ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Rehabilitation Services Administration, DC Dept. on Disability Services State Plan for Fiscal Year 2013 (submitted FY 2012)

1.1 The The Department on Disability Services is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Department on Disability Services [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Director

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Director

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Matthew P Bachand

Title of Signatory
Director

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
09/04/2012

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2013
Yes

Comments:

The District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration (DC-RSA) assures that, no later than September 30, 2013, DC-RSA will take the necessary steps to ensure that it will: • establish a State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the act, as required in Section 101(a)(21)(ii), so that the DC-RSA can work with the SRC to fulfill the responsibilities listed in Section 101(a)(21)(ii). • DC-RSA further assures that it will report on a quarterly basis progress made toward fulfillment of the following outstanding assurance from the FY 2011 state plan; and that the following outstanding FY 2011 assurance must be completed by September 30, 2013: Executing a complete interagency agreement for the coordination of transition services in accordance with Section 101 (a)(11)(D) and 34 CFR 361.22(b). DC RSA will report on the results of the 2008-2010 and 2011-2013 CSNAs in the FY 2014 State Plan. Furthermore, DC RSA will conduct a CSNA for 2014-2016.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Matthew P Bachand

Title of Signatory
Director

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
09/30/2013

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
DC RSA

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

Attachment 4.2(c) Summary of Input and Recommendations of the State Rehabilitation Council, Response of the Designated State Unit, and Explanations for Rejection of Input or Recommendations Due to the recent reconstitution of District of Columbia’s State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in November, 2011, and the changes in management of the District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), both parties support the decision to only make minimal changes to the Proposed FY 2013 State Plan. Instead, we agree that our attention and energy needs to be focused on conducting the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment and Consumer Satisfaction Surveys as mandated by the Rehabilitation Act. DC RSA General Response: DC RSA is in agreement with the recommendations of the SRC. While further discussion on actual implementation strategies and timetables must still occur, RSA is not, at this time, rejecting any of the SRC’s recommendations. While not all efforts will be able to be completed in FY13, DC RSA will initiate efforts on most, if not all, of these suggestions in FY13. If any effort is not initiated, DC RSA will provide the SRC with an explanation. Regardless of how RSA edits the FY 2013 State Plan, the SRC strongly recommends RSA prioritize the following issues: 1. Develop the scope of work for and conduct the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment: Section 101(a)(15(9A)(i-iii) of the Rehabilitation Act mandates that the state VR agency and the SRC jointly conduct a comprehensive needs assessment every three years. The last needs assessment was completed in 2008. Plans are underway for RSA and the SRC to start developing the scope of work and release a Request for Proposals to potential consultants. DC RSA response: RSA has submitted a statement of work for the CSNA to both the SRC and the DC RSA procurement liaison. DC RSA anticipates that a Request for Proposals will be available to the Public by December 1 so that a vendor can be in place by Q2 of FY13. 2. Finalize the implementation, personnel training structure and full utilization of the new VR Case Management System: On several occasions, RSA has not had the ability to provide necessary aggregate data on the demographics of people served by RSA nor the services these individuals are receiving. RSA needs to ensure that this system is implemented in ways that captures data and produces required reports, as well as improves overall workflow. In addition, RSA needs to ensure that a training structure is in place that keeps current staff proficient when updates occur and prepares future staff regardless of when they are hired. DC RSA Response: DC RSA has, over the last month, increased its engagement of the case management system in order to fully implement the system, System 7 (provided by Libera). As a result of these meetings, DC RSA has begun improving its administration of the system and will be implementing training for all end users as improvements are made to the system. DC RSA will prioritize counselor workflow over reporting so that consumer services remain a priority, but both are high priorities for the administration. Furthermore, DC RSA plans on increasing training for many areas 3. Improve the recruitment and retention of qualified RSA personnel: In FY 2012, the agency reports losing eight counselors due to resignation or other reasons and anticipates losing eleven more in the next five years due to attrition or retirement. There are currently six counselor position vacancies that need to be filled. The SRC is concerned that low retention rates and the lack of ability to recruit qualified personnel is negatively affecting the current staff’s capacity to provide quality and timely services, especially for those working with individuals who are blind, deaf, have limited English proficiency (LEP) or have an intellectual disability. We support RSA’s efforts to improve the quality and consistency of internal communications and supervision of personnel. DC RSA Response: DC RSA acknowledges that counselor attrition has been significant in the last year. However, at present, DC RSA has hired 36 counselors. DC RSA also currently has 3 interns from George Washington University, and continues to recruit both experienced VR counselors and counselors who are graduating from GWU and other local and regional universities, such as University of the District of Columbia, Coppin State University, and West Virginia University. Our recruitment efforts prioritize linguistic diversity, particularly counselors who speak Spanish. In terms of counselor retention, much of the effort to improve DC RSA in the next year will focus on improving the counselor/client interactions so that services can be rendered more effectively and that staff morale can be easier maintained. 4. Improve coordination with schools, especially public charter schools, to ensure 100% of transition students who want to work have an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE): RSA reported in their FY 2011 Performance Accountability Report that 24.48 percent of transition students have an IPE. Not only is this unacceptable, this situation greatly increases the potential of RSA having to address a higher level of need when individuals are finally connected to services. The agreements between RSA, DC Public Schools and the Office of the State Superintendent of Education are currently not effective enough to meet the legal obligations the District has to its transition students. In addition, these agreements do very little to connect RSA to students with disabilities attending the plethora of public charter schools in the District. DC RSA Response: DC RSA agrees that the current rate of transition students being referred to RSA who timely receive an eligibility determination and IPE are unacceptable. DC RSA agrees that the implementation of the current MOAs with the State and Local Education Agencies need to be implemented in a more deliberate manner, with more consistent follow-up and with better targeting of efforts using data. In the short term, DC RSA will continue to focus its efforts on students in the final year of school so that those students can be served appropriately and without interruption between LEA and RSA services. To that end, DC RSA will be seeking, in FY13, to greatly improve training and technical assistance to LEAs so that school staff can provide students with timely, accurate information regarding VR services. In addition, DC RSA continues to grow its Project Search offerings with a site at George Washington University and to strengthen its ties with the Department of the Interior site that is operated by Ivymount Day School. Further service expansions will be added where possible, particularly in partnership with the University of the District of Columbia Community College. 5. Increase adult basic education opportunities and improve outreach to individuals with disabilities who have low literacy skills or LEP: With so many students with disabilities having left high school without a diploma or a quality education, many adults need to have the opportunity to acquire basic skills, especially in reading before they will be ready for employment. RSA should focus on connecting these individuals to general services. RSA should also ensure that everyone has the opportunity to access these services. DC RSA Response: DC RSA believes that these services are readily available in the District, but that our coordination with those service providers needs to improve. DC RSA will be working to build a counselor resource center to better inform counselors about these services, and also to provide consumers with more easily accessible information about these services and how to access them. By providing such information and instituting a more rigorous process for referral and follow-up, DC RSA believes we will better be able to take steps to help organizations offering such services to ensure their accessibility. In addition to the priorities above, the SRC also recommends the following steps be taken as soon as possible: 1. RSA should work with the Office of Boards and Commissions to reconstitute the DC State Independent Living Council. DC RSA Response: DC RSA is currently in the process of recruiting consumers for the SILC. Over 12 possible participants have been sent to the Mayor’s Office for vetting, and we expect a swearing-in ceremony for these members to be held prior to the end of Q1 of FY13. 2. The SRC should review and comment on RSA regulations adopted by the Agency during the period when there was no SRC participation, starting with the secondary education and the cost participation. DC RSA Response: DC RSA has provided these preliminary regulations to the RSA for comment (Spring 2012) and The SRC did comment on these regulations. The regulations have been submitted to the Secretary of the District of Columbia for posting and public comment. DC RSA will revisit the regulations at the end of the public comment period, and will also consider the input of the SRC again at that time. 3. RSA should collaborate more with the Department of Employment Services to define and achieve outcomes that would benefit both agencies. This should include cross-training staff at One Stop Centers to work with individuals with disabilities so people can start getting services even if the RSA representative is not present on a particular day. DC RSA Response: DC RSA has an MOA with the Department of Employment Services and has established joint activities. Cross-training of staff is included in the MOA. A report on activities conducted under MOAs will be provided to the SRC as we review all our MOAs. Furthermore, DC RSA will share MOAs with the SRC as we implement them so that all are aware of our progress. 4. RSA should work with employers to increase the capacity to establish natural supports for people in Supported Employment so job coaches transition out of the picture. DC RSA response: RSA is planning, in FY13, to continue trainings with TransCen and other vendors to improve the use of supported employment, job development, and job placement so that the vendors have a better understanding of how to help employers identify and implement natural supports and to help job coaches transition out of the picture as soon as possible. The job development efforts of the RSA business relations unit will also include more support for employers in understanding natural supports. 5. RSA and the SRC should work to engage individuals at every stage of intake, service, and employment outcome in the Consumer Satisfaction Survey. DC RSA Response: RSA has conducted surveys targeting areas such as intake and closure in its customer satisfaction surveys during FY12. In FY13, this responsibility will transfer back to the SRC, with RSA staff assisting in the transition process. 6. RSA should improve access to benefits counseling for the individuals they serve. DC RSA Response: RSA is consistently working to increase access to benefits counseling. The numbers of consumers who are receiving these services is increasing, but not yet at a rate acceptable to DC RSA. 7. RSA should take the necessary steps to meet all requirements under the Language Access Act. DC RSA Response: DC RSA Agrees. Monitoring of the Language Access Act requirements has increased during Q4 of FY12, and will be targeted for continuous improvement activities in FY13. 8. RSA should improve internal collaboration among the divisions serving individuals with specific disabilities. DC RSA Response: DC RSA considers this work to be constant and ongoing. The Transition, Blind Services, and Deaf/Hard of Hearing teams have increased coordination greatly in FY12 and will continue to coordinate and improve services in FY13. 9. RSA should help raise its staff’s and the broader community’s expectations of where people with disabilities work and what tasks they can accomplish. DC RSA Response: Through the efforts of DDS’ “Employment First” initiatives, our increase in staff training, and other efforts to improve placement, DC RSA believes that staff and the broader community will be able to see more actual examples of persons with disabilities performing tasks that exceed the expectations that staff and the broader community currently have for persons with disabilities. It is the actual observation of success that will change minds, not just a logical explanation. DC RSA will market these observable successes so that attitudes can “catch up” with reality. 10. RSA should improve outreach in the business community to ensure people with disabilities have opportunities to work any every sector represented in the local area. DC RSA Response: DC RSA is in the process of “relaunching” its business relations unit, which will be designed to improve both outreach and placement. Further outreach efforts, particularly to consumers who have had cases closed unsuccessfully in FY11, will be developed in Q1 of FY13, as well. Also, DC RSA is training staff, through a “train the trainers” approach, to develop and implement Positive Personal Profiles to aid in identifying potential employment opportunities.

