ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

Published September 4, 2014.   Print   Print preview   Export to MS Word   Export to Excel  

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services State Plan for Fiscal Year 2014 (submitted FY 2013)

Preprint - Section 1: State Certifications

1.1 The Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Iowa Department of Education [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan. Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement. Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law. Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below) Yes

Administrator Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)... Yes

Administrator Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement. Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?Yes

Name of SignatoryDavid L. Mitchell

Title of SignatoryAdministrator Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)06/28/2013

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2014No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

Preprint - Section 2: Public Comment on State Plan Policies and Proceduress

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 3: Submission of the State Plan and its Supplement

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

Preprint - Section 4: Administration of the State Plan

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency has not been selected.

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

Preprint - Section 5: Administration of the Provision of Vocational Rehabilitation Services

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Preprint - Section 6: Program Administration

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 7: Financial Administration

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

Preprint - Section 8: Provision of Supported Employment Services

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Attachment 4.2(c) Input of State Rehabilitation Council

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

The following motions were approved by the SRC at its August 29, 2012, November 28, 2012, March 19, 2013, and June 18, 2013 meetings:

• To adopt the Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Guidelines for Unpaid OJT Training.

• To eliminate a separate Rights and Responsibilities form for the Iowa Self-Employment program.

• A vote to implement a new manual for Independent Living.

• Jackie Wipperman accepted the nomination to Chair the SRC and Jeanne Sorenson accepted the nomination as Vice Chair of the SRC for 2013. Due to unexpected circumstances, Ms. Wipperman resigned from Iowa’s Client Assistance Program in June, impacting her position as Chair of the SRC. Chairperson Joan Bindel agreed to fill-in until a replacement is found.

Information has been provided related to roles and responsibilities for new SRC members who joined Iowa’s SRC in 2012. The IVRS SRC continues to expand its membership and has had the luxury of a fully functional and equally-committed board during this reporting period.

New SRC members were provided an overview of IVRS policy, procedures, fiscal reports, agency updates and operational information throughout the year. Quality assurance plans and performance measures for IVRS staff were reviewed, along with appeal information. There was one appeal this FY which was upheld and shared with SRC membership.

SRC meetings were revised two years ago to allow for public comment prior to subsequent agenda items. Issues related to Independent Living program have been addressed in this venue. Copies of all IVRS reports and SRC discussion materials are included on the IVRS website.

Third party cooperative agreements were included as part of the ongoing communication between IVRS and the SRC, specific to the sustainability model. SRC members are aware of the deficit IVRS could face, as well as the impact created by the MOE, and resulting fiscal forecast.

IVRS Administrator David Mitchell continued his efforts to solicit feedback from SRC members to explore opportunities to expand or develop partnerships. Progress made by IVRS in various initiatives was reported at each SRC meeting. These have included collaborative efforts established between IVRS and the following entities; the Veteran’s Administration, the Employers Disability Resource Network, Manpower (Project Ability), Disability Rights Iowa, Social Security Administration (Ticket-To-Work, Partnership Plus), Project Search, Technical Assistance Center for Education (Benefits Planning, Motivational Interviewing, Community Based Assessments), the Iowa Association of Community Providers, Iowa’s Workforce Development, the Iowa School for the Deaf, Office of Disability and Employment Policy (ODEP) Employment First, the Iowa Coalition for Integrated Employment, Iowa Department of Human Services (including Money Follows the Person and Iowa Medicaid Enterprise), the Iowa Rehabilitation Association, APSE (Association of Persons Supporting Employment First), Developmental Disabilities Council, the State Employment Leadership Network (SELN), and Walgreens Retail Employees with Disabilities Initiative (REDI).

Iowa Client Assistance Program (ICAP) reports are included as a regular part of SRC agenda items. SRC members are also provided detailed updates related to IVRS progress on state plan goals, objectives and strategies.

Program and policy changes have been evaluated by SRC members. Policy recommendations are shared with SRC members for approval. The IVRS Case Services Manual was reviewed during FY13, along with Guidelines for On-the-Job-Training (OJT) procedures. The SRC was asked to approve the adoption for new rules for an OJT, specific to Wage and Hour guidelines. The SRC was asked to approve revisions to the IVRS self-employment program which re-designed to allow individuals with a goal of self-employment to benefit from a more hands-on, less complex program option. Both motions were approved by the SRC.

In FFY13, IVRS revamped service delivery for IVRS job candidates with a diagnosis of Deaf in an effort to improve access. Two specific pilot projects were launched; one of which assigned internal staff as a statewide resource, and the other which expanded the use of job coaching and interpreter services within the Cedar Rapids area. IVRS Bureau Chief Kenda Jochimsen participated on a Feasibility Planning and Study group for the Iowa School for the Deaf. That group provided recommendations for skill development and expectations for student achievement, in addition to gathering data to be used in further analysis and development of a regional plan model.

Satisfaction data continues to be analyzed by SRC members, and has been expanded to solicit information from current cases of individuals who apply and receive services from IVRS. Survey results are shared at regular SRC meetings and reviewed monthly by IVRS administration. Current surveys allow IVRS job candidates to connect with staff and express issues or share recommendations they have for improving service delivery. The majority of surveys from active cases indicate job candidates consider IVRS services “excellent” or “good.” IVRS continues to survey closed cases each month and shares results internally, in addition to posting survey information on the IVRS Internet website. Satisfaction survey results are also reviewed quarterly by IVRS with SRC members.

SRC members attended a Legislative Reception March 19th at the State Capitol with management staff from IVRS. Administrator Mitchell and Mathew Coulter, IVRS’ Bureau Chief and Financial Office communicated with Governor Branstad regarding the IVRS budget request for 2014/2015. Administrator Mitchell also submitted a report to the National Governor’s Association and served as a featured speaker at several Employment First initiatives this year.

IVRS participated in the webinar provided by RSA regarding performance management in state VR agencies and working with the SRC. Information from the webinar is used to promote an understanding among SRC members on how data influences decision-making to impact performance at IVRS.

Background information leading up to their involvement in the SRC is shared at quarterly SRC meetings by current members. Understanding the passion and perspective each SRC member brings has allowed this group to establish themselves as proactive, inquisitive and innovative leaders. The SRC in Iowa is considered a diverse group, who are united by a shared dedication in helping IVRS to fulfill its mission.

Iowa SRC members include: Joan Bindel, Daniel Bray, Sherri Clark, Craig Cretsinger, Curtis Chong, Gus Cordero, Jill Crosser, Nancy Cruz-Tretina, Jim Flansburg, John Mikelson, Jeff Mikkelsen, Renee Neppl, Jeanne Sorenson, Jackie Wipperman, Chris Townsend, Kristine Hennings and Venita Springman, with IVRS represented by David Mitchell, Matt Coulter, Kenda Jochimsen, Lee Ann Russo, Kelley Rice, Jane McCord and Jeff Haight.

This screen was last updated on Jun 13 2013 12:39PM by Lee Russo

Attachment 4.7(b)(3) Request for Waiver of Statewideness

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

ATTACHMENT 4.7(b)(3) REQUEST FOR WAIVER OF STATEWIDENESS

IVRS requested a waiver of statewideness which was approved by RSA as part of the FY2013 state plan. IVRS is requesting a continuation of this waiver of statewideness for Project Search.

The opportunity to expand Project Search is being explored by IVRS with interested parties outside of the Des Moines school district. Additional locations beyond Des Moines (the originating site for Project Search approved under the waiver), include Cedar Rapids, IA and Ankeny, IA.

Project Search provides a framework involving a well-defined partnership between a school, a business, a community partner, and IVRS. It is a unique business led, one year school-to-work program that takes place entirely at the workplace. Total workplace immersion facilitates a seamless combination of classroom instruction, career exploration, and on-the-job training and support through internships and worksite rotations.

IVRS provides a comprehensive assessment for eligibility and employment planning. All IVRS services are available to eligible participants. These services are enhanced and complimented through Project Search and their comprehensive efforts at providing specific on-the-job community support, necessary to complete rotational community work experiences in the hospital setting for nine months. This support is done in conjunction with the development of work readiness skills occurring in an integrated classroom setting at the work-site along with specific work and academic competencies based upon individually chosen job sites.

The key components of the Project Search model involve an extensive period of training and career exploration, innovative adaptations, long-term coaching, and continuous feedback from teachers, job coaches, and employer.

Services result in participating youth obtaining training necessary to gain marketable skills that will enable them to secure competitive employment. This goal is achieved by offering participating youth real-life work experience combined with training in employability and independent living skills to help make successful transition from school to productive adult life. Independent living and social/life skills are addressed to ensure compatibility and fit for work readiness and daily living activities.

IVRS developed a Third Party Cooperative Arrangement (TPCA) which served to contribute to increased employment outcomes for eligible VR high school students from the Des Moines School District with the most significant disabilities, with a focus on those whose diagnosis consisted primarily of Intellectual Developmental Disability. The School District committed to using non-federal share dollars for the Project.

The Third Party Cooperative Arrangement verifies that Project Search funds provided from the school district are certified as non-federal dollars. IVRS continues to review and approve all services under this arrangement for purposes of maintaining administrative control for program and fiscal responsibilities of the Third Party Cooperative Arrangement.

IVRS also certifies that the order of selection policy is applied to individuals receiving Project Search services under this waiver.

All services provided under this wavier will be provided under an approved IPE and authorized by the responsible IVRS counselor.

As part of the approval process, IVRS completed an analysis to confirm that Project Search services provided under the TPCA were not currently provided by the school district to students with disabilities.

Additionally, the Transition Alliance Program (TAP) which RSA approved in 1997 under a Waiver of Statewideness is continuing to expand. Two other schools districts anticipate partnering with IVRS to offer TAP in their high schools. These include Ankeny High School in Ankeny, Iowa and Charles City High School in Charles City, IA.

TAP is jointly funded by a school district and IVRS. Each TAP provides enhanced transitional services to eligible IVRS clients who require year-round support up to age 25.

All TAP contracts include information related to Order of Selection/IVRS Wait List, and outline non-federal provisions and match dollars accordingly.

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2013 11:06AM by Lee Russo

Attachment 4.8(b)(1) Cooperative Agreements with Agencies Not Carrying Out Activities Under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

IVRS has been involved in cooperative relationships with many Federal, state and local agencies and programs for many years. In particular: • Veterans Administration – IVRS has a long standing agreement with the VA which was updated in FFY11. This agreement spells out the referral process, which agency will be responsible for which services, the inclusion of each other’s employees in staff development activities, and the identification of key liaison individuals. • Department of Human Services – This is a general agreement between DHS and IVRS which allows and encourages interaction between the two agencies around individuals with whom we both work. It relates to referrals, joint planning, office space, shared funding and related activities. An IVRS staff person is a required member of the Iowa Mental Health Planning Council, a group that represents a cross-section of constituencies and interest groups. Over 50% of its members must be consumers, family members, advocates, and others who are not state employees or providers. The duties of the council are to advocate for adults with a serious mental illness and children with a serious emotional disorder and to monitor, review, and evaluate the allocation and adequacy of mental health services within the State. New IVRS Administrator David Mitchell will give consideration to attending an initial meeting of the Iowa Mental Health Planing Council. He will either continue his participation or appoint another IVRS staff person to represent IVRS on this committee. • Central Points of Coordination (CPC) – In Iowa adult non-vocational and extended vocational services to persons with disabilities are provided through the county, under a county management plan. Counties develop their plans based on requirements in the law and county priorities established by the County Board of Supervisors. The CPCs carry out the day to day implementation of the county management plans. These individuals have a significant role in deciding who does and does not get services. IVRS staff has developed informal agreements with CPCs to ensure that the county money and IVRS money is appropriately coordinated. • Governance Group -- Leaders of seven departments developed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) to support collaborative service design to increase employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities. The seven agencies are Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation, Iowa Department For The Blind, Iowa Workforce Development, Iowa Department of Human Rights/Division for Persons with Disabilities, Iowa Department of Human Services, Iowa Department of Education, and Iowa Governor’s Developmental Disabilities Council. The Partners agree to support all their local offices in adopting the MOA Objective and Strategies to increase employment outcomes for Iowans with disabilities through state and local collaboration. • The Employer Disability Resource Network (EDRN) is a collaborative group of state, federal and private partners working together to identify, develop and mobilize resources, supports and services that add value to Iowa businesses hiring persons with disabilities. EDRN Partners include Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services; Iowa Department for the Blind; Deaf Services; Division of Persons with Disabilities; Veterans Administration; Social Security Administration; Iowa Workforce Development; U.S. Small Business Administration/SCORE; Goodwill Industries of Central Iowa; Great Plains ADA Center. EDRN provides Iowa employers access to qualified applicants, enhances the available labor market by combining on-the-job training, internships and classroom experiences for high-demand occupations and serves as a resource for up-to-date information about disability employment issues for the business community. • Youth Leadership Forum, College Leadership Forum, – Along with several other state agencies IVRS has participated in efforts to provide Summer leadership development opportunities for 30 high school or college students with disabilities since 1999.

