ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Delaware Division for the Visually Impaired - DHHS Campus State Plan for Fiscal Year 2012 (submitted FY 2011)

1.1 The Dept of Health and Social Services (DHSS) Div for the Visually Impaired (DVI) is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Secretary Dept of Health and Social Services (DHSS)

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Director Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI)

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Robert L. Doyle III

Title of Signatory
Director

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/30/2011

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2012
Yes

Comments:

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Robert L. Doyle III

Title of Signatory
Director

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/30/2011

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities (Option A was selected/Option B was not selected).

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI)

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

Attachment 4.10. Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

The SRC is satisfied with the State unit’s current Comprehensive System of Personnel Development, and the process for determining training needs.

Attachment 4.11(b). Annual Estimates of Individuals to be Served and Costs of Services

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies approximately 1270 individuals between the ages of 16-70 in the state of Delaware that may be eligible for VR services, but estimates that the VR program will serve only 240 of these individuals during FFY 12.

The SRC recommends that agency staff engage in efforts to determine the reasons why the remaining 1030 individuals will not seek services from the VR program. To the extent that these remaining persons lack knowledge regarding their eligibility for such services, the SRC recommends that the agency engage in a campaign to increase awareness of available services to all potentially eligible citizens across the state.

With respect to the expenditure of Innovation and Expansion funds discussed in Attachment 4.11(b), the SRC would like to see a portion of these funds used to create employment opportunities in the community. The SRC also recommends that the agency continue to utilize funds, to the extent permissible, to increase consumer awareness regarding available programs, educate potential employers regarding the benefits of providing employment opportunities to persons with visual disabilities, and to consider other strategies that will enable consumers to acquire job readiness skills.

DSU Response:

The Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) accepts the recommendations offered by its State Rehabilitation Council and has implemented strategies that will continue into FFY 12.

DVI has incorporated into the essential job functions of a casual/seasonal VR Counselor I position the task of contacting everyone on the registry of blind and visually impaired Delawareans maintained by the division to gauge their interest in making application for VR services. Additionally we will provide incentives to optometrist and ophthalmologist that will encourage these physicians to make direct referrals of individuals to DVI that meet our visual criteria.

In order to target individuals around the state that may be working and experiencing vision loss we have undertaken marketing strategies that include surveying employers, the production of Public Service Announcements, renting billboards, and strategic placement of advertisements on buses around the state to capture the attention of those individuals that would benefit from VR services in terms of an employment outcome.

The DVI VR program is consistently serving more consumers. The agency served 161 in 2008, 182 in 2009 and 220 in 2010. Comparing 2008 to the most recently completed fiscal year, we served 36.6% more consumers.

Attachment 4.11(c) (1). Goals and Priorities

The SRC agrees with the agency’s goals as articulated in Attachment 4.11(c) (1) and suggest we remain on course with the previous years’ identified goals with concentrated focus in marketing the skills and abilities of our consumers and; to increase employer awareness of the Assistive Technology utilized by individuals with severe visual impairments.

The SRC also suggested that the agency add an additional goal in the area of consumer satisfaction.

DSU Response:

DVI accepts the recommendations. The agency is committed to marketing the skills and abilities of individuals with severe visual impairments to increase the quantity and quality of positive employment outcomes. DVI has undertaken a massive advertising campaign that will target employers in an effort to market individuals with visual impairments as an untapped resource to fill vacant positions. Opportunities to visit our DVI Technology Skills Center will be extended to employers as a means to increase their awareness of the various technologies utilized by individuals with visual impairments that substantially modifies visual limitations. Promoting the use of OJT, internships and externships will also be employed as a strategy to broaden employment opportunities for our targeted population.

In response to the SRC’s recommendation to add a goal related to consumer satisfaction, the agency notes that overall consumer satisfaction has been high, nevertheless. DVI sees surveying and monitoring consumer satisfaction as a joint responsibility of both the SRC and DVI. As such the agency has added a fourth goal.

4th Goal: Consistently provide a high level of consumer satisfaction.

Strategies include:

1. Working in partnership with the SRC, DVI will establish new consumer satisfaction surveys and measurement protocols during the 2012 plan year.

2. Working in partnership with the SRC, DVI will host 2 town hall meetings during the 2012 plan year to gather consumer input.

3. DVI will respond to 100% of written consumer complaints within 10 business days of receipt.

4. Working in partnership with the SRC, DVI will develop marketing materials that highlights steps and resources for resolving concerns during their VR experience. This brochure will be made available to 100% of DVI’s VR consumers and new applicants.

Attachment 4.11(c) (4). Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds

To enhance efforts to obtain meaningful employment for individuals with the most significant disabilities whom will require intensive job training and on-going supports, the SRC suggests that the agency incorporate into its plan building the capacity of our Community Rehabilitation Programs to successfully place our individuals with the most significant disabilities.

DSU Response:

DVI recognizes the need to develop the capacity of CRP’s to successfully place our individuals with the most significant disabilities. Our strategy for FFY 2012 is to meet with all CRP’s to develop a working plan that will facilitate an increase in the number of supported employment outcomes.

Attachment 4.11(d). State Strategies for Innovation and Expansion

The SRC expressed approval of utilizing funds for mass marketing to increase the number of applicants for VR services, developing partnerships that facilitate positive employment outcomes and creating summer opportunities that promote skill development for transitioning students and staff development.

DSU Response:

DVI appreciates the SRC’s recognition of its efforts to increase agency awareness of its programs and services to facilitate positive employment outcomes. During FFY 10, I&E funds were used to upgrade the DVI Technology Skills Center, job creation, various in-house workshops for professional staff development and a one week long residential Summer Transition Education Program (STEP) developed between DVI and the University of Delaware’s Center for Disability Studies to accommodate four (4) transition students.

Attachment-4.11(e) (2). Evaluation and Report of Progress in Achieving Identified Goals and Priorities and Use of Title I Funds for Innovation and Expansion Activities

The SRC is impressed with the overall progress DVI has made in achieving the goals and priorities identified for FY 10. The Council recommends DVI continue to focus on improving the quality and quantity of our employment outcomes and to use available fiscal resources to achieve that end.

DSU Response:

DVI appreciates the support of its Council and will continue to develop and implement strategies that facilitate quality employment outcomes for our targeted population.

This screen was last updated on Jun 18 2011 11:09AM by sadebharperh

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:34AM by sadebgoodhartb

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

The Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) is represented on the Statewide Workforce Investment Board by the Cabinet Secretary of Health and Social Services. As there are no local boards within the State of Delaware, the Deputy Director attends the scheduled meetings to be kept abreast of WIA activities. Planning meetings are held regularly ensuring all partners (mandatory and non-mandatory) and their respective employment and training programs and activities, as well as funding streams have been identified.

Meetings are held on a quarterly basis with sub-committee meetings scheduled as needed. The Deputy Director has approached the chair of the Youth Services Committee with a request for that individual to attend an upcoming staff meeting involved with planning transition activities for students served by the Division. It is our intention to have this connection take place prior to the end of the 2007 calendar year. The purpose will be to tap into the Youth Services Committee’s activities in planning transition events for the upcoming year.