This screen was last updated on Oct 31 2012 10:27AM by sadcbachandm

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

This screen was last updated on Sep 17 2009 5:42PM by sadcwinfieldd

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

The Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration (“Administration” or “DDS/RSA”) values its relationships with its federal, state and local partners that are outside of the Workforce Investment System. The Administration is working aggressively to finalize its MOUs and MOAs. As the Administration transitions under new leadership, it is simultaneously implementing corrective measures to address the deficiencies while making gradual progress in completing its outstanding agreements. A list of the signed Memoranda of Agreements (MOA) with agencies not carrying out activities under the statewide workforce investment system, and the services each provides, follows. The University of the District of Columbia (UDC): UDC Satellite Office MOA “The objective of this MOA is to establish the terms, conditions, and procedures Under which UDC will provide DDS/RSA with a satellite office, located at 4200 Connecticut Avenue, NW, (i.e., UDC campus), Building 44, Room A-39.” Services: UDC shall: 1. Provide DDS/RSA with a satellite office, located in Building 44, Room A-39, for the purpose of conducting outreach services to person(s) currently receiving or interested in receiving vocational rehabilitation services. These services may include: receipt of referrals or applications for services, counseling and guidance, and any other service(s) prescribed by the Act. 2. Ensure that the satellite office will be used solely by the DDS/RSA vocational rehabilitation counselor identified in Section IV (B) of this Agreement. 3. Ensure that the satellite office is 7 x 11 feet and has, a keyed door entry, which will only be accessed by DDS/RSA’s vocational rehabilitation counselor or DDS/RSA personnel. 4. At no cost to DDS/RSA, provide the DDS/RSA vocational rehabilitation counselor, stationed at the satellite office, with the following amenities: 5. Five drawer desk with one desk chair and one office chair located within the satellite office; a. One light fixture, located within the satellite office; Telephone, located within the satellite office; b. Locked drawer filing cabinets, located within the satellite office (quantity of 2); c. Office supplies, including but not limited to, pens, pencils, staplers, and other supplies necessary to carry out the functions of the vocational rehabilitation counselor identified in Section IV (B), or as prescribed by the Act; d. Air conditioning, heating, and other utilities associated with operating the satellite office; e. Use of copier machines and copy paper, as needed; DDS/RSA shall: 1. Assign a vocational rehabilitation counselor to be stationed at the satellite office during the academic week (i.e., Monday through Friday). 2. Ensure that the vocational rehabilitation counselor does the following: a. Provides prompt and equitable handling of referrals for vocational rehabilitation services, in accordance with the Act and DDS/RSA policy and procedure; b. Provide assessments for the purpose of determining eligibility, priority for services; and/or determining the scope of vocational rehabilitation needs c. Determine eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services and Order of Selection priority categories; d. Develops an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) with the client, which provides the terms and conditions of the vocational rehabilitation services to be provided; e. Maintains a secure and confidential case record, as noted in Section in (C) (1) of this Agreement, for each applicant and recipient of vocational rehabilitation services; f. Provides job related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, and follow-up services, as needed. 3. Provide the vocational rehabilitation counselor with a computer and printer, which will be located within the satellite office, 4. Coordinate with the Department on Disability Services (DDS) Information Technology (IT) Department to provide IT support for the computer and printer located within the satellite office. Joint Responsibilities DDS/RSA and UDC’s joint responsibilities include: FERPA Statement: The Parties recognize that student educational records are protected by the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). FERPA permits disclosure of student "educational records" to "school officials" that have a "legitimate educational interest" in the information; The Parties can designate other entities, including vendors and consultants, as "other school Officials." Designated representatives of either Patty will be designated as "other school official” for purposes of this Agreement. No designated representative of either Party shall disclose student educational records it receives under this agreement to any third party, except with the prior written consent of the student (or parent, where applicable) and as permitted by law, Approved re-disclosures to third parties shall not exceed purpose for original disclosure, Any disclosures made shall comply with the University’s definition of legitimate educational interest." Parties agree and warrant that it shall use student educational records solely to accomplish its obligations under this agreement and solely in a manner and for purposes consistent with the terms and conditions of this agreement and University policies and procedures, Parties will take appropriate legal action against any unauthorized use or disclosure of any educational record. Confidentiality: The Parties of this MOA will observe such regulations, standards, policies and procedures as necessary to meet the requirements for safeguarding the confidentiali4, of information under 34 CFR § 361.38 and 29 DCMR § 118. All information related to person(s) served via the satellite office shall be maintained in official records and deemed confidential. Such person(s) shall be informed of the confidential nature of information required and the conditions governing inspection of records. Any release of information must comply with the requirements of 29 DCMR § 118.5. Cost Reimbursement: Nothing in this Agreement shall prohibit a cost sharing arrangement between DDS/RSA and UDC unless the same is prohibited by federal law or regulations. To the extent that cost reimbursement is necessary to further execute the provisions of this MOA, the parties agree to execute an amendment to this MOA. The amendment will be executed in a manner consistent with Section IV (C) (4) of this Agreement. Changes to the MOA: Either party may request changes to this MOA. Any changes, modifications, revisions or amendments must be agreed to in writing, by bath parties, and shall be incorporated into this MOA by reference pursuant to the written agreement memorializing the change, modification, revision or amendment executed by the parties. Responsibility for the Acts of the Parties: The parties to this MOA are cooperating District of Columbia entities. No employee or agent of either entity shall be deemed to be an employee or agent of the other entity and shall have no authority, express or implied, to hind the other entity except as expressly set forth herein. Each entity shall be responsible for its acts and those of its erriployees1 agents and subcontractors, if any, during the course of this MOA. Notice of Lawsuit: Either party that becomes a defendant in a lawsuit that involves services provided under this MOA shall deliver to the other party, within five (5) calendar days of service of process, a copy of any pleading relating to such lawsuit. Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA) CSOSA Participants The Parties agree that individuals referred to DDS/RSA shall be at least sixteen (16) years of age, and must provide proof of identification, disability, District residence and availability to work. The Parties agree that individuals referred to DDS/RSA for services must provide additional documentation as required to receive vocational rehabilitation services. The Parties will meet within thirty days of execution of this MOA to determine the number of persons referred to DDS/RSA for vocational services and develop additional program criteria as needed. DDS/RSA will notify CSOSA in writing when the number of CSOSA/VOTEE referrals has reached capacity. Responsibilities of DDS/RSA: 1. Receive offenders who meet the program eligibility criteria identified in section III (C) of this Agreement; 2. Provide appropriate services as described in section III (B) of this Agreement; 3. Conduct intake at selected CSOSA itinerary site locations at request of CSOSA Point of Contact; 4. Respond to requests from CSOSA personnel regarding each referred offender’s attendance and program participation status; 5. Participate in quarterly meetings to review the partnerships progress; and 6. Participate in quarterly Learning Lab Open House/Resource Fair. Responsibilities of CSOSA/VOTEE: 1. Pre-screen and select offenders who are eligible for the other Party’s program(s); 2. Advise each eligible offender of the conditions of participation (e.g., the other Party’s application requirements, the other Party’s necessary documents, and the importance of his/her compliance with all conditions of his/her probation, parole, and/or supervised release); 3. Transmit the other Party’s required referral form and supporting documents (if any); 4. Direct each eligible offender to complete a Privacy Act Waiver form to permit each participating offender to grant CSOSA written permission to share limited required information in the application and documentation required to determine program eligibility. Consistent with the Privacy Act, CSOSA cannot require an individual to submit his or her Social Security number to the other Party; 5. Assign a Vocational Development Specialist (VDS) or Learning Lab Specialist (LLS) who will monitor the progress of each offender in the other Party’s program(s) and will make inquiries to the other Party about each offender’s progress at least twice per month; and 6. Initiate meetings to review the partnership’s operation on a quarterly basis. Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services Responsibilities of DYRS: 1. Provide DDS/RSA with information on existing DYRS policies and procedures 2. Provide the VR Counselor with necessary information pertaining to youth seeking services; 3. Ensure that DYRS case managers are available for consultation with the DDS/RSA VR Counselor on an as-needed basis determined by the VR Counselor; 4. Reimburse DDS/RSA for all approved personnel service expenses resulting from the hiring of additional transition staff, including the payment of wages, taxes, and other benefit costs as required by the District of Columbia Personnel Regulations; 5. Provide DDS/RSA with satellite office space, twice a week for eight (8) hours per day, for the purpose of conducting outreach services to person(s) currently receiving or interested in receiving vocational rehabilitation services. These services may include: receipt of referrals or applications for services, counseling and guidance, and any other service(s) prescribed by the Rehabilitation Act; 6. Ensure that the satellite office space will be used solely by the DDS/RSA VR Counselor; and 7. At no cost to DDS/RSA, provide the DDS/RSA vocational rehabilitation counselor, stationed in the satellite office space, with the following amenities: a. Desk, one desk chair, and one office chair located within the satellite office; b. One light fixture, located within the satellite office; and c. Telephone, located within the satellite office. Responsibilities of DDS 1. DDS/RSA has responsibility for providing diagnosis, vocational counseling, physical and mental restoration services (as defined in 34 CFR § 361.5), vocational training and job placement to eligible DYRS commitment youth. 2. DDS/RSA will provide consultation and technical assistance to DYRS (as needed) to assist in planning for the transition of youth from school to post-school activities, including VR services when requested and appropriate. 3. DDS/RSA will be available to provide transition planning, along with DYRS, that facilitates the development and completion of individualized education programs for youth. 4. Assign one VR Counselor, Grade 11 Step 1, to be stationed at the satellite office two day per week for eight (8) hours per day. The VR Counselor shall provide services to DYRS youth, even when he or she is not stationed at the DYRS satellite office. The VR Counselor’s caseload shall include all eligible DYRS youth referred to DDS/RSA and, as the Counselor’s schedule permits, may also include non-DYRS clients as assigned by DDS/RSA in order to ensure that the VR Counselor is carrying a full caseload. National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMMS) Responsibilities of DDS/RSA 1. Assign a vocational rehabilitation counselor to be stationed at the satellite office one day per week for eight (8) hours. 2. Ensure that the vocational rehabilitation counselor does the following: a. Provides prompt and equitable handling of referrals for vocational rehabilitation services, in accordance with the Act and DDS/RSA policy and procedure; b. Provide assessments for the purpose of determining eligibility; priority for services; and/or determining the scope of vocational rehabilitation needs; c. Determine eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services and Order of Selection priority categories; d. Develops an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) with the client, which provides the terms and conditions of the vocational rehabilitation services to be provided; e. Maintains a secure and confidential case record, as noted in Sections IX and X of this Agreement, for each applicant and recipient of vocational rehabilitation services; f. Provides job related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, and follow-up services, as needed. Responsibilities of NMMS 1. Provide DDS/RSA with a satellite office once a week for eight (8) hours for the purpose of conducting outreach services to person(s) currently receiving or interested in receiving vocational rehabilitation services. These services may include: receipt of referrals or applications for services, counseling and guidance, and any other service(s) prescribed by the Act. 2. Ensure that the satellite office will be used solely by the DDS/RSA vocational rehabilitation counselor when onsite. 3. At no cost to DDS/RSA, provide the DDS/RSA vocational rehabilitation counselor, stationed at the satellite office, with the following amenities: a. Desk, one desk chair, and one office chair located within the satellite office; b. One light fixture, located within the satellite office; and c. Telephone, located within the satellite office. Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) Responsibilities of DDS 1. DDS/RSA has responsibility for providing diagnosis, vocational counseling, and job placement to eligible persons with disabilities at no cost to local education agencies. 2. DDS/RSA may provide eligible individuals with disabilities the following services as defined in Sec. 361.48, 34 CFR Part 361, State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program. 3. DDS/RSA will provide consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services when requested and appropriate. 