Idaho to set up a program to train offenders and other segments of the population considered disadvantaged, as defined by this grant, in the basics of heavy equipment operation, using the National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER) curriculum. The goal is to provide offenders with skills in heavy equipment operation that will result in increased employability potential in the fields of highway construction, agricultural heavy equipment operation, and/or heavy equipment operation related employment or industries.

Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and Blind (IESDB):

This agreement established guidelines and policies to facilitate the referral of IESDB students to the Agency for appropriate vocational rehabilitation services and to coordinate the provision of services when the student(s) is/are mutual clients of both entities.

Idaho Department of Education/School-Work Transition Cooperative Agreements:

IDVR has entered into ten consortium assignments that span a myriad of school districts in both rural and metropolitan areas. Each consortium provides a designated counselor and support staff who focuses exclusively upon the school age population within the respective consortium.

Idaho Department of Education - Secondary Transition:

This agreement deals with our mutual definition of secondary transition and the cooperative delivery of services to transitioning students with disabilities. It outlines the provision of services required from local school districts, IDVR and Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, roles and responsibilities of each Agency including financial responsibilities, provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services.

Easter Seals-Goodwill Northern Rocky Mountain (ESGW):

This agreement established guidelines and policies to facilitate the referral of eligible participants leaving Idaho’s prison system and enrolling into ESGW’s Reentry Center to the Agency for appropriate vocational rehabilitation services and to coordinate the provision of services when the individual(s) is/are mutual clients of both entities.

Department of Labor (DOL)

The purpose of this agreement is to provide a facilitated job club strategy targeted to the unique needs of individuals who are applicants for or recipients of VR services. Historically, IDOL has provided a job club that is open to all job seekers. This traditional job club is geared towards individuals who do not face the same types of employment issues as people with disabilities experience on a regular basis. The services provided in the VR Job Club will not be the usual and customary services provided in a traditional IDOL job club, but will be new, modified, expanded and/or re-configured to have a vocational rehabilitation and disability focus. The customized services provided in the VR Job Club are only available to applicants for, or recipients of VR services. Additionally, the creation of a job club strategy is included in the agency’s State Plan Goals and Priorities (Attachment 4.11(c) (1)). Due to limited resources, the job club will be available only in the Treasure Valley. If funds become available in the future and this proves to be a valuable strategy, consideration will be given to providing this strategy on a state wide basis.

This screen was last updated on Sep 9 2011 1:10PM by saidthorsenh

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Attachment 4.8(b)(2)

COORDINATION WITH EDUCATION OFFICIALS

Colleges and Professional Technical Programs in Idaho under the State Board of Education:

These agreements provide coordination of services between IDVR and the universities and colleges in Idaho, so that students with disabilities can succeed in an environment of higher education as outlined in CFR361.22.

The cooperative agreements with colleges and universities outline information regarding consultation and technical assistance, roles, responsibilities, including financial responsibilities of each, and procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need services.

Idaho Department of Education - Secondary Transition:

This agreement deals with our mutual definition of secondary transition and the cooperative delivery of services to transitioning students with disabilities. It outlines the provision of services required from local school districts, IDVR and Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, roles and responsibilities of each Agency including financial responsibilities, provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services.

The parties enter into these agreements solely to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from K-12 public education into adult life. This transition to adult life may involve any or all of the following goal oriented activities: post-secondary education, training and job placement, direct placement into appropriate employment (to include supported employment if required), consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities, advocacy and any other activities that are relevant to the student and within the scope of the IDVR mission and role.

This agreement with the Idaho Department of Education and education officials ensures a coordinated, comprehensive system focusing on youth with disabilities as they transition from secondary school to post-school activities, promoting post-secondary education, vocational training, integrated employment (including supported employment), continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, and community participation emphasizing a team approach to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from public education into employment. Roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each Agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for services are outlined as well. This agreement also includes referrals of students with disabilities (e.g. physical, medical) who are not eligible for special education services, and students who have a 504 Plan (Rehabilitation Act of 1973), to IDVR for determination of eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services.

This agreement outlines the local education Agency responsibility for the purchase of assistive technology equipment that is required for educational purposes. The agreement also outlines IDVR responsibility for the purchase of any assistive technology device of equipment that may be necessary for the student’s eventual employment. The agreement also provides a protocol for discounting the cost of equipment purchased by the school for repurchase by IDVR to be utilized in an employment program.

Additionally, IDVR will accept referrals within 2 years prior to the student exiting high school (or earlier if appropriate), determine eligibility and collaboratively, with input from the student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) Team, develop Individual Plans for Employment (IPEs).

School-Work Transition Cooperative Agreements:

IDVR has entered into ten consortium assignments that span a myriad of school districts in both rural and metropolitan areas. While these projects represent a substantial segment of the Agency’s services to the transitional population, the agreement referenced above relates to services in all districts across the state. The Agency’s consortium projects include:

1. Panhandle Consortium (Region I)

2. Coeur d’Alene/Post Falls School-Work (Region I)

3. Lewiston School-Work (Region II)

4. Local Consortium of Southern Idaho School Districts (Region IV)

5. Southern Counties Consortium of Schools (Region V)

6. Greater Opportunities to Achieve Life Skills Consortium School Districts (Region VI)

7. Canyon, Owyhee and Gem School Districts (Region III)

8. Nampa School District (Region III)

9. Meridian Joint School District 2 (Region III)

10. Boise School-Work (Region III )

IDVR also has individual cooperative agreements with other educational entities throughout the state. The goal of these cooperative agreements is to provide the necessary coordination of services at a local level, which will assist eligible individuals who have disabilities in an educational environment. These agreements are specific in terms of program and financial responsibilities of each party and include:

Idaho Interagency Council on Secondary Transition:

IDVR continues to be involved in the Idaho Interagency Council on Secondary Transition with the purpose of ensuring that youth with disabilities experience a collaborative, comprehensive system that facilitates a smooth transition from secondary school to adult life. The goal of this group is to provide and promote a common conceptual framework that leads to opportunities for youth with disabilities in community living, recreation, continued education, and employment. Interagency cooperative planning, information sharing, and the collaborative use of resources will help accomplish our mission at the state and local level.

Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and Blind (IESDB):

This agreement established guidelines and policies to facilitate the referral of IESDB students to vocational Rehabilitation for appropriate vocational rehabilitation services and to coordinate the provision of services when the student(s) is/are mutual clients of both entities.

This screen was last updated on Sep 9 2011 1:03PM by saidthorsenh

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Attachment 4.8(b) (3)

COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH PRIVATE NONPROFIT VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICE PROVIDERS.

IDVR does not establish cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers as we purchase services on a fee-for-service basis.

IDVR has implemented two reimbursement methods with private, nonprofit Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP). These include contracts for services provided on an incremental basis (payments following the provision of selected services) as well as fee-for-service.

IDVR continues to participate as a guest at the quarterly meetings conducted by both CRP associations. The main purpose of the Agency participation is to solidify and improve collaborative relationships for the enhancement of service delivery to individuals with disabilities.

The major topics of discussion include:

1. Social Security Work Incentives

2. Contract issues as well as fee-for-service reimbursement issues

3. Methods to improve the partnerships through open communication

4. Strategies to improve provider program outcomes

All new providers of service for IDVR clients must go through a certification and approval process. The Chief of Field Services reviews the qualifications of the vendors providing services to IDVR clients in order to assure the quality of these services, as well as the safety of clients. Vendors are certified through either the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) or Rehabilitation Services Accreditation System (RSAS).

IDVR policy assures that applicants and eligible individuals exercise choice of service providers. Each region throughout the state provides a comprehensive list of CRP services and expertise available, which enables the consumer to make an informed choice in the selection of an appropriate vendor.

In order to demonstrate quality assurance oversight of the CRP vendors, IDVR has requested that each facility submit quarterly performance reports which are provided to the respective credentialing organization that monitors the CRP for on-going compliance of established performance standards. Additionally, IDVR is in the process of developing a monitoring protocol that will collect on-going specific CRP program data. This protocol is scheduled to be in effect beginning July 2011.

This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2011 4:30PM by saidthorsenh

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

4.8(b) (4)

EVIDENCE OF COLLABORATION REGARDING SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES AND EXTENDED SERVICES

IDVR is committed to the advancement of opportunities for Idaho citizens with disabilities including those with the most significant disabilities to be employed and to become independent in the least restrictive and most integrated environments. IDVR has established and continues to maintain strong working relationships with pertinent state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services throughout the state.

IDVR continues to manage extended employment funding which is annually provided by appropriation from the state legislature. One full time employee is responsible for distributing the funding among the participating community rehabilitation programs that offer not only community supported employment but also extended sheltered employment.

IDVR continues to be successful in maximizing the Federal Supported Employment allocation by collaborating with other agencies and organizations to ensure that available resources are identified and utilized in order to maximize the impact of the services for all individuals with the most significant disabilities requiring long-term community supported employment. Included within this collaboration are Medicaid services provided under the Home and Community Based Services Waiver, as well as services provided through the statewide IDVR consortia with the State Regional Mental Health programs.

IDVR counselors work closely with the staff involved with the State Extended Services/Supported Employment program to ensure that eligible individuals are referred and placed on the waiting list to receive long-term community supported employment funding when appropriate. IDVR counselors also assist individuals who desire to move from an extended services environment into competitive and community-based supported employment when appropriate.

This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2011 4:32PM by saidthorsenh

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

Attachment 4.10

COMPREHENSIVE SYSTEM OF PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

Collection and analysis of data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development consistent with the provisions of 34 CFR 361.18 (a) includes the following activities:

> Analysis of current and future staffing needs continues through periodic reviews of turnover rates, promotions and transfers. Anticipatory staffing analysis is ongoing.

> During FFY 2010, the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) turnover rate for Qualified Rehabilitation Professionals (QRP), Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors (VRC) and Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists (VRS) was 9.59%. The overall turnover rate for all Vocational Rehabilitation staff was 10.7%. It is projected over the next five (5) years that the turnover rate for all staff will be between 15% and 20%.

> In the next five (5) years, two (2) out of eight (8) Regional Managers will likely retire. In addition, within the next two (2) years the Planning and Evaluation Manager will retire. In 2010 the Field Chief and one Regional Manager retired while a second Regional Manager resigned. The Field Chief position is expected to be replaced by September 2011. Both Regional Manager positions were filled by promotion of Assistant Regional Managers. Steps have been taken to provide leadership opportunities to QRP interested in management. The position of Assistant Regional Manager is one such position that offers management experience.