This past year, Teen Weekend and Children’s Beach House weekend took place to assist students in the development of Activities of Daily Living and Social Skill building as the primary focus. These events are collaborative efforts with the Delaware Association for the Blind, which is a non-profit organization, and with the Children’s Beach House in Lewes, Delaware which is a foundation providing educational activities to children of all disability groups.

Cooperation with entities outside the Statewide Workforce Investment System, DVI contracts for services with the following agencies as needed based on specific individual goals/needs. They are Easter Seals, Goodwill Industries, Adult Retarded Citizens (ARC), Heartwood Corporation, Association for the Habilitation and Employment for the Developmentally Disabled (AHEDD), Opportunities Centers, Inc. (OCI), Ellwyn and the Salvation Army. If needs are not met by one of these entities, DVI issues a Request for Proposal (RFP) to the community at large to identify unknown potential vendors for a specific service.

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:37AM by sadebgoodhartb

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

The Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Program works with the Department of Education (DOE) through the Local Agreement implemented on March 4. 2004 reviewed and accepted on September 19, 2007 by RSA to be incompliance with 34 CFR 361.22. DVI-VR continues to maintain a transition program that is designed as an integrated network of activities, which facilitates the successful progression of students through high school into the adult employment arena. The program includes: vocational assessment; career exploration; vocation training; post-secondary education; employment within integrated work settings (including supported employment); and individualized adaptive living services from DVI including orientation and mobility training, low vision services, in home adaptive living skills training and equipment, etc.

The majority of our student referrals continue to be made through the Educational Services Program of the agency, which provides educational programming to students in public and private schools through graduation or to the end of the school term during which the student reaches 21 years of age. All of the students served by our Educational Services program are involved in the Special Education program in accordance with Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). Even if the children are fully mainstreamed within the classrooms of their respective schools, such that the only specialized services that they receive are through DVI programs, special education designation ensures that the schools will fully interface with our programs in order to facilitate individual student development.

Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors continue to be responsible for the full range of vocational rehabilitation services for each student when they reach the age of 16 or as early as age 14 if the student has employment goals. In order to ensure consistent progress toward vocational goals, contacts by the VR counselor are required throughout the calendar year with the students, their families, DVI Education staff, and appropriate school personnel. In SFY 2007, DVI was successful in obtaining an additional VR counselor position whose primary caseload are transition aged students. Counselors attend Individualized Educational Plan meetings (IEP) whenever possible to aid in developing a transitional Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) a minimum of 60 days prior to exiting the school program.

At the request of the DVI Itinerant Teacher, through the DVI Educational Services program, the student’s parent/guardian or through the IEP process, vocational exploration and vocational planning can take place. At this time, assistive technology, funding resources for the technology, timeframes for delivery of services, transportation assistance, low vision services, Orientation and Mobility, and all other pertinent VR services are provided as deemed necessary. If a need assessment determines that specific equipment must be provided, VR will loan (if it is in stock) the necessary equipment to an individual until such equipment can be ordered, setup and installed by the responsible parties. If funds or loaner equipment are not available, DVI-VR will work with DOE through the DVI Principal, who acts as the liaison between DVI and DOE, to resolve such matters and the parent to help acquire the necessary equipment.

We continue to use Status 17 for transition cases with policy and procedures established. Once the IPE has been implemented, students are transferred into this status for purposes of identification and specialization and remain there until the secondary education program is complete.

Transition students are encouraged to participate in job fairs sponsored by the community at large. A Career Day opportunity for our students occurs every other year in cooperation with the Overbrook School for the Blind in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Students are encouraged to participate through their assigned Itinerant Teacher and Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor.

We work closely with the Delaware Deaf/Blind (Education) program within the DOE to ensure timely referral for transition within any unit of DVI. DVI continues to be actively involved on the Interagency Task Force for Individuals who are Deaf/Blind. DVI Educational Service staff and VR staff provide assistance to the school districts in administering and identifying accommodations necessary for a visually impaired student to be able to complete high school and become a productive member of society.

The agreement with DOE includes specific roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining State lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services. It also includes the appeal process for families to grieve any decisions regarding services requests.

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:37AM by sadebgoodhartb

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

This past year, Teen Weekend and Children’s Beach House weekend activities were planned to assist students in the development of Activities of Daily Living and Social Skill building as the primary focus. These events are collaborative efforts with the Delaware Association for the Blind (DAB), which is a non-profit organization and with the Children’s Beach House in Lewes, Delaware which is a foundation providing educational activities to children of all disability groups. In recent years, we have worked collaboratively with DAB to apply and receive funds which result in being able to provide students these two specific beneficial opportunities.

It is the practice of Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) to use the established purchased of service agreements with private non-profit organizations as negotiated between Delaware’s Department of Labor’s Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR). These contracts are for specific vocational rehabilitation services to include Community Based Assessments, On-Site Training Services, Supported Employment Services, Trial Work Experiences, Vocational Assessments, Work Adjustment Training, Vocational Training, and other facility based assessments.

When specific blindness services are required beyond the scope of existing contracted agreements, DVI has the flexibility to seek approval from the Office of Management and Budget in order to enter into contractual agreements to procure specific client services from other private non-profit organizations. If needs are not met by one of these entities, DVI issues a Request for Proposal (RFP) to the community at large to identify unknown potential vendors for a specific service.

Historically, cooperative agreements with non-profit organizations are difficult to achieve as blind consumers require more specific and individualized services. It is our experience that most vendors do not have the appropriately trained staff on board to provide these specific in nature services. Their feeling in general is that “blind individuals are difficult to place”. Another factor is that Delaware is a small State based on population and since blindness is a low incident population, CRP’s are reluctant to invest in staff training due to lack of return on their investment (i.e.-not a steady stream of business from DVI consumers).

Thus, attempts to develop cooperative agreements w/Private Non-Profit organizations who are vocational rehabilitation service providers are developed regarding specific identified needs. DVI contracts for services with the following agencies as needed based on specific individual goals/needs. They are Easter Seals, Goodwill Industries, Adult Retarded Citizens (ARC), Heartwood Corporation, Association for the Habilitation and Employment for the Developmentally Disabled (AHEDD), Opportunities Centers, Inc. (OCI), Ellwyn and the Salvation Army.

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:38AM by sadebgoodhartb

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

The Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) has no formal written agreement in place with the Division for Developmentally Disability Services (DDDS) for the provision of supported employment services however over the years DVI has worked cooperatively with this state agency to secure funding for payment of “On Going Support Services” (follow along) following a consumer’s job stabilization to ensure job retention.

DDDS, Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR), and the Department of Education (DOE) entered into a formal agreement to pilot a program entitled “Early Start to Employment.” Although DVI was not a signatory in this agreement the agency was contacted by DOE for inclusion. Resultantly one of our transition students was included in the pilot program.

It is the goal of DDDS to have every student who is a Supported Employment Candidate and active with DDDS to start Supported Employment Services in the last year of high school. This is to insure that there is no gap in services between the last month of school and the beginning of Supported Employment services and/or actual employment obtained through the Supported Employment service provision.

Transition planning will include identification of transition students with most significant disabilities that are appropriate candidates for this particular program.