4. DDS/RSA will be available to provide transition planning by personnel of the state agency with educational agency personnel that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs. 5. DDS/RSA will provide funds in compliance with federal and state laws as appropriate to provide comprehensive vocational rehabilitation services to eligible individuals with disabilities including transition services. In the development of a comprehensive program of vocational rehabilitation services, vocational rehabilitation professionals will be expected to work cooperatively with OSSE. Comprehensive services include all VR services that are appropriate under an Individualized Plan for Employment agreed to by an eligible individual and a qualified vocational rehabilitation counselor employed by RSA. RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION 1. OSSE will establish and maintain policies and procedures and provide technical assistance to local education agencies to ensure that: a. Students with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) have been provided with a course of study and graduation plan at the age as required by District of Columbia law. b. Local educational agencies (LEAs) conduct age-appropriate transition assessment(s) at a minimum in the areas of education, training and employment, and, where appropriate, independent living. c. The IEP team considers in the development of the IEP, a coordinated set of activities to assist the student in reaching his/her post-school goals. d. Each LEA is encouraged to establish a point of contact to support coordination with RSA. e. Students with IEPs have an appropriate and meaningful set of goals and services within the Transition Goals and Services section of the IEP, f. Students with IEPs who are placed in a nonpublic residential or day school have the same opportunities for a high quality education including secondary transition services, as students in a secondary public school setting. g. The LEA provides at no cost to the student, a Summary of Performance (SOP) no later than 60 days prior to graduation or the age at which the student exceeds the District of Columbia’s age eligibility for a free appropriate public education. 2. In its role as the State Education Agency (SEA), OSSE will monitor LEAs to ensure compliance with IDEA Part B, including timely and appropriate secondary transition planning. 3. OSSE will require LEAs to invite RSA staff, where the parent or adult student consent, to IEP meetings where DDS/RSA is likely to be responsible for providing or paying for secondary transition services. Local education agencies will also be encouraged by OSSE to initiate and/or cooperate appropriately with RSA in the development of graduation plans, technical preparation (Tech Prep) programs of study, vocational components and transition goals and services of the IEP. 4. OSSE will encourage Special Education Coordinators to work cooperatively with Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors within the schools to provide appropriate information and services to students with disabilities and their families. 5. OSSE will provide appropriate in-service training and technical assistance to staff of LEAs and nonpublic schools related to curriculum and classroom modifications and learning strategies to accommodate students with disabilities. 6. OSSE will provide appropriate in-service training and technical assistance to VR Counselors within the schools in best practices in transition planning to promote positive post-school outcomes. 7. OSSE will provide state and federal funds to LEAs for the development of comprehensive special education services to identified children with disabilities. In the development of a comprehensive program of special education services, LEAs will be expected to work cooperatively with DOS/RSA. Comprehensive services include, but are not limited, to appraisal services, instructional services and support services. COORDINATION OF SERVICES Parties to this MOA agree to establish, maintain and implement policies and procedures to ensure coordination and timely and appropriate delivery of services in accordance with each agency’s authority and responsibilities as defined in this MOA. Both agencies agree to provide annual reports on agreed-upon performance and outcome measures as follows: FOR OSSE: The number of students who have received transition assessments, have had transition goals established in their IEPs, and have received transition services FOR RSA: The number of students who have been referred to RSA, the number of those referred who were found eligible, of those eligible, the number for whom an IPE was developed, and the number of successful case closures from those received vocational rehabilitation services. District of Columbia Public Library Responsibilities of the DC Public Library (DCPL) DCPL is responsible for developing and implementing a program that will enroll eligible District residents who are print disabled for Newsline Services so that they are able to receive media services through digital text or digital audio formats from various news organizations or other suppliers. 1. Collect data and transmitting it to DDS/RSA tracking usage of services and training program. 3. Secure DDS/RSA approval before entering into any contractual arrangements that use Independent Living funds. 4. The Victor Stream Reader administration and training is provided by DCPL adaptive services staff. 5. Responsible for direct payment of salary of Newsline Administrator for FY-13. 6. Responsible for the selection of Newsline Administrator to handle various administrative duties that will provide support for the program, and for keeping DDS/RSA informed of the selection of the Newsline Administrator. 7. Verify and approve monthly invoices of the Newsline Administrator. 8. Responsible for IT support for NFB-Newsline Administrator. Responsibilities of the DDS: 1. Ensure that appropriate referrals of RSA consumers requiring Newsline Services or Victor Reader Stream are made to DCPL. THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES — ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES (HHS/ACF), THE District of Columbia PUBLIC SCHOOLS (DCPS) Responsibilities of the HHS/ACF 1. Provide classroom space and separate Instructor/Job Coach space, if possible, with telephone, computer connections and internet access. 2. Provide furniture and equipment for the Project SEARCH classroom space (such as small or long tables to be used as student work areas, chairs, locked cabinet for student files, basic office supplies, etc). 3. Provide access to work space, telephone, fax, photocopy equipment, basic office supplies, computer and email access for Project SEARCH Instructor and job coaches. 4. Provide an ACF liaison who is available on a frequent basis to assist with skills development experiences and job site development, introduce Project SEARCH staff to the HHS/ACF staff, market the program internally, navigate the ACF culture, attend periodic meetings to discuss and evaluate program progress, and work with the Instructor to reinforce workplace rules. 5. Develop work sites within the Department of Health and Human Services for skills development and a point of contact at each site for the purpose of teaching competitive, marketable skills to the program participants. Facilitate job analysis of those sites for the Project SEARCH staff. 6. Determine human resources processes and provide access to hiring opportunities if a Project SEARCH participant is appropriate for an internal job opening. 7. Provide badges and appropriate employee orientation to students and Project SEARCH staff. 8. Provide feedback to students and Project SEARCH staff regarding a student’s progress in mastering skills and contributing to their office or department. 9. Implement accommodations as required under HHS rules, regulations and procedures in a universal design for the benefit of all interns, where appropriate. 10. Participate on a Planning Team made up of representatives from each Party (and their subcontractors) to this MOA, to jointly evaluate intern progress, report outcomes, and work toward continuous intern improvement. 11. Assist in collecting data on students and employer outcomes. 12. Collaborate on establishing student eligibility guidelines for the internship program and select students for the program as a participating partner of the Planning Team. 13. Collect data on student progress and workplace outcomes and, with each student’s consent, report to all partners. 14. Collaborate with Project SEARCH Cincinnati for technical assistance, data collection and other issues related to Project SEARCH’s model integrity. 15. Supervise, coordinate and monitor student activities. Ensure that every day a student is in the ACF facilities that there is member of D.C. staff/employee in the HHS/ACF facilities. A DCPS/DDS/RSA employee (or a contractor employee of DCPS/DDS/RSA) must be in and available in the HHS/ACF facilities, but not necessarily in the same building as the student participants. Responsibilities of the DCPS 1. Provide a Special Education Instructor/Team Leader with school-to-career transition experience to coordinate Project SEARCH activities and teach in the program. 2. Adopt and/or adapt the Project SEARCH curriculum and instructional materials that encompass employability skills, functional academics, school-to-career transition activities, job development and job readiness. Assist HHS/ACF in the development of work sites for skills development, in coordinating and monitoring student activities, and providing direct support to students in their work experiences. 4. Coordinate student and teacher recruitment activities. 5. Collaborate on establishing student eligibility guidelines and select students for participation in the program, as the lead member of the Planning Team. 6. For accepted students, revise Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and assess each student’s strengths, talents and interests to determine the best possible skills development experiences and job matches. 7. In conjunction with other members of the Planning Team, provide guidance to the HHS/ACF staff regarding support for people with disabilities in the workplace and assist in designing workplace adaptations and accommodations, working with project partners to ensure implementation of recommendations, as necessary. 8. Facilitate participant eligibility for career counseling, job coaching and job development through RSA. 9. With the student’s consent, participate in the development of an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) (i.e., provide information and suggestions as part of the student’s planning team) that reflects the student’s choices for each student who is eligible for RSA services. 10. Ensure that there is staff support for the students when the Special Education Instructor is engaged in training or attending meetings. 11. Coordinate student-specific meetings between students, parents, RSA staff, job coaches and other applicable partners to discuss and evaluate student progress every four to six weeks. 12. Provide information to Project SEARCH job developers and job coaches to facilitate job development for Project Search students at the Department of Health and Human Services and elsewhere, examining existing open positions, determining their applicability for Project SEARCH students, and assisting with job analyses for targeted positions. 13. Collect data on student progress and workplace outcomes and, with each student’s consent, report to all partners. 14. Collaborate with Project SEARCH Cincinnati for technical assistance, data collection and other issues related to Project SEARCH’s model integrity. 15. Supervise, coordinate and monitor student activities. Ensure that every day a student is in the ACF facilities that there is member of D.C. staff/employee in the HHS/ACF facilities. A DCPS/DDS/RSA employee (or a contractor employee of DCPS/DDS/RSA) must be in and available in the HHS/ACF facilities, but not necessarily in the same building as the student participants. Responsibilities of DDS/RSA 1. Provide a Rehabilitation Counselor to support students and the overall project as needed. 2. Provide job coaching funding and job development services for eligible students in Project SEARCH 3. Provide expertise and assistance in adaptations and job accommodations to the Department of Health and Human Services staff, students or others, and provide those accommodations, as necessary. 4. Collaborate on establishing student eligibility guidelines for Project SEARCH and select students as a participating partner of the Planning Team. 5. Attend regular meetings to discuss and evaluate program progress. 6. Provide education and training to the Department of Health and Human Services employees regarding supporting people with disabilities in the workplace as necessary. 7. As needed, provide monetary support for pre-approved costs that are in excess of normal expenses of the students necessitated by their participation in Project SEARCH. 8. Maintain a contractual arrangement with Project SEARCH Cincinnati for technical assistance, data collection and other issues related to model integrity. This includes, but is not limited to, providing training and technical assistance to implementation teams, site supervisors, and staff teams at least monthly, in person or by phone; participating in problem-solving, as needed, on ongoing operational issues; participating in the evaluation of program outcomes; auditing the program for model fidelity; and documenting activities and lessons learned so as to create a Replication Manual for Project SEARCH programs in the Federal Government. 9. Maintain a contractual relationship with St. John’s Community Services, a Community Rehabilitation Provider, through their existing Human Care Agreement for Supported Employment Services (DCJM¬2010-H-0002-09) to provide job coaching and job development services to the students and host managers, including, but not limited to, a) Working as part of a team with other partners to identify work sites for skills development and perform job analyses. b) Providing Education and training to the Department of Health and Human Services employees regarding strategies to promote the successful employment of people with disabilities, as needed. c) With the student’s consent, participating in the development of an IPE that reflects the student’s choices for each student eligible for RSA services. d) Providing consistent job coaching staff from initial skills development experiences through successful community employment. e) Providing external job development in the community and job development in the Federal government, in collaboration with RSA, for Project SEARCH students. f) Working with the DCPS teacher and the Department of Health and Human Services Liaison, identify and support managers interested in hosting students for work experiences. g) Working with the DCPS teacher and individual managers, developing task lists and job descriptions for each of the work experiences, updating them as needed. h) Working with the DCPS teacher, assisting students in updating resumes and portfolios, preparing for the job application and interview process. i) Working with the DCPS teacher to provide travel training for the Project SEARCH year and for subsequent community employment. j) Collaborating to establish student eligibility guidelines for Project SEARCH and participating in the selection of students, as a participating partner of the Planning Team. k) Providing expertise in designing individual adaptations and accommodations, and work with the Department of Health and Human Services and RSA staff to provide the accommodation as needed. l) Attending regular meetings with team members from the Parties to this Agreement to discuss and evaluate program progress. m) Assisting with public relations activities to promote the Project SEARCH program and positive transition outcomes. n) Collaborating with Project SEARCH Cincinnati on technical assistance, data collection and other issues related to model integrity. o) To the extent that any of the responsibilities of the Community Rehabilitation Provider enumerated in their Human Care Agreement for Supported Employment Services (HCA Supported Employment Services, DCJM-2010-H-002-09) are included in this Agreement, all legal requirements and obligations contained in the referenced HCA Supported Employment Services are incorporated in their entirety in this Agreement. 