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2012 7:11AM by Ken Schellenberg

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) Coordination with Education Officials

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Local Education Agencies (LEA) – This is the formal term for local school districts. Over the years, IVRS has developed arrangements with local school districts regarding referrals, seeing clients in the school, participating in IEP staffings, and various other activities. The Transition Alliance Programs (TAPs) are another example of agency cooperation with local school districts. In Iowa, every high school has an IVRS counselor formally assigned to serve that school. Counselors can provide consultation that includes information and referral assistance, to benefit clients who are eligible but awaiting services from IVRS. • Area Education Agencies (AEA) – IVRS has a statement of understanding with each of the nine AEAs in Iowa, which outlines how IVRS will provide services to the students of that AEA. It also spells out the responsibility of the AEA in making referrals to IVRS, providing office space in which the IVRS counselor can see clients, and providing copies of reports that are useful in determining the eligibility and developing a plan for employment with students of the AEA. • Community Colleges – IVRS has a written agreement with most of the community colleges which calls for IVRS staff to be housed on campus and have ready access to students and faculty. In a few settings, staff are not housed at the community college but are provided space to use when they regularly visit the campus. In two instances, the IVRS area office is located on a community college campus. • Regents Universities – Specific staff are assigned to each of the three Regents Universities in Iowa. Staff have ready access to students, faculty and administration in these settings. AGREEMENT between IOWA VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICES and the DIVISION OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION I. Purpose The Department of Education, Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services, hereafter known as IVRS, and Division of Elementary and Secondary Education, hereafter known as DESE, both share responsibility to prepare youth with disabilities for successful community employment. The purpose of this agreement is to facilitate the integration and coordination of transition services from school to post-secondary education and/or employment, for individuals with disabilities who are enrolled in secondary education and are, or may be, eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services. Specifically, the intent of this agreement is to: • Define the responsibilities of both divisions; • Provide for efficient and effective utilization of agencies’ resources; • Minimize duplication; and • Delineate a basis for continuous, effective working relationships between the two agencies. II. Consultation and Technical Assistance IVRS counselors will provide consultation and technical assistance to area education agencies (AEAs), local education agencies (LEAs) for improving programs and services and to educators for planning the transition of individuals with disabilities from school to post school activities. Consultation involves information and advice regarding the most suitable services or activities to assist the individual to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain employment. The scope of consultation and technical assistance will be more limited in scope for those individuals who have not had a case developed. Educators will request consultation and technical assistance services from IVRS when needed to plan for individual transition needs, including development of the individual’s course of study. Educators will consult with IVRS regarding the individual’s impediments to employment and provide all information available. III. Transition Planning IVRS counselors and educators are both responsible for the development and completion of the employment component of an individual’s Individual Education Program (IEP). IVRS involvement in IEP development and completion will be determined by individual student need, not student age or grade. IEP teams and IVRS counselors will consider four factors to determine when employment preparation should start and the intensity of the services that should be provided: 1) student knowledge and skills, 2) student learning characteristics, 3) complexity of support needs, and 4) number of environments effected (see appendix). The more intense the need for services, the earlier preparation should start and the more people who have specialized knowledge (e.g., work experience counselors, IVRS counselors) should be involved. IVRS counselors will develop an individualized plan for employment (IPE) for each eligible individual prior to the individual’s graduation. The individual, parents, educators and IVRS counselors will collaborate so that the goals of the IEP and the IPE will be consistent with each other. Educators will refer individuals to IVRS when individuals are ready to start planning for employment as their primary life goal. At the state level, both divisions will collaborate with policies, provide joint training and keep each other informed on state and federal activities, as relevant to the delivery of transition services. IV. Roles, Responsibilities, and Financial Obligations Each division shall be responsible for the costs they incur in carrying out this agreement, including: IVRS • Use assessment information provided by education to determine eligibility and services. Securing additional assessment only when necessary and assuming financial responsibility for the cost of the additional information • Provide consultation and technical assistance to educators. • Participate in the development of the employment component of the IEP, based on individual need. • Develop an IPE prior to the individual’s graduation. • Ensure IPE goals are consistent with IEP employment goals. • Provide, purchase or arrange for services when the individual is close to exiting high school and the service is needed for the student’s specific employment outcome. DESE • Provide all existing educational assessment and performance information relevant for the determination of IVRS eligibility and services. • Request consultation and technical assistance from IVRS counselors when needed for planning and implementing transition services. • Develop and complete the employment component of the IEP, based on individual need. • Ensure IEP employment goals are consistent with IPE goals. • Refer individuals when students need services. • Pay for all services listed on the IEP, unless another agency or entity agrees to provide such services. V. Outreach and Identification The mission of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services is to work for and with individuals who have disabilities to achieve their employment, independence, and economic goals. Eligibility is determined when an individual has a physical or mental impairment that constitutes or results in a substantial impediment to employment and the individual requires VR services to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain employment consistent with the individuals unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice. IVRS shall accept a statement from a licensed psychologist that a student demonstrates a pattern consistent with a disabling condition. Additional assessments shall be purchased by IVRS only when necessary for determination of IVRS eligibility and services. Scope of Services: Scope of services are provided to individuals who have a priority rating consistent with the category being served. All other IVRS eligible individuals will be placed on a waiting list. As appropriate to the vocational needs of each individual and consistent with each individual’s informed choice, VR must ensure that the following rehabilitation services are available to assist the individual with the disability to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain employment consistent with the individuals unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests, and informed choice: a. assessment for determining eligibility and priority for services 1. referral and other services necessary to assist applicants For those individuals who are eligible and not on the waiting list: b. assessment for determining vocational rehabilitation needs c. vocational rehabilitation counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist the individual to exercise informed choice d. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies e. physical and mental restoration services f. vocational and other training services for students who are within a few months of exiting the secondary school program. No training or training services in an institution of higher education may be paid for by IVRS unless maximum efforts have been made to secure grant assistance in whole or in part from other sources to pay for that training. g. Other services as specified in 34 CFR § 361.45 that are used to support an employment plan for students who are within a few months of exiting the secondary school program and require the service for employment. All school personnel, including school nurses, shall share educational information of youths with disabilities, including electronic access to IEPs, when appropriate and necessary for IVRS services. This shall include referrals to IVRS. Similarly, IVRS staff shall share relevant information about youths with disabilities when appropriate and necessary to facilitate the integration and coordination of transition services from school to post-secondary education and/or employment. David L. Mitchell, Administrator, Iowa Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services, W. David Tilly, Administrator, Elementary and Secondary Education Jason E. Glass, Director, Iowa Department of Education

This screen was last updated on Jun 26 2012 9:42AM by Lee Russo

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) Cooperative Agreements with Private Nonprofit Organizations

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

IVRS develops cooperative agreements with private, non-profit entities to provide specific services under the State Plan. The non-profit organization agrees to provide funding that is used to match the federal allocation. Those funds are then awarded to the non-profit entity, consistent with state competitive procedures. The funds are designated for specific services as long as they are provided to eligible IVRS clients consistent with categories of the waiting list that are receiving services. IVRS monitors programs and expenditures for compliance with existing state and federal policies. If a cooperative agreement does not comply with the statewideness agreement, IVRS will obtain a waiver of statewideness. At the current time, IVRS manages two cooperative agreements with private non-profit organizations for the purpose of providing supported employment services.

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2012 7:04AM by Ken Schellenberg

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

IVRS has established contractual agreements for the provision of supported employment services with approximately 46 Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) in Iowa. Agency standards for services must be met for a contractual agreement to be developed between IVRS and a CRP. IVRS has two cooperative agreements for the purpose of expanding supported employment services in underserved areas. The cooperative agreements are with Hope Haven (Rock Valley) and North Iowa Vocational Center. Prior to arranging for Supported Employment, the IVRS counselor must identify funding for extended services required to maintain employment after the IVRS case file is closed. From 1999 through 2001, IVRS developed and implemented the Menu of Services concept as the result of a collaborative project with the Community Rehabilitation Program (CRP) partners. The project was initiated due to the inadequacy of the existing outcome based fee agreements which did not meet the needs of the eligible clients receiving services through the state agency. The Menu of Services is an agreement between IVRS and the CRP, which insures that the client’s needs drive the planning and service delivery process. IVRS counselors and clients determine which outcomes are needed in order for the client to progress forward in reaching the supported employment goal as identified on the Individual Plan for Employment (IPE). The IVRS counselor and client refer their questions and service requests to the CRP, which determines if it has the capacity to provide answers and work in partnership with the counselor and the client. There are specific categories from which the counselor and client may choose one outcome or a combination of outcomes that lead to supported employment placement and stabilization: - Referral - Community Worksite Assessment - Comprehensive Vocational Evaluation - Facility Worksite Assessment - Career Exploration and Job Shadowing - Work Adjustment Training - Job Seeking Skills Training - Vocational Preparation - Transportation Training - Job/Employer Development - Job Coaching - Selected - Supported Reports from the CRP describe the quality indicators that were accomplished, in addition to other pertinent information necessary to enhance vocational success, and the client’s and counselor’s understanding of the questions asked. As clients stabilize their employment and job coaching has faded, the IVRS case file is closed and the client transitions to extended services. In 2006, IVRS faced financial challenges and in response, initiated an intensive review of expenditures. This led to exploring a variety of options in order to change an over-burdened system. At that time, IVRS had been informed by the Rehabilitation Services Administration of the need to consider the Medicaid Waiver in paying for services before using any IVRS dollars, due to the fact that the State of Iowa Medicaid Waiver Plan included Supported Employment Services in their plan. Meetings were held between IVRS and DHS which resulted in the development of a collaborative funding solution that met RSA’s directive and Medicaid requirements. Despite having an active voice in the development of the new system, many in the CRP community were left dissatisfied. It was understood, however, that IVRS was left with no recourse due to federal regulations that required using comparable services and benefits prior to an expenditure of IVRS funds. IVRS also looked at the function of the IVRS counselor and determined that a core responsibility of a counselor’s position involved job placement. IVRS was the only state in the region that paid CRP’s for job development services for non-supported employment cases. IVRS had been paying for a core service that internal staff had been hired to provide. When roles and responsibilities shifted, IVRS experienced an increase in placement outcomes and decrease in costs. An added benefit was recognized when IVRS staff embraced the fact that their job involved developing employment opportunities instead of merely “managing a case” or paying external sources for service provision. A subsequent decrease in referrals from CRPs to IVRS can be attributed to several factors. These include: a change in the way IVRS utilized services from CRPs, a change in the entire IVRS contracting process as a whole, and a renewed commitment by IVRS to perform as front line staff in the role of helping a client achieve placement success. For more detail about current and proposed changes to the Supported Employment delivery system in Iowa, please refer to Attachment 4.11(c)(4)Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B funds.

This screen was last updated on Jun 21 2012 7:11AM by Ken Schellenberg

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

IVRS maintains a web-based case management system with resulting monthly, quarterly, and annual reports providing client caseload data which, along with budget information, is used to predict resources available for client services. The table below contains the major personnel categories and vacancies as of 4/1/2013 in the Administrative Services Bureau, Rehabilitation Services Bureau and Planning and Development team. Personnel in the Disability Determination Services Bureau are not reported as they are not covered by the IVRS State Plan.

In projecting vacancies over the next five years, the numbers reflect current employees over age 55 that could choose to retire. In recent years, IVRS has hired some Rehabilitation Assistants and Rehabilitation Associates to provide caseload management support, freeing Master’s level counselors to focus on their core functions of eligibility decision making, plan development, counseling and guidance and job placement. Positions are targeted to offices based on optimum caseload size as well as clients projected to come off the waiting list and move into active services. The projected retirements could change depending on action in the next legislative session to raise the minimum retirement age.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Supervisory 17 1 15
2 Professional 109 2 45
3 Support 102 0 31
4 0 0 0
5 0 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

The table below provides the requested data.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 University of Iowa-M.A. in Rehabilitation Counseli 26 0 2 12
2 Drake University-M.A. in Rehabilitation Counseling 45 0 0 14
3 Drake University-M.A. in Rehabilitation Administra 13 0 13 1
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

The agency actively considers applications from graduates of the two programs in Iowa and recruits from graduate programs in Minnesota, Illinois, and Wisconsin. During the past year, IVRS area offices (Cedar Rapids, Fort Dodge, and West Central Area Offices) supervised practicum and intern students in the Rehabilitation Counseling programs to provide them with an understanding of the state rehabilitation agencies. Students ready for internship meet the agency’s minimum qualifications for hiring. If selected for a permanent position, their IVRS employment meets their internship requirement.