If the program participant obtains employment during the school year and reaches the point of receiving follow along services prior to graduation, there is an agreement in place between DDDS, DVR and DOE that DOE will pay the placement vendor for follow along services until Sept. 1, of that current federal fiscal year. DDDS will then take over payment for the follow along services.

Other applicants for services, who are not transition students, identified as most significantly disabled that will benefit from supported employment services, based on the severity of their disability, will be served through other Community Rehabilitation Programs. These CRP’s have contracts with the General VR agency (DVR) and in all cases accept the same contracted rates with DVI. The VR Program Specialist for DVI participates in the contract negotiations and approval process when requested to do so by DVR.

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:38AM by sadebgoodhartb

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

There are currently (11) staff positions dedicated to the direct provision of VR services. The VR Team is currently staffed statewide by (3) Senior VR Counselors, (2) Employment Services Specialists, (2) Administrative Specialists Level I, (1) Teacher, Special Education Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist, (1) Trainer/Educator II, (1) VR District Administrator, and (1) VR Counselor I (Seasonal/casual). Presently, all 3 of our full-time VR counselors have Masters Degrees in VR Counseling or a Counseling related field.

The agency requires (13) staff positions dedicated to the direct provision of VR services. The statewide staffing needed by the agency to handle the increased number of consumers being served in the upcoming year is (3) Senior VR Counselors, (3) Employment Services Specialists, (2) Administrative Specialists Level I, (1) Teacher, Special Education Certified Orientation and Mobility Specialist, (1) Trainer/Educator II, (1) VR District Administrator, (1) VR Program Specialist, and (1) VR Counselor I (seasonal/casual).

In FFY 2010 direct service staff provided Vocational Rehabilitation services to 202 Delawareans. Of these, 48.5% were considered “Most Significantly Disabled” (MSD) and 40.6% “Significantly Disabled” (SD). Last year we projected that direct service personnel would provide VR services to 160 consumers in FFY 2010 and that 71% of these individuals would also meet assessment criteria as MSD. For FFY 2012, we project that direct service personnel will provide VR services to 240 consumers and 71% of these individuals will meet the assessment criteria as MSD.

In addition to the VR direct service positions mentioned above, DVI has an assortment of ancillary positions that plays a technical, administrative, fiscal or support role in VR service provision and which are partly funded with VR Basic Support funds. Below is a summary of the personnel data regarding all positions whose salaries are partially or totally funded by the VR Basic Support grant.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Sr. Accountant/Accounting Specialist 2 0 1
2 BEP Director/Administrative Officer 2 0 1
3 Fisc Admin Ofcr/Administrative Specialist I 4 0 1
4 Vocational Rehabilitation Senior Counselor 3 0 1
5 Employment Services Specialist 3 1 1
6 Information Systems Support Specialist 1 0 1
7 Mgr of Comp/Applic Sprt/Telecom Network/etc 4 0 0
8 VI Business Svc Supervisor 1 1 1
9 SSSA/VR Dist Admin/VR Prog Spec 3 1 2
10 0 0 0

 

Delaware continues to be without an institution of higher education with a program to prepare Vocational Rehabilitation professionals. DVI continues to support local university applications to implement such training programs. Currently, VR professionals are encouraged to enroll with on-line training programs, such as George Washington University. Therefore no students graduate in state in the field of vocational rehabilitation.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

As a means of recruiting qualified personnel to address our current and projected needs for qualified personnel, DVI has entered into partnership agreements with the University of Delaware, the Delaware State University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore to provide internships for graduate students majoring in Rehabilitation Education and other closely related field of study. These partnerships afford an internship opportunity to appropriate students to participate in the work environment of VR Service delivery and the delivery of ancillary services in a role similar to rehabilitation counselor. Interns are assigned working mentors in the VR program, as well as working in partnership with other field services to gain the broad scope of knowledge needed to become a successful rehabilitation professional. Generally, after completion of a successful internship, the intern is considered to be a qualified candidate for employment.

To retain qualified personnel we have instituted a system for Staff Development Training that affords all agency staff the opportunity for professional growth within their specific occupational field.

Our agency has also developed a solid partnership with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB). OMB operates a Selective Placement Registry for the State of Delaware. This Registry lists qualified persons with disabilities from various ethnic backgrounds who have been pre-determined eligible to fill specific vacancies within state agencies. Agencies are free to select qualified individuals from this registry without going through the normal state recruitment process.

 

In an attempt to recruit, prepare and retain qualified personnel, as well as maintain the highest personnel standards in the state for a VR Program, the agency follows recruitment practices established by the state. In addition, vacancies for the Division are shared with various advocacy group chair persons so that their memberships are aware of any vacancies. They are asked to encourage qualified members to apply when vacancy recruitments occur.

The minimum qualifications for an entry level VR Counselor I requires a Bachelors degree or higher in Rehabilitation Counseling, Social or Behavioral Science or a related field. A Qualified Rehabilitation Counselor in Level II or the Senior level designated in the State Personnel system are required to possess or obtain a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or a related field (such as but not limited to Sociology, Psychology, or Behavioral Science), and must include graduate level coursework in Theory & Techniques of Counseling. For the VR Counselor positions, if not already CRC certified, they are strongly encouraged to actively participate in a plan to meet eligibility requirements to sit for the Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) examination within five (5) years from the date of hire.

Should the agency be unable to hire personnel that meets the highest established personnel standards, the minimum entry level qualifications are acceptable; however a training plan is developed between the incumbent and the hiring manager to obtain the necessary knowledge, skills, or educational requirements.

Due to the absence of an in-state graduate program in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling newly hired counselor(s) at The VR Counselor I and II levels are encouraged to take advantage of online distance learning opportunities with George Washington University (GWU), Virginia Commonwealth university and other schools nationwide that offer graduate programs in Rehabilitation Counseling and coursework leading to certification eligibility. We share with VR staff information regarding available online graduate programs in Rehabilitation Counseling.

The agency also participates on the committee at the State Human Resource Management office for Selective Placement. This is a program where qualified persons being served by VR can be placed on Registries in specific job classifications to be considered by hiring managers.

 

The very specific nature of providing VR services to the blind and visually impaired requires a highly skilled and specialized professional staff. For this reason it is critical that DVI be able to afford staff opportunities to significantly develop the necessary skills and abilities to successfully rehabilitate DVI consumers resulting in job placements.

As outlined in the Division’s Staff Development Policy, as part of the annual Training Needs Assessment, the individual staff person meets with his/her supervisor to determine areas of training needed for career development. The VR Program Specialist (Staff Development Officer) compiles and summarizes this data and updates each person’s Career Development file.

Based on the needs assessment, the Staff Development Officer works with staff and supervisors to see that each has the opportunity to receive the training that has been identified as needed to perform their job duties as efficiently and effectively as possible. Through the coordination of in house training seminars, access to the Delaware Department of Health & Social Services (DHSS) extensive training curriculum, the Human Resource Management Office’s Career Enhancement Program, and a multitude of outside training opportunities, specific needs can usually be met.