10. Participate in problem solving regarding ongoing operational issues. 11. Supervise, coordinate and monitor student activities. Ensure that every day a student is in ACF facilities that there is member of D.C. staff/employee in the ACF facilities. A DCPS/DDS/RSA employee (or a contractor employee of DCPS/DDS/RSA) must be in and available in the ACF facilities but not necessarily the same building as the student participants. 12. Authorizes and grants all participants under this Memorandum, and their employees, the right to use the Project Search name, Project Search materials, and any other items related to Project Search or Project Search Cincinnati, which DDS has legal authority and access to use. SCOPE OF SERVICES All Parties will work collaboratively to: 1. Provide skills development experiences for student participants with disabilities for the school year and job placement opportunities for students who complete the program. 2. The Planning Team will meet a minimum of four times during the term of this MOA to evaluate program status, address program issues and work towards continuous program improvement. 3. Develop sites for skills development experiences that teach marketable, competitive skills and transfer to open jobs in the community with a goal of 85% or greater job placement for participants who complete the program. 4. With the consent of student participants, collect data on student outcomes including jobs attained, wages earned or offered, hours worked per week, and benefits received. THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS (DCPS), THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA DEPARTMENT ON DISABILITY SERVICES (DDS) — REHABILITATION SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (RSA) The Parties to this Agreement will collaborate and cooperate to create a High School Project SEARCH School-¬to-Career Transition program at the Department of Education for students with disabilities, and to foster and facilitate the acquisition of marketable skills by the participants as they complete their skills development program within the Department of Education, Each student will participate in a variety of skills development experiences to obtain skills leading to employment in the community and/or within the Federal government. This Agreement specifies the roles and responsibilities of the Parties as they work in partnership to increase training and employment opportunities for students with disabilities. The program is modeled after Project SEARCH at the Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. Responsibilities of DOE 1. Provide classroom space and separate Instructor/Job Coach space, if possible, with telephone, computer connections and Internet access. 2. Provide furniture and equipment for the Project SEARCH classroom space (such as small or long tables to be used as student work areas, chairs, locked cabinet for student files, basic office supplies, etc). 3. Provide access to work space, telephone, fax, photocopy equipment, basic office supplies, computer and email access for Project SEARCH Instructor and job coaches. 4. Provide a Department of Education liaison who is available on a frequent basis to assist with skills development experiences and job site development, introduce Project SEARCH staff to the Department of Education staff, market the program Internally, navigate the business culture, attend periodic meetings to discuss and evaluate program progress, and work with the Instructor to reinforce workplace rules. 5. Develop work sites within the Department of Education for skills development and a point of contact at each site for the purpose of teaching competitive, marketable skills to the program participants. Facilitate job analysis of those sites for the Project SEARCH staff. 6. Determine human resources processes and provide access to hiring opportunities if a Project SEARCH participant is appropriate for an internal job opening. 7. Provide badges and appropriate employee orientation to students and Project SEARCH staff. 8. Provide feedback to students and Project SEARCH staff regarding a student’s progress in mastering skills and contributing to their office or department. 9. Provide access to conference space for Open Houses and other events, 10. Implement accommodations as required under ED rules, regulations and procedures in a universal design for the benefit of all employees, where appropriate. 11. Participate on a Planning Team made up of representatives from each Party (and their subcontractors) to this MOA, to jointly evaluate program progress, report outcomes, and work toward continuous program Improvement. 12. Assist in collecting data on students and employer outcomes. 13. Collaborate on establishing student eligibility guidelines for Project SEARCH and select students for the program as a participating partner of the Planning Team. The Dept of Ed reserves the right to approve student candidates before they are accepted into the program and to terminate the participation of any interns for due cause. All student participants must be fully screened, with paperwork completed and IEPs finalized, by the start of the school year. Responsibilities of DCPS 1. Provide a Special Education Instructor/Team Leader with school-to-career transition experience to coordinate Project SEARCH activities and teach in the program. 2. Adopt and/or adapt the Project SEARCH curriculum and instructional materials that encompass employability skills, functional academics, school-to-career transition activities, job development and job readiness. 3. Assist the Department of Education in the development of work sites for skills development, in coordinating and monitoring student activities, and providing direct support to students in their work experiences. 4. Coordinate student and teacher recruitment activities. 5. Collaborate on establishing student eligibility guidelines and select students for participation in the program, as the lead member of the Planning Team. Accelerate recruitment and screening of prospective students by DCPS so that interns will be selected before the school year ends, ensuring adequate time for family engagement and independent skills training. Revise the select on criteria so that participation in the program requires students to meet a minimum level of literacy and exhibit adequate school attendance. 6. For accepted students, revise individual Education Plans (IEPs) and assess each student’s strengths, talents and interests to determine the best possible skills development experiences and job matches. 7. In conjunction with other members of the Planning Team, provide guidance to the Department of Education staff regarding support for people with disabilities in the workplace and assist in designing workplace adaptations and accommodations, working with project partners to ensure implementation of recommendations, as necessary. 8. Facilitate participant eligibility for career counseling, job coaching and job development through RSA. 9. With the student’s consent, participate in the development of an Individual Plan for Employment (IPE) (i.e., provide information and suggestions as part of the student’s planning team) that reflects the student’s choices for each student who is eligible for RSA services, Revise the students’ IEP, so that the documents accurately reflect student skill levels, career interests, and transition needs. 10. Ensure that there is staff support for the students when the Special Education Instructor is engaged in training or attending meetings. 11. Coordinate student-specific meetings between students, parents, RSA staff, job coaches and other applicable partners to discuss and evaluate student progress every four to six weeks. Implementing a standard Project SEARCH curriculum that involves family collaboration and more ongoing and active DCPS support 12. Provide information to Project SEARCH job developers and job coaches to facilitate job development for Project Search students at the Department of Education and elsewhere, examining existing open positions, determining their applicability for Project SEARCH students, and assisting with job analyses for targeted positions. 13. Collect data on student progress and workplace outcomes and, with each student’s consent, report to all partners. 14. Collaborate with Project SEARCH Cincinnati for technical assistance, data collection and other issues related to Project SEARCH’S model integrity. 15. Supervise, coordinate and monitor student activities. Ensure that every day a student is in the ED facilities that there is member of D.C. staff/employee in the ED facilities. A DCPSIDDS/RSA employee (or a contractor employee of DCPS/DDS/RSA) must be in and available in the ED facilities, but not necessarily in the same building as the student participants. 16. Implement a summer training program for student interns that focus on basic literacy/computer skills and workplace behavior. Responsibilities of DDS/RSA 1. Provide a Rehabilitation Counselor to support students and the overall project as needed. 2. Provide job coaching funding and job development services for eligible students in Project SEARCH. 3. Provide expertise and assistance in adaptations and job accommodations to the Department of Education staff, students or others, and provide those accommodations, as necessary. 4. Collaborate on establishing student eligibility guidelines for Project SEARCH and select students as a participating partner of the Planning Team. 5. Mend regular meetings to discuss and evaluate program progress. 6. Provide education and training to the Department of Education employees regarding supporting people with disabilities in the workplace as necessary. 7. As needed, provide monetary support for pre-approved costs that are in excess of normal expenses of the students necessitated by their participation in Project SEARCH. 8. Maintain a contractual arrangement with Project SEARCH Cincinnati for technical assistance, data collection and other issues related to mode! integrity. This includes, but is not limited to, providing training and technical assistance to implementation teams, site supervisors, and staff teams at least monthly, in person or by phone; participating in problem-solving, as needed, on ongoing operational issues; participating in the evaluation of program outcomes; auditing the program for model fidelity; and documenting activities and lessons learned so as to create a Replication Manual for Project SEARCH programs in the Federal Government. 9. Maintain a contractual relationship with a Goodwill of Greater Washington, a Community Rehabilitation Provider, through their existing Human Care Agreement for Supported Employment Services (D 3JM¬2010-H-0009-01) to provide job coaching and job development services to the students and host managers, including, but not limited to, a) Working as part of a team with other partners to identify work sites for skills development and perform job analyses, b) Providing education and training to the Department of Education employees regarding strategies to promote the successful employment of people with disabilities, as needed. c) With the student’s consent, participating in the development of an IPE that reflects the student’s choices for each student eligible for RSA services. d) Providing consistent job coaching staff from initial skills development experiences through successful community employment. e) Providing external job development in the community and job development in the Federal government, in collaboration with RSA, for Project SEARCH students. f) Working with the DCPS teacher and the Department of Education Liaison, identify and support managers interested in hosting students for work experiences. g) Working with the DCPS teacher and individual managers, developing task lists and job descriptions for each of the work experiences, updating them as needed. h) Working with the DCPS teacher, assisting students in updating resumes and portfolios, preparing for the job application and interview process, i) Working with the DCPS teacher to provide travel training for the Project SEARCH year and for subsequent community employment. j) Collaborating to establish student eligibility guidelines for Project SEARCH and participating in the selection of students, as a participating partner of the Planning Team. k) Providing expertise in designing individual adaptations and accommodations, and work with the Department of Education and RSA staff to provide the accommodation as needed. l) Attending regular meetings with team members from the Parties to this Agreement to discuss and evaluate program progress. m) Assisting with public relations activities to promote the Project SEARCH program and positive transition outcomes. n) Collaborating with Project SEARCH Cincinnati on technical assistance, data collection aid other issues related to model integrity. o) To the extent that any of the responsibilities of the Community Rehabilitation Provider enumerated in their Human Care Agreement for Supported Employment Services (HCA Supported Employment Services, DCJM-2010-H-009.01) are included in this Agreement, all legal requirements and obligations contained in the referenced HCA Supported Employment Services are incorporated in their entirety in this Agreement. 10. Participate in problem solving regarding ongoing operational issues. 11. Supervise, coordinate and monitor student activities. Ensure that every day a student is in ED facilities that there is member of D.C. staff/employee in the ED facilities. A DCPSIDDS/RSA employee (or a contractor employee of DCPS/DDS/RSA) must be in and available in the ED facilities but not necessarily the same building as the student participants. 12. Authorizes and grants all participants under this Memorandum, and their employees, the right to use the Project Search name, Project Search materials, and any other items related to Project Search or Project Search Cincinnati that DOS has legal authority and access to use. SCOPE OF SERVICES All Parties will work collaboratively to: 1. Provide skills development experiences for student participants with disabilities for the school year and job placement opportunities for students who complete the program. 2. The Planning Team will meet a minimum of four times during the term of this MOA to evaluate program status, address program issues and work towards continuous program improvement, 3. Develop sites for skills development experiences that teach marketable, competitive skills and transfer to open jobs in the community with a goal of 85% or greater job placement for participants who complete the program. 4. With the consent of student participants, collect data on student outcomes including jobs attained, wages earned or offered, hours worked per week, and benefits received.