> A new IDVR Administrator will be designated and in place by FFY 2012.

> IDVR will continue to work with the State Board of Education, the Governor and legislators to obtain additional full time positions and funding due to the continuing need for increased numbers of vocational rehabilitation staff. Significant State limitations on new positions have precluded addition of personnel in recent years during the economic downturn.

> Idaho’s overall population growth slowed considerably in 2010. The state still ranks as one of the fastest growing states in the nation.

> The Agency has determined that a ratio of one (1) QRP for every 20,000 people in the state is an ideal staffing ratio. The population of Idaho is approximately 1.5 million people, thus a minimum of seventy-five (75) QRP over the next five (5) years would be required to meet this ratio. IDVR currently has a total of seventy-two (72) QRP, VRC and VRS, thus three (3) additional positions are needed.

> Tracking, monitoring and reporting of individual academic preparation, certification pursuits and continuing education for QRP, VRC and VRS is regularly maintained by IDVR.

> IDVR has one hundred and fifty (150) employees; one hundred and twenty- eight (128) of these are Field Staff comprised of eight (8) Regional Managers, three (3) of which are Field Service Managers; seventy-two (72) QRP, VRC and VRS; and fifty (50) Vocational Rehabilitation Assistants (VRA).

> The ratio of QRP, VRC and VRS to individuals served is 1:189. An optimal caseload size is approximately one hundred and twenty-five (125). IDVR continues to explore avenues to ensure client needs are met by coordinating services and partnering with other state agencies and entities.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor 72 2 10
2 Vocational Rehabilitation Assistants 50 0 8
3 Field Management Staff 10 1 3
4 HR 2 1 0
5 Fiscal 5 1 0
6 IT 5 1 2
7 Administrator 1 0 0
8 Planning and Evaluation 2 0 1
9 Administrative Staff 3 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

IDVR provides feedback to the department chair and dean at the University of Idaho on existing and future staffing needs, with an emphasis on individuals with disabilities and minorities. In addition, IDVR critiques program content and advises the department chair and dean on specific topics in order to prepare the students for successful placement within the Division upon graduation.

University of Idaho has a Rehabilitation Counseling Master’s Program. Currently there are fifteen (15) students enrolled. The fifteen (15) students enrolled are anticipated to graduate in May of 2011.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 University of Idaho 15 1 0 16
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

Plan for Recruitment, Preparation and Retention of Qualified Personnel

Plans to address current and projected needs for qualified personnel include the following activities:

> IDVR maintains periodic contact with regional universities and gathers information about the numbers of individuals who will be graduating from rehabilitation programs. During the spring 2011 semester, the number of individuals anticipating graduation from accredited universities with a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling is: Western Washington (12), University of Idaho (15), Utah State University (25), San Diego State University (27), University of Wisconsin-Stout (36), and New Mexico Highlands (9).

> IDVR and the University of Idaho will develop an agreement to be renewed annually that will outline the details of a mutually beneficial partnership. IDVR will contribute to the vocational counselor education program in order to ensure a long lasting quality educational program. University of Idaho will provide educational opportunities for existing staff and other rehabilitation related organizations and individuals to advance the profession of rehabilitation counseling. Educational opportunities could include not only formal university education but activities such as workshops, research projects, specialty events, summer training conferences in conjunction with the Idaho Chapter of the National Rehabilitation Association and internship positions within the University structure.

> Periodic site visits are conducted at the University of Idaho. IDVR staff meets with students and faculty in order to establish relationships and initiate recruitment activities with current graduate students.

> IDVR provides feedback to the department chair and dean at the University of Idaho on existing and future staffing needs, including individuals with disabilities as well as those with minority backgrounds. In addition, IDVR critiques program content and advises the department chair and dean r on areas needing attention for successful placement of graduates within the Division.

> Periodic contact is made with Western Washington University, University of Idaho, Portland State University, University of Arkansas, Utah State University, University of Northern Colorado at Greeley, San Diego State University, University of Wisconsin Stout, University of Arizona, Montana State University at Billings, New Mexico Highlands University, Texas Tech University, and University of Texas Pan Am. The Division has developed a process whereby each of the eight (8) Regional Managers and the IDVR Administrator are assigned to different universities that have a Master’s Level Rehabilitation Program for recruiting purposes. Each will maintain ongoing relationships to promote communication concerning vacancy announcements and to develop and maintain a pool of qualified QRP applicants. They keep in contact with key personnel at each university, i.e., Department Heads and Internship Coordinators.

> The staff attends the National Council of Rehabilitation Educators (NCRE) conference annually (contingent on available funding) in order to maintain relationships that promote the type of communication necessary to pro-actively distribute details of potential vacancy announcements and to assist in maintaining a pool of QRP applicants.

> The Agency sends position announcements to the members of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) for them to disseminate to interested applicants. The SRC also conducts annual staff surveys for all IDVR employees, compiles and reviews results and offers feedback and recommendations on findings, specifically areas that may need improvement.

> IDVR continues to face challenges in recruiting qualified applicants. The entry-level wage for QRP is lower than comparable state and private positions.

> All Regional Managers, Central Office Management and other leadership personnel complete recruitment activities. Development of recruitment and marketing plans continue to be a priority that will lead to an accurate assessment of the recruitment efforts of the Division.

> Professional organizations such as the local chapter and the national chapter of the National Rehabilitation Association assist in promoting Agency recruiting efforts.

> IDVR participates in Career Fairs around the state to encourage and seek out individuals from diverse backgrounds including individuals with disabilities and from minority backgrounds.

> IDVR conducts exit interviews with staff, when possible, to determine whether there are areas of concern affecting staff retention that need to be addressed.

 

Personnel Standards

Establishment and maintenance of personnel standards includes the following activities:

> The State of Idaho does not require a state licensure for rehabilitation counseling. Therefore personnel educational standards established by IDVR for qualified rehabilitation professionals (QRP) are intended to satisfy Federal requirements, 34 CFR 361.18(c).

> IDVR has established three QRP levels: Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor I, II & III (VRC I, II & III).

> The academic standards established by IDVR for the VRC I & II positions include the following: 1) graduation from an accredited university with a Master’s Degree in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling and a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) designation obtained by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC); 2) graduation from an accredited university with a Master’s Degree in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling; 3) a current Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) or Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) designation issued by the State of Idaho Bureau of Occupational Licensing (IBOL); 4) a Bachelor’s degree in a related field and a current CRC designation issued by the CRCC.

> The academic standards established by IDVR for the VRC III position include the following: 1) graduation from an accredited university with a Master’s Degree in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling and a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) designation obtained by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC); 2) a current Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) or Licensed Clinical Professional Counselor (LCPC) designation issued by the State of Idaho Bureau of Occupational Licensing (IBOL); 3) a Bachelor’s degree in a related field and a current CRC designation issued by the CRCC.

> Due to the limited pool of recruits for the QRP positions, IDVR will consider hiring individuals who do not possess the above academic standards. These individuals would be hired into the Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist (VRS) or the Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) designation as outlined in the IDVR CSPD policy, HR 1001. As a condition of employment the individuals agree to obtain educational and/or credential standards outlined in the IDVR CSPD policy, HR 1001, within five years of their hire date. These individuals are restricted in their professional latitude to approve eligibilities, plans and case closures.

> IDVR allows current employees who do not meet the certification standards to complete the educational and/or credential requirements within five years. If those employees fail to meet the standards in the allotted time frame, individuals are re-classified to a Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist designation. In that capacity, individuals are restricted in their professional latitude to approve eligibilities, plans and case closures. These rights and their former position will be re-instated, upon approval, once they achieve the required credentials.

> IDVR also places emphasis on experience and special skills including but not limited to the following: bilingual skills such as fluency in Spanish; proficiency in sign language; and extensive employment history in specialty areas such as Corrections, School to Work Transition and Mental Health.

> There are currently fifty-eight (58) QRP who meet IDVR CSPD educational standards, twelve (12) who do not meet the standards and two (2) vacant positions.

> CRC designation is required for all Regional Managers, Field Services Managers and the Bureau Chief. The CRC, LPC or the LCPC designation is required for all VRC III positions.

> Regional Managers conduct bi-annual assessments of progress towards meeting the CSPD timelines and report outcomes to the HR staff.

> Remaining IDVR staff positions, not specifically named in this section, are required to meet the State of Idaho, IDVR and/or State Board of Education (SBOE) minimum standards set for each position description.

> IDVR requires those QRP, VRC and VRS who have not obtained the CRC credential to follow and abide by the CRCC Code of Ethics http://www.crccertification.com/pages/crc_ccrc_code_of_ethics/10.php. VRA and other staff who work directly with IDVR participants will also be required to follow and abide by the CRCC Code of Ethics. A copy of the most current CRCC Code of Ethics is provided to QRP and VRA at time of hire.

> IDVR provides continued counseling to employees on Division expectations for meeting the requirements as defined by Federal regulations of a Qualified Rehabilitation Professional (QRP) and formalizes plans for achieving outlined goals.

> IDVR provides financial support through funding from the Basic Support and In-Service Training Grants for coursework to support counselor objectives in meeting CSPD requirements. In FFY 2010, $1823.90 was spent to support this effort.

 

Staff Development

Activities for staff development to ensure all personnel are receiving appropriate and adequate training include the following:

> Tracking, monitoring and reporting individual training and development of all Vocational Rehabilitation staff. IDVR has a software program that allows staff to electronically request training. In addition, it provides ways to track and monitor all training activities.

> An annual training needs assessment is conducted in order to determine personnel training needs. Individual employee skill sets, position descriptions and position duties are also assessed to identify areas that require further development. In addition, organizational needs are analyzed to identify areas in need of succession planning, to expand those employee skills essential in the effective servicing of special populations and to meet job demands. Information gathered from employee performance evaluations, supervisory feedback, employee exit interviews and administrative review results also assists the Agency with identifying areas of need.

> In October all staff participated in a statewide conference which included a general session panel discussion of the Division’s policies and procedures, as well as a variety of breakout sessions on topics including: Effective Communication, Assistive Technology, Time Management, Vocational Choice, Addiction and Families, Co-occurring Disorders, Healthcare Reform, Serving the Fifty Plus Work Force, VA-VR, CPR & First Aid, Conversational Spanish, and Defensive Awareness and Practical Skills.