DHSS and DVI encourage all staff to pursue career advancement. Provided sufficient funding is available, tuition reimbursement can be requested for courses taken at colleges and universities in pursuit of Associates’, Bachelor’s, Master’s and/or Doctorate Degrees. DHSS Tuition Reimbursement policy allows up to a maximum of $1000 per fiscal year. However, a waiver requesting 100% reimbursement or spending in excess of the $1000 cap is permitted by approval of the Division Director. Also the agency has sponsored membership to the National Rehabilitation Association (NRA) for (3) VR team members, as well as (3) agency memberships in the Association of Educators and Rehabilitation (AER) in order to grow staff professionally.

 

Whenever an applicant for services needs an interpreter in order to communicate, DVI staff obtains the services of an appropriate interpreter from a list of local professional interpreting services. All written materials are disseminated to consumers in the appropriate media: Braille, large print, tape or electronic file, as well as Spanish for various forms/brochures.

 

DVI’s Special Education Teachers for the Visually Impaired (TVIs) work in our local school districts throughout the state. At age 14, TVIs begin to refer their students to the Vocational Rehabilitation Unit to begin transition services. The students are assigned to our designated Transition Counselor who works with the students in the schools and in their homes to garner parental support during the transitional phase from school to the world of work. The designated Transition Counselor also works to promote the concept of self-sufficiency, provides career counseling, and encourages and assists the student with obtaining part time employment.

DVI personnel providing services to students with disabilities include, Teachers for the Visually Impaired, Orientation and Mobility Specialists, Certified Rehabilitation Instructors, Technology Trainer/Educators, Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors and Employment Services Specialist. All personnel requiring CEU’s to maintain their specific certification or to keep abreast of trends impacting persons with disabilities are afforded the opportunity to participate in trainings for professional development. Staff Development Trainings are paid for through the Federal In-Service Training (IST) grant, as well as limited state funding.

This screen was last updated on Jun 18 2011 11:09AM by sadebharperh

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide Assessment

The statewide assessment of the rehabilitation needs with individuals with the most significant cut across subgroups as a focus for the VR Needs Assessment was conducted by the University of Delaware’s Center for Disabilities Studies.

The model developed by InfoUse as issued by the Rehabilitation Services Administration in late 2009 was used as guidance to develop a subset of recommended components for immediate implementation to meet the established deadline for administration of the state plan to describe the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation service needs of individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services; individuals with disabilities who are minorities; individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system. In addition to the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state. Additional survey components will be developed and conducted jointly with our State Rehabilitation Council over the next two years.

Methodology

This initial phase of the needs assessment was conducted using several techniques:

• A review of state and national data relevant to visual impairments and employment to determine the scope of potential need at the state level.

• A survey of 66 past and current consumers of DVI’s Vocational Rehabilitation Services program.

• An internet survey of 24 DVI and community provider front-line staff.

• Interviews with 12 leadership-level staff at DVI and community and provider organizations.

Findings:

Assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state;

Delaware’s overall population in 2007 was estimated at more than 865,000 (American Community Survey), 557,332 of whom were people aged 16-64 years (see Table 1 information about Delaware’s population related to race and ethnicity). Based on Delaware’s general population projections and estimates of the percentage of Delawareans with visual impairments, the population of Delawareans who are blind or have visual impairments (ages 16-64) is expected to increase from 12,421 in 2008 to at least 13,690 by 2015 (see Table 2 for estimates of age group distributions). This increase will probably be greater for people in the upper part of that age range and those who are older than age 64, given the influx of retirees to Delaware from other states in the region. Both the economy and increasing life spans may result in older Delawareans working after retirement age, either by choice or necessity. Age or health-related vision loss may lead a portion of this group of Delawareans to require vocational rehabilitation services to support or maintain their employment.

Considering that there are around 3,000 people in Delaware’s Visually Impaired Registry, approximately 9,000 Delawareans who are blind or have a visual impairment are not yet enrolled in the Registry. Though not all of this large unknown group would have a need for DVI VR services, the potential unmet need in Delaware is still potentially quite large.

Table 1: Culturally-related Demographic Characteristics

Distribution of Delaware’s Population by Race Percentage

White 72.6%

African American 20.4%

Asian 2.9%

Other 4.1%

Hispanic/Latino 6.5%

Speak a Language Other Than English 11.5%

Spanish or Spanish Creole 5.9%

Other Indo-European 3.0%

Asian or Pacific Islander 1.6%

Other 1.0%

Table 2: Estimated Age Distribution of Delawareans with Visual Impairments*

Age Group Percentage

5-15 years 7.1%

16-64 years 56.2%

65 and older 36.7%

*Estimates derived from 2007 American Community Survey data for Delaware

According to the 2007 American Community Survey, Delawareans with sensory disabilities aged 16-64 are employed at just more than half the rate of those without a disability (41.6% vs. 78.4%). Earnings for Delawareans 16 and older with sensory disabilities are approximately 84% of those for people without a disability (though much better than the 65% rate for those with any disability). However, among Delawareans aged 16-64 with sensory disabilities, the poverty rate is almost 2.5 times greater than for those without disabilities (21.1% vs. 8.3%).

According to the 2007 American Community Survey, Delawareans aged 18-34 with sensory disabilities also have less education than those without disabilities (64.1% had a high school degree or less, compared to 51.7% of those without disabilities). This lower education level is likely an important dynamic contributing to the pattern seen in the employment and income data, and suggests two issues relevant to the DVI VR program’s work: 1) a significant proportion of people with visual impairments enter adulthood with an educational background that will limit their employment opportunities beyond the limitations that may be associated with their visual impairments; and 2) a large number of adults who are visually impaired may need access to educational opportunities and take advantage of these opportunities to broaden their skills and knowledge in order to enhance their employment options.

Assessment of VR Service needs of individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

Supports and services to help people who have recently become blind were specifically mentioned as an area of need. Included in this category were counseling to help adjust to the psychological aspects of vision loss; assistance with learning life skills to adapt to becoming blind (e.g., training related to mobility); and training to help adapt employment skills and abilities.

People with one or more disabilities in addition to a visual impairment may have an added dimension of complexity in their lives as a result of those disabilities. The complexity can result from a number of factors, including the nature of particular disabilities, the related supports and services received, and additional services systems with which they may need to interact. People with multiple disabilities may need increased supports and services related to their other disabilities to enhance their employment skills and readiness.

Understanding that this survey did not explicitly speak to the assessment need for Supported Employment Services utilizing Title VI Part B funds, currently 37 individuals receiving VR services have an identified secondary or tertiary disability emotional/mental, or cognitive disability. Information derived from the 2008 Disabilities Compendium lists 4.1% of the Delaware’s population as identified having a cognitive disability. Given this information, it can be reasonable to assume that some percentage of this group may also qualify for DVI VR services. Based on this information the need for supported employment services will remain a much needed service to facilitate positive employment outcomes for persons requiring intensive supports.

Individuals with disabilities who are minorities;

The only identified need unique to minority populations was for translation and interpreting services, particularly Spanish. With Delaware’s growing Hispanic population, particularly in the southern part of the state, there is an increasing population that speaks Spanish and other Latin American languages as their primary language. Also encountered during consumer interviews were a few individuals who were native speakers of languages other than English and Spanish, suggesting a limited need for accessing interpreting services beyond Spanish.