This screen was last updated on Oct 31 2012 10:27AM by sadcbachandm

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Attachment 4.8(b) (2) Coordination, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services. The Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration considers service provision to high school students with disabilities and their families a major priority within the District of Columbia. The Administration is working aggressively with local educational leaders in special education to develop strategies to identify students earlier who will need transition services. The Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration has developed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to efficiently coordinate data sharing and the early identification of students in need of transition services with the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS). DDS/RSA is working with leadership and staff from the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) to develop and implement and MOA. Finalizing this MOA was a key goal for transition services in FY 2012; a signed MOA (dated 1/5/12) is now complete. The DDS/RSA continues to participate on the National Community of Practice (NCoP) monthly teleconferences on transition. The NCoP consists of statewide VR agencies, national organizations, community organizations, local and state education agencies, public and private organizations, and parents of students with disabilities. DDS/RSA also is active on the local transition community of practice (CoP), which is led by the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) and includes broad public and private organizations that serve youth with disabilities. The agency participates on the State Advisory Panel on Special Education and in Partners in Transition, which is an outgrowth of a City-Wide Transition Workgroup, started by DDS, with support from the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, a project of the Institute for Educational Leadership. These partnerships are essential to enhance transition services in the District of Columbia. Through active coordination with OSSE, the central DCPS offices, other government agencies, and private partners, the Administration has made significant progress in identifying student, family and program needs; developing new strategies that focus on employment while in school; increasing options and opportunities that assist students in making career choices; and, increasing awareness of support services and employment opportunities in the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area. As a result of the realignment in the Vocational Rehabilitation Services Division (VRSD) and expansion of the Transition Unit, the process of student referrals for services has been realigned to facilitate a more efficient transfer to a vocational rehabilitation counselor so that they can complete the IPE process prior to the student exiting high school. The provision of technical assistance to students and their families, guardians and surrogates in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from secondary school to post-school activities and inclusion in the adult community is stipulated in the amended MOA with DCPS and an OSSE January 5, 2010 Memorandum (MOA addendum signed on 1/5/12). This MOA, described in attachment 4.8(b)(1) included, but was not limited to, provisions regarding referral procedures, provision of TA, transition planning, roles and responsibilities, outreach, and data sharing. On January 5, 2010, the State Superintendent of Education issued a Memorandum to the Chancellor, District of Columbia Public Schools; the Public Charter School Board of Directors, the Public Charter School Directors; and principals of DC Public Schools regarding secondary transition. This document clarifies what is required of all Local Education Agencies (LEAs) to ensure the District of Columbia has in place secondary transition policies and procedures, as required by IDEA and Title 5, Chapter 30 of the District of Columbia Municipal Regulations (DCMR). The document further emphasizes the roles and responsibilities of LEAs to prepare students with disabilities for postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment, continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation upon graduation or exiting high school. It clearly states and defines the coordinated set of activities in the transition process. Importantly, the document instructs the LEAS to invite a representative from DC RSA to IEP meetings and to invite other public agencies that are providing transition services as well. Because the MOA was renewed without amendment, no new issuance of this memorandum is needed. The District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS), Charter Schools, and Private Schools continue to work with the Administration in the “Transition Individual Educational Plan” process. Schools invite the appropriate representatives that may be responsible for providing or paying for transition services, when the goal of the IEP meeting is to discuss transition services. To plan effective transition services for students with disabilities, it is essential that all invited key representatives encourage and support participation in this process by the special education coordinator (SEC) or designated special education staff in identifying students with IEPs or 504 Plans; tracking referrals for VR services during the 11th grade or junior year; contacting the DC RSA transition specialist or VR counselor assigned to the school to commence the coordination of transition services; contact the youth and family member(s) or legal guardian and maintain contact throughout the first half of the school year during the student’s junior year of secondary school; and, transferring to the vocational rehabilitation counselor referrals for all junior and seniors to ensure the vocational rehabilitation counselor determines eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services and develops the IPE prior to the student’s anticipated exit from secondary school. As previously stated, the purpose of the MOA is to foster cooperation and collaboration between DCPS, DDS/RSA, and DDS/DDA. The Administration works to encourage other agencies to enter into formal agreements with DDS/RSA and DCPS to address consultation, coordination, and the provision of technical assistance to students [beginning at age 16 or earlier] and families in the development of vocational and independent living goals in preparation for the successful movement from school to employment, continuing education, and independent living. The roles and responsibilities for each partner agency are: 1. The local education agencies are responsible for the development, implementation and cost of educational and vocational/transition programs that are consistent with the mandate for the development and implementation of a transition plan as part of each student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). 2. The Developmental Disabilities Administration will provide service coordination for all eligible students and, will refer students in DDA who are deemed eligible for supported employment or other employment services to RSA. The Administration will provide case management administration for students receiving supported employment services. 3. The Administration will provide technical assistance and consultation to the school staff, students (beginning at age 16), and families in planning for the transition of students from school to post-school activities and the development of vocational and independent living goals in preparation for the successful movement from school to employment and/or independent living. The DDS/RSA Transition Unit staff continue to engage in extensive outreach to students, their families and school staff, presenting and providing information on available vocational rehabilitation services and other resources at awareness events, exhibiting assistive technology devices; attending IEP meetings and school events (Back to School Nights, career planning fairs and assemblies), obtaining transition referrals from secondary schools for immediate submission to the vocational rehabilitation counselors; and, assisting the vocational counselors in the secondary schools. The provision of technical assistance to students and their families, guardians and surrogates in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from secondary school to post-school activities and inclusion in the adult community is stipulated in the amended MOA and an OSSE January 5, 2010 Memorandum (renewed by addendum 1/5/12) The Administration’s vocational rehabilitation counselors are assigned to the schools and are paired with transition specialists. Together they provide outreach, vocational rehabilitation referral information and orientation to students, school officials, parents, and others involved in transition services. The vocational rehabilitation counselor determines a student’s eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services, develops an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), and sponsors the delivery of necessary transition services to assist the student with planning for and obtaining successful post-school employment. The Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) and the Individualized Service Plan (ISP), for students also eligible for DDA services are completed or updated as early as possible prior to the student’s anticipated school exit to allow for a smooth transition to the student’s desired post-school outcome. The Administration has a formal MOU with the DC Public Schools (DCPS), finalized on December 17, 2010, to allow transition specialists and rehabilitation counselors to gain access to the DCPS Easy IEP automated system, which will allow immediate access to retrieve the IEP and related reports on students with disabilities who are referred and who are preparing to exit secondary school. All members of the DDS/RSA transition team have been trained on the use of DCPS’s Easy IEP system. The Administration and DCPS have developed a joint Consent form, which also facilitates a referral from DCPS to RSA and the release of their information in Easy IEP. The Administration allocates a large percentage of its staffing resources to transition services for students with disabilities. The Youth and Transition Unit’s four (3) Transition Specialists and six (6) vocational rehabilitation counselors provide technical assistance to secondary school staff, youth with disabilities and their families. The scope of services provided by the transition staff spans a wide spectrum of outreach activities, including conducting workshops and informational sessions for parents and youth with disabilities on transition support, planning, career options, benefits considerations, independent living, accommodations, disclosure, etc. During FY11, RSA was referred 576 youth and 141 obtained an IPE. In FY12, 445 youth were referred to RSA and 348 obtained an IPE. A rehabilitation assistant and a staff assistant have also been assigned to the Transition Team and are supervised by the transition unit manager. Each Transition Specialist, Rehabilitation Counselor team is assigned to 17-22 secondary schools. Currently, almost 100 secondary schools have been assigned to the Youth and Transition Unit. Aided by the transition specialists, the vocational rehabilitation counselors are providing outreach; vocational rehabilitation services; and orientation to students, school officials, parents, and others involved in the transition services process. The vocational rehabilitation counselor determines a student’s eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services, develops an approved Individualized Plan for Employment, and sponsors the delivery of necessary transition services to assist the student in planning for and obtaining successful post-school employment. The goals of the Administration in FY 2013 continue to be to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for students with disabilities prior to the student’s anticipated school exit to allow for smoother transition from high school to the student’s desired post-secondary outcome, and also to improve the vocational training options for students exiting local schools so that they can successfully transition to employment. RSA will continue to grow its Project Search offerings while seeking to add other effective programs to its portfolio.