> Throughout the year training requests are approved for individual staff to attend training in areas of interest or need. In 2010 topics, conferences and titles have included: Personality Disorders, ICA (Idaho Counseling Association) Annual Conference, Pathways to Seamless Transition, Tools for Life, The Management Conference, Moving Toward Your Vision, TBI & Other Neurological Conditions, NRA National Conference, NRA Idaho Chapter Summer Conference, Ethics, ASL (American Sign Language), Rethinking Schizophrenia Management: Exploring a Once-Monthly Medication, Section 504 of Rehabilitation Act Compliance workshop, Understanding ADA, Moral Recognition Therapy, The Trouble with Transitions: Issues for Persons with Autism, Idaho Conference on Alcohol and Drug Dependency, Partners Building Bridges: Overcoming Challenges through Leadership and Collaboration, Assistive Technology Training Expo, TBI – The Silent Epidemic, 8th Annual Mental Health Symposium, Ethics: Legalities of Confidentiality, Effective Practices Conference, Career Information Systems (CIS) Fall workshops, Idaho Juvenile Justice Association (IJJA) Conference, RSA Stakeholder ShareShop on Deaf & Hard of Hearing Resources and Services, State Purchasing Forum, 2010 Employment Law & Legislative Conference, Compliance Supplement for Circular A-133, and Hay Job Evaluation Training.

> Succession planning and leadership development continue to be a focus of the Division. Two counselors were promoted to Regional Manager positions within FFY 2011. In order to encourage and support the movement of qualified personnel into promotional openings, the Agency supported five (5) staff in completing the last session of the Emerging Leaders series offered through the Center for Continuing Education in Rehabilitation (CCER) and supported two (2) staff in the series beginning June 2011. Additionally, three (3) staff attended the Orientation to Leadership series offered through CCER. Direct management experience is provided to staff through the use of an assistant regional manager designation in each of the eight (8) regions. This position is filled on a rotating basis allowing qualified staff within each region an opportunity to experience management duties.

> Eighteen staff participated in a 2 ½ day training that was developed and facilitated by CCER. The training was designed specifically for the Assistant Regional Manager role and included topics such as leadership vs. management, performance management, the supervisor’s role in dealing with conflict between staff and with clients, and managing change.

> IDVR personnel who are considered subject matter experts developed a curriculum and subsequently facilitate annual training on Critical Case Questioning and Caseload Management to new VR counselors and assistants.

> All new VR assistants are required to complete a series of online training. The series includes: Disability History, Ethics, Developing Collaborative Relationships, Sticky Situations and Developing Cultural Competence.

> The Division utilized funds from the In-Service Quality grant to provide Motivational Interviewing training. The Motivational Interviewing (MI) training is designed to be delivered over a three month period. The course consists of one (1) two day training session followed by one day of training for two consecutive months. Twenty-seven staff and one VR intern were involved in the training. The goal of the training is to teach VR counselors a method of obtaining an accurate understanding of client expectations, perspective and goals in a more efficient manner. Based upon the success of this training in the Washington DVR, it is estimated that MI techniques will reduce the number of counseling sessions required as well as generate a greater number of successful outcomes. Although it is early in the process, anecdotal reports from VR counselors indicate that the techniques appear to be effective.

The second level of Motivational Interviewing training is centered on obtaining a higher level of proficiency in the specific techniques. This is achieved through the critique and grading of taped interviews. Generally speaking, 6-8 critiqued tapes are required prior to reaching a greater level of proficiency. Currently, fifteen individuals are participating in the proficiency process. This is double the estimated projection of staff who would continue past the initial MI training.

 

Personnel to Address Individual Communication Needs

Communication with Diverse Populations:

Activities to ensure employment of personnel who are trained to communicate in special languages are as follows:

> IDVR continues to participate in state/regional conferences on Hispanic culture and issues.

> Candidates who are fluent in Spanish are recruited and placed within specific areas of the State to serve the needs of the Hispanic community.

> Since Idaho has a separate entity that addresses issues related to low vision and blindness, IDVR does not provide specific training to its staff in Braille.

> Training is provided in the area of deaf and hard of hearing as needed and candidates who are fluent in American Sign Language and/or can communicate with this population are placed within specific areas of the State to serve the needs of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing community.

 

Coordination of Personnel Development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act:

A Regional Manager has been assigned as an active member of the Idaho Interagency Council on Secondary Transition, which promotes interagency cooperative planning, information sharing, and the collaborative use of resources at the state and local level. This Council works to ensure that training needs are adequately identified and then addressed through shared training opportunities. These opportunities include Tools for Life: Secondary Transition and Technology. Jacque Hyatt, Specialist for the Idaho Department of Education Bureau of Special Populations visits approximately five schools each year and invites a QRP to conduct joint trainings with school district personnel, parents, and students with disabilities. Additional activities include QRP attendance at statewide school district transition fairs where they speak with school personnel, parents, and students with disabilities.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2011 11:46AM by saidthorsenh

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Attachment 4.11(a):

COMPREHENSIVE STATEWIDE ASSESSMENT

In response to the requirements of Section 101.15 (a) of the Rehabilitation Act as amended, the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR), in partnership with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), draws from many sources to assess thoroughly the needs of Idahoans with disabilities. The current Statewide Needs Assessment spans FFY 2011-2013. The Statewide Comprehensive Needs Assessment will continue to be conducted on a triennial basis and will include case reviews, consumer satisfaction surveys, focus groups of people with disabilities, town meetings conducted annually in major metropolitan areas of the state, as well as information gathered from community rehabilitation programs statewide. Additionally, counselors assigned to specialized populations (deaf and hard of hearing, transition, corrections, mental health, migrant and seasonal farm workers, American Indians, as well as Hispanics) elicit input not only from the client population but from others who provide services to these populations including input from various state boards and groups focused on the needs of people with disabilities.

Other facets of the IDVR Needs Assessment include:

1. A Strategic Planning process involving a rolling three-year plan which is updated annually. The strategic plan has become an important tool in the decision making process that affects the day-to-day operations of IDVR. Input is solicited from IDVR staff, the CAP, the SRC, and the SILC. Primary focus areas include:

> Service delivery with an emphasis on continued improvement in the quality of service delivery

> Minority populations and other targeted populations

> Deaf and hard of hearing

> Strengthened partnerships with shareholders

> Enhanced revenue opportunities for all VR programs

> Transitioning students

2. Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment Survey:

The survey was designed to evaluate the degree to which IDVR is addressing the rehabilitation needs of the demographic populations encompassed within this state.

Groups targeted for their input and statewide representation included:

> Client Assistance Program (CAP)

> A variety of specific disability advocacy organizations, e.g. Parents Unlimited, NAMI

> Statewide transition partners

> Consumers

> Colleges and Universities

> State Mental Health Council and mental health providers

> State Independent Living Council

> State Rehabilitation Council

> Developmental Disability Council

> Task Force on the ADA

> Adult Corrections

> Juvenile Corrections

> WIA partners

> Department of Labor

> Industrial Commission

> Local and statewide school personnel

> Local Chambers of Commerce

> Idaho Migrant Council

> Health related organizations

> Veterans Administration

> Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired

> American Indian Tribal representatives and 121 projects

> Idaho Inclusiveness Coalition

> IDVR staff

> Community Rehabilitations Programs

A total of 381 responses were recorded. In addition, responses were recorded from the wide spectrum of sources that were tapped throughout the state including focus groups of people with disabilities, town meetings, responses procured from community rehabilitation programs, counselors assigned to specialized populations, as well as various state boards and groups focused on the needs of people with disabilities. Five major themes were identified that are capable of being addressed within the purview of IDVR.

Those themes were:

1. Hispanic population:

A significant number of responses focused upon the need to ingress this population more effectively. An analysis of this need indicated an expanding population which constitutes 10.2% of the statewide population. It was further noted that during FFY 2009 the Hispanic/Latino population constituted 8% of the entire clientele served by the Agency.

2. Outreach to other targeted minority populations:

Historically, the population of Idaho has not included a variety of minorities. During the most recent statewide needs assessment it was determined that various minorities have begun to migrate into the state and together constitute a statistically significant population that is currently underserved. Those populations include African Americans, Asian Americans, American Indians and Alaska natives. Additionally, due to the increase of the lifespan of Americans, older workers are choosing to extend their employment activity into the later years and, therefore, constitute another underserved minority population.

3. Transitioning Students:

It was determined that IDVR should more closely collaborate with statewide educational partners in order to identify and promote vocational goals that reflect labor market trends within the state and correlate with the interests and aptitudes of the student. Some responses received reflected issues beyond the scope of VR services alone, including the lack of effective family support, inefficient school sponsored work experiences, and a stronger network and coordination among agencies designed to provide the essential support required to ensure the acquisition of meaningful employment that will result in self-sufficiency.

4. Deaf and Hard of Hearing:

The statewide assessment identified a need to increase Agency capacity to provide substantial vocational services to this historically underserved population.

5. Supported Employment Services:

The following comments were recorded in regard to this topic: A stronger focus on community based, integrated employment rather than sheltered employment (work services), increased long-term funding for supported employment, and a reduction of the waiting list for funding of supported services. During FFY 2009 efforts were made to increase this budget but with no success. Due to the current state of the economy, it is not anticipated that any additional money will be allocated to this service over the next few years.

Individuals with the most significant disabilities, including Supported Employment:

IDVR is not operating under an order of selection and is able to serve all eligible Idahoans. At the end of FFY 2009, 97% of all cases open during the year were coded as either significantly disabled (SD) or most significantly disabled (MSD). No one was closed in extended employment in a non-integrated setting.

The Comprehensive Needs Assessment reinforced the need for additional state-only funds designated for long-term support. There is a strong consensus among shareholders regarding the need to work closely with IDVR to craft a solution to the long-term support funding shortfall.

Additionally, a stronger focus on community based employment outcomes rather than sheltered workshop (extended employment) has been identified as a need for this population.

It should be noted that all clients served in supported employment meet the classification of MSD. IDVR monitors the proper coding of MSD through its on-going case review process.

Through representation on the SILC, IDVR provides significant input into the development of the State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL). The SILC conducted a series of focus groups across the state to gather input on the needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly those with the most significant disabilities. IDVR incorporated the results of these focus groups into its Comprehensive Needs Assessment.