To address the need for translation and interpreting services that will overcome communication barriers to facilitate effective communication, DVI contracts with Back to Basics, a company that provides translation/interpreter services for a variety of foreign languages as well as, Deafinitions, a company that provides interpreters for our Deaf Blind consumers.

It is recognized however that an effective service delivery system for individuals with disabilities who are minorities reach beyond communication. Care will be taken to provide training and awareness of other cultural attitudes, beliefs, and values to insure our ability to develop professional relationships that encourages and facilitates achievement of self-sufficiency to the maximum degree possible for that specific individual.

Individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

Stakeholders had conflicting opinions about unserved and underserved populations of Delawareans who are blind or visually impaired, with some reporting a population as unserved, while others reported the same population as underserved.

The only population that appears to be completely unserved is the Amish community in west central Delaware (which had estimated size of 1,215 in 2009). There is some suggestion that members of Amish communities may be at greater risk of visual impairments related to genetic factors (e.g., ocular albinism); however, the extent to which the Delaware Amish population is at risk for such impairments is not known.

The populations identified as both unserved and underserved include:

• People with multiple disabilities

• People who are unaware of DVI services (e.g., employees who are losing their vision and fear repercussions from employers; those who have recently lost or left a job because of recent vision loss)

• People who are totally blind who are unemployed or underemployed (and have not interacted with DVI VR before)

• Those with limited English proficiency (especially Hispanics/Latinos)

• Transition-aged students (i.e., those approaching adult age)

• People older than 55

• People who have acquired a visual impairment later through injury (e.g., a traumatic brain injury) or a medical issue.

In order to reach out to individuals identified as underserved, DVI in mutual agreement with our SRC have developed specific goals and priorities that are identified in State Plan Attachment 4.11(c)(1). A few of the priorities as identified to meet the needs of this specific group include:

? Creating partnerships with public and private entities willing to employ, train, or otherwise support people with multiple disabilities and those individuals who have acquired a visual impairment later through injury (e.g., a traumatic brain injury) or a medical issue.

? Intensify efforts to increase awareness of available services to Delawareans who may be eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services.

? Establish Training Centers for eligible individuals who need exposure to and training on various business systems, software, and other employment related tools.

? Develop a campaign targeted to educate the corporate citizens of Delaware as to the benefits of partnering with DVI to meet their employment needs.

The findings of this survey suggest that the only population that appears to be completely unserved is the Amish community. Based on these results it appears that a reasonable strategy will require communication with leaders of the Amish community to determine if based on their cultural system of beliefs are they even interested in seeking vocational rehabilitation services.

Individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system;

There do not appear to be any material changes in this area since the 2008 Needs Assessment. One Stop Centers appear to be physically accessible and provide reader technology and large print options to make materials accessible to users with visual impairments. However, they continue to lack staffs that have the skills to help Delawareans with visual impairments take advantage of that accessibility. Delawareans who are blind or have visual impairments are still mostly referred by One Stops or the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (both administratively located in the Delaware Department of Labor) to DVI. DVI VR clients still interact with the One Stops to learn about and use the job bank, though much of the time they are accompanied by DVI VR staff because of the accessibility issues.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state;

Based on consumer, staff, and leadership views, while there appears to be a sufficient number of providers who could provide VR/Community Rehabilitation Program services (CRP’s) to Delawareans with visual impairments, these resources appear under-utilized and under-developed with respect to serving this population.

The response of CRP’s interviewed varied. Some identified as providers of VR services to Delawareans with visual impairments indicated that they had never served this population or had not done so for a number of years. Others indicated that while they were identified as DVI VR providers, they had not yet received service referrals or had received them only occasionally (and less often than expected) while others reported limited by financial disincentives to serve Delawareans who are blind or visually impaired (e.g., small numbers of people who are blind or visually impaired may make capacity-building investments -- such as training, hiring additional personnel, and purchasing specialized technology and software –- cost prohibitive from a return-on-investment perspective); to a lack of sufficient personnel who understand the unique needs of people who are blind or visually impaired.

DVI recognizes the need for capacity building in the areas of education and awareness of visual impairment to decrease the inability of specific CRP’s to assist our consumers with obtaining employment consistent with their unique skills, aptitudes, abilities, capacities and interests; sharing costs of Assistive Technology necessary for vocational training and perhaps increasing the purchase of service fees for job placement services to include a bonus payment for 6 and 12 month job retention. Keeping in mind that service providers are selected through informed choice of our consumers. Very few DVI VR consumers are choosing to use CRP’s other then Goodwill Industries, Blind Industries of Maryland, Kent Sussex Industries, Independent Resources Incorporated, and Community Integrated Services.

This screen was last updated on Aug 11 2010 9:13AM by sadesuttonk

The numbers in our data base suggest that there are 1270 individuals in the state of Delaware between the ages of 16-70 that would potentially be eligible for VR service. It is estimated that VR will serve approximately 19% or 250 individuals during FY’12. We project that out of the 250 individuals to be served during FFY2012, 55 individuals will achieve a positive employment outcome

It is anticipated that DVI will have sufficient resources and funding streams to serve all eligible individuals making application for VR services which will preclude DVI from implementing an order of selection wait list.

The table below represents the estimates for the number of eligible individuals for services, and the estimated cost of providing identified services utilizing Title I and Title VI funds.

It is anticipated that DVI will have sufficient resources and funding streams to serve all eligible individuals making application for VR services which will preclude DVI from implementing an order of selection wait list.

The table below represents the estimates for the number of eligible individuals for services, and the estimated cost of providing identified services utilizing Title I and Title VI funds.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Eligible Title I $850,500 243 $3,500
Eligible Title VI $63,000 7 $9,000
Totals   $913,500 250 $3,654

This screen was last updated on Jun 20 2011 8:04AM by sadebharperh

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

- 4.11 (c) (1) Goal and Priorities

Based on the results of the FFY 2010 Triennial Needs Assessment, it is mutually agreed between the SRC and The Division for the Visually Impaired that the agency will establish goals and priorities designed to enhance efforts to obtain meaningful employment for persons with visual impairments.

Priorities:

? Increase Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes.

? Create partnerships with public and private entities willing to employ, train, or otherwise support these individuals.

? Intensify efforts to increase awareness of available services to Delawareans who may be eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services.

? Establish Training Centers for eligible individuals who need exposure to and training on various business systems, software, and other employment related tools.

? Develop a campaign targeted to educate the corporate citizens of Delaware as to the benefits of partnering with DVI to meet their employment needs.

Goal 1: Increase Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes

Performance Measure 1.1: ARRA funds supplemented by Innovation and Expansion funds will be utilized to create a minimum of 4 part time employment opportunities within private entities that can be sustainable beyond 1 year of agency funding.

Performance Measure 1.2: A minimum of 30 employment outcomes will be achieved in areas that pay above minimum wage.

Goal 2: Create partnerships with public and private entities

Performance Measure 2.1: Participate in Chamber sponsored networking events to create new partnerships with public and private entities.