This screen was last updated on Oct 31 2012 10:27AM by sadcbachandm

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Attachment 4.8(b) (3) Establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers The Department on Disability Services/Rehabilitation Services Administration utilizes Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to provide services for DDS/RSA consumers. The Administration, through its Human Care Agreements (HCAs), continues working with its growing network of local private non-profit, community rehabilitation providers. Currently, the Administration has implemented Human Care Agreements with 23 CRPs, to provide services to DDS/RSA consumers, with some providers offering multiple services. The HCAs includes six (6) service providers who provide Evidenced-Based Supported Employment services for individuals with mental health disabilities; fifteen (15) who provide supported employment, thirteen (13) service providers who provide direct job placement services, and two (2) who provide work adjustment training services. DDS also has added Benefits Analysis/Counseling as a set of services, for which three (3) providers have been approved. During FY12, DC RSA and DC DMH used fee for service contracts to provide Evidence-based supported employment services to VR consumers. In addition, one VR supervisor and four VR counselors have been tasked with providing eligibility determinations for DC DMH consumers who might be eligible for DC RSA services within 30 days. This service has yet to receive a full evaluation on its progress, but internal tracking indicates a majority of eligibility determinations are occurring (in accordance with 34 CFR 361.42) in less than 30 days, and 4 consumers have entered employment. 2 consumers have successfully retained employment for at least 90 days. The Administration has Contracting Officer Technical Representatives (COTR) to monitor day-to-day compliance with the HCA contracts for supported employment and job placement services. The solicitation for the Human Care Agreements is on-going, with the number of CRPs tripling in the past two years, from 7 in FY09, to 23 in FY11, and with additional vendors anticipating the release of a new HCA contract vehicle for FY13. The following describes the programs and services provided to our consumers by the community rehabilitation programs that are currently working with the Administration: Community Connections, Inc. is a private, not-for-profit mental health agency in Washington, D.C. Since 1984, Community Connections has worked with people who have been marginalized to assist them toward stable, integrated community living. Clinical programs, residential and supportive services, and research projects play mutually supportive roles in achieving this goal. Green Door provides vocational work adjustment training with emphasis on transitional employment for adults with significant and persistent mental illness to assist them in improving their functioning in the community, maximizing their community tenure and succeeding in obtaining and retaining employment. Emphasis is placed on supported employment and transition consumers. Green Door has an agreement with the Administration to provide comprehensive independent living services to individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. The target population are adults eighteen years of age and older with a primary diagnosis of severe persistent mental illness, a significant number of whom have a secondary diagnosis of substance abuse. Many of these consumers are African American, Latino and Asian. The Green Door is a model psychosocial program certified by the International Center for Clubhouse Development. Program services that are offered include, but are not limited to counseling, peer and family counseling, educational program advocacy, continuing education, guidance counseling, pre-vocational skills, basic education and literacy GED training, life skills; and, information and referral for numerous support services. Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Institute of Catholic Charities, a 501(c)3 organization, provides vocational and work adjustment training and work placement services to assist transition youth in preparing for the world of work, completing vocational evaluations and assessments, work adjustment training, supported employment, job placement and follow-along support. The Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Institute specializes in services to adults with intellectual disabilities but also provides services to individuals with physical disabilities, mobility impairments, sensory limitations, autism, mental disabilities and substance abuse. Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Institute of Catholic Charities engages students 16 and older in transition planning and career preparation, learning workplace skills, visiting a variety of places of employment, working in internships or competitive employment, and travel training. Graduating students are referred to adult service providers, Developmental Disabilities Administration, and Rehabilitation Services Administration, to ensure continued support and programming. Their staff communicates with each student’s family or residential staff to periodically clarify expectations, celebrate accomplishments, and look to the future. Anchor Mental Health is a 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit organization, affiliated with the Archdiocese of Washington. Its mission is to provide the support necessary to empower adults recovering from mental illnesses to define and pursue their life goals. Anchor Enterprises helps consumers locate and hold competitive employment in the community. The Arc of DC, Inc., a non-profit agency, provides services to people with intellectual disabilities who may also have secondary disabilities. Services include, but are not limited to, supported employment, work adjustment training, and vocational training with an emphasis on transitional employment and job placement. Creative Options & Employment, Inc. (COE) is a one stop non-profit community-based person-centered organization that assists people with disabilities by eliminating employment barriers, enhancing marketable skills, providing person-centered planning, fostering community inclusion and developing the necessary supports to maintain individual career and personal goals. Deaf-Reach, Inc. was founded in 1972 by the National Health Care Foundation for the Deaf (Deaf-Reach) as a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization within the District of Columbia. Its mission is to maximize the self-sufficiency of deaf adults needing special services by providing supported employment, referral, education, advocacy, counseling, and housing. National Children’s Center, Inc. (NCC), 501(c)3, is a recognized leader in providing comprehensive and innovative services for children and adults with developmental disabilities in the District of Columbia and Maryland. Their community-based services include early intervention, schools, employment, adult day and residential programs. These quality personalized lifespan services now benefit more than 500 infants, children and adults with developmental disabilities every day. Additionally, they offer supported employment services and long-term follow-along services for persons with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities. Project ReDirect, Inc. has a mission to empower families to prevent child abuse, juvenile delinquency, and to work proactively to facilitate the restoration of the family. They provide supported employment and job placement services. Psychiatric Center Chartered, Inc. is a private, certified mental health facility that has served the Washington Metropolitan area since 1973, and allows customers to remain in the community while receiving intensive therapy. The Rehabilitation and Employment Services Program continuum consists of six (6) interactive programs: psychosocial rehabilitation, prevocational training/counseling, sheltered work, work readiness, supported employment and transitional employment. St. John’s Community Services (SJCS) is a nonprofit, community-based organization that supports children and adults with intellectual, developmental, physical and other disabilities. SJCS’s “support without walls” activist approach enables people with disabilities to fully participate in and become contributors to the communities of their choice in education, employment, adult day, and residential services. SJCS employment services in the District of Columbia, Pennsylvania (Philadelphia), Northern Virginia and West Tennessee support people with disabilities to explore career options and to acquire and retain competitive employment. People supported include those with intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, mental health issues, visual impairment, autism, physical disabilities, traumatic brain injury, stroke survivors, as well as welfare recipients. As individuals explore their job interests and express preferences, SJCS staff work with them to determine their goals and the support needed to do the job successfully. SJCS employment specialists provide comprehensive vocational assessments, career planning, job development and selection, on-the-job training, job coaching, and other life skills training. At the same time, SJCS supports employers and co-workers to work effectively with new employees. The SJCS staff works to meet the needs of both employees with a disability and employers, while gradually increasing the probability for a long-term employee-employer relationship. Additionally, SJCS provides consulting services to local, national and international organizations. New Life, Incorporated provides independent living skills and recreational services for wheelchair users who are youths and adults with developmental and physical disabilities living in the Washington, DC area. Through supervised interactions with other youths and adult wheelchair users, consumers receive training in a wide variety of wheelchair sports. Over the past 30 years, many consumers have attended Special Needs summer camps and participated in wheelchair sports activities and games. Through one-on-one mentorship and motivational, life-changing experiences, youth wheelchair users have emerged better equipped to tackle the challenges of living independently in the community and seeking employment. Capitol Hill Supportive Services Programs, Inc. provides job readiness skill training, preparing and assisting individuals to obtain employment by locating job openings, assessing job requirements, matching job requirements with the individual’s capabilities, and providing follow-up services to both the individual and the employer. Pathways to Housing DC was founded by Dr. Sam Tsemberis in 1992, and is widely credited as being the originator of the Housing First model among people with psychiatric disabilities. Housing First provides housing first and then combines that housing with supportive treatment services in the areas of mental and physical health, substance abuse, education, and employment. Housing is provided in apartments scattered throughout a community. This “scattered site” model fosters a sense of home and self-determination, and it helps speed the reintegration of Pathways’ clients into the community. The model has been replicated in more than 40 cities across the United States, as well as in Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain and Portugal. In 2009, the agency received three prestigious federal stimulus grants from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to build new programs in new communities. SAMHSA is the federal agency charged with improving rehabilitative services to reduce the impacts of substance abuse and mental illness. The vocational habilitation services program consists of pre-vocational training and supported employment, computer training, mentorship programs, GED and SAT preparation, educational training, and the enlistment and involvement of public and private service agencies, corporations, educational institutions, and governmental entities. They also are an approved DC DDA Medicaid Waiver provider of prevocational habilitation, independent habilitation and supported employment. The Art and Drama Therapy Institute, Inc. (ADTI) is a medically supervised, therapeutic day treatment center for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. ADTI is located in an economically deprived part of Northeast Washington, D.C., less than three miles from The White House. Its innovative approach to the care and treatment of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities through the use of art, music, movement, and drama therapies, along with innovative behavior management techniques, has been hailed by the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation and The Washington Post as “a national model.” ADTI is home to the Therapeutic Noh Theater, directed by Master Teacher, Dr. Sirkku M. Sky Hiltunen. In addition, ADTI has built its own authentic Keiko Komatsubara Noh Stage—the first of only three (3) in the United States. Dr. M. “Muggy Do” Dickinson, is the Founder and Producer of ADTI’s Inspirational Choir and Moroccan Ensemble, whose CD received two nominations for a Grammy. ADTI provides job placement and supported employment services. Work Opportunities Unlimited, Inc. provides supported employment services that include support services, individual placements, benefit planning and asset management, vocational evaluation, situational assessments, and job readiness and job placement services. Their Career Services Team works with both the Rehabilitation Services Administration and the Developmental Disabilities Administration. Goodwill of Greater Washington provides work adjustment training, supported employment and job placement services for adults with disabilities. For over 75 years, Goodwill of Greater Washington has provided vocational services and employment to individuals with disabilities and disadvantage. Goodwill works closely with local employers to develop programs that prepare people for jobs in a wide variety of industries. In addition to formal classroom training, Goodwill prepares clients for permanent jobs through a combination of supported, temporary or transitional employment at a Goodwill facility or in the community. Global Business and Management Solutions provides work adjustment training, supported employment and job placement services for adults with disabilities. They also offer job training and support to employers. SOC Enterprises provides job placement and supported employment. SOC’s employment and rehabilitation services assist, empower and support individuals with disabilities to achieve employment, independence and integration in the workplace and in the community. SOC’s comprehensive rehabilitative services promote and increase self-sufficiency, quality of life and/or occupational skill development. RCM of Washington provides job placement services for adults with significant disabilities. They also provide community living services and supports, and individualized planning that assists people in achieving goals they set for themselves. Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind helps people who are blind or visually impaired in the greater Washington region to overcome the challenges of vision loss. Their work enables people of all ages who are blind or visually impaired to remain independent, active and productive in society. Their programs and services include adaptive technology, professional and career services training, low vision services, rehabilitation, counseling, children’s services, independent living and older adult programs. Innovative Concepts is a new agency providing supported employment services to DDS/RSA consumers. Marriott Foundation Bridges from School to Work develops and supports mutually beneficial job placements to meet the workforce needs of local employers and the vocational goals of young people with disabilities. The Foundation was established to enhance employment opportunities for young people with disabilities. Their services include transition planning, career preparation support, job placement and follow-along services.