Service Needs of Individuals with Disabilities who are Minorities:

IDVR addresses services to minority clients through the hiring of a culturally diverse staff, by providing cultural diversity training to IDVR staff, by hiring bi-lingual vocational counselors to ingress the Hispanic population, and by collaborating with the three Section 121 Tribal Vocational Rehabilitation (TVR) grantees.

The most recent census data indicates that Idaho’s two largest minority groups include: Hispanics at 10.2% of the state’s population and American Indians are at 1.5% of the state’s population. In FFY 2009, Hispanics comprised 8.2 % of IDVR clients served. American Indians comprised 3.4 % of IDVR clients served. Historically, particular areas of the state with higher Hispanic populations have been underserved because of the unique barriers related to the culture, which make it difficult to attract participation from that population.

It is important to note that efforts were undertaken to solicit responses from the Hispanic population in regard to the Comprehensive Needs Assessment. In reality, because of the cultural disconnect between this population and government programs; the rate of response was marginal. However, this disadvantage was partially mitigated by the bi-lingual counselors serving this population who were able to elicit some meaningful responses not only from clients but from collateral support sources.

Individuals with Disabilities who have been Unserved or Underserved:

Historically, transitional students in Idaho have experienced significant barriers when exiting the school system and entering the world of work. The following barriers have been identified:

> More vocational training at the high school level needed (lack of work skills)

> Knowledge of procedural details related to scholarships, applications (employment or school), resumes, etc.

> Difficulty accessing community resources

> Family support/attitudes

> Limited job opportunities in small communities

> Fear of losing SSA benefits

> Lack of work ethics and experience

> Substance abuse issues

> Transportation

IDVR has identified the transitional population as a major focus area in its current State Plan. The barriers noted above will continue to be addressed by IDVR and partners as outlined in Goal 3 of the State Plan.

Individuals with Disabilities Served through Other Components of the Statewide Workforce Investment System:

IDVR is an active participant in the Statewide Workforce Investment System. Each region of the state has established a regular schedule of participation within each One Stop Center. In one particular region the VR counselor is permanently housed within the One Stop Center.

IDVR continues to provide training and information to One Stop Center partners on disability related issues, thus increasing the willingness and ability of all partners to serve individuals with disabilities.

While no specific concerns or problems were identified regarding the relationship between IDVR and the One Stop centers, IDVR will continue to build upon the partnership developed to date.

Assessment of the Need to Establish, Develop, or Improve Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) within the State:

IDVR maintains a CRP specialist who serves as a liaison with CRPs and is vested with the responsibility for insuring that services are delivered consistent with IDVR standards.

There are thirty seven Community Rehabilitation Programs in Idaho. Twelve of them belong to a traditional association called ACCSES IDAHO and the remainder are realigning with a new association called Vocational Services of Idaho (VSI).

The majority of the ACCSES-IDAHO is accredited by Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). The remainder of the CRPs is accredited by Rehabilitation Services Accreditation System (RSAS).

IDVR monitors all CRPs to ensure that they are properly accredited before they are accepted as viable vendors. This monitoring is ongoing to ensure that the accreditation remains active. Additionally, IDVR is in the process of developing a monitoring protocol that will collect specific on-going program data.

Idaho is a predominantly rural state. In several of the rural areas there is very limited choice with regard to CRP vendors available. In the current economic downturn, most CRPs have also felt the impact of federal deficits and reduced state general funds. This economic situation has a direct impact on the types of service CRPs are capable of providing to individuals with disabilities. The possibility of a CPR requiring assistance in improving or expanding services delivery will be monitored in order to ensure high quality service delivery and positive outcomes. IDVR continues to facilitate on-going discussions with interested stakeholders to address this particular need.

This screen was last updated on Sep 9 2011 1:03PM by saidthorsenh

Attachment 4.11(b)

ANNUAL ESTIMATES

ANNUAL ESTIMATE OF INDIVIDUALS TO BE SERVED AND COST OF SERVICES

The estimated number of all individuals who are eligible for services under this State Plan: 13,000

IDVR is not in an order of selection

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Title I Part B Title I $6,200,000 5,000 $1,240
Title VI Part B Title VI $297,000 200 $1,485
Totals   $6,497,000 5,200 $1,249

This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2011 5:23PM by saidthorsenh

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Attachment 4.11(c) (1):

STATE’S GOALS AND PRIORITIES FOR FFY 2011-2013

The goals and priorities for the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) are reviewed annually and revised as necessary based on input from a variety of sources including the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), Agency staff, State Independent Living Council (SILC), Client Advocacy Program (CAP), Tribal VR representatives, the Statewide Comprehensive Needs Assessment, the Field Services Employee Council and the IDVR Management team.

The goals and priorities are developed using information from the FFY 2010 Comprehensive Needs Assessment, findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under Section 107, first hand observation and experiences of the rehabilitation managers and Field Services Employee Council, input from organizations mentioned in the previous paragraph, and the expectations defined by federal standards and indicators. These goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by IDVR and the State Rehabilitation Council.

The goals and priorities identified for inclusion in this State Plan will be:

> Measurable

> Attainable

> Meaningful based upon the unique needs and circumstances of Idaho, keeping in mind the rural nature of this state and the limited resources available

> Consistent with IDVR mission and principles

> Disseminated to staff and evaluated annually

> Consistent with federal standards and indicators

Goal 1 Hispanic Minority Population: Comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services are readily available to the Hispanic minority population.

Objective for Goal 1:

1.1 Hispanic population: From 2000 to 2008 this population increased 51% across the state according to the Idaho Department of Labor Statistics. Persons of Hispanic or Latino origin represented 10.2% of the entire population of the state. In FFY 2009, IDVR served 1122 Hispanic or Latino people. This constituted 8% of the total population served by the Agency. The objective will be to increase the percentage of Hispanic/Latinos served by 1% annually over the next three federal fiscal years (FFY 2011- 13). Baseline established by the FFY 2011 IDVR statistics.

Strategy:

> The Agency will implement an effective advertising campaign in the regions that experience a high density of this population in order to increase community awareness.

> The Agency will target the Community Council of Idaho and various members of the SRC to assist in establishing effective methods of communication and outreach to this population.

> Identify community resources available to serve as referral sources.

> The Agency will continue to apply for available migrant and seasonal farm worker grants that will provide resources for outreach and service to this population.

> Due to the high number of Hispanics in Southwestern Idaho, a job club strategy was implemented in FFY2010 under a one year contract. This approach to job search and development maximized successful outcomes. If funding becomes available, this strategy will again be considered. Additionally, opportunities for partnerships to deliver this serve will be explored.

> Utilize the expertise within the State Rehabilitation Council to enhance strategies and services to this population.

GOAL2 Outreach to Targeted Populations: Comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services are readily available to non-Hispanic minority groups and the aging population.

Objectives for Goal 2:

2.1 Non-Hispanic minority groups continue to expand within the state as illustrated by the 2010 tri-annual needs assessment and general population estimates. The minority groups representing the greatest percentage of growth in residents within the state of Idaho between the time period of 2000 to 2008 include:

Black/African American - 115%

Asian - 37%

American Indian and Alaska native - 21%.

In order to meet the needs of these growing minority populations, IDVR will increase the number served by 1% per year over the next three year time frame (2011-2013). Baseline established by the FFY 2010 IDVR statistics.

Strategy:

> The Agency will work with various community organizations to help locate these individuals.

> Coordinate efforts in order to effectively accommodate any cultural or disability issues that could constitute a barrier to the application process.

> Due to the high number of minorities in Southwestern Idaho, a job club strategy was implemented in FFY2010 under a one year contract. This approach to job search and development maximized successful outcomes. If funding becomes available, this strategy will again be considered. Additionally, opportunities for partnerships to deliver this service will be explored.

2.2 Aging population: Due to the statistical increase in the life span of Americans, older workers (age 45 and over) are choosing to extend their employment activity into the later years. With the onset of a severe and prolonged economic recession, it is increasingly more difficult for older workers with disabilities to compete in the work force. Although IDVR has historically served this population, the needs are greater at this time. It is necessary for the Agency to commit more resources and effort to the assistance of this segment of the population. Over the next three year period, IDVR will target an increase of 1% annually in the total numbers served. Baseline established by the FFY 2010 IDVR statistics.

Strategy:

> Collaboration with the Office on Aging to identify and recruit potential applicants who could benefit from vocational rehabilitation services.

> Due to the concentration of this targeted population in Southwestern Idaho, a job club strategy was implemented in FFY2010 under a one year contract. This approach to job search and development maximized successful outcomes. If funding becomes available, this strategy will again be considered. Additionally, opportunities for partnerships to deliver this service will be explored.

> Enhance collaboration with Experience Works to expand training opportunities and employment experience within the Agency for older workers.

Goal 3 Transitioning Students: Based on a better understanding of post-secondary training/employment options, transitioning students achieve a positive employment outcome.

Objectives for Goal 3:

3.1 IDVR and statewide educational partners will identify and promote vocational goals that reflect labor market trends within the state and correlate with the interests and aptitudes of the student. This will be documented through a description within the case file outlining the variety of training and vocational options identified and measured by an increase in the number of employment outcomes by a minimum of 2% per year. Baseline to be established in 2010.

Strategy:

> VR counselors will confer with school personnel, the student and, when appropriate, a parent or guardian to identify an appropriate vocational goal.

> The counselor will verify by an entry in the case file that the full spectrum of vocational possibilities has been presented to the client during the vocational guidance and counseling process.

> The Regional Manager of Region III and Special Education staff will work together to plan and coordinate workshops for educators and vocational counselors. The curriculum will include topics designed to enhance the knowledge and understanding of issues relevant to transitioning students.

> The Agency will explore the feasibility of a job club for transitioning students and implement if determined feasible and if funding becomes available. Additionally, opportunities for partnerships to deliver this service will be explored.

> The Agency, in conjunction with TESH and Project Search High School Transition Program, will investigate the feasibility of the continuation and/or expansion of this program to various areas of the state.

3.2 Through closer collaboration with Idaho school districts, students with disabilities participating in charter school programs, as well as those participating in on-line schooling and virtual/internet high schools will be more effectively identified and served. In addition, IDVR will target the 504 transitional population, both inside and outside the consortium projects. A baseline will be established in FFY 2011 and the number served will be increased by 1% each subsequent year.