Performance Measure 2.2: Dedicate resources to hosting Lunch and Learn opportunities for employers as a means to develop partnerships and educate employers as to the skills and abilities of individuals with visual impairments as an untapped human resource.

Goal 3: Increase awareness of available services to Delawareans who may be eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services

Performance Measure 3.1: Host a minimum of 2 Workshops and/or Technology Fairs in the community designed to increase awareness of available services to Delawareans who may be eligible to receive vocational rehabilitation services.

Performance Measure 3.2: Continue to participate in Outreach events sponsored by other state agencies and other public and private organizations in the community.

Goal 4: Establish Training Centers for eligible individuals who need exposure to and training on various business systems, software, and other employment related tools

Performance Measure 4.1: Expand the agency’s Technology Center by acquiring a minimum of 4 new computers and equipping them with Microsoft version 2007 and 2010 software packages used to train consumers and other screen reading software packages such as window eyes or magic to insure our consumers possess the skills that are necessary to compete in today’s competitive labor market.

Performance Measure 4.2: Work with CRP’s and other identified Workforce Investment Employment Training centers selected as vendors by DVI VR consumer with acquiring the assistive technology necessary to provide employment related training.

Performance Measure 5.1: Redesign the Marketing Tools used for job development to incorporate support services available through DVI to employers.

Performance Measure 5.2: Allot funding towards public service announcements promoting the employability of persons with visual impairments.

This screen has never been updated.

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:53AM by sadebgoodhartb

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

Title VI, Part B funds in the amount of $45,000 will be utilized to provide intensive

Supported Employment Services for seven most significantly disabled individuals.

The goal for FY 2012 is to develop negotiated relationships with employers to craft customized supported employment opportunities in integrated settings for a minimum of 7 most significantly disabled individuals. In additional to a primary disability of blindness or severe visual impairments, individuals for customized employment will also have any of the following secondary disabilities: developmental disabilities, deaf blindness, traumatic brain injuries, or mental illness. Customized employment will be developed that is consistent with the individual’s unique skills, abilities, interests, and informed choice.

General funds will be utilized to supplement Title VI part B funds as deemed necessary to provide supplemental disability related support services that facilitate successful employment outcomes. Supplemental support services may include, but are not limited to, personal adjustment counseling, adaptive devices, transportation, and maintenance.

To identify individuals requiring such intensive job support services, the state unit plans to perform comprehensive assessments to determine the nature and scope of the individual’s rehabilitation needs prior to plan development. The VR Counselor’s assessment will include a psychological evaluation, a functional skill assessment, utilizing three to five situational assessments in a community job setting, and an evaluation of rehabilitation technology needs based on the individual’s selected employment goal as necessary and appropriate.

In accordance with Section 7(36) of the Rehab Act, the provision of supported employment services allows for 18 months. Under special circumstances, in mutual agreement with the eligible individual, the contracted vendor, the VR Counselor, and the VR District Administrator, DVI policy allows for extended service provision in order to achieve the employment outcome identified in the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). We will continue in this manner.

This screen was last updated on Jun 18 2011 11:36AM by sadebharperh

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

To operate an effective vocational rehabilitation program for individuals with significant and most significant disabilities, the Division for the Visually Impaired (DVI) described its goals and priorities in State Plan Attachment 4.11(c)(1) as:

(1) Increase the Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes

(2) Improve Case Management

(3) Automate and Streamline VR processes.

It is expected that the planned strategies as described below will result in best practices by facilitating the attainment of the stated performance measures for each identified goal.

Increase the Quality and Quantity of Employment Outcomes

Strategy 1: Networking: All VR Counselors and Employment Service Specialists will become members of the State Chamber of Commerce and will engage in networking opportunities at sponsored events to identify potential employers in high demand industries requiring college training to broaden employment opportunities in the higher paying occupations for VR clients exiting college/university and/or vocational training programs.

Strategy 2: Marketing: The former VR Counselor Assistant II positions have been upgraded to that of an Employment Services Specialist II. These positions will be dedicated to job development and placement activities. As such, they will share responsibility for marketing the skills and abilities of individuals with blindness to employers in the community to include promoting avenues for employers to observe the individuals skills and abilities through, situational assessments, internships, and on the job training utilizing Title I funds and/or intensive supportive employment services utilizing Title VI Part B funds.

Strategy 3: Outreach: A series of events will constitute efforts to encourage unserved and underserved populations to make application for VR services.

(a) Each DVI quarterly newsletter will feature a former VR client whom is successfully employed in hopes that this will encourage more minorities and older blind individuals on the blind registry to rethink their ability to prepare for and obtain competitive employment.

(b) New mailing lists to include businesses, churches, and community centers catering to diverse ethnic groups will be sought for distribution of the DVI newsletter and brochures to encourage potentially eligible individuals to apply for VR services.

(c) Facilitate awareness of VR services for job retention to prevent unserved individuals from considering application for Social Security Title XVI funds.

(d) VR personnel will offer lunch time learning sessions to businesses to educate employees on services provided by DVI.

Improve Case Management

Strategy 1: Monthly supervisory meetings: Case Reviews will be held between the VR Counselors and the VR District Administrator to ensure presumptive eligibility determinations are consistently utilized following verification that the applicant receives social security benefits based on significant disability. Additionally the VR District Administrator will provide consultation and guidance, in cases identified by the VR Counselor as proving difficult, to develop an employment plan within the 90 day time frame.

Strategy 2: Timeliness: On the date an individual progresses to status 10 a phone call will be made to schedule Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling and Guidance for employment planning. Correspondence requesting the individual contact the VR unit to schedule an appointment will be sent only if telephone contact is not established. Adopting this method of immediate scheduling at time of movement into status 10 will improve services to individuals with disabilities by affording the VR Counselor more time to assess the nature and scope of the individual’s rehabilitation needs for employment planning and to assist the eligible individual with completing an employment plan within the 90 day time frame from the date of movement into status 10.

Automation & Streamlining

Strategy 1: Enhancements: Modifications will be made to DE Blind’s information management system, the Visually Impaired Client Registry (VICR) to:

(a) Capture data elements for state/federal reports.

(b) Track and barcode client equipment purchases for inventory purposes.

(c) Afford staff the ability to print client contact logs and other required case service record forms, at strategic intervals, directly from the system for filing in the hard copy Case Service Record.

Strategy 2: Collaboration: DVI will continue to work with the State Rehabilitation Council for the Blind to evaluate aspects of the process that are unnecessarily burdensome and inefficient for clients and staff.

Innovation and Expansion

As identified through the 2007 Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment there is a need to improve Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP’s) serving individuals with most significant disabilities.

Strategy 1: To improve services to individuals with the most significant disabilities DVI plans to Improve Communication with CRP’s through consultation and training in blindness related issues. VR Counselors will coordinate monthly meetings to consult with the assigned placement person on the progress of job search activities, ensure monthly reports are obtained and provide guidance for overcoming any challenges that may be negatively impeding the placement process to include necessary assessment of Rehabilitation Technology Services that will broaden employment opportunities. These meetings will include the VR client to ensure that the client remains fully engaged throughout the placement process and is afforded the opportunity to exercise informed choices.