In an attempt to address the recruitment of individuals from minority backgrounds into the field of rehabilitation, IVRS reviewed its recruiting and hiring practices to assure consideration of applicants from diverse backgrounds. IVRS actively attempts to recruit from a wide variety of services including the state hiring system, Iowa Workforce Development and various community newspapers. Communication continues with staff on the importance of working with our diverse client basis from a service delivery perspective, but also from a staff recruiting basis. The screening process is equitable to all applicants. Screening is done strictly on a numeric basis and the top scoring applicants are interviewed. Applicants are selected from the top scorers.

Currently about 6.4% of the employee pool is minority status and 7.7% are persons with disabilities. Although the State of Iowa as a whole is underutilized for Females, Minorities and Persons with Disabilities, IVRS has met or exceeded all state goals. With the addition of the Rehabilitation Associate and Rehabilitation Assistant classifications, the options for applicants from diverse populations have also increased. These positions provide a career ladder for IVRS employees who continue their education and become eligible to fill counselor vacancies.

 

The academic degree standard for VR counselors includes a Master’s Degree in rehabilitation counseling, counseling and guidance, or a closely related major emphasis; including courses in Foundation of Rehabilitation Counseling or Rehabilitation Counseling Application, AND Occupational Information/Job Placement. Persons hired under this standard must agree to complete such classes or Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling within a reasonable period of time from the date of hire. The agency does provide support for these efforts.

State personnel standards for supervisors and resource in the Rehabilitation Services Bureau are similar.

The Rehabilitation Associate classification was expanded in the Rehabilitation Services Bureau Area Offices in 2004. Rehabilitation Associates provide case-management assistance increasing the counselors’ capacities to perform in their core functioning areas. The education, experience, and special requirements for that classification include graduation from an accredited college or university with major coursework in a human services related area; or an equivalent combination of education and experience substituting full-time human service work experience for the required education (thirty semester or equivalent hours equals one year) to a maximum substitution of two years.

As of 4/1/12, 94% of vocational rehabilitation counselor positions are filled with individuals that meet the academic standard cited for national certification. Three counselors who do not have master’s degrees were hired between October 1978 and March 1979, and are or will be eligible to retire in the next 5 years. IVRS hired two new counselors who have MSW degrees in 2012. As part of hiring condition, they were required to take 2 or 3 Rehabilitation Counseling Master’s level courses in order to bring their skills to the national standards. One counselor completed required courses, and the other was enrolled in the Rehabilitation Counseling Program at Virginia Commonwealth University’s Category R classification.

Several factors influence the ability to hire persons with a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling or a closely related field. For some positions, the job description determines the skills needed to do the job. This is especially true in the case of positions that require sign language skills. In the review of applicants, the agency looks not only at academic degrees held, but their ability to perform the job duties of a specific opening. Some candidates with prior experience in community rehabilitation programs, school systems, or personnel organizations have the desired skills and contacts to place individuals with disabilities into employment. In many rural areas, qualified candidates with master’s degree are quite limited. In those cases, individuals with related work experience are considered for vacancies. As positions become vacant, the supervisor determines if some of the case management duties can be performed by a Rehabilitation Associate, freeing up time for the Rehabilitation Counselor to provide counseling and employer development services, as well as signing all eligibility determinations and employment plans.

IVRS Rehabilitation Counselors are covered by a collective bargaining agreement. After a counselor obtains permanent status, they cannot be required to pursue additional coursework if they are maintaining satisfactory job performance. The CSPD plan strives to encourage current staff to voluntarily pursue coursework that will bring them to the academic standard required for national certification. Agency practice when hiring new counselors is to consider only those candidates that hold the required degree or will complete the degree within six months of starting employment or with management approval.

The first objective of this plan is to establish priorities for getting all counselors to the level of the standard. Those priorities are:

1. Individuals who are required to take Rehabilitation Counseling courses.

At the time of this report, Council Bluffs Area Office is in a process of filling a rehabilitation counselor position. This process required a second posting of the vacancy, as the successful candidate during the first recruitment process declined to accept the position, as she was not willing to take additional courses.

2. Current employees with over 20 years of service in the state system who will be eligible to retire before they can reasonably be expected to complete a master’s degree.

Progress to date: Three counselors without master’s degrees have service ranging from 30 to 35 years and are eligible for retirement. They are not enrolled in graduate coursework. One of the three above-noted counselors is due to retire in August 2013. This will change the data for the next year’s report.

The second objective is to fund graduate training from a portion of the Federal In-Service Training Grant. Financial assistance is provided, as available, to support staff within these efforts.

With these objectives in place, it is anticipated that all counselors will meet the highest standard in the state, be retired or require supervisory sign-off of non delegable functions by the end of FFY 2014.

Transcripts for all applicants for Rehabilitation Counselor positions are reviewed against the national CRCC academic requirements -- a degree in rehabilitation counseling or a closely related field -- by Rehabilitation Services Bureau (RSB) management staff and the In-service Training Grant Manager. If applicants have not taken the required coursework, the RSB management staff is advised of this fact. Successful candidates that do not meet the national standard will be told, prior to the job offer, of the need to complete the degree or course requirements. Those candidates, if selected as the best candidate for the position, are given a conditional offer with agreement that he/she will complete required graduate-level courses. In such case the requirements are incorporated into the Performance Plan and Evaluation (PPE), which is conducted annually between the employee and the supervisor. Results will be reported in the annual In-Service Training Grant Performance Report.

Primary emphasis should be on providing quality case services. For that reason, we recommend that counselors enroll in one class per semester. IVRS will allow the counselor to adjust their schedule to travel to and complete one course. Counselors will be responsible for completing all homework assignments on their own time.

Funds for tuition and books may be provided through a combination of RSA Stipends and In-service Training Funds. The application for Educational Assistance should be completed by the employee, signed by the supervisor and forwarded to the Staff Development Manager two weeks before the starting date for any class.

If the academic advisor recommends taking two courses per semester, IVRS will consider the request. Time and funding of anything above two courses per semester will be completely the responsibility of the counselor.

Some counselors may elect to complete the degree requirements via distance learning. Coursework is completed over the internet. Supervisors may approve work time for the equivalent of one course per semester, i.e. 1 hour per week for each semester hour of coursework. Tuition and books will be paid through the In-service Training grant.

 

IVRS provides significant in-service training opportunities to all levels and classes of employees. Training activities focus on improving knowledge or understanding of rehabilitation topics, development and demonstration of new levels of skills, and organizational change projects that enhance the achievement of employment outcomes for persons with disabilities. IVRS staff has the opportunity to participate in workshops and seminars, concentrated training activities to improve skills in working with specific groups of individuals with disabilities, and individual or group staff development activities designed to enable staff to acquire special skills. New supervisors enroll in the Supervisory Certificate program offered through the Iowa Department of Administrative Services—Human Resources Enterprise. All supervisors attend Management Team sessions to update them on leadership and supervisory issues.

In addition to formal training, participation in leadership roles in teams that address Strategic Planning build capacity of staff at all levels to develop services that meet the needs of agency clients. Through these activities, they begin developing skills needed to increase capacity at the local level to improve consumer outcomes.

There are ongoing opportunities for staff to indicate training needs. One section of the annual performance evaluation of all staff relates to training needs that have been identified for that individual. The individual is then given an opportunity to become involved in training to improve that performance area. Staff also request agency support to attend conferences and workshops pertaining to areas of development that are identified in annual evaluation conferences.

The annual performance evaluation system for rehabilitation counselor and rehabilitation associates is designed to ensure that a strong emphasis is placed on issues that relate to the provision of quality services to vocational rehabilitation clients, especially those with the most severe disabilities. Evaluations that mainly assessed the number of individuals closed as rehabilitated have been revised to incorporate case review results. Individualized evaluation looks at ways of emphasizing a staff member’s strengths and helping them improve in their areas of need. The RSB Bureau Chief and the Assistant Bureau Chief regularly conduct training in IVRS field offices on case review standards and policy changes, many of which relate to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement, and rehabilitation technology. Formal staff development sessions also support implementation of goals and priorities in the State Plan with respect to Cultural Diversity, coordination with Workforce partners, services to deaf and hard of hearing clients, retention of clients to successful rehabilitation, changes in the Supported Employment model and services to high school students transitioning to adult life.

The agency routinely uses the latest research to update training programs in areas such as ADA, assistive technology, mental illness, learning disabilities, and head injury/traumatic brain injury. The Region VII ADA Project has provided staff for training and technical assistance in its most recent grant and IVRS is coordinating training for staff and business partners with this representative. IVRS continues to partner closely with the Region VII Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Center in designing and providing training events based on the IVRS employee needs. The Regional TACE has been directly involved in helping the agency introduce and implement motivational interviewing strategies as well as hosting regional meetings providing opportunities for strategic planning and capacity building with our state partners.

 

IVRS staff has access to the AT&T Language Line and can purchase the interpreter services to allow applicants and clients to engage effectively in the vocational rehabilitation process. Accommodations are made for individuals with communication impairments, such as providing interpreters for the deaf and hard of hearing. IVRS is implementing additional service delivery in the area of serving individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. This involves improved collaboration and communication with staff at the local level in understanding the culture associated with individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing as well as improved access for those individuals to communicate with VR staff through the use of a video phone. Collaboration continues with the Deaf Services Commission of Iowa and the Iowa School for the Deaf on ways to improve service delivery for this population. IVRS maintains an agreement with the Iowa Department for the Blind to translate training materials into large print or Braille format for trainees with visual impairments and learning disabilities. All training materials are provided in the preferred means of communication, including Braille, large print, disk, or closed caption.

 

IVRS has a close working relationship with the bureau responsible for Special Education within the Iowa Department of Education. Attachment 4.8 (b)(2) contains the agreement between these two entities. Approximately 48% of the IVRS caseload is referred by high school personnel or post-secondary institutions. IVRS counselors participate in IEP meetings and provide technical assistance to high schools in regard to students that are on waiting lists that are not being served. IVRS and some school districts are participating in local initiatives to provide continuity in students’ transition from high school to either post-secondary education or employment. In these initiatives, joint training is provided to IVRS staff and school personnel so that resources of each entity can be appropriately utilized for improved student outcomes.

This screen was last updated on Jun 13 2013 1:12PM by Lee Russo

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

To comply with the provisions of Title I, Section 101, State Plans, of the Rehabilitation Amendments of 1998, IVRS and the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) were involved in conducting a three-year comprehensive statewide needs assessment (CSNA) of the vocational rehabilitation service needs of individuals with disabilities. In 2011, IVRS completed this mandated assessment to determine the current needs of Iowans with disabilities, as well as assess the services provided by Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs).

IVRS professionals and SRC personnel have been fully committed to the needs assessment study and participated in multiple meetings over the past year and a half. The major objective of the CSNA study included an examination of the rehabilitation needs of (1) individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services, (2) individuals with disabilities who are minorities, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program, and (3) individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Select members of the SRC availed themselves to assist in the shared responsibility of completing the CSNA. Sub-group committee members met regularly at scheduled intervals to establish a process for the CSNA, and initiate a review of needed data. These members participated in RSA-sponsored webinars related to the CSNA, reviewed training materials associated in developing a model CSNA, and read reports from other states and their experiences in completing a CSNA.

RSA recommendations and IVRS responses from Iowa’s 2009 Monitoring Report were shared by then-Administrator Stephen Wooderson with SRC and subsequently, CSNA sub-committee members. Information confirmed that the planning process was up to IVRS and SRC members to determine goals and strategies to build the State Plan. In accordance with CSNA principles, a project that was both reasonable and feasible was designed. The end result took advantage of existing knowledge within IVRS, while relying on the expertise of SRC sub-committee members and external sources. Additionally, a wide array of data was gathered and analyzed from state, local and federal reports.