Strategy:

> VR counselors will work closely with their special education partners to identify eligible students enrolled in participating charter schools and on-line virtual/internet high schools who otherwise may not have knowledge and awareness of VR transition services.

Goal 4 Deaf and Hard of Hearing: A broad spectrum of meaningful vocational services is available to this historically underserved population.

Objectives for Goal 4:

4.1 During FFY 2010, a greater emphasis was focused upon on this population by the creation of a full time specialized counselor position serving four regions in the Treasure Valley. It is anticipated the counselor will have a full time caseload by the end of FFY2011. The impact of this additional position will be measured by an increase of 1% per year in the number of deaf or hard of hearing individuals served statewide over the next two year time frame. Baseline established by IDVR 2009 data.

Strategy:

> The VR counselor located in the Treasure Valley is responsible for serving this population exclusively.

> This counselor will network with community organizations including schools in which the deaf population is served.

> This counselor will cultivate referral sources across the state and will collaborate with other counselors who provide services to this particular population.

> This counselor will serve as a resource for designated VR counselors in other regions.

4.2 During FFY 2009, a cooperative agreement was established between IDVR and the Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and Blind (IESDB). IDVR agreed to fund two full time IESDB employees whose responsibility is to locate and refer deaf or hard of hearing transitioning students to IDVR for services. IESDB specialists will work in conjunction with IDVR to support the development of appropriate IPE strategies. The success of this collaborative effort will be measured by a 4% increase in the number of referrals from IESDB to IDVR during the next three year time frame. (FFY2011-2013) Additionally, the number of rehabilitations for this population will increase 6% between FFY2011 and the completion of FFY 2013. Baseline established by IDVR FFY 2011 data.

Strategy:

> These two specialists will refer deaf/hard of hearing students to VR counselors statewide for application and eligibility determination.

> The IESDB specialists will utilize contract funding to provide additional support services to eligible students in support of the individual’s plan for employment.

> The IESDB specialists will utilize their networking skills and experience to improve access to comparable community benefits.

> The IESDB specialists will also actively participate in the placement and follow along process.

4.3 During FFY2011, the Idaho State Department of Financial Management and IDVR completed the reorganization and integration of the Council for the Deaf and the Hard of Hearing into IDVR. The purpose of this integration is to enhance the statewide effectiveness of vocational services to this population. The Council has historically functioned as the primary advocacy group for the interests of the deaf and hard of hearing population. In its role as a service unit within the Agency, the primary duty of CDHH is to collaborate with field staff to increase access to employment, education and social-interaction opportunities for eligible deaf and hard of hearing individuals. Additionally, CDHH will provide the following:

1. A network through which all state and federal programs dealing with the deaf and hard of hearing can be channeled,

2. Encourage consultation and cooperation among departments, agencies and institutions serving the deaf and hard of hearing,

3. Determine the need for further services and make appropriate recommendations to Agency staff as well as government officials to ensure that the needs of deaf and hard of hearing are best served,

4. To monitor consumer protection issues that involve the deaf and hard of hearing within the state,

5. Submit periodic reports to the governor, the legislature and departments of state government regarding the manner in which federal and state programs, rules and regulations, and legislation affect persons with hearing impairments.

Strategy:

> IDVR and the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing will create an MOU that describes the parameters under which the Council will operate and achieve agreed upon goals.

> Applicable state and federal laws and regulations will be delineated within the MOU and adhered to in the provision of services.

This screen was last updated on Sep 9 2011 1:03PM by saidthorsenh

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on Aug 4 2009 11:36AM by saidcooks

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

Attachment 4.11(c) (4):

GOALS AND PLANS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF TITLE VI, PART B FUNDS

IDVR uses all funds received annually under Section 622 of the Act for the provision of Supported Employment (SE) services for eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities who require supported employment to become employed and who have selected SE as the appropriate employment strategy following a comprehensive assessment of rehabilitation career job needs. All of these funds are allotted as direct client service funds to all IDVR Regional Offices. Individuals receiving services under this funding are experiencing multiple issues that may include extended learning requirements, inappropriate job behavior, difficulties in interaction with the supervisor, coping with changes on the job such as job tasks, coworkers, supervisors as well as transportation issues.

Supported Employment services include situational assessment, job placement and job coaching, placement and follow-along, as well as transportation and other supportive services when justified.

The priorities for the strategy for FFY 2011-13 include the following:

1. A continued emphasis on community based integrated employment rather than sheltered employment (work services)

2. Pursuit of increased long-term state funding for supported employment

3. Continued efforts towards a reduction of the waiting list for funding of long-term supported employment services

4. Investigation into the possibility of being approved as a Medicaid service provider for the purpose of procuring additional vocational funding.

FFY 2011-13 Supported Employment goals include the following:

1. The number of individuals leaving the waiting list and entering community based integrated employment will be equal to or greater than the previous year’s total.

2. Increase funds available for long term supported employment services by 1% utilizing a variety of creative methods including identification of natural supports.

Number of Supported Employment outcomes will be equal to previous year’s total.

This screen was last updated on Jul 15 2011 5:29PM by saidthorsenh

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

Attachment 4.11(d)

STATE STRATEGIES

The following strategies have been identified to support the needs identified in the FFY 2010 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment as described in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and the Agency goals and priorities. These strategies will be implemented in order to achieve Agency goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

These strategies are subject to change due to the nature of the strategies and the continuous evolution of concerns related to disability issues in the state. The Agency continuously monitors these strategies based on current circumstances, striving to stay in tune with the needs of Idahoans with disabilities.

Attachment 4.11(d) (1) (A):

EXPANSION AND IMPROVEMENT OF SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES AND ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY SERVICES AND DEVICES

Innovation and Expansion:

IDVR will provide funding support for the State Rehabilitation Council expenditures including travel, lodging, advertising for town meetings, supplies, meeting room rentals, interpreters when necessary, facilitation services, and costs related to consumer satisfaction/outreach surveys.

Funding support for the State Independent Living Council (SILC) is also allocated out of Innovation and Expansion funding. IDVR has allocated 71% of independent living funding provided through Title I to the SILC. The remaining 29% is distributed directly to the Disability Action Center (a center for independent living). The SILC is responsible for disseminating funding to the other centers for independent living statewide.

Supplemental funding support for the State Independent Living Council (SILC) will be allocated out of Innovation and Expansion funding. In FFY 2012 IDVR will distribute $5,000 of Title I funds to the SILC to be utilized in support of the five designated duties outlined under CFR 364.21.

Additionally an agreement has been entered into providing $44,500 in Title One funds in support of SILC activities’.

Strategy 1: Assistive Technology Services and Devices

IDVR will continue to focus upon efficient usage of rehabilitation technology enhancements as they become available on the market. This equipment will be utilized to overcome barriers that would otherwise impede the achievement of a desired vocational outcome.

During FFY 2009, IDVR established a new counseling position to address the deaf and hard of hearing population located within the Boise metropolitan valley. In an effort to facilitate and refine services to this population, several state-of-the-art rehabilitation technologies are being incorporated within the service delivery process. These technologies will include the implementation of video phones. Secondly, internet interpreting services will be provided to the clientele through the implementation of webcams and microphones. Thirdly, IDVR is currently in the process of translating into an ASL video format all pertinent IDVR forms that are utilized by clientele. IDVR will also provide access to these forms on the Agency’s internet website. These services will be implemented on an on-going basis and will continue to be upgraded as technologies progress.

Even though the services outlined above are currently being associated with the Boise position, if funds are procured these technologies may also be available commencing in FFY 2012 on a statewide basis to other Agency personnel who provide services to this population.

Strategy 2: Expansion and Improvement of Services to Individuals with Disabilities

> IDVR continues to refine a review instrument used for internal casework audits that identifies current practices that do not meet Agency or Federal standards as well as examples of "best case practices".

> IDVR has revised the case closure checklist in order to ensure that it complies with Agency policy and federal requirements.

> IDVR will continue to collaborate with other state agencies and organizations to address disability related issues as they arise.

> IDVR staff will participate on regional or statewide transportation committees that are developed to expand or create options for public transportation and to represent the interests of Idahoans with disabilities.

> IDVR will actively support clients in their participation in Mental Health Court in communities where this program has been implemented.

> IDVR will continue to invite community rehabilitation partners to attend relevant trainings sponsored by IDVR, including the annual in-service training when appropriate.

> IDVR will continue to extend invitations to the Tribal VR representative to attend quarterly IDVR management meeting and staff trainings.

> IDVR will work closely with the Inter-Agency Secondary Transition Working Group and other interested organizations to share information and develop cooperative strategies that address the full spectrum of issues faced by transitioning youth.

> IDVR has initiated a cooperative agreement with the Idaho Education Services for the Deaf and Blind that utilizes the skills and expertise of IESDB staff in the recruitment and placement of eligible individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing.

> IDVR transition counselors will work closely with school district special education directors and staff to provide VR orientation regarding the rationale behind the selection of the vocational goal for the IPE.

> IDVR will identify a staff from each region that will be responsible for identifying job/labor markets trends in the local economy in order to provide relevant and timely vocational guidance.

> IDVR will utilize ideas that are generated from the employee "think tank" meetings in the planning and delivery of services. Examples include but are not limited to: 1. Electronic linkage between work ready clients and employers 2. A listing of work ready clients in specific employment categories 3. Exploring the feasibility of electronic collection of referral information.

> IDVR will continue to collaborate with state Mental Health officials to develop collaborative means of bridging gaps in vocationally related mental health services caused by a decrease in overall funding of the mental health programs.

> IDVR, in conjunction with the SRC, will better educate legislators regarding the activities and accomplishments of the Agency.

> IDVR will increase efforts to educate the public, other state agencies, industries, and partners regarding the return on investment inherent in the VR program.

> IDVR will develop a strategy that will best illustrate to legislators and other interested parties the efforts made by the Agency in the rehabilitation of individuals in agricultural sectors.

> IDVR, in conjunction with the SRC and other interested parties, such as community rehabilitation programs, will develop strategies designed to enhance future revenue for the Agency. This could include program income as well as non-federal match sources.

> IDVR and SRC will create opportunities to discuss revenue challenges among diverse community entities such as community foundations and other resources in order to develop strategies for revenue enhancement or sharing to increase funds in support of client services.