Strategy 2: During FY 2008, the VR District Administrator will utilize innovation and expansion funds to provide statewide trainings for all CRP’s providing services to individuals with a primary disability of blindness at an estimated cost of $1,000.00. Training will include an overview of simulated eye conditions to familiarize providers with visual limitations and capacities for performing specific tasks, sighted guide training to provide travel assistance within their facilities and in the community while assisting with job search and placement activities, and demonstration of Rehabilitation Technology to familiarize providers with current technology that will substantially modify or eliminate specific visual barriers to employment.

Strategy 3: Innovative approaches are required in marketing the value of hiring individuals with blindness to employers as a means to address their employment needs through developing a partnership with DVI. To address this challenge DVI will host two-employer workshops that will include give-a-way promotion items, lunch, demonstration of rehabilitation technology and a round table discussion with former successful VR clients and their employers. We estimate utilizing $500.00 in innovation and expansion funds for this activity.

Strategy 4: Assisting VR clients with developing a better understanding of Ticket to Work, Blind Work Expenses, ADA, Use of One Stops, and employer expectations utilizing guest speakers for employment workshops will be coordinated and conducted for approximately 40 VR clients during FY 2008 at an anticipated cost of $1,500.00.

 

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:54AM by sadebgoodhartb

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

Goal 1: Increase quality and quantity of employment outcomes

Outcome: Achieved

At the close of FY’ 10, VR achieved an overall 42% increase in employment outcomes (43) over FY’ 09 (25). Forty (40) of forty-three (43) employment outcomes were competitive closures in a variety of occupations that included: Retail Sales, Building Trades, Customer Service, Education, Self-employment, Production, Food Service, Randolph- Sheppard Vending, Protective Services, Health & Wellness, and Financial Services. Three of the 40 competitive closures were supported outcomes. The remaining 3 were homemaker closures.

The strategies listed below contributed to the achievement of VR’s ability to increase the quality and quantity of employment outcomes.

Strategy #1: Networking:

Progress: In addition to the agency’s membership the VR Counselors and Employment Specialists are members of their local Chamber of Commerce and one of the Employment Specialists is a member of the Governors Committee for the Employment of People with Disabilities. Various networking events and outreach functions were attended by Counselors and Employment Specialists that have resulted in the formation of solid business partnerships with businesses such as Christiana Care, Delaware Park, State of Delaware’s Human Resource Department (Office of Management and Budget), Craig Technologies, and Society for Human Resource Managers.

Strategy #2: Marketing:

Progress: A brochure was designed for use by our Employment Specialist as a marketing tool in job development and placement to market the skills and abilities of job ready consumers to prospective employers. The brochure proved to be an extremely useful tool. 70% percent of the individuals marketed using this resource obtained offers of employment.

Strategy #3: Outreach

Progress: A total of 42 events were attended by direct service during FY 10 an effort to create an awareness of the comprehensive services offered by DVI and to encourage un-served and underserved populations to make application for VR services. Resultantly DVI VR saw a 22% increase in the number of individuals making application for VR services in FY 10.

Each DVI quarterly newsletter features a former VR Client that is successfully employed to encourage more minorities and older blind individuals to rethink their ability to prepare for and obtain competitive employment

Goal 2: Improve case management performance

Outcome: Achieved

Case Reviews demonstrate continuing compliance with federal regulation governing presumptive eligibility determinations and good faith efforts in development of Individualized Plans for Employment within the 90-day time frame.

Strategy #1: Monthly Supervisory Meetings

Progress: Continued monitoring demonstrates 100% compliance in eligibility determinations made utilizing presumptive eligibility based on consumer receipt of Social Security disability related payments.

Strategy #2: Timeliness

Progress: Monthly reviews conducted by the VR District Administrator demonstrated good faith efforts to comply with the federally mandated 90-day time frame for development of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) were made 100% of the time. When development of the IPE could not be completed within this timeframe, the Counselor obtained a signed waiver from the consumer.

The inability to meet the mandated 90- day timeframe was a result of:

? Failure of consumers to respond to several VR attempts to contact by phone, email, written correspondence, or via the emergency contact person provide by the consumer at time of initial interview.

? Consumer reported family emergencies impacting their ability to engage in VR activities leading to plan development

? Consumer reports of their own medical emergencies or those relating to family members.

Goal 3: Automation and streamlining of the case management process

Outcome: Achieved

Strategy: Enhancements

Progress: Modifications were made to the DVI’s Electronic Case Management system to:

• Capture data elements for state/federal reports

• Track client equipment purchases for inventory purposes

• Afford staff the ability to print client contact logs and other required case service record forms at strategic intervals for filing in hard copy case files.

A business case summary was completed and approved by the Departments’ Office of Management and Budget that affords DVI the opportunity to have all VR related forms entered into our electronic case management system. Pertinent required consumer information (i.e. demographics, social security number, etc) will populate automatically for each client thus decreasing the amount of time needed to enter the information into various client forms. It is anticipated that at a minimum, 85% of the VR forms will be automated during FY 12.

Goal 4: Consistently provide a high level of consumer satisfaction

As a result of SRC input, DVI has established this new goal into our State Plan. The following strategies will be utilized.

1. Working in partnership with the SRC, DVI will establish new consumer satisfaction surveys and measurement protocols during the 2012 plan year.

2. Working in partnership with the SRC, DVI will host 2 town hall meetings during the 2012 plan year to gather consumer input.

3. DVI will respond to 100% of written consumer complaints within 10 business days of receipt.

4. Working in partnership with the SRC, DVI will develop marketing materials that highlight steps and resources for resolving concerns during their VR experience. This brochure will be made available to 100% of DVI’s VR consumers and new applicants.

 

The established goal for FY’10 to obtain three (3) successful competitive supported employment outcomes was achieved.

Strategies: Contracting services with Community Integrated Services and Opportunities Center Incorporated VR was able to secure three successful competitive supported employment outcomes. Two individuals secured part time jobs at Dover Air Force Base above minimum wage. The other individual obtained two separate customized supported positions as a Stable Attendant and an Office Shredder.

 

1.1 The number of individuals exiting the VR program who achieved an

Employment outcome during the current performance period compared to the number of individuals who exited the VR program after achieving an employment outcome during the previous performance period will equal or exceed the pervious performance period.

Outcome: Passed

Evaluation Criteria: VR exceeded the number of employment outcomes obtained during FY ’10 over FY’09 by 42%. Forty-three individuals achieved an employment outcome during this reporting period as compared to the twenty-five (25) individuals that exited the program in FY’09 with an employment outcome.

1.2 Of all individuals who exit the VR program after receiving services, the percentage that are determined to have achieved an employment outcome will be at least 68.9%.

Outcome: Passed

Evaluation Criteria: 75%, or forty-three (43) of fifty-seven (57) individuals that exited the VR program after receiving services were determined to have achieved an employment outcome.

1.3 Of all individuals determined to have achieved an employment outcome, the percentage that exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage shall be minimally 35.4%.

Outcome: Passed

Evaluation Criteria: 90.7% of all status 26 closures in competitive, self-

Employment, or BEP employment had earnings equivalent to Delaware’s minimum wage.

1.4 Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment or

BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage the percentage that are individuals with significant disabilities shall be minimally 89%.