Results of the CSNA were presented to the full SRC by sub-committee members of the Planning and Evaluation Committee, Outreach Committee and IVRS staff. A new process for soliciting responses from current or potential clients of IVRS was established in response to a lack of attendance in prior focus group meetings. In 2008, the SRC indicated they saw little value in continuing focus groups meeting, as attendance was sparse and recommendations did not focus on State Plan changes.

The SRC has a continued goal of gathering input from the public, and has worked with researchers to revise the consumer satisfaction process. Since March of 2008, satisfaction surveys were expanded in order to tie-back results to cases services and case review data.

The SRC also recommended that the Outreach Committee develop a long-term strategy to obtain ongoing input from consumers. Methods in which to accomplish this were discussed by the full SRC, and consideration has been given to continuing to utilize the current process to solicit input during the Administrative Rules process. Email has been discussed as another format in which to receive input from stakeholders. The current SRC process includes an assigned time set aside during regularly quarterly meetings. A record of all public comment received by IVRS is set to be published the summer of 2011.

While IVRS has historically performed well on the federal Standards and Indicators, IVRS and SRC members have sought, and remain open to ways in which services can be improved. Applied research was used by IVRS staff and SRC sub-committee members to address the four specific assessment objectives required for State Plans:

1. Individuals with most significant disabilities, and their need for supported employment;

2. Individuals with disabilities who are minorities, un-served or underserved;

3. Individuals with disabilities service through other components of workforce investment system;

4. Assess the need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs.

Information was gathered and findings synthesized using internal and external sources. The data sources used during the CSNA process included information from clients of IVRS, community partners and IVRS staff. All information was shared with SRC sub-committee members assisting in the completion of the CSNA.

1. Individuals with most significant disabilities, and their need for supported employment;

Individuals with most significant disabilities, and their need for supported employment continues to be addressed as a required state plan goal. The impact of the Waiting List has affected the ability of IVRS to adequately all serve Iowans eligible to receive IVRS services at this time. IVRS continues to experience concerns related to issues that involve both funding and capacity. As a result, there are currently 3,811 individuals waiting for services from IVRS at this time, 13 of whom are Most Significantly Disabled.

Since the last CSNA, Iowa has explored changes in relationship to service delivery for the provision of Supported Employment. IVRS has also experienced significant changes to the way services may be contracted with CRPs.

IVRS recognizes the need for continued communication to occur with CRP staff. Significant inroads have been made between IVRS and CRP partners, one of which involves ARRA funds being used by IVRS to offset training costs for CRP staff. Of further note is the fact that a representative from a CRP has re-submitted her name in hopes of being appointed by Iowa’s new governor to the SRC.

2. Individuals with disabilities who are minorities, unserved or underserved;

Efforts to improve the service rate for minorities and address individuals who are unserved or underserved continue as part of each IVRS Area Office plan. The data reviewed as part of the CSNA shows that IVRS has been consistent in very nearly meeting the RSA standard of .80 on performance indicator 2.1 (Ratio of Minorities Service Rate Over Non-Minorities Service Rate). A review of Iowa’s population data reflecting Iowa’s minority population of less than 10%, includes an anticipated increase which warrants efforts be directed to ensure State Plan goals for minority populations continue. Specific goals already established for individuals who are deaf, as well as the transition-aged youth, will remain in place. IVRS lost 46 staff whom opted for early retirement in 2010, and the agency was only able replace a certain number of positions. This left IVRS offices with one of two dilemmas -- new staff, most of whom did not have the experience of departing staff who worked with individuals with hearing loss, or, capacity issues in pockets of the State in which hiring did not occur.

3. Individuals with disabilities served through other components of workforce investment system;

As outlined in the FY11 State Plan, there were 545 hits from the Workforce database that included Wagner-Peyser and WIA’s Title 1 service system. Of that total number who received services in the One-Stop, 154 individuals were actively receiving services from IVRS during the same time period.

IVRS staff are continuing to participate as part of a planning group with Workforce Development, and have already expanded the use of Wage C information statewide. Workforce has agreed for IVRS to be part of the data warehouse currently under development by Workforce. IVRS is in the process of determining the best way to connect field staff with data compiled (or made available) through Workforce. At this point, consideration is being given to IVRS obtaining the following data points:

a. Wage and hour information from IWD

b. Occupational projections

c. Placement rates by employer and occupations

d. What are the current and future skill sets that are needed for employment? By industry and wage data?

e. How do we get this data and answer these questions by region, city, office, etc.?

f. What is the trend data on urban vs. rural employment in terms of:

i. Wages

ii. Hours

iii. Jobs by industry

iv. Jobs by skills sets and training

v. Commuting patterns

vi. Growth communities

4. Assess the need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs.

After Iowa’s monitoring visit from RSA in 2009, a liaison from the Iowa Attorney General’s (AG) office was assigned to IVRS. Part of the subsequent task(s) in which AG services were utilized involved addressing RSA recommendations about IVRS contracting procedures.

The AG liaison’s interpretation of RSA recommendations subsequently propelled IVRS into an entirely different way in which services were contracted from CRPs. Because Iowa law requires state agencies to adhere to competitive bidding requirements for contracted services, IVRS was compelled to write a Request for Proposal/Informal Solicitation directing CRPs to submit bids if they remained interested in providing services to IVRS. This requirement subjected CRPs to “bid” for IVRS services, and caused ill-will from the CRP community against IVRS.

Prior efforts had been made between IVRS and CRP personnel to develop a cohesive, standardized and uniform system for service delivery which resulted in the creation of the Iowa Model and Menu of Services. After CRPs were informed that in order to provide services to IVRS, they needed to submit a bid through the Informal Solicitation process, the number of CRPs opting to provide services to IVRS decreased from 82 to 46.

Efforts to repair and rebuild relationships that resulted from changes in the way IVRS has been allowed to purchase CRP services continue. The limited interpretation of state law addressing competitive bidding requirements has resulted in pockets of the state without access to CRP services. As a result, contracting procedures are in the process of being scrutinized in order for a legal decision to be rendered prior to IVRS initiating another RFP.

IVRS is currently managing Establishment Contracts with two Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) for Supported Employment Services. Both contracts were in their second year of a four-year contracting period during the CSNA, having been established in 2008.

During 2010, IVRS developed a Request for Proposal (RFP) that was disseminated statewide to Iowa CRPs. The RFP “solicited proposals for innovative ways to significantly increase transportation services for eligible IVRS clients to get to and from work, particularly in small urban or rural areas.” IVRS did not receive any responses to this RFP.

As a result, another RFP was written that allowed funds to be directed to offset the cost of Job Coaching and Employer Development training for staff from CRPs. Both Iowa APSE and TACE expressed interest, and after several discussions, one response to the RFP was submitted by APSE. A contract was awarded by IVRS to APSE to provide training across the state to CRP staff using ARRA funds.

At this writing, almost 100 individuals from CRP’s and IVRS have participated in Job Coaching and Employer Development training provided by APSE and sponsored by IVRS.

Discussions between IVRS, SRC and CRP members are continuing. The IVRS CRP Advisory Committee meets bi-annually to review, revise and/or make recommendations for process change. A variety of conversations between IVRS and CRP staff have occurred, as changes to the contracting process were established during the CSNA. Both SRC and IVRS representatives participated as part of the SELN initiative and remain involved in strategic planning efforts for persons with disabilities in Iowa.

To view the CSNA in its entirety, please refer to the accompanying document entitled "Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment June 2011" submitted by IVRS with this report.

This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2011 3:18PM by Lee Russo

Attachment 4.11(b) Annual Estimates

(a) Part B of Title I - U.S. Census Bureau and 2007 American Community Survey reports estimated there were 397,420 people in Iowa with some kind of disability. That number represents 14.5 percent of Iowa’s civilian, non-institutionalized population age 5 and over. In FFY13, IVRS determined 6,820 individuals eligible for services. IVRS anticipates being able to serve up to 12,400 in FFY14.

(b) Part B of Title VI – IVRS funded supported employment services under status 18-6 for229 individuals in FFY13, using both Part B Title VI funds and Part B Title I funds. Total Supported Employment expenditures were $523,823 of which $240,674 came from Part B Title VI funds. IVRS estimates that it will serve approximately 229 clients in Supported Employment during FFY14. Funding will again come from a combination of Part B Title VI funds and Part B Title I funds.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
2 - MSD Title I $3,510,916 4,662 $753
4 - SD Title I $6,488,655 7502 $864
6 - OE Title I $639,568 236 $2,710
2 - MSD Title VI $240,674
Totals   $10,879,813 12,400 $877

This screen was last updated on Jun 13 2013 2:19PM by Lee Russo

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) State Goals and Priorities

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107: The goals and priorities of the Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services are based upon information from the comprehensive statewide needs assessment completed for the FFY12 state plan, performance on RSA Standards and Indicators (see Attachment 4.11(e)(2), as well as analysis of other R911 data. They were jointly developed with the State Rehabilitation Council and revised at the May 30, 2012 meeting.

1. Improve the retention and rehabilitation rate of clients from diverse backgrounds in the caseload annually. Rationale: IVRS has been effective in outreach to diverse populations as evidenced by a 12.16% minority representation in the caseload. Of greater importance is the failure to meet the RSA indicator 2.1 which requires at least a .8 ratio when comparing the service rate of minorities to non-minorities. Over the past three years, IVRS has maintained an average service rate ratio of .79. Retention of diverse clients through successful closure is a priority.

Strategy 1.1 Increase the retention of minority clients through plan development. 1.1 Measure Achieve a service rate ratio at least .8 in each area office between clients with a minority background compared to individuals without a minority background exiting the program who received VR services. Calculation Count minority clients closed in each status 08, 26, 28, 30, 38 Count non-minority clients closed in each status 08, 26, 28, 30, 38 Status of Minorities (26 + 28) / (08+26+28+30+38) divided by Status of Non-Minorities (26+28) / (08+26+28+30+38) FFY10 Baseline: .79 statewide FFY11 Measure: .78 statewide

Strategy 1.2 Increase the rehabilitation rate for clients from minority backgrounds. 1.2 Measure Achieve a rehabilitation rate of no less than 55.8% in each office for clients from minority backgrounds. Calculation Count minority clients closed in each status 26, 28 Status of Minorities (26) divided by Status of Minorities (26 + 28) FFY10 Baseline: .41 FFY11 Measure: .45

Strategy 1.3 Increase the number of minority clients that achieve a successful rehabilitation. 1.3 Measure Using FFY 10 as a baseline, increase the number of 26 closures for clients from minority backgrounds by 5% in each area office. Calculation Multiply the number of 26 closures for clients from minority backgrounds in each Area Office by 1.05 to obtain the goal. FFY10 Baseline: 214 statewide FFY11 Measure: 203 statewide

Strategy 1.4 Develop relationships between IVRS and recognized experts to establish MOUs with organizations that serves diverse populations. 1.4 Measure Using FFY10 as a baseline, track the number of MOUs that are developed between IVRS and organizations that serve diverse populations, or the number of outreach efforts that contribute to developing cultural competencies for IVRS staff. FFY10 Baseline: IVRS has no established MOUs with external organizations that serve diverse populations. FFY11 Measure: IVRS has established MOUs with Iowa Blind, the Veteran’s Administration, as well as the Department of Education and other state partners. In FFY12, new agreements were developed between IVRS and the Department on Aging in addition to Project Search partners. This Project involves collaboration with IVRS, schools, community rehabilitation program partners, and local business and industry. IVRS continues to address cultural competencies in staff through a statewide quality review process.

2. Improve outreach and rehabilitation rates for individuals who are underserved such as individuals with autism spectrum disorder or individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing. Rationale: IVRS and the Deaf Services Commission of Iowa have developed a collaborative working relationship to foster improved services to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing clients. Nationally about 10% of the population has hearing loss. The IVRS Work Group for Individuals who are Deaf or and Hard of Hearing continues to work on improving the communication skills of the counselors. One of their key efforts has included sharing information about deafness and hearing loss with all IVRS staff. Rehabilitation Services Bureau Management will monitor progress on this Work Group’s goals: The Work Group for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing and Rehabilitation Services Bureau will collaborate with Deaf Services Commission of Iowa to inform individuals with deafness and hearing loss about changes in eligibility determination and waiting list to increase applications for services. The Work Group will work with Deaf Services Commission of Iowa to learn about and utilize new technology that expands ability to serve this population. The need for service delivery to be provided by knowledgeable staff to individuals who are Deaf and Hard of Hearing has been identified as an ongoing goal within IVRS.