> IDVR will explore strategies and protocol in use in other states related to the WIPPA grant, SSA benefits analysis, employment networks, Projects with Industry and the Ticket to Work program as a means of generating additional case service dollars for the Agency.

> In conjunction with Disability Rights Idaho, IDVR will create a more effective referral protocol to the WIPA grant in order to provide work incentives planning and assistance to IDVR clients.

> IDVR will explore the possibility of a mutually beneficial agreement with community colleges as a strategy to capture additional federal funds.

> IDVR will investigate the benefits as well as the costs of creating a business liaison position within the Agency. If deemed beneficial and cost effective, IDVR will move forward in the creation of this position when funds become available.

> IDVR will enhance the working relationship with the Idaho Division of Veteran Services and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in order to better serve veterans with disabilities.

> IDVR will build a working relationship with apprenticeship and labor organizations to facilitate the employment of individuals with disabilities

> IDVR, in conjunction with the SRC, will work with other interested parties and organizations to educate employers and businesses regarding disability issues in order to create greater employment opportunities.

Attachment 4.11(d) (1) (B):

OUTREACH TO SERVE THE MOST SIGNIFICANTLY DISABLED WHO ARE MINORITIES OR UNSERVED OR UNDERSERVED

Strategy 1: Deaf and Hard of Hearing

The triennial needs assessment conducted in 2010 specifically identified as underserved, individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. A major emphasis is being undertaken as evidenced by the Agency’s stipulated intent identified in Goal 4 (see section 4.11(c)(1)) to increase Agency capacity to serve this population by the creation of a full time specialized counselor position serving four regions in the Boise valley. Additionally, the Agency has agreed to fund two full time positions to be housed within the Idaho Educational Services for the Deaf and Blind whose responsibility is to locate and refer deaf or hard of hearing transitioning students to IDVR for services. These resources will be used to increase the percent of individuals participating in community based, integrated, employment.

During FFY 2010/11, IDVR, in association with the governor’s office, analyzed the feasibility of integrating the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing into the Agency. The Agency advocated for this integration for the following reasons: 1. The primary mission of the Council is to provide the deaf and hard of hearing with increased access to employment opportunities, 2. Increase awareness for the needs for the deaf and hard of hearing through educational programs, 3. Encourage consultation and cooperation among departments, agencies and institutions serving the deaf, 4. Provide a network through which all state and federal programs dealing with the deaf and hard of hearing individuals can be channeled, and 5. Monitor consumer protection issues that involve the deaf and hard of hearing population. This proposed integration has taken place and the Council for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing is now considered a program as defined by the State of Idaho under the Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and subject to the same Federal rules and regulations.

Strategy 2: Hispanic/Latino

The primary minority and underserved population in Idaho is the Hispanic population, many of whom enter the state on a seasonal basis to work in agriculture. IDVR will continue to outreach and serve the Hispanic and well as the migrant and seasonal worker population. The Agency will implement an effective advertising campaign in the regions that experience a high density of this population in order to increase community awareness of this population and identify community resources available as comparable benefits. Additionally, the Agency will look for additional methods of reaching this population and implement the identified method, contingent upon available funding. This particular demographic population experiences a large number of individuals with the most significant disabilities based upon the labor intensive nature of the work and other occupational hazards related to seasonal and migratory farm work as well as cultural and education barriers. All of these areas of need will be taken into consideration in the development of comprehensive rehabilitation plans.

Strategy 3: Black, Asian, American Indian and Alaska Native

Although Idaho historically has experienced a very low percentage of minorities within the state, the latest figures from the Idaho Department of Labor indicate that certain minority groups are expanding. The latest figures from the Idaho Department of Labor as well as the 2010 tri-annual needs assessment indicate that certain minority groups are increasing in various regions of the state. IDVR has committed to increasing the service and outreach to minority individuals as outlined by the Agency’s intent in Goal 2 (see section 4.11(c) (1)) to increase service capacity to the Black, Asian, and American Indian and Alaska Native populations. The Agency will work with various community organizations to help locate these individuals and coordinate efforts in order to effectively accommodate any cultural or disability issues that might create a barrier to successful employment.

Strategy 4: Collaboration with Section 121 Projects

In Idaho, there are currently four Section 121 Vocational Rehabilitation projects serving the American Indians. General IDVR counselors meet minimally on a monthly basis with the four projects. IDVR general counselors will open tribal cases periodically when requested by an individual or a project representative.

Attachment 4.11(d) (1) (C):

DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT OF THE STATE COMMUNITY REHABILITATION PROGRAMS (CRPs)

Strategy 1:

In Idaho, the CRP programs function as independent vendors structured on a fee for service basis. In order to assure the highest quality service outcome to Agency clientele, each vendor must be certified by one of two National Certification entities. The first is the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF). The second is the Rehabilitation Services Accreditation System (RSAS).

Strategy 2:

Alliance Enterprises, the company providing case management software to IDVR, has invited IDVR to participate in the research and development of new software designed to monitor and evaluate the performance outcomes related to CRP services as well as other vendor services. This research is currently on-going and will be finalized within the next two years. (2011-2012) Once the pilot program has been completed, if the objectives have been achieved, IDVR will assess the effectiveness and will make a decision regarding purchase and implementation.

Strategy 3:

IDVR has engaged with the CRP partners to expand and improve the quality of services to Agency clients. The Agency will collaborate with its partners to improve facility infrastructure, quality of training, accessibility to transportation and ultimately the enhancement of successful employment outcomes. Any establishment activities undertaken by IDVR will be supported by the pre-planning requirements under 34 CFR 361.49(b)(1) and 34 CFR 361.29.

Strategy 4:

Currently, Idaho has a “Projects with Industries” (PWI) grant administered through a community rehabilitation program that is funded through September 2011. This grant, which serves four regional offices, has been successful in the area of job placement, job readiness and development activities. IDVR and the relevant community rehabilitation programs will research funding options that could provide the financial resources necessary for the continuation of the types of services provided through this grant. If options are identified and determined to be within the parameters of the Rehabilitation Act and all regulations, consideration may be given to pursuing the identified funding options and the continuation of these employment strategies.

Attachment 4.11(d) (1) (D):

IMPROVEMENT OF THE STATE’S FEDERAL EVALUATION STANDARDS AND PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Strategy:

In FFY 2010, IDVR met all standards and performance indicators. The Agency continues to closely monitor monthly performance levels to ensure that the outcomes for FFY 2011 will again reflect compliance with all indicators.

Additionally, IDVR regularly educates management and staff regarding their responsibilities towards meeting these goals. Progress is monitored regularly by the Field Services Chief.

Attachment 4.11(d) (1) (E):

STRATEGIES FOR ASSISTING OTHER COMPONENTS OF THE STATEWIDE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM IN ASSISTING INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES

Strategy 1:

IDVR continues to be actively involved as a Workforce Development partner in Idaho. A representative from IDVR regularly attends meetings with other Workforce Development partners to help set the agenda for the Workforce Development Council meetings to ensure relevant topics are included for discussion or vote, to share important information regarding Agency/community resources for mutual clientele, and provide information to the Board on selected issues. The partners promote system integration to the maximum extent feasible through the cross training of staff and participation in a continuous improvement process designed to increase outcomes and customer satisfaction. IDVR will strive to maintain this high level of cooperation and participation.

Strategy 2:

IDVR staff continues to have a close working relationship in each of the One-Stop Centers across the state. At least one IDVR staff member is assigned at each of the local One-Stop Centers. The staff member has a regular schedule of attendance at the One-Stop or is on call with a five-minute response time due to the close proximity of the offices. The partners share resources where possible in accordance with each Agency’s guidelines when working with common clientele. IDVR will continue to maintain a close working relationship with the One-Stop Centers and partner agencies.

The IDVR Organizational Development Specialist is working in collaboration with the Idaho Department of Labor Employer Association to survey state employers to determine HR training needs.

Strategy 3:

IDVR is partnering with the U.S. Department of Labor Apprenticeship and the Idaho Department of Labor (IDOL) on an apprenticeship project. This project has been slow to develop, however considerable interest remains. The project is designed to enhance the skills and knowledge of employment specialists who work for CRPs within the State of Idaho. Employment specialists throughout the state provide job placement services for both IDVR and IDOL participants. By enhancing their skill sets and knowledge base in the areas of job placement, counseling theories, medical/psychosocial aspects of disability, vocational evaluation and other topics that are important to learn when working with individuals with disabilities, it is believed that our participants will obtain higher quality employment outcomes to include but not limited to higher wages and benefits.

Strategy 4:

IDVR partners annually during the month of October with IDOL, Idaho Council on Developmental Disabilities, Department of Aging, Idaho School for the Deaf and Blind, Idaho Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, SILC, local school districts, and the Idaho ADA Task Force to increase employer awareness regarding the hiring of individuals with disabilities. During the month of October one day is set aside to place transitioning students with disabilities with an employer so they may job shadow in a career of their choice. This assists in raising employer awareness and increases the students understanding of the workplace.

Strategy 5:

IDVR partners with the U.S. Department of Apprenticeship, IDOL, Workforce Development, and all Idaho Universities and colleges. By participating on this committee IDVR is able to ensure the educational and employment needs of individuals with disabilities are being recognized and met. It further enhances their ability to secure jobs utilizing the apprenticeship program.

Attachment 4.11(d) (2) (A), (B) and (C):

EXTENT TO WHICH THESE STRATEGIES WILL BE USED TO ADDRESS THE GOALS IDENTIFIED IN THE NEEDS ASSESSMENT, SUPPORT THE INNOVATION AND EXPANSION ACTIVITIES AND OVERCOME IDENTIFIED BARRIERS

Assistive technology services and devices:

This particular strategy will be utilized to support all four goals identified in attachment 4.11(c) (1). In order to overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities, IDVR has established a collaborative relationship with the Idaho Assistive Technology Project, which assures that the latest rehabilitation technology, is available to clientele throughout the state. In addition, by supporting the Reutilization Demonstration Grant, individuals with the most significant disabilities will have better access to durable medical equipment that will enable them to actively participate in independent living, supported employment and other vocational activities.

Expansion and improvement of services to individuals with disabilities:

IDVR will employ every resource outlined in attachment 4.11(d) (1) (A) strategy 2 to ensure that the nine areas of focus outlined are achieved in order to successfully complete the four goals identified in attachment 4.11(c) (1).

Outreach to minority and other underserved/unserved populations:

The 2010 IDVR Comprehensive Needs Assessment reinforced the need for greater focus upon the service needs of these populations. By collaborating with community partners, IDVR will develop enhanced service delivery strategies that will more effectively reach the targeted, underserved, minority populations identified in the first two goals established in 4.11(c) (1). Additionally, transitioning youth are a primary concern both on a state and national level. Two out of three students leave high school unprepared for college or the modern workplace. Minority and low income students are particularly at risk. This includes individuals with disabilities. By partnering with other agencies through the Inter-Agency Secondary Transition Working Group and other interested organizations, the resources and expertise provided to this population are greatly increased. This will address the dropout rate and enable students to become better prepared for employment.

Community rehabilitation programs (CRP):

The four strategies outlined in 4.11(d) (1) (C) will ensure that the quality of the services provided by our CRP vendors across the state remains at a level required to deliver efficient and effective outcomes. All four populations identified in the goals will benefit from the high standard of service delivery provided by competent vendors.

Improvement of the federal evaluation standards and performance indicators: Through the achievement of the annual projected rehabilitation performance outcome, the Agency will ensure that the statistical numbers associated with each State Plan objective related to the four stated goals are met.

Strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities:

Adequate funding to meet the demand for vocational services is always an issue with the Agency and will continue to be of concern as costs for services increase. The use of comparable benefits will help to supplant Agency funds that can then be used elsewhere. The 2010 Statewide Needs Assessment indicated an overall theme regarding the need for additional funds for support services for individuals. The collaboration with other agencies and continued focus on WIA partners will assist in the on-going search and acquisition of comparable benefits.

 

This screen was last updated on Sep 9 2011 1:03PM by saidthorsenh

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

Attachment 4.11(e) (2):

EVALUATION AND REPORTS OF PROGRESS FOR FFY 2010

The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation maintains an effective working relationship with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) to ensure that the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities are effectively communicated. The Division meets with the SRC on a quarterly basis where Division staff shares the State goals and priorities and input is solicited from the Council. The Division regularly consults with the Council regarding the development, implementation and revision of State policies and procedures pertaining to the provision of Vocational Rehabilitation services. The SRC conducts annual statewide client satisfaction surveys. IDVR integrates that information, along with the survey information collected by IDVR and develops and implements any appropriate training related to deficiencies identified in the survey results. The survey result, along with the training that is adapted from those results, is designed to have a positive impact on the Federal Standards and Indicators that govern the outcome of the VR program.

The SRC and the Division maintain communications in order to better manage the relationship between the two organizations. One component of the communication plan is for the Division’s Administrator and the SRC Chairman to communicate by phone at a minimum of once every two weeks to discuss on-going items of concern. This has worked relatively well in maintaining communication. Every new policy developed by the Division is submitted to the SRC for discussion. Discussions typically occur prior to the final draft of the policy. On occasion, the SRC will vote on a policy change by the Division after discussion is concluded. If timeliness is a concern, the SRC receives information on important items by e-mail. Some of the SRC business is also conducted through the use of e-mail.

SRC members, especially the Chairman, are invited to IDVR quarterly management meetings. In these meetings, the opportunity is afforded for interaction with Division Management Staff. The SRC is invited and encouraged to attend and participate in national and regional meetings as well. SRC members continue to attend national CSAVR meetings.

ACTIONS TAKEN IN SUPPORT OF IDVR FFY 2010 GOALS AND PRIORITIES

Goal 1- Service Delivery: IDVR will provide the services required to ensure that individuals with significant disabilities secure employment and achieve economic self-sufficiency.

Objectives:

1.1 Comprehensive vocational guidance and counseling will be consistently provided during the development of the IPE. Case audits at closure and regional reviews will be used to monitor compliance with this goal. A minimum of 300 cases will be monitored for compliance during FFY 2008.

Achieved during FFY 2008:

Over 300 cases were monitored for compliance via case audits at closure and Regional Administrative Reviews. Based upon data compilation, over 90% of the cases reflected comprehensive vocational guidance and counseling.

Achieved during FFY 2009:

In 2009 the quality assurance format was revised to include the review of 18 cases monthly across all regions. During 2009 the case closure checklist was revised and implemented in all case closures.

Achieved during FFY2010:

In 2010 the review again included 18 cases per month across all regions. During 2009 the case closure checklist was revised and implemented for all case closures and is still currently being used.

1.2 IDVR will collaborate with the WIPA grant awardees housed under the auspices of the Idaho CAP program in order to identify individuals receiving SSA who could potentially benefit from the provision of PASS plans, identification of work incentives and assistance in negotiating the SSA system. This objective will be measured by the number of participants referred to the WIPA grant program. Since this is a new grant program, the total number of participants referred at the completion of FFY 2008 will be used as a baseline from which to measure future increase or decrease of referrals.

Achieved in FFY 2008:

A total of 93 SSA clients were referred to the WIPA grant program for identification of work incentives and navigation of the SSA system.

Not Achieved in FFY2009:

A total of 43 SSA clients were referred to the WIPPA grant program for identification of work incentives.

Achieved in FFY 2010:

A total of 112 SSA clients were referred to the WIPPA grant program for identification of work incentives and navigation of the SSA system.

1.3 IDVR counselors will encourage and support PASS plan development for individuals receiving SSA whenever appropriate, with a goal of 5 PASS plans written for FFY 2008.

Achieved during FFY 2008:

A total of 13 Pass plans were written in FFY 2008, with at least 5 approved, and the remaining pending a decision.

Achieved during FFY2009:

A total of 59 referrals were made to the PASS program, 7 Pass plans written, and 16 PASS plans in development.

Not achieved during FFY2010:

In 2010, the Pass Plan program staff was reassigned to a VRC position and the Pass program discontinued due to the lack of adequate and timely response from SSA during the development of plans. The program did not deliver the necessary results for the Agency or the clients.

Goal 2- Transitioning Students:

IDVR will partner with the Idaho Department of Education, Special Education, to create regional working groups that include the VR counselor, special education teachers and other pertinent participants to further the cooperation and collaboration of agencies providing services to transition age youths.

Objectives:

2.1 IDVR Field Services Chief, along with representatives from Special Education and other community agencies, will establish the framework for regional working groups throughout Idaho. These working groups will standardize the delivery of services within each region and encourage the sharing of resources. By the end of FFY 2008, at least one region of the state will be identified as having Agency and community participants committed and available to begin the formation of a functional working group. A minimum of one regional group will be established and functioning by the end of FFY 2009.

Achieved in FFY2008:

Twin Falls Regional Working Group was established in FFY 2008 and has been meeting on a regular basis.

Achieved in FFY 2009:

The Magic Valley Transition Team (MVTT) in Twin Falls continues to meet on a regular basis. This group is composed of community members, parents, area high school teachers, administrators, state Agency staff and others interested in the success of transitioning students. This group created a program know as the Students Transitioning in Responsibility, Independence and Vocational Education (STRIVE). The STRIVE program strategy is to provide direct services to secondary and adult students. The students are chosen by area school districts and are provided with services such as employment and career information, community participation, independent living skills and identification of adult services. These areas align with the activities required to be included in a student’s IEP. Currently, there are 7 students participating in the STRIVE program.

Achieved in FFY2010:

The Magic Valley Transition Team (MVTT) in Twin Falls continues to meet on a regular basis and has developed into a strong force in support of transitioning youth. The group coordinated a number of events in the area including such things as a resource fair, Ready-Set-Go, Disability Mentoring Day as well as other achievements. They have plans for future activities and events and appear to have the momentum and energy to be a viable organization for the foreseeable future.

2.2 Based upon the implementation of the working group prototype IDVR will exceed the documented School Work Transition rehabilitations in FFY 2008 compared to year end FFY 2007 by 1%.

Achieved in FFY 2008:

The number of School Work Transition rehabilitations documented in 2007 totaled 350. The number of School Work Transition rehabilitations in 2008 totaled 370, resulting in an increase of approximately 6%.

Not Achieved in FFY 2009:

The number of School Work Transition rehabilitations documented in 2009 totaled 292, resulting in a decrease of approximately 21%. During FFY 2009, Idaho experienced a significant downturn in its economy, which resulted in a substantial reduction of school age employment outcomes.

Not Achieved in FFY 2010:

The number of School Work Transition rehabilitations documented in 2010 totaled 315, which represents an increase of approximately 8% from the previous year. This increase is significant considering that Idaho continues to experience a difficult economic climate.

Goal 3-Staff Development:

IDVR will continue to develop and employ qualified staff as defined by the guidelines of the Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD).

Objectives:

3.1 Identify and support counselors employed by IDVR in their efforts to meet the CSPD requirements within the 5-year timeframe in order to maximize the number of counselors with master’s level credentials.

Achieved: IDVR identified those counselors who need to meet the CSPD requirements within 5 years of their hire date. In addition, IDVR provides financial support as well as assistance with investigating additional coursework and programs that offer stipends.

3.2 Provide staff pertinent training opportunities that enhance their rehabilitation knowledge and professional development.

Achieved: Training opportunities have been identified by conducting needs assessments in 2010. In addition, training has been provided to staff which has enhanced their rehabilitation knowledge and professional development as well as training to address identified needs. Trainings include caseload management, management and leadership, ethics, vocational assistant training, work incentives, and motivational interviewing.

3.3 Training will be provided to staff, based on the results of a regularly scheduled internal regional casework review process, to ensure that competencies are maintained.

Achieved in FFY2009/2010: IDVR redesigned the internal regional casework review process, which includes identifying staff training needs and addressing those needs in order to ensure that competencies are maintained. Training is provided to address any needs or identified deficiencies.

Goal 4 Supported Employment (SE):

IDVR will provide high quality Supported Employment (SE) services statewide to a greater number of eligible individuals.

Objectives:

4.1 IDVR will work with interested state and community partners to craft a strategy to increase the percentage of individuals in long-term community supported employment versus sheltered employment (work services). This goal will be measured by an increase of 1% in community employment placements.

Not Achieved in FFY 2008: This goal was not achieved due to a number of external factors. State Medicaid changed specific parameters within the waiver program which directly impacted client funding for programs such as EES. Additionally, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of individuals requesting work services to maintain skills or re-enter the work force after losing community jobs due to the economic downturn.