Outcome: Passed:

Evaluation Criteria: All forty (40) or 100% of the individuals exiting the VR program with reported earnings equivalent or greater than Delaware’s minimum wage during FY’10 were identified as individuals with significant disabilities.

1.5 The average hourly earnings of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment or BEP employment with earning levels equivalent to at least the minimum wage as a ratio to the State’s average hourly earnings for all individuals in the State who are employed (as derived for the Bureau of Labor Statistics report “State Average Annual Pay” for the most recent available year) shall be 59%.

Outcome: Passed:

Evaluation Criteria: Delaware’s average hourly earnings for all individuals in the State who are employed as derived from the most recent earnings data from the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) for Delaware is $18.81.

The average hourly earnings of the 40 individuals exiting the VR program with earning levels equivalent to at least the minimum wage as a ratio to the State’s average hourly wage during FY ’10 was $13.22. 59% of the state average earnings equals $11.09. Delaware exceeded this goal by 14.7% or $2.12 per hour.

1.6 Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-employment, or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage, the difference between the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of economic support at the time they exited the VR program and the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of support at the time they apply for VR service shall be 30.4%.

Outcome: Failed

Evaluation Criteria: Twenty two individuals reported their income as the largest single source of economic support at the time they applied for VR services (22/43= 51.2%). The number reporting their own income as the largest single source of support at the time they exited the VR program totaled 31 (31/43= 72.1%). Resultantly, the difference between the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of economic support at the time they exited the VR program and the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of support at the time they apply for VR service is 20.9%.

A couple of challenges have been the number of blind Delawareans who have resisted efforts to reduce reliance on social security benefits and the influx of individuals receiving retention and promotion opportunities through the agency over the last year.

2.1 The service rate for all individuals with disabilities from minority backgrounds as a ratio to the service rate for all non-minority individuals with disabilities shall be .80%.

Outcome: Passed

Evaluation Criteria: During FFY 10 a total of eighty-three (83) individuals exited the VR program, thirty-six (36) of which were minorities. All exited having received some specific VR service following application. It’s important to note that historically DE Blind has had fewer than 100 individuals exiting the program in any given federal fiscal year. 43.4% of the individuals that exited our program during this reporting period were minorities.

 

During FY ’10 a total of $64,942 was spent in Innovation and Expansion funds.

• ARRA funds in the amount of $34,448 was spent to create a Vocational Evaluator position at Delaware Industries for the Blind to assess transferable job skills, assess functional capacities to successfully complete an in-house Customer Skills Training Program, as well as the ability to obtain employment in an integrated setting.

• $ 12311.94 was spent to upgrade outdated computer hardware/software in the Technology Center to enable VR consumers to train on applications utilized by businesses. This amount also includes purchase of Rehab Technology/Low Vision aids to be kept on hand for placement purposes to prevent service delays for the provision of equipment.

• $17,806.91 was encumbered during this period to create jobs in the community for individuals with the most significant disabilities. Employment outcomes for these placements will be realized during FY 11.

• $375.00 was used to host mandatory quarterly staff development trainings for all direct service personnel.

During FY ‘12 the VR District Administrator will continue to work closely with the Agency Director, the Business Enterprise Program Director, the Director of Delaware Industries for the Blind and other community employers to create and develop employment opportunities and other such partnerships that will facilitate the increase of employment outcomes. It is expected that a minimum of $40,000 shall be set aside for Innovation and Expansion activities.

This screen was last updated on Jun 18 2011 11:52AM by sadebharperh

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Contracted vendors (Community Rehabilitation Programs) such as Easter Seals, Goodwill, OCI, Heartwood, KSI, Horizon House and Chrysalis will provide supported employment services under a purchase of service agreement to DVI consumers referred for services who because of the nature and severity of their disabilities need intensive supported employment services and extended services after transition, in order to perform the specific job tasks to maintain and retain employment that are consistent with the current standards of industry and accreditation organizations.

The vendor will be paid to:

1. Provide Supported Employment (SE) Assessment services to evaluate the needs, strengths, skills and job preferences of consumers to be served. Situation assessments will be a minimum of one and a maximum of three work experiences. Each experience will last a minimum of 6 hours unless the nature of the Consumer’s disability requires a lesser number of hours.

2. Provide SE Placement Services to assist the consumer in job search, in obtaining, and retaining employment; to provide job leads and to assist consumers with scheduling, attending job interviews, and navigating the hiring process. Consumers will be placed in jobs that offer a minimum of 20 hours of employment unless the nature of the consumer’s disability requires a lesser number of hours worked each week.

3. Provide a minimum of four weeks of intensive on-site SE training services to assist the consumer with new employee orientation, learning job skills, establishing work habits, and meeting all required work standards of the job.

4. Provide a minimum of four weeks of SE stabilization on the job that requires on-site assistance at a rate 20% of the time or less.

5. Provide follow-up services for 90 days post-stabilization to ensure consumer receives on-going support necessary to retain employment.

All contracted vendors shall maintain a program of professional development for those employees within its organization who provide services under the terms of a purchase of service agreement by participating in training opportunities for on-site trainers, employment specialists/job developers and SE managers.

Payment for services will be made in milestones as follows:

1. Assessment (10% of payment): maximum of 60 days

• Determination of the consumer’s rehabilitation needs through assessment of the consumer’s abilities and functional limitations will be made in a competitive setting.

2. Placement (20% of payment):

• Job Placement is made based on consumer’s identified abilities and functional limitations in a competitive setting.

• A job-site analysis has been performed and completed.

• The job in which the consumer has been placed meets all RSA supported employment guidelines, the consumer has made an informed choice in selection of the identified employer, and he/she is satisfied with the placement.

3. Four Week Job Retention (20% of payment):

• The consumer has worked successfully for a period of four weeks at or above the number of hours based on his/her functional limitations.

4. Stabilization (20% of payment):

• The consumer has been employed a minimum total of four weeks and requires assistance approximately 20% of the time of his/her total work week hours on the job.

5. Successful Closure (30% of payment):

• Following withdrawal of intensive support the consumer has achieved 90 days of consecutive employment and meets all required RSA criteria to be considered having achieved a positive employment outcome by performing essential job functions in an independent manner.

A vendor to provide Follow-Along services (extended services) will be identified at the time the plan for Supported Employment Services is developed for implementation. Consumers will transition to Follow -Along Services at time of closure.

Extended services will continue to be offered primarily through community rehabilitation programs. Due to budget cuts impacting the Division for Developmental Disability Services in the state of Delaware, when appropriate extended services will be offered and provided by DVI’s Independent Living Services Unit.

Extended services include a minimum of two worksite visits each month to monitor stable job performance. Other services as identified during the course of the vocational rehabilitation process that are required for an individual to maintain employment will be coordinated prior to case closure.

Post Employment services will be provided as necessary and appropriate for job retention.

This screen was last updated on Sep 4 2009 10:55AM by sadebgoodhartb

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Last updated on 06/30/2011 at 12:58 PM

Last updated by sadebharperh

Completed on 06/30/2011 at 12:58 PM

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Published on 09/27/2011 at 10:52 AM

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