Staff will represent IVRS on the Iowa Autism Council to improve outreach and rehabilitation rates for this population. The Autism Council is appointed by the Governor and meets on a quarterly basis. As a result of a survey done by a doctoral student at the University of Kansas, a closer look has been given to the autism population and services available. IVRS data for this population shows that there are not a large number of individuals with autism carried in the caseload. As part of an ongoing objective to develop best practices, IVRS will appoint one person to work with the autism population from each area office. The Work Group will analyze policies to determine if the policy negatively impacts these populations and provide internal recommendations to IVRS and the SRC. A viable goal determined by the needs assessment involves increasing referral numbers from both of these underserved populations.

Strategy 2.1 Increase the representation of clients with deafness and hearing loss or autism spectrum disorder in the IVRS caseload. 2.1 Measure Using FFY 10 as a baseline, increase representation of clients with deafness and hearing loss by 1% each year until their representation in the caseload reaches at least 8%. Using FFY10 as a baseline, increase representation of clients with autism until their representation in the caseload reaches 5%. Calculation The sum clients at eligibility with primary or secondary disability RSA code 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08 divided by total number eligible clients for deaf or hard of hearing, RSA code 08 for autism (IVRS code 1708, 1808, 1908). FFY10 Baseline for deafness or hearing loss: 5.14% FFY10 Baseline for autism spectrum disorder: 2.13% FFY 11 Measure for deafness or hearing loss: 6.1% FFY11 Measure for autism spectrum disorder: 3.2% Strategy 2.2 Retain clients with deafness and hearing loss or autism spectrum disorder in the caseload through plan development and successful closure.

2.2 Measure Maintain a rehabilitation rate for clients with deafness and hearing loss of at least .769. Achieve a rehabilitation rate for clients with autism of at least .60 Calculation The sum of Clients closed status 26 with Primary or secondary disability RSA Code 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08 divided by the sum of clients closed in status 26 and 28 with primary or secondary disability RSA Code 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08. Same calculation used for autism code 08. FFY10 Baseline for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing: .769 FFY10 Baseline for individuals on the autism spectrum disorder: .56 FFY11 Measure for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing: .745 FFY11 Measure for individuals on the autism spectrum disorder: .53

3. Collaborate with workforce partners to access work incentives for IVRS clients that achieve successful rehabilitation by annual assessment of strategies. Rationale: The State of Iowa has developed an effective, collaborative working relationship with seven state partner agencies to identify and resolve barriers related to employment services for individuals with disabilities. These State partners, who have been meeting on a quarterly basis since 1998, include the Department of Education, Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services (IVRS), Department of Human Rights, Department for the Blind, Department of Human Services, Iowa Department of Workforce Development and the Governor’s Developmental Disabilities Council. In 2003 a signed Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) further strengthened this partnership and demonstrated a commitment to enhancing employment services for Iowans with disabilities. The MOA was renewed for another five years in 2008 and re-signed again last FY. Through the Governance Group and the commitment of staff and resources to a statewide Support Team, the agencies will continue to maintain communication and feedback from the field offices on service issues related to our mutual clients. To achieve this goal, the Governance Group will continue to meet quarterly to remove barriers to collaboration around employment services to individuals with disabilities. The Support Team will work with local partner groups to identify positive examples of collaboration and disseminate these practices statewide. IVRS staff will continue collaboration with the Iowa Workforce Development Work Incentive Planning & Assistance Grant to increase access to Benefits Planning services by IVRS clients. IVRS staff will coordinate with the Department of Human Services Medicaid Infrastructure Grant to devise a method to track the number of clients that utilize Medicaid for Employed Persons with Disabilities after a successful rehabilitation.

Strategy 3.1 Track and increase the number of IVRS ticket holders that achieve successful rehabilitation and also receive services from Iowa Workforce Development. 3.1 Measure increase by 2% per year the number of IVRS ticket holders that receive services jointly through IVRS and IWD closed in status 26 and 28. Calculation (List of status 26 and 28 client names and birth dates are compared with IWD database to get count with clients involved with both IWD and IVRS with Tickets for numerator) Multiply by 1.02 the number of clients closed in status 26 or 28 if they listed having any of the following: IRSS Ticket to Work on IPE IRSS Ticket to Work on Plan Closure Form SSI at Application is greater than $0.00 SSDI at Application is greater than $0.00 FFY10 Baseline: Of 1,003 Ticket Holders closed from active status in FFY10, 300 received services from Iowa Workforce Development Wagner Peyser or WIA programs. FFY11 Measure: 492 received services from Iowa Workforce Development Wagner Peyser or WIA programs.

Strategy 3.2 Increase the number of IVRS clients that utilize the Medicaid buy-in program upon successful rehabilitation and case closure 3.2 Measure Increase by 2% per year the number of clients that utilize Medicaid for Employed Persons with Disabilities after a successful rehabilitation. Calculation (List of status 26 client names and birth dates are compared with DHS MEPD file.) Multiply the sum of status 26 IVRS clients on the DHS Medicaid for Employed Persons with Disabilities list by 1.02 FFY10 Baseline: 120 of the 26 closures were MEPD members.

Strategy 3.3 FFY11 Measure: Track number of mutual clients served by IVRS and Workforce Proteus program to obtain data specific to services either by wage or employment rates Measure 3.3 FFY10 Baseline: 167 WIA/Proteus FFY11 Measure: program number not available until July.

4. Retain eligible IVRS clients until they become rehabilitated, achieving their optimal level of employment and self-sufficiency, achieving or exceeding strategy measures. Rationale: The overall rehabilitation rate during the past three years has met the RSA standard except for FFY10. There is a sizable group of people who have received services, and often significant program dollars, who are closed as not successfully rehabilitated. We believe we can develop methods to engage clients earlier in the process and follow up and follow along which will improve retention of these individuals. IVRS rehabilitation teams will continue to provide intensive vocational assessment and counseling services, beginning early in the rehabilitation process to engage and retain clients. By developing relationships with business and industry, clients can better understand future workforce needs, requirements, qualifications, and work demands in order to make informed choices about career decisions. The rehabilitation team will maintain frequent, ongoing contacts with clients to provide early identification of barriers to successful completion of the rehabilitation plan.

Strategy 4.1 Exceed RSA Standard 1.2 for VR clients that develop and initiate an Individual Plan for Employment. 4.1 Measure Exceed a rehabilitation rate of 55.8% annually. Calculation The sum of client cases closed status 26 divided by the sum of client cases closed status 26 + 28 FFY10 Baseline: 0.5196 Rehabilitation Rate FFY11 Measure: 0.5795 Rehabilitation Rate.

Strategy 4.2 Exceed RSA Standard 1.5, the average hourly wage ratio for VR clients closed after a plan is initiated. 4.2 Measure Exceed a ratio of average hourly earnings of IVRS clients compared to the state average hourly wage of at least .52 or greater. Calculation Average Hourly Earnings of IVRS Clients closed status 26 divided by Average Hourly Earnings for all employed individuals in the state (denominator calculated from www.bls.gov/cew/home.htm, QCEW Databases FFY10 Baseline: .63 FFY11 Measure: .62

5. Improve meaningful, sustained employment for supported employment consumers. a. Rationale: The Iowa Model for Supported Employment Services includes the supported employment readiness analysis, a thorough analysis of employer needs and a customized training protocol developed prior to placement so the employer, natural supports, CRP and client all understand the expectations for sustained employment. IVRS will track progress of placements to determine the effectiveness of the program and make necessary revisions. Data collection will include number of hours of employment, rate of pay and changes in the amount of public support at closure compared to application. Supported Employment services for clients seeking to improve their quality of life without jeopardizing other public support benefits will receive collaborative funding between IVRS and DHS Medicaid Waiver programs.

Strategy 5.1: Increase average weekly earnings for clients that successfully complete a Supported Employment service program 5.1 Measure Achieve average weekly earnings of at least $150 for supported employment clients closed as successfully rehabilitated. Calculation (Select/Count SES clients closed status 26 from clients who were provided service line items 959, 960, 967, 968, 969, 970) The sum of the weekly earnings of the above selected clients divided by the count of the number of clients of the above selected FFY10 Baseline: $141.04 FFY11 Measure: $155.37.

Strategy 5.2 Increase average weekly hours worked for clients that successfully complete a Supported Employment service program 5.2 Measure Achieve an average of at least 20 hours worked per week for supported employment clients closed as successfully rehabilitated Calculation (Select/Count SES clients closed status 26 from clients who were provided service line items 959, 960, 967, 968, 969, 970) Add the weekly hours of the above selected clients divided by the count of the number of clients of the above selected FFY10 Baseline: 18 FFY11 Measure: 20.

Strategy 5.3 Decrease dependence on public support from application to closure for supported employment clients closed as successfully rehabilitated. 5.3 Measure Using 2010 as a baseline, achieve a 25% decrease in public support from application to closure for Supported Employment clients closed as successfully rehabilitated. Calculation **(SSDI + SSI + TANF + GenAssist + VetDisability + WorkComp + OtherPublic) = Total Public Support at application from clients who were provided service line items 959, 960, 967, 968, 969, 970 and had public support of at least one of the following The sum of SES public support for clients** closed status 26 / number of cases at application divided by The sum of SES public support for clients** closed status 26 / number of cases at closure FFY10 Baseline: Public Support increased 12.6%. Looking at raw data, we found that not all closures were recorded accurately. FFY11 Measure: Public Support decreased by 8%.

6. Track data and assess the effectiveness on the Transition Alliance Project (TAP) and Collaborative Transition Protocol (CTP) students to assure annual progress. Rationale: Transition Alliance Programs (TAPs) were created in partnership between the Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services and local school districts. Youth participating in TAP are provided opportunities to develop or enhance skills in academic, vocational and independent living competencies. The Collaborative Transition Protocol, developed within the non-categorical framework of the Iowa Department of Education and IVRS, provides the necessary information for both Eligibility and Plan Development. Through the Collaborative Transition Protocol, students in transition will not participate in unnecessary testing to be labeled for the adult service delivery system and, through working collaboratively with educators, develop learning methods that relate to post-school career goals. IVRS will develop a mechanism that expands the Collaborative Transition Protocol across all Area Education Agencies in the state while maintaining the integrity of the original research project, thereby achieving the same level of quality decision-making in the transition process. IVRS staff will work with other adult service agencies to develop understanding and support for the Collaborative Transition Protocol so that the non-categorical educational system and the adult service system work together to achieve post-secondary living, learning and working outcomes for students. Expansion of this protocol statewide should result in decreased assessment costs, accuracy of eligibility determination and significance of disability, and better information for development of IEPs and IPEs.

Strategy 6.1 Increase percentage of TAP that achieve a successful rehabilitation outcome. 6.1 Measure Using FFY10 as a baseline, increase by 3% percent per year the number of TAP youth who exited the VR program after receiving services under an IPE and achieved an employment outcome with earnings above minimum wage at closure Calculation Multiply the number of students exiting the TAP program after 26 by 1.03 FFY10 Baseline: 92 TAP clients were closed in competitive employment FFY11 Measure: 65 TAP clients were closed in competitive employment though it is noted that the number of TAP programs decreased by two during this reporting period.

Strategy 6.2 Add four Area Education Agencies per year that adopt the Collaborative Transition Protocol in at least one school district 6.2 Measure: Each school year one school district in at least four different Area Education agencies will adopt the Collaborative Transition Protocol, until all ten AEAs participate. Calculation Using FFY10 as a baseline, add the number of AEAs that initiate work on the Collaborative Transition project until the total equals ten. FFY10 Baseline: All high schools in AEA 267 adopted the Collaborative Transition Protocol, five AEAs are currently implementing and three AEAs have not begun implementation. FFY11 Measure: Continued progress is being made in CTP implementation in all but two of the ten AEAs. This year, a sixth AEA committed to implementing CTP to bring the total to eight AEAs.

Strategy 6.3 Maintain accurate eligibility determination and significance of disability for 100% of clients served under the Collaborative Transition Protocol. 6.3 Measure Maintain 100% accuracy of eligibility determination and significance of disability and provide better information for development of IEPs and IPEs for students participating in the Collaborative Transition Protocol. Calculation from the case study results completed on clients that are served by the Collaborative Transition Protocol, 100% will meet accuracy standards for eligibility determination and significance of disability using IEP reports. FFY10 Baseline: 100% accuracy for clients from schools in which CTP has been fully implemented. FFY11 Measure: 100% accuracy for clients from schools in which CTP has been fully implemented.

Strategy 6.4 Increase referrals at application from Elementary or Secondary schools to IVRS. 6.4 Measure Increase by 5% the number of transition-age youth referred at application from high schools for services annually. Calculation Using FFY10 as a baseline, multiply the number of referrals at application from referral source Educational Institutions--Elementary and Secondary Schools by 1.05 each year. FFY10 Baseline: 2,015 FFY11 Measure: 2,186.

This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2012 12:12PM by Lee Russo

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

This order is justified because it directly follows the requirements in the Federal VR Act and the related regulations. During the spring of 1999, both the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) and the IVRS Policy Committee recommended that the number of functional capacity areas in which an individual had to have serious limitations to be considered Most Significantly Disabled (MSD) change from four to three. After considerable discussion and a revision of our State Plan, this was done.

Currently IVRS is not able to serve all categories on the waiting list. ARRA funds have been previously used to backfill vacant positions to maintain staff capacity to serve all categories. Given the uncertainty arising from potential additional cuts in state appropriations, a state hiring freeze, as well as a rising unemployment rate in the state, it became necessary to close one or more categories. In May of 2012, IVRS opened the waiting list to all individuals who were MSD. At that time, IVRS staff were notified that: ”Beginning today May 11, 2012 consumers that are determined to have Most Significant Disabilities will move directly into services. MSD consumers will not be placed on a waiting list. The Budget Team has decided to no longer restrict the movement of MSD consumers into services. Consumers with Significant Disabilities and Others Eligible consumers will continue to be placed on waiting lists for services. IVRS expenditure estimates have decreased over the past few months due to revised personnel cost projections and reduced case service cost projections. Health insurance cost estimates made last year were too high and case service costs have also been slightly lower than expected. These factors caused the Budget Team to eliminate the MSD waiting list. The Budget Team also plans to increase the caseload over the next few months in an effort to provide opportunities for increased employment outcomes and ensure we are able to engage our job candidates as soon as possible. This will also help maintain federal carry forward dollars at a reasonable level.”

An additional change in the manner in which IVRS addressed the waiting list involved releasing the names of individuals for whom services could be initiated on a weekly basis, rather than releasing individual names each month. This change has allowed IVRS start to become more efficient in caseload management techniques and anticipate service provision. The following serves as a sample email IVRS receive each week:

Good Morning,

There are no individuals on the Most Significantly Disabled waiting list.

All individuals on the Significantly Disabled waiting list whose application date fell on or before January 7, 2013 were released into services this morning, June 10, 2013. This amounted to 120 cases.

All individuals on the OTHERS ELIGIBLE list whose application date fell on or before October 23, 2009 have been released into services. No OE cases were released today.

The list of cases released can be viewed from the waiting list report by entering a report date of 06/10/2013 on the Case Management tab.

IVRS anticipates being able to remove between 500 – 600 people from the waiting list each month each month through FY2014. IVRS is not able to project a time in which the waiting list for individuals in category 4 or category 6 will be eliminated due to limited state appropriations. IVRS will be requesting an 8% increase in state appropriations for 2014/2015. This 8% increase will only allow IVRS to maintain status quo and does not expand our ability to serve additional individuals on the SD and other eligible waiting lists. IF IVRS is unsuccessful in obtaining an 8% increase in state appropriations, then IVRS may have to consider closing the MSD waiting list category. Current Department of Management goals, continue to call for a reduction in the size of state government. IVRS continues to advocate for the expansion of services to assist individuals to access services that contribute to gainful employment. Determination of fiscal and staff capacity to serve all categories is made weekly by the IVRS Budget Team.

 

Description of Priority categories

The IVRS has adopted the following Title I Priority Categories:

a. Category 2 individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities - an individual who meets the definition of an individual with a significant disability; and is seriously limited in three or more functional capacities in terms of an employment outcome. Functional capacities included the seven following areas: mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills.

b. Category 4 individuals with a Significant Disability - have a severe physical or mental impairment which seriously limits one or more functional capacities in terms of an employment outcome; and whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time; and who has one or more physical or mental disabilities resulting from amputation, arthritis, autism, blindness, burn injury, cancer, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, deafness, head injury, heart disease, hemiplegia, hemophilia, respiratory or pulmonary dysfunction, mental retardation, mental illness, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, musculoskeletal disorder, neurological disorders (including stroke and epilepsy), paraplegia, quadriplegia, other spinal cord conditions, sickle cell anemia, specific learning disability, end-stage renal disease, or another disability or combination of disabilities determined on the basis of an assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs to cause comparable substantial functional limitations.

c. Category 6 includes all other eligible individuals.

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

When a determination is made by the IVRS Budget Team to allow individuals into service, eligible individuals are taken off the IVRS waiting list based on their priority category and date of application.

If services cannot be provided to all eligible individuals in any of the above categories, a waiting list, based on the date of application, will be used. All individuals in Category 2 must be served before others are removed from the Category 4 waiting list. Individuals in Category 6 will only be removed from the waiting list if all individuals in Category 2 and Category 4 are being served. Currently, all individuals in Category 4 and 6 are being placed on a waiting list upon determination of eligibility.

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

Based on current projections, we believe that approximately 12,400 individuals will receive services from IVRS in the coming year. The numbers below are based on the representation in the current caseload.

Actual outcomes may vary, as we continue to see change in the way the caseload breaks out in the waiting list categories.

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 4,662 734 641 30.7 $3,818,304
2 7,502 1,342 559 39.0 $6,417,132
3 236 86 33 49.2 $623,968
10 12,400 2,162 1,233 35.99 $10,859,404

This screen was last updated on Jun 18 2013 5:12PM by Lee Russo

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

The State Unit estimates that 229 individuals will be served in supported employment during Fiscal Year 2014. Currently, there are 41 Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) available to provide services under a contract established with IVRS. The State Unit accepted new expenditure rates that each CRP submitted to outline their costs of providing specific items on the Menu of Services. The Menu of Services items are used so that instead of having a package of services, an attempt has been made to individualize services required by a client. It is the responsibility of the counselor and client to determine which of the unbundled services the client needs, and which the counselor/agency may be able to provide directly. Only those that are needed and cannot be provided by the agency are purchased. As part of the FFY12 State Plan, IVRS completed the mandatory Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment (CSNA) to determine the current needs of Iowans with disabilities, as well as assess the services provided by Community Rehabilitation Programs. Since the prior 2008 CSNA, the role of CRPs as service providers fell under review from a consortium that consisted of individuals from a variety of Iowa organizations. This group included representatives from the Department of Human Services Bureau of Long-Term Care, Policy Analyst staff from Medicaid Enterprise, sub-group members of the IVRS Community Rehabilitation Program Advisory Committee, and supporting staff from the Technical Assistance Continuing Education (TACE). This group was tasked with re-evaluating practices related to service delivery for individuals receiving Supported Employment Services (SES) in Iowa. The initial objective for consortium members was to review areas of concern identified on survey sent to all SES providers, consider recommendations from a variety of perspectives, and ultimately enhance the way SES occur in Iowa. To do this required various changes to the original SES process in order to address issues such as accessibility, consistency, paperwork redundancies and a lack of understanding of various SES “systems.” Between 2009-2010, revisions to SES procedures and practices were drafted to complement the initial vision established under the Iowa Model of Supported Employment. It is hoped that fine-tuning current processes will contribute to an increase in understanding, improve relationships and result in better outcomes for individuals receiving SES. Making this a reality will require ongoing communication and collaboration between all systems in the delivery of SES for individuals in Iowa. Refining current SES processes, coupled with enhancing both communication and collaboration from SES providers have been established as the primary priorities going forward. The State Unit plans to continue to make supported employment services available by encouraging existing supported employment programs to maintain the average number of hours worked at closure at twenty per week. This provides some flexibility for consumers with disability factors that indicate fewer hours, as well as those with the ability to become self-sufficient. If disability factors indicate a reduced number of hours, supported employment services can be approved by an area office supervisor prior to case file closing. Continuing goals for individuals receiving supported employment services include increasing the average number of hours worked and wages earned, and decreasing dependence on public support. The State Unit recognizes that Title VI, Part B funds are only a supplement to the regular Title I funds. By the end of the first quarter of the fiscal year the State Unit typically has exhausted its Title VI, Part B dollars and is spending Title I dollars for supported employment. For FFY12, about 46% of the Supported Employment expenditures were funded by Title VI, Part B dollars. IVRS is making an effort to partner with various government entities including the Department of Human Services Medicaid Waiver program to ensure that adequate funding will be available to pay for supported employment.

This screen was last updated on Jun 13 2013 2:35PM by Lee Russo

Attachment 4.11(d) State's Strategies

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Certain contracting procedures within IVRS were revised after the 2009 Monitoring visit by RSA. One resulting factor from that visit included a re-commitment on the part of IVRS to ensure prominence was given to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the Title I program of vocational rehabilitation and the Title VI, Part B program of supported employment. Several different initiatives were subsequently developed, one of which included revisions to the contracting process that existed within IVRS. Additionally, two separate initiatives were launched that called for exploring innovative ways in which to reduce barriers related to gaps in transportation and training. Strategies and Measures related to State Plan Goals are in 4.11(c)(1).

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

(1) Strategies related to Assistive Technology services and devices:

Goal 4 is related to improving the rehabilitation rate for clients exiting the program. IVRS hired an Assistive Technology Counselor Specialist to serve as a resource for area office personnel who require assistance serving clients who have assistive technology needs. Staff from the Iowa Program for Assistive Technology (IPAT) based at the University of Iowa also provides updates on assistive technology issues. The IVRS Assistive Technology Counselor Specialist is available to consult with staff when clients require more intensive assistive technology services. This role also includes an emphasis on developing working relationships that contribute to the referral process for individuals with disabilities to programs or activities. In addition, IVRS expectations require that this role involves a continual exploration of new and innovative technologies that become available to help in service to clientele.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

Goal 2 also addresses assistive technology specifically for individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. The IVRS Work Group for Individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing exchange information to improve services to clients with a disability of hearing loss. An initial goal developed by this specialized Work Group relates to better information about technology utilized by clients who are deaf or hard of hearing. Subsequent goals were developed as a result of the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment and outline strategies to increase the representation of clients with deafness and hearing loss, as well as Work Group members developing Best Practices for this population to serve as a model for the rest of the state. Outreach to individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals who have been unserved or underserved Goal 1 relates to services to individuals with disabilities who are minorities. The IVRS caseload statistics indicate that minority representation of 12.16% exceeds minority representation in the population. However, success in maintaining these individuals through successful closure does not meet the RSA standard of a .8 ratio. The service rate ratio is calculated monthly for each area office. Changes that occurred mid-year in 2011 resulted in IVRS reducing the number of area offices from 14 to 11. Prior data showed that six area offices exceeded the RSA Standard with eight offices not meeting the standard. Each area office develops a plan that includes goals in case management, employment and serving diverse clients. Strategies 1.1, 1.2, and 1.3 place an emphasis on the need to identify local action plans to achieve satisfactory outcomes for diverse clientele, including outreach to organizations that can provide support and guidance in maintaining clients through successful closure.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs: Implementation and further development to the Iowa Plan for Supported Employment is discussed in Goal 5. The objectives IVRS continues to address involve the following: placing supported employment consumers in jobs consistent with their skills and interests; providing training necessary to reach stabilization; facilitating long term follow-up services in order to reduce the number of clients that find it necessary to repeat the process due to inadequate long term supports. Strategies 5.1, 5.2 and 5.3 place attention to continuing to evaluate and enhance the Iowa Model for Supported Employment.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Performance with respect to evaluation standards and performance indicators Attachment 4.11(e)(2) reports performance on RSA Standards and Indicators. IVRS has historically exceeded all indicators with the exception of 2.1, however also did not meet standard 1.2 related to the Percentage of Persons with Employment Outcomes in FFY10. Goal 1 is aimed at meeting and or exceeding 2.1. Goal 4 is aimed at meeting or exceeding 1.2.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system The partnership within the statewide workforce investment system in Iowa is quite strong. Seven state agencies have developed and revised a memorandum of agreement that seeks to strengthen employment services for Iowans with Disabilities, with an additional department on board to represent Aging. Strategies 3.1 and 3.2 bring attention to the strong partnership at the state level and provide support to local entities that encounter policy barriers that interfere with serving mutual consumers.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

Six goals and related strategies were developed consistent with needs identified from last year’s Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment. Strategies related to those goals are described in Attachment 4.11(c)(1). Support innovation and expansion activities IVRS reserves a portion of funds to support innovation and expansion activities. IVRS I & E activities accounted for 3.14% of the Basic Support Budget this past year. I & E activities included funding for the following: • Travel and interpreter costs for State Rehabilitation Council members to attend meetings. Additional expenditures were used to offset costs related to supplies and fees incurred from SRC marketing activities. • Contracts with local school districts to fund Transition Alliance Projects. Information about this program is reported under Goal 6 in this document. • Contracts with the Iowa Department of Human Rights to fund the Youth Leadership (YLF) and College Leadership Forums (CLF) for high school and college age students with disabilities. In partnership with the Department for the Blind and in conjunction with the Division of Persons with Disabilities, IVRS helps sponsor leadership training for individual juniors and senior students with disabilities. The five-day leadership training program provides youth with the opportunity to identify barriers to personal and professional success and methods to overcome those barriers. Throughout the week, they learn about disability rights, legislation and assistive technology. They interact with role models who also have disabilities and develop a personal leadership plan. The College Leadership Forum is similar to the Youth Leadership Forum and is targeted to students with disabilities that are juniors or seniors in college. • Hope Haven and North Iowa Vocational Center are two Community Rehabilitation Programs contracting with IVRS under an Establishment Grant. Overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access and participation: IVRS goals and strategies were developed to assure that there is consistency in service provision to all individuals with disabilities. Each month all referrals who are not MSD are placed on SD and Others Eligible waiting lists and the IVRS Budget Team assesses the ability to take persons off those two lists. Decreasing the amount of time that an applicant is on the waiting list should result in better retention and successful outcomes.