Not achieved in FFY 2009: Due to a state appropriations cut, during 2009, adequate long term support funding was unavailable to provide CSE opportunities for additional eligible clients necessary to exceed the previous year’s achievement.

Not achieved in FFY2010: As in 2009, adequate long term support funding was unavailable to provide CSE opportunities for additional eligible clients necessary to meet or exceed the previous year’s achievement.

4.2 IDVR will document the need for state funding for long-term support services. This documentation will be used to support the request of an enhancement in state funding in the FFY 2009.

Achieved: Upon analysis of the EES program and potential customers, IDVR has determined that a minimum of $800,000 is necessary to address the extent of individual budgetary needs.

 

Attachment 4.11(c) (4):

GOALS AND PLANS FOR DISTRIBUTION OF TITLE VI, PART B FUNDS

IDVR uses all funds received annually under Section 622 of the Act for the provision of Supported Employment (SE) services for eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities who require supported employment to become employed and who have selected SE as the appropriate employment strategy following a comprehensive assessment of rehabilitation career job needs. All of these funds are allotted as direct client service funds to all IDVR Regional Offices. Individuals receiving services under this funding are experiencing multiple issues that may include extended learning requirements, inappropriate job behavior, difficulties in interaction with the supervisor, coping with changes on the job such as job tasks, coworkers, supervisors as well as transportation issues.

Supported Employment services include situational assessment, job placement and job coaching, placement and follow-along, as well as transportation and other supportive services when justified.

FFY 2010 Supported Employment goals and outcomes include the following

1. The number of individuals entering community based integrated employment will be equal to or greater than the previous year’s total.

Not met: The annual average number of clients in community based integrated employment has gone down from 52% in 2008 to 51% in 2009 and 48% in 2010. One factor that appears to be a continuing theme in this decline is that clients are losing their community jobs or scheduled work hours are reduced substantially due to the poor economy over the last few years and they are requesting to work in work services while they look for a new community job. Additionally, several group work opportunities were lost because hotels/motels and other janitorial contracts with community rehabilitation programs were not renewed due to the economic downturn.

2. Increase funds available for long term supported employment services by 1% utilizing a variety of creative methods over the next two years.

Not met: Due to state budget cuts and the current economic condition, additional funds were not procured in FFY 2009 or FFY2010.

3. Number of Supported Employment outcomes will be equal to or greater than the previous year’s total.

Not met: FFY 2008 supported employment outcomes totaled 194. FFY 2009 supported employment outcomes totaled 154. The FFY 2010 supported employment outcomes totaled 90.

The priorities for the strategy for FFY 2011-13 include the following:

1. A continued emphasis on community based integrated employment rather than sheltered employment (work services)

2. Pursuit of increased long-term state funding for supported employment

3. Continued efforts towards a reduction of the waiting list for funding of long-term supported employment services

4. Investigation into the possibility of being approved as a Medicaid service provider for the purpose of procuring additional vocational funding.

FFY 2011-13 Supported Employment goals include the following:

1. The number of individuals leaving the waiting list and entering community based integrated employment will be equal to or greater than the previous year’s total.

2. Increase funds available for long term supported employment services by 1% utilizing a variety of creative methods including identification of natural supports.

Number of Supported Employment outcomes will be equal to previous year’s total.

 

Attachment 4.11(e) (2) (D):

Status of Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators

Evaluation Standard 1: Employment Outcomes

Performance Indicator 1.1:

The Number of Individuals Achieving Employment Outcomes During the Current Performance Period Compared to the Number from the Previous Performance Period.

FFY 2008: 2083 Rehabilitations - Indicator Failed

FFY 2009: 1857 Rehabilitations - Indicator Failed

FFY 2010: 1896 Rehabilitations - Indicator Passed

Performance Indicator 1.2:

The Percentage of Individuals Receiving Services Under an Individualized Plan for Employment Who Achieve Employment Outcomes.

Federal Minimum: 55.8%

FFY 2008: 65.9% - Indicator Passed

FFY 2009: 64.8% - Indicator Passed

FFY 2010: 63.0% - Indicator Passed

Performance Indicator 1.3:

Competitive Employment Outcomes as a Percentage of all Employment Outcomes.

Federal Minimum: 72.6%

FFY 2008: 97.8% - Indicator Passed

FFY 2009: 97.6% - Indicator Passed

FFY 2010: 99.6% - Indicator Passed

Performance Indicator 1.4:

Competitive Employment Outcomes for Individuals with Significant Disabilities as a Percentage of all Individuals with Competitive Employment Outcomes.

Federal Minimum: 62.4%

FFY 2008: 98.9% - Indicator Passed

FFY 2009: 99.3% - Indicator Passed

FFY 2010: 98.9% - Indicator Passed

Performance Indicator 1.5:

The Ratio of the Average VR Hourly Wage to the Average State Hourly Wage.

Federal Minimum: .52 ratio

FFY 2008: .60 - Indicator Passed

FFY 2009: .61 - Indicator Passed

FFY 2010: .64 - Indicator Passed

Performance Indicator 1.6:

The Percentage of Individuals Achieving Competitive Employment Outcomes Who Report Their Own Income as the Primary Source of Support at Application Compared to at Closure.

Federal Minimum: At least 53.0 (math difference)

FFY 2008: 68.5 - Indicator Passed

FFY 2009: 68.2 - Indicator Passed

FFY 2010: 72.3 - Indicator Passed

Evaluation Standard 2: Equal Access to Services

Performance Indicator 2.1:

Access to Services for Minorities as Measured by the Ratio of the Minority Service Rate to the Non-Minority Service Rate.

Federal Minimum: .80 ratio

FFY 2008: .857 - Indicator Passed

FFY 2009: .926 - Indicator Passed

FFY 2010: .927 - Indicator Passed

 

Attachment 4.11(e) (2) (E):

Utilization of the Funds Reserved for the Innovation and Expansion Activities in FFY 2010

IDVR provided funding support for the State Rehabilitation Council expenditures including travel, lodging, advertising for town meetings, supplies, meeting room rentals, interpreters when necessary, facilitation services, and costs related to consumer satisfaction/outreach surveys.

Cost: $42,670.63

Funding support for the State Independent Living Council (SILC) is also allocated out of Innovation and Expansion funding. IDVR has allocated 71% of independent living funding provided through Title I to the SILC. The remaining 29% is distributed directly to the Disability Action Center (a center for independent living). The SILC is responsible for disseminating funding to the other centers for independent living statewide.

Cost:

SILC: $135,800 (total federal and state match)

DAC: $55,468 (total federal and state match)

This screen was last updated on Sep 9 2011 1:03PM by saidthorsenh

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Attachment 6.3

QUALITY, SCOPE, AND EXTENT OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

The Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) provides the full scope of Community Supported Employment Services (CSE) to those Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) eligible individuals with the most significant disabilities, who require extended services to maintain employment, and have at least a reasonable expectation that a source of extended services (long-term support) will be available at the time of transition. CSE includes, if necessary, situational assessments through Trial Work Experiences (TWE), or other diagnostic strategies, to assess the individual’s interests and abilities.

Once an appropriate Community Supported Employment position is identified for an individual, IDVR provides supported employment job coaching services for a period of up to 18 months. The services can be extended beyond 18 months, when appropriate, upon agreement of the consumer and the counselor.

Community Supported Employment Services provided to individuals are coordinated through an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) that includes a description of the services needed, the identification of the state, federal, or private programs that will provide the continuing support; and the basis for concluding that continuing support is available.

Community Supported Employment Services include the following:

1. If necessary, a supplemental evaluation to the evaluation of the rehabilitation potential provided under 34 CFR, Part 361.

2. Job development and placement into competitive, community integrated employment. Traditional time-limited services needed to support the training in employment.

3. Any other service that would be identified as requisite to the targeted supported employment outcome.

Each individual’s IPE describes the timing of the transition into extended services, which is to be provided by the long-term support provider following the termination of time-limited services by IDVR.

All Community Supported Employment Services are provided by qualified Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) who have demonstrated the capacity to provide the service and are accredited by either the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) or Rehabilitation Services Accreditation Systems (RSAS) accredited. Community Supported Employment Services are purchased through Title VI-B and Title 110 funds.

Current Idaho Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (IDVR) policy and the Federal regulations require a third party commitment in writing, to designate the long-term support provider. Since 07/01/2004, the Extended Employment Services (EES) Program under the IDVR is the main provider of long-term support, although those individuals who qualify for the DD waiver can use Medicaid funds. A CSE participant may only be transitioned to long-term support based on an assessment of rehabilitation goal achievement and job stability. Periodic monitoring occurs to ensure that each individual receiving Community Supported Employment Services is making satisfactory progress.

Due to the economic climate of the state, IDVR was not given the opportunity to request additional funds for EES services to provide long term maintenance for the SE program in FFY2010 and, in fact, funds were cut by 10.4%. IDVR requested an increase in funds during the 2011 legislative session for FFY2012, however, IDVR was not granted the requested increase.

This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2011 4:51PM by saidthorsenh

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on 09/09/2011 at 1:10 PM

Last updated by saidthorsenh

Completed on 09/09/2011 at 1:10 PM

Completed by saidthorsenh

Approved on 09/14/2011 at 2:34 PM

Approved by rsajonesd

Published on 09/14/2011 at 2:36 PM

Published by kschelle

The following documents have been identified as being related to the information you are viewing.

  • Monitoring Report for Idaho - General — as of December 17, 2011
    DOC (463KB) | PDF (472KB)

  • "A Better Bottom Line: Employing People with Disabilities" — A blueprint for Governors has been issued by the National Governors Association (NGA).
    PDF (4.13M)

  • TAC-14-02 — Submission of the FY 2015 State Plan for the Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and Supplement for the Supported Employment Services Program. (May 28, 2014)
    DOC (247KB) | PDF (233KB)

  • ED-80-0013 - Certification Regarding Lobbying — 34 CFR 82.110(b) requires each State VR agency to submit for approval a signed certification regarding lobbying for each program for which federal funds are requested. In other words, one certification must be submitted for the VR program and another for the Supported Employment program.
    MS Word (24KB)

OMB Control Number: 1820-0500, approved for use through 03/31/2016

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless such collection displays a valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 25 hours per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The obligation to respond to this collection is required to obtain or retain a benefit (Section 13 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended). Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4537 or email ICDocketMgr@ed.gov and reference the OMB Control Number 1820-0500. Note: Please do not return the completed form to this address.