This screen was last updated on Oct 31 2012 10:27AM by sadcbachandm

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services: The Administration’s Supported Employment program (SE) for persons with persistent mental illness utilizes an evidenced-based approach to help individuals with the most significant disabilities to secure, retain, or regain competitive employment in an integrated setting that pays minimum or better wages, and provides benefits. Supported Employment services are individualized and include, but are not limited to: • Counseling and guidance • Job coaching (on–the-job training) • Rapid job search and placement • Short-term training • Follow-along (unlimited supports) • Development of natural supports. The Administration coordinates its Supported Employment services through partnerships with DDS’s Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and the Department of Mental Health (DMH). These partners have worked together to develop a cadre of community based providers with expertise in serving persons diagnosed with developmental disabilities and persons diagnosed with serious mental illness. DDS/RSA and DDA have continued to establish Human Care Agreements with additional supported employment providers for who serve people with developmental disabilities. The Evidenced-Based Practice (EBP) in supported employment for persons with persistent mental illness is a model that emphasizes employment as an alternative to other models; it has been adopted by the Administration. The model allows the Administration to make supported employment services accessible to individuals with a lack of job readiness, chronic substance abuse, a history of violent behavior, minimal intellectual capacity and/ or symptoms of a mental illness. The Administration continues to improve and strengthen its partnerships with the Department of Mental Health (DMH) and the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) to maximize the delivery of supported employment services for individuals with significant disabilities and to improve competitive employment outcomes for its shared consumers. As the program progresses, the Administration continues its role on the Interagency Committee on Supported Employment (ICSE) reviewing DDA consumers being considered for supported employment. The ICSE, comprised of DDA, DMH and the Administration, is working to increase the number of referrals for supported employment. The Administration’s supported employment staff continues to streamline the application process to ensure that notifications of appointments, eligibility determinations, and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) are completed in accordance with federal requirements. Long term follow-along services for consumers are provided by DDA and DMH. DDS/DDA administers a Medicaid Home and Community Based waiver, which includes long term supports for consumers with developmental disabilities in Supported Employment as well as an array of other services, such as residential, transportation, and homemaker services that may be required to support an individual. DMH provides on-going support through its core mental health agencies. Six (6) private non-profit organizations (Anchor Mental Health; Community Connections, Inc.; Deaf-Reach, Inc.; Green Door; Pathways to Housing; and Psychiatric Center Chartered Inc.) are providing people with persistent mental illness with Evidenced Based Supported Employment. Seventeen (17) providers (Goodwill of Greater Washington; Arc of DC, Inc.; Creative Options & Employment, Inc.; National Children’s Center, Inc.; Pride Industries; Project ReDirect, Inc.; St. John’s Community Services, Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Institute; RCM of Washington; SOC Enterprises; New Life; Innovative Concepts; Global Business and Management Solutions; Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind; Capital Hill Supportive Services Programs, Inc.; Art & Drama Therapy Institute; and Work Opportunities Unlimited), provide supported employment services that include, but are not limited to, work adjustment training, job coaching, and job placement services. Plansfor distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds Disability of Individuals Number to be Served % Number to be Rehabilitated Supported Employment Model Projected Funding Mental Illness 295 70% 70 Job Coaching Evidenced-Based Model 150,000.00 Cognitive Disabilities 71 17% 13 Job Coaching Supported Employment 50,000.00 Traumatic Brain Injury 29 7% 3 Job Coaching 70,000.00 Other 25 6% 5 Job Coaching 30,000.00 TOTAL 420 100% 91 $300,000.00

This screen was last updated on Oct 31 2012 10:27AM by sadcbachandm

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

The Administration maintains annual employee profiles within the DDS Office of Human Capital. This office tracks and documents counselor completion of college course and in-service training credits needed to earn and/or maintain CRC certification. In addition, the Office of Human capital provides information to supervisors, counselors and support staff on relevant training opportunities to enhance service delivery to our customers. The Adminstration is pursuing several means of insuring staff are continuously informed of their current CRC status and remaining need, including but not limited to check-ins with the Office of Human Capital and dashboarding software. During FY13, DC RSA plans on increasing the emphasis on the recruitment and retention of qualified VR staff. The total number of personnel employed by the Administration in the provision of providing vocational rehabilitation service is. The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Counselor total number is 36. The total number of support staff for VR counselors is 10. Total estimated population served to date is 7400 individuals with disabilities. The average counselor/person served ratio currently is 206:1.However, the current number of active cases in the system is approximately 3500, for an average caseload size of 97 cases/counselor. The agency plans to implement an internal monitoring process to ensure counselor caseloads do not exceed 150:1. Due to the currently low caseload size, DC RSA is not seeking to hire counselors for 3 of its vacancies at this time. However, if caseloads increase larger than expected, DC RSA will recruit counselors as data suggests. B. Number of personnel currently needed by the agency to provide vocational services by personnel category The total number of personnel vacancies in positions currently needed by the Administration to provide VR Services VR Administrator: 1 Supervisors: 2 Counselors: 0 Support staff: 1 During FY12, counselor attrition was met with an aggressive hiring strategy and, at present, DC RSA has enough counselors to maintain an average caseload under 120 for the next year. DC RSA also has a supervisor vacancy and a VR administrator vacancy. DC RSA is aggressively recruiting for those vacancies. DC RSA is also seeking to hire another supervisor so that each supervisor can keep a low number of direct reports. We believe 6 counselors per supervisor is an appropriate ratio at this time. C. Projections of the number of personnel, by personnel category The estimate of the number of persons needed by the agency to provide VR services over the next five years is based on the estimate of the number of persons expected to retire or leave the agency with the next five years. Prior year attrition, which was high, factors into the projection. STAFF PROGRAM ATTRITION RETIREMENT 2 Supervisors VR 1 1 10 VR Counselors VR 4 4 7 Rehab Assistants VR 0 0 At this time, there is one (1) individual in a supervisory position and four (4) vocational rehabilitation counselors planning for retirement in the next five (5) years. A total of 10 staff are expected to retire or leave the field. Several current staff members are completing courses and course requirements to sit for the CRC. The Administration continues its vigorous recruitment efforts to attract CRC’s and prepare current VR staff to become certified. 20 VRCs are eligible to sit for the CRCC and that the remaining 17 have their CRC already.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 VR Counselor 40 3 8
2 Rehabilitation Assistant 7 1 0
3 Rehabilitation Supervisor 6 2 2
4 VR Administrator 1 1 0
5 VR Services Manager 1 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

Currently, one (1) VR counselor is enrolled in the Master’s Program at The George Washington University in rehabilitation counseling. Three (3) VR counselors have been enrolled in core courses that will prepare them to sit for the CRC. All 3 will be taking the CRC exam this year. The Administration is also engaging in vigorous recruitment to fill the current VR counselor vacancies with people with their CRC or who will be able to site for the CRC exam. All 36 VR Counselors have Master’s Degrees. C. Number of students who graduated during the prior year, by personnel category and certification or licensure. The DDS/RSA had 1 students graduate with a Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling from one of the above cited institutions in fiscal year 2011.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 The George Washington University 4 4 0 1
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

The Administration recently began recruiting counselors at the desired grade 12 pay level, the highest grade level for a rehabilitation counselor. Applicants at this level must have completed a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling with at least two (2) years of experience and CRC. Last year, the Administration formally established a recruitment plan to address the hiring of a sufficient number of vocational rehabilitation counselors within DDS/RSA. Current recruitment efforts include (1) posting vacancy announcements on the D.C. Office of Personnel website, and (2) posting vacancy announcements at community programs and through professional organizations, (3) visiting classrooms and faculty at universities, and (4) increasing its use of interns and volunteers. RSA hired 7 new counselors during FY12 to fill vacancies using this strategy, and currently has 3 interns from local universities. The recruitment plan consists of two major goals: Goal 1: Expand recruitment efforts Objective 1.1 Contact graduate school programs and develop relationships with the program chairs. Maintain appropriate contact information to mail notices of job openings. Objective 1.2 Schedule attendance at job fairs at colleges and universities Objective 1.3 Develop opportunities for paid and non-paid internships with colleges and universities Objective 1.4 Participate in research projects, classroom visits, and other activities to raise DCRSA’s profile with the above institutions and therefore increase access to potential counselors. Goal 2: Increase retention efforts Objective 2.1 Continue DDS/RSA new counselor orientation program Objective 2.2 Increase opportunities for professional growth through increased opportunities for continuous learning through in-service training and workshops Objective 2.3 Expand opportunities for employee recognition DDS/RSA is still in the process of formalizing an onboarding program with several weeks of prescribed activities to acculturate new staff to DDS as well as to provide the training needed to effectively utilize the case management system, understand the organizational structure, and develop an understanding of the DC population of job-seekers at large and the subpopulation of job-seekers with disabilities. DDS/RSA is implementing a 12 session supervisor training “boot camp” in the summer of 2012 that will help supervisors support counselors and other staff through prevailing practices in management. This management training should help ease morale concerns amongst both supervisors and their subordinate staff and serve to attenuate counselor attrition. In addition, the “boot camp” will allow DDS to further discern the specific professional development needs that are particular to supervisors, and will provide training as appropriate and necessary. DDS provides an annual awards event that celebrates employee success. However, DDS/RSA will be expanding this recognition to monthly and quarterly events as well. Customer service, strong counseling, and teamwork will be emphasized during 2013. The Administration will also solicit bids from training firms both within the rehabilitation counseling community and with other training agencies that have been successful in training public employees. By “casting a wide net” for potential trainers, The Administration anticipates being able to provide a wider variety of necessary trainings as the data about training needs presents itself. For example, performance management training will be conducted for counselors if the principles and practices of performance management need to be inculcated in counselors to insure they adopt appropriate behaviors under this management philosophy. The Administration encompasses a uniquely diverse staff. Currently, it has 15 bilingual staff. We are continuing to expand our outreach to attract employees proficient in Spanish and sign language and all languages served by the District of Columbia and covered entities identified by the D.C. Office of Human Rights. Languages in which current staff is bilingual include French, Spanish, Ibo, American Sign Language (ASL), Thai, Korean, Japanese, and Mandarin.