 

This screen was last updated on Jun 29 2012 1:19PM by Lee Russo

Attachment 4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

4.11(e)(2) Evaluation and Reports of Progress

The goals and priorities of the Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services are based upon information from the comprehensive statewide needs assessment completed for the FFY 2012 state plan, performance on RSA Standards and Indicators (Attachment 4.11(e)(2), as well as analysis of other R911 data. They have been jointly developed with the State Rehabilitation Council and reviewed at each SRC meeting.

1.1 Measure

Achieve a service rate ratio at least .8 in each area office between clients with a minority background compared to individuals without a minority background exiting the program who received VR services. Calculation Count minority clients closed in each status 08, 26, 28, 30, 38 Count non-minority clients closed in each status 08, 26, 28, 30, 38 Status of Minorities (26 + 28) / (08+26+28+30+38) divided by Status of Non-Minorities (26+28) / (08+26+28+30+38) FFY08 Baseline: .76 statewide FFY09 Measure: .79 statewide FFY10 Measure: .79 statewide FFY11 Measure: .77 statewide FFY Measure: .81.

Strategy 1.2 Increase the rehabilitation rate for clients from minority backgrounds. 1.2 Measure Achieve a rehabilitation rate of no less than 55.8% in each office for clients from minority backgrounds. Calculation Count minority clients closed in each status 26, 28 Status of Minorities (26) divided by Status of Minorities (26 + 28) FFY08 Baseline: .50 FFY09 Measure: .468 FFY10 Measure: .41 FFY11 Measure: .45 FFy12 Measure: .516.

Strategy 1.3 Increase the number of minority clients that achieve a successful rehabilitation. 1.3 Measure Using FFY 08 as a baseline, increase the number of 26 closures for clients from minority backgrounds by 5% in each area office. Calculation Multiply the number of 26 closures for clients from minority backgrounds in each Area Office by 1.05 to obtain the goal for FFY09 FFY08 Baseline: 157 statewide FFY09 Measure: 173 statewide FFY10 Measure: 214 statewide FFY11 Measure: 203 statewide FFY12 Measure: 206 statewide.

2. Improve outreach and rehabilitation rates for clients with deafness and hearing loss annually. Rationale: IVRS and the Deaf Services Commission of Iowa have developed a collaborative working relationship to foster improved services to the Deaf and Hard of Hearing clients. Nationally about 10% of the population has hearing loss. The Rehabilitation Counselors for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (DHH) group has done a lot to improve the communication skills of the counselors. One of their key efforts has been to share information about deafness and hearing loss with all IVRS staff. Rehabilitation Services Bureau Management will monitor progress on DHH goals: DHH and Rehabilitation Services Bureau will collaborate with Deaf Services Commission of Iowa to inform individuals with deafness and hearing loss about changes in eligibility determination and waiting list to increase applications for services. DHH will work with Deaf Services Commission of Iowa to learn about and utilize new technology that expands ability to serve this population. Strategy 2.1 Increase the representation of clients with deafness and hearing loss in the IVRS caseload. 2.1 Measure Using FFY 08 as a baseline, increase representation of clients with deafness and hearing loss by 1% each year until their representation in the caseload reaches at least 8%. Calculation The sum clients at eligibility with primary or secondary disability RSA code 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08 divided by total number eligible clients FFY08 Baseline: 5.35% FFY09 Measure: 5.65% FFY10 Measure: 5.14% FFY11 Measure: 6.1% FFY12 Measure: 4.2%.

Strategy 2.2 Retain clients with deafness and hearing loss in the caseload through plan development and successful closure. 2.2 Measure Maintain a rehabilitation rate for clients with deafness and hearing loss of at least .70. Calculation The sum of Clients closed status 26 with Primary or secondary disability RSA Code 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08 divided by the sum of clients closed in status 26 and 28 with primary or secondary disability RSA Code 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08. FFY08 Baseline: .8 FFY09 Measure: .85 FFY10 Measure: .769 FFY11 Measure: .745 FFY12 Measure: .817.

3. Collaborate with workforce partners to access work incentives for IVRS clients that achieve successful rehabilitation by annual assessment of strategies. Rationale: The State of Iowa has developed an effective, collaborative working relationship with seven state partner agencies to identify and resolve barriers related to employment services for individuals with disabilities. These State partners, who have been meeting on a quarterly basis since 1998, include the Department of Education, Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services (IVRS), Department of Human Rights, Department for the Blind, Department of Human Services, Iowa Department of Workforce Development and the Governor’s Developmental Disabilities Council. In 2003 a signed Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) further strengthened this partnership and demonstrated a commitment to enhancing employment services for Iowans with disabilities. The MOA was renewed for another five years in 2008 and re-signed in October 2012. The Iowa Department of Aging was added as an additional partner. Through the Governance Group and the commitment of staff and resources to a statewide Support Team, the agencies will continue to maintain communication and feedback from the field offices on service issues related to our mutual clients. To achieve this goal, the Governance Group has made recent revisions to focus efforts increasing employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities in community-based, integrated employment. Each of the partner agencies have designated a representative to serve on an Operational Team to advocate for and facilitate collaboration among partners at the state and local level. The Operational Team reviews program initiatives and progress for purposes of helping avoid duplication of resources and services and leverage initiatives to effectively meet barriers impeding community-based, integrated employment opportunities. The Operational Team works with local partner groups to identify positive examples of collaboration and disseminate these practices statewide. IVRS staff will continue collaboration with the Iowa Workforce Development in relationship to benefits planning services and training opportunities for IVRS clients. IVRS staff will coordinate with the Department of Human Services Medicaid Infrastructure grant to devise a method to track the number of clients that utilize Medicaid for Employed Persons with Disabilities after a successful rehabilitation.

Strategy 3.1 Improve successful rehabilitation outcomes for TANF clients that are co-enrolled in IVRS services.

3.1 Measure Increase by 1% percent per year the number of Promise Jobs recipients referred to IVRS that achieve successful rehabilitation. Calculation Multiply the sum of clients receiving TANF at application and closed status 26 by 1.01 FFY08 Baseline: Of the 26 closures in FFY08, 41 received TANF at application FFY09 Measure: Of the 26 closures in FFY09, 54 received TANF at application FFY10 Measure: Of the 26 closures in FFY10, 34 received TANF at application FFY11 Measure: Of the 26 closures in FFY11, 33 received TANF at application. Of the 26 closures in FFY12, 25 received TANF at application.

Strategy 3.2 Track and increase the number of IVRS ticket holders that achieve successful rehabilitation and also receive services from Iowa Workforce Development. 3.2 Measure Increase by 2% per year the number of IVRS ticket holders that receive services jointly through IVRS and IWD closed in status 26 and 28. Calculation (List of status 26 and 28 client names and birth dates are compared with IWD database to get count with clients involved with both IWD and IVRS with Tickets for numerator) Multiply by 1.02 the number of clients closed in status 26 or 28 if they listed having any of the following: IRSS Ticket to Work on IPE IRSS Ticket to Work on Plan Closure Form SSI at Application is greater than $0.00 SSDI at Application is greater than $0.00 FFY08 Baseline: Of 208 Ticket Holders closed from active status in FFY08, 75 received services from Iowa Workforce Development Wagner Peyser or WIA programs. FFY09 Measure: Of 1,053 Ticket Holders closed from active status in FFY09, 154 received services from Iowa Workforce Development Wagner Peyser or WIA programs. FFY10 Measure: Of Ticket Holders closed from active status in FFY10, 300 received services from Iowa Workforce Development Wagner Peyser or WIA programs. FFY11 Measure: Of Ticket Holders closed from active status in FFY11, 492 received services from Iowa Workforce Development Wagner Peyser or WIA programs. FFY12 Measure: Of Ticket Holders closed from active status in FFY12, 369 received services from Iowa Workforce Development Wagner Peyser or WIA programs.

Strategy 3.3 Increase the number of IVRS clients that utilize the Medicaid buy in program upon successful rehabilitation and case closure 3.3 Measure Increase by 2% per year the number of clients that utilize Medicaid for Employed Persons with Disabilities after a successful rehabilitation. Calculation (List of status 26 client names and birth dates are compared with DHS MEPD file.) Multiply the sum of status 26 IVRS clients on the DHS Medicaid for Employed Persons with Disabilities list by 1.02 FFY08 Baseline: For FFY08 119 of the 26 closures were MEPD members FFY09 Measure: For FFY09 164 of the 26 closures were MEPD members FFY10 Measure: For FFY10, 120 of the 26 closures were MEPD members Measure: For FFY11, 109 of the 26 closures were MEPD members Measure: For FFY12, 111 of the 26 closures were MEPD members.

4. Retain eligible IVRS clients until they become rehabilitated, achieving their optimal level of employment and self-sufficiency, achieving or exceeding strategy measures. Rationale: The overall rehabilitation rate during the past four years has met the RSA standard. There is a sizable group of people who have received services, and often significant program dollars, who are closed as not successfully rehabilitated. We believe we can develop methods to engage clients earlier in the process and follow up and follow along which will improve retention of these individuals. IVRS rehabilitation teams will provide intensive vocational assessment and counseling services, beginning early in the rehabilitation process to engage and retain clients. By developing relationships with business and industry, clients can better understand future workforce needs, requirements, qualifications, and work demands in order to make informed choices about career decisions. The rehabilitation team will maintain frequent, ongoing contacts with clients to provide early identification of barriers to successful completion of the rehabilitation plan.

Strategy 4.1 Exceed RSA Standard 1.2 for VR clients that develop and initiate an Individual Plan for Employment. 4.1 Measure Exceed a rehabilitation rate of 55.8% annually. Calculation The sum of client cases closed status 26 divided by the sum of client cases closed status 26 + 28 FFY08 Baseline: 0.63 Rehabilitation Rate FFY09 Measure: 0.61 Rehabilitation Rate FFY10 Measure: 0.5196 Rehabilitation Rate FFY11 Measure: 0.5795 Rehabilitation Rate FFY12 Measure: 0.6368 Rehabilitation Rate.

Strategy 4.2 Exceed RSA Standard 1.5, the average hourly wage ratio for VR clients closed after a plan is initiated. 4.2 Measure Exceed a ratio of average hourly earnings of IVRS clients compared to the state average hourly wage of at least .52 or greater. Calculation Average Hourly Earnings of IVRS Clients closed status 26 divided by Average Hourly Earnings for all employed individuals in the state (denominator calculated from www.bls.gov/cew/home.htm, QCEW Databases FFY08 Baseline: .66 FFY09 Measure: .64 FFY10 Measure: .63 FFY11 Measure: .62 FFY12 Measure: .60.

5. Improve meaningful, sustained employment for supported employment consumers annually through FFY12. a. Rationale: The Iowa Model for Supported Employment Services includes the supported employment readiness analysis, a thorough analysis of employer needs and a customized training protocol developed prior to placement so the employer, natural supports, CRP and client all understand the expectations for sustained employment. Data collection will include number of hours of employment, rate of pay and changes in the amount of public support at closure compared to application. Supported Employment Services for clients seeking to improve their quality of life without jeopardizing other public support benefits will receive collaborative funding between IVRS and DHS Medicaid Waiver programs.

Strategy 5.1: Increase average weekly earnings for clients that successfully complete a Supported Employment Service program 5.1 Measure: Achieve average weekly earnings of at least $150 for supported employment clients closed as successfully rehabilitated. Calculation (Select/Count SES clients closed status 26 from clients who were provided service line items 959, 960, 967, 968, 969, 970) The sum of the weekly earnings of the above selected clients divided by the count of the number of clients of the above selected FFY08 Baseline: $171.53 FFY09 Measure: $163.58 FFY10 Measure: $141.04 FFY11 Measure: $155.37 FFY12 Measure: $162.59 Strategy 5.2 Increase average weekly hours worked for clients that successfully complete a Supported Employment Service program 5.2 Measure: Achieve an average of at least 20 hours worked per week for supported employment clients closed as successfully rehabilitated Calculation (Select/Count SES clients closed status 26 from clients who were provided service line items 959, 960, 967, 968, 969, 970) Add the weekly hours of the above selected clients divided by the count of the number of clients of the above selected FFY08 Baseline: 22 FFY09 Measure: 21 FFY10 Measure: 18 FFY11 Measure: 20 FFY12 Measure: 21.

Strategy 5.3 Decrease dependence on public support from application to closure for supported employment clients closed as successfully rehabilitated. 5.3 Measure: Using 2008 as a baseline, achieve a 25% decrease in public support from application to closure for Supported Employment clients closed as successfully rehabilitated. Calculation **(SSDI + SSI + TANF + GenAssist + VetDisability + WorkComp + OtherPublic) = Total Public Support at application from clients who were provided service line items 959, 960, 967, 968, 969, 970 and had public support of at least one of the following The sum of SES public support for clients** closed status 26 / number of cases at application divided by the sum of SES public support for clients** closed status 26 / number of cases at closure FFY08 Baseline: Public Support increased 24.89%. Looking at raw data, we found that not all closures were recorded accurately. FFY09 Measure: Decreased 0.4% FFY10 Measure: Increased 12.6% FFY11 Measure: Decreased 0.8% FFY12 Measure: Increased 1.5%.

6. Track data and assess the effectiveness on the Transition Alliance Program (TAP) and Collaborative Transition Protocol (CTP) students to assure annual progress through FFY12. Rationale: Transition Alliance Programs (TAPs) were created in partnership between the Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services and local school districts. Youth participating in TAP are provided opportunities to develop or enhance skills in academic, vocational and independent living competencies. The Collaborative Transition Protocol, developed within the non-categorical framework of the Iowa Department of Education and IVRS, provides the necessary information for both Eligibility and Plan Development. Through the Collaborative Transition Protocol students in transition will not participate in unnecessary testing to be labeled for the adult service delivery system and, through working collaboratively with educators, develop learning methods that relate to post-school career goals. IVRS will develop a mechanism that expands the Collaborative Transition Protocol across all Area Education Agencies in the state while maintaining the integrity of the original research project, thereby achieving the same level of quality decision-making in the transition process. IVRS staff will work with other adult service agencies to develop understanding and support for the Collaborative Transition Protocol so that the non-categorical educational system and the adult service system work together to achieve post-secondary living, learning and working outcomes for students. Expansion of this protocol statewide should result in decreased assessment costs, maintaining accuracy of eligibility determination and significance of disability and better information for development of IEPs and IPEs.

Strategy 6.1 Increase percentage of TAP that achieve a successful rehabilitation outcome. 6.1 Measure Using FFY08 as a baseline, increase by 3% percent per year the number of TAP youth who exited the VR program after receiving services under an IPE and achieved an employment outcome with earnings above minimum wage at closure. Calculation Multiply the number of students exiting the TAP program after 26 by 1.03 FFY08 Baseline: 95 TAP clients were closed in competitive employment. FFY09 Measure: 84 TAP clients were closed in competitive employment though it is noted that one TAP was discontinued during this time period FFY10 Measure: 92 TAP clients were closed in competitive employment during this time period. FFY11 Measure: 65 TAP clients were closed in competitive employment during this time period though it is noted that the number of TAP programs decreased by two during this time period. FFY12 Measure: 74 TAP clients were closed in competitive employment.

Strategy 6.2 Add four Area Education Agencies per year that adopt the Collaborative Transition Protocol in at least one school district. 6.2 Measure: Each school year one school district in at least four different Area Education agencies will adopt the Collaborative Transition Protocol, until all ten AEAs participate. Calculation Using FFY08 as a baseline, add the number of AEAs that initiate work on the Collaborative Transition project until the total equals ten. FFY08 Baseline: All high schools in AEA 267 adopted the Collaborative Transition Protocol FFY09 Measure: Five additional AEAs have adopted the Collaborative Transition Protocol during this time period. FFY10 Measure: Two additional AEA have adopted the Collaborative Transition Protocol during this time period. FFY11 Measure: Continued progress is being made in CTP implementation in all but two of the ten AEAs. This year, one AEA committed to implementing CTP to bring the total to eight. In FFY12, two AEAs remain in which to add CTP in the future.

Strategy 6.3 Maintain accurate eligibility determination and significance of disability for 100% of clients served under the Collaborative Transition Protocol. 6.3 Measure: Maintain 100% accuracy of eligibility determination and significance of disability and provide better information for development of IEPs and IPEs for students participating in the Collaborative Transition Protocol. Calculation From the case study results completed on clients that are served by the Collaborative Transition Protocol, 100% will meet accuracy standards for eligibility determination and significance of disability using IEP reports. FFY08 Baseline: 100% accuracy for clients from schools in AEA 267. FFY09 Measure: 100% accuracy for clients from schools in AEA 267. FFY10 Measure: 100% accuracy for clients from school in AEA 267. FFY11 Measure: 100% accuracy for clients from schools participating in CTP Strategy. FFY12 Measure: 100% accuracy for clients from schools participating in CTP Strategy.

6.4 Increase referrals at application from Elementary or Secondary schools to IVRS. 6.4 Measure: Increase by 5% the number of transition-age youth referred at application from high schools for services in FFY2009. Calculation Using FFY08 as a baseline, multiply the number of referrals at application from referral source Educational Institutions--Elementary and Secondary Schools by 1.05 each year. Baseline FFY08 = 1,974 Measure FFY09 = 2,176 Measure FFY10 = 2,015 Measure FFY11 = 2,186 Measure FFY12 = 2,057.

 

IVRS will improve meaningful, sustained employment for supported employment consumers and reduce the number of individuals who repeat the process due to inadequate placement or supports. Report: Outcomes for Supported Employment services have received a lot of analysis during the past several years. Medicaid waiver funding is the resource to utilize for all quality-of-life-enhancement-focused employment. It is a comparable service/benefit and should be used when possible. Currently IVRS and the Department of Human Services are exploring ways to collaborate with funding to assure that CRPs are adequately reimbursed for the range of services available from each agency. Implementation of the new guidelines, as well as Customized Employment procedures, began on 10/1/2008. Supported Employment services focusing on the goal of gainful employment with a goal of working at least 20 hours per week are funded by IVRS. Supervisory approval is needed at the time of case closure when the limitations imposed by the disability require fewer than ten hours of work each week. If the individual is not capable of working ten hours, the local planning team develops strategies and provides services to get the client to that level, when appropriate. For FFY09 the average weekly earnings for supported employment clients closed as successfully rehabilitated was $163.58. They were working an average of 21 hours per week. For FFY10 the average weekly earnings for supported employment clients closed as successfully rehabilitated was $141.04. They were working an average of 18 hours per week. For FFY11, the average weekly earnings for supported employment clients was $155.37 and they worked an average of 20 hours a week. For FFY12 the average weekly earnings for supported employment job candidates was $162.59 and they worked an average of 21 hours a week.

 

period 10/1/11 – 9/30/12)

1.1 The number of cases closed as rehabilitated this year compared to last year. In FFY12, IVRS closed 2,162 compared to 2,136 compared the previous year.

1.2 The rehabilitations divided by the closures of all cases that received some services under an IPE expressed as a percent. In FFY12, our rehabilitation rate was 63.68%.

1.3 The percent of the rehabilitations with a work status of competitive or self-employment and at least at minimum wage. 2,125 of the 2,162 closures were in competitive employment or self-employment at least at the minimum wage. In FFY12 this was 98.29% and well over the RSA indicator of 72.6%.

1.4 Of the competitively employed the percent who are SD or Most SD. 2,039 of the 2,162 competitively employed closures were SD or MSD. In FFY12 this was 95.95% compared to the RSA indicator of 62.4%.

1.5 Of the competitively employed their average hourly earnings as a ratio to the State’s average hourly earnings. Our ratio was .60. The RSA indicator is .52.

1.6 Of the competitively employed the difference between the percent reporting their own income as their largest single source of support at closure compared to that figure at application. The mathematical difference for IVRS was 63.34%. The RSA indicator is 53%.

2.1 The service rate for minorities as a ratio to the service rate for non-minorities. The ratio for IVRS in FFY12 was .812.

 

Innovation and Expansion Activities for FFY12 Innovation and Expansion Activities accounted for 3.04% of the IVRS budget this FY. Activities funded with Innovation and Expansion dollars included the following: • State Rehabilitation Council—Funds covered travel and meal expenses for members. Expenditures were also provided to offset costs related to supplies and fees incurred as a result of SRC marketing activities. • TAP Contracts—Information about this program is reported under Waiver of Statewideness • Youth Leadership Forum Contract—IVRS, in partnership with the Department for the Blind and the Division of Persons with Disabilities, sponsors a leadership training program for approximately 30 juniors and seniors students with disabilities. The five-day leadership training program provides youth the opportunity to identify barriers to personal and professional success and methods to overcome those barriers. Throughout the week they learn about disability rights legislation, and assistive technology. They interact with role models who also have disabilities and develop a personal leadership plan.

This screen was last updated on Jun 25 2013 10:36AM by Lee Russo

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope, and Extent of Supported Employment Services

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

A. Quality of services – Supported employment services being provided to Iowans with the most significant disabilities under Title VI, Part C, of the Rehabilitation Act, are of the same quality as services provided other applicants and clients of the state unit under Title I of the Act. All providers of services are expected to meet the same standards of quality.

B. Scope and extent of services – Services provided to individuals by the state unit under Title VI, Part C of the Act are:

1. Evaluation of the potential of individuals with the most significant disabilities to be rehabilitated through the use of supported employment. This is used only as a supplement to an evaluation that may already have been done under the regular VR program.

2. Job development for and placement in jobs of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

3. Provision of those time-limited services needed to support the trainees in employment, such as:

a. Intensive on-the-job training and other training provided by skilled, certified job trainers for workers with the most significant disabilities.

b. Facilitation of social integration to achieve good co-worker relationships.

c. Transportation training for maximum independence.

d. Development and implementation of a specific behavioral program plan in those cases where a worker’s (i.e., client’s) behavior is jeopardizing keeping the job.

e. Co-worker and supervisor training for developing a support network.

f. Provision of follow-up services, including regular contact with employers, trainees, and other suitable professional and informed advisors, in order to reinforce and stabilize job placements.

g. Regular observation and supervision of individuals with the most significant disabilities at the work site.

C. Coordination of transition to extended services – Prior to placing an individual in a job, the IVRS or CRP staff person completes a job analysis and a customized training plan to document employer expectations. The individual remains in a training status until they have attained competency on all job tasks and the employer indicates that performance is satisfactory. At that point, the individual is placed into status 22. The IVRS or CRP staff person assesses stabilization at 45 and 90 day intervals. At the point that the individual, the staff person and the employer agree that performance is stable, the IVRS case file is closed as successfully rehabilitated and the client transitions to extended services.

Extended services are provided by other agencies, organizations, or other available sources with which cooperative arrangements have been made. Effective integration and employer satisfaction are regarded as key elements in the measurement of success.

This screen was last updated on Jun 17 2011 11:09AM by Lee Russo

System Information

System information

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on:06/25/2013 10:37 AM

Last updated by:saiarussol

Completed on: 06/28/2013 10:31 AM

Completed by: saiarussol

Approved on: 08/07/2013 2:25 PM

Approved by: rscodobakc