 

(1) Standards consistent with nationally or state approved certification The Administration bases its personnel standards for VR counselors on the degree needed to meet the national CRC requirements through CRCC. New hires as a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor must have a master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or Counseling. To-date, all of our counseling staff has master’s degrees. We have approximately 20 counselors who can sit for the CRCC examination. (2) Strategies to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet the standards ASME Local 2401, the counselors’ collective bargaining unit, as well as all counseling staff, have been notified and given their CSPD letter and have been asked to return their letters to the Office of Human Capital with their plan to pursue certification. The Administration has established and continues to implement the following process to assist counselors to meet CSPD requirements: 1. The Administration will pay for 3 credit hours a semester including books for on-line or classroom courses. 2. The Administration will pay the one-time cost of the CRC examination. 3. The Administration will allot hours during the work day for staff to attend training. 4. After negotiation with a university offering the rehabilitation counseling program, the Administration will arrange to offer courses on site. (3) Plan for retraining , recruitment and hiring of personnel (A) Specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel Agency jobs are listed on the D.C. Department of Human Resources website. The Administration currently collaborates with The George Washington University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The Administration has hosted interns from both universities and has recruited numerous staff from both of these rehabilitation counseling programs. The Agency is currently seeking to strengthen relationships with Virginia Commonwealth University and other universities offering degrees in rehabilitation counseling. The Administration will assist counselors with Master’s degrees in taking core courses that will allow them to sit for the CRC exam. In addition, the Administration will encourage staff to enroll in Master’s degree programs in rehabilitation counseling. The Administration will assist staff with 3 credit hours per semester and pay for staff to sit for the CRC examination. Additionally, the Administration has launched outreach activities in the community as well as at vocational training programs, colleges and universities to attract young professionals interested in embarking on a career in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling. B.Time frames to meet the standards The Administration notified counselors by letter of the CSPD requirement in March, 2010. The labor union was notified of the federal requirements. All staff must complete CSPD requirements by October 1, 2015. The Administration will implement incremental time frames to ensure that all staff who pledge to complete university programs can do so before the deadline. Follow-up contact will be made with each counselor on an individual basis to formalize the proposed training plan and checklist of required college courses based on the formal analysis of their transcripts from the selected university program. As of October 1, 2015, any remaining VR counselor who does not meet the CSPD requirement can no longer perform the duties of a “qualified rehabilitation counselor.” C. Procedures for evaluating progress in hiring and retraining personnel 1. Finalize and clarify any remaining issues with Human Resources and the local union 2. Finalize review of counselor transcripts and initiate follow-up contact with counselors to develop a formalized training plan. 3. Clarify procedures for requesting training with all staff. 4. Clarify responsibilities of designated staff within the Office of Vocational Supports related to monitoring and evaluating CSPD performance for all employees. 5. Maintain up-to-date records of training activities. 6. Complete annual training plans on all staff. Annually, all DDS/RSA staff receives an e-performance evaluation from their immediate supervisor. The employee will update the training plan along with their supervisor as part of e-performance reviews. The Office of Human Capital will track receipt of the plans and monitor compliance. D. Identification of initial minimum requirements (1) Standards consistent with nationally or state approved certification The Administration bases its personnel standards for VR counselors on the degree needed to meet the national CRC requirements through CRCC. New hires as a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor must have a master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or Counseling. To-date, all of our counseling staff has master’s degrees. Currently, 20 counselors are certified. 11 are currently able to sit for the CRC. 3 Staff are not yet eligible, but all are taking certification courses. of Certified Rehabilitation Counselors of Counselors eligible to sit for the CRC of Counselors staff with Master Degrees of staff with Bachelor Degrees There are: 20 - Certified Rehabilitation Counselors 5 - Supervisors 2 - QA Monitor 4 - Administrators/Managers 1 – Assessment Specialist 11 All 36 Counselors have Master degrees 0 (2) Strategies to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet the standards ASME Local 2401, the counselors’ collective bargaining unit, as well as all counseling staff, have been notified and given their CSPD letter and have been asked to return their letters to the Office of Human Capital with their plan to pursue certification. The Administration has established and continues to implement the following process to assist counselors to meet CSPD requirements: 1. The Administration will pay for 3 credit hours a semester including books for on-line or classroom courses. 2. The Administration will pay the one-time cost of the CRC examination. 3. The Administration will allot hours during the work day for staff to attend training. 4. After negotiation with a university offering the rehabilitation counseling program, the Administration will arrange to offer courses on site. (3) Plan for retraining , recruitment and hiring of personnel (A) Specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel Agency jobs are listed on the D.C. Department of Human Resources website. The Administration currently collaborates with The George Washington University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The Administration has hosted interns from both universities and has recruited numerous staff from both of these rehabilitation counseling programs. The Agency is currently seeking to strengthen relationships with Virginia Commonwealth University and other universities offering degrees in rehabilitation counseling. The Administration will assist counselors with Master’s degrees in taking core courses that will allow them to sit for the CRC exam. In addition, the Administration will encourage staff to enroll in Master’s degree programs in rehabilitation counseling. The Administration will assist staff with 3 credit hours per semester and pay for staff to sit for the CRC examination. Additionally, the Administration has launched outreach activities in the community as well as at vocational training programs, colleges and universities to attract young professionals interested in embarking on a career in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling. B.Time frames to meet the standards The Administration notified counselors by letter of the CSPD requirement in March, 2010. The labor union was notified of the federal requirements. All staff must complete CSPD requirements by October 1, 2015. The Administration will implement incremental time frames to ensure that all staff who pledge to complete university programs can do so before the deadline. Follow-up contact will be made with each counselor on an individual basis to formalize the proposed training plan and checklist of required college courses based on the formal analysis of their transcripts from the selected university program. As of October 1, 2015, any remaining VR counselor who does not meet the CSPD requirement can no longer perform the duties of a “qualified rehabilitation counselor.” C. Procedures for evaluating progress in hiring and retraining personnel 1. Finalize and clarify any remaining issues with Human Resources and the local union 2. Finalize review of counselor transcripts and initiate follow-up contact with counselors to develop a formalized training plan. 3. Clarify procedures for requesting training with all staff. 4. Clarify responsibilities of designated staff within the Office of Vocational Supports related to monitoring and evaluating CSPD performance for all employees. 5. Maintain up-to-date records of training activities. 6. Complete annual training plans on all staff. Annually, all DDS/RSA staff receives an e-performance evaluation from their immediate supervisor. The employee will update the training plan along with their supervisor as part of e-performance reviews. The Office of Human Capital will track receipt of the plans and monitor compliance. D. Identification of initial minimum requirements The desired minimum state requirement for the Administration is a Master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling and having a CRC or being CRC eligible. If, after extensive recruitment efforts, the Administration is unable to find acceptable candidates meeting the desired qualifications, new hires will be limited to candidates with Master’s degrees in counseling, special education, social work or one of the 13 human service categories recognized by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification under Category R. A condition of employment will require the candidate to enroll in an approved graduate program in rehabilitation counseling with the goal of obtaining a Master’s degree and CRC certification. The agency will pay a minimum of three credit hours per semester. E. plans for training staff who do not meet the established standards DC RSA will not hire staff who do not meet the established standards for sitting the CRC moving forward.

 

(1) System of Staff Development with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology. Over the last three years, supervisors and staff have received intensive training, attended conferences and received incentives to enhance their knowledge of best practices for quality service delivery. Training received through TACE at The George Washington University included supported employment and independent living, ethics and VR case management. Additional training included: 1. Employment Issues in Multiple Sclerosis: Implications of Adult Onset Disabilities 2. Independent Living: Indentifying IL vs. VR Cases 3. Part 1: Medical Aspects of Psychiatric Disabilities 4. Part 2: Medical Aspects of Psychiatric Disabilities 5. Ethics in the Real World 6. Medical Aspects of Disabilities/Neurological Conditions 7. Window-Eyes Training 8. Cost Participation Regulation Training 9. Ethical Workplace Culture and Rehabilitation Counseling Practice 10. George Washington University’s 12th Annual Rehabilitation Counseling Symposium 11. Social networking Ethics and Best Practices 12. Case management information system: Libera System 7 database training 13. Secondary transition workshop 14. Documentation training 15. Disability awareness conference 16. City-wide transition workgroup training 17. MRA DORS training conference 18. COTR training 19. Employer contact training 20. Mini-training on informed choice/eligibility 21. Mini-training on job development 22. Supervisory training 23. Asset development for people with disabilities summit 24. Independent living/Supported Living training 25. National Association of Convenience Stores training 26. Policy training 27. Phase II: Case Management training 28. Phase III: Case Management training 29. Annual CSAVR Meeting and Training sessions 30. MD Division of Rehabilitation Services-Scaling the Heights of Excellence 31. CSUN Annual Conference 32. ILLOWA AHEAD Regional Conference 33. National Transition Community of Practice Meeting 34. National Rehabilitation Association (NRA) Convention 35. ASPE National Conference 36. American Council for Blind Conference 37. National Federation of the Blind Conference 38. National Association of the Deaf (NAD) 50th Biennial Conference 39. Regional disability meeting for SSA Supervisors in Philadelphia 40. DCRSA Regulation Training: Review of Regulation Requirements 41. DCRSA Regulation Training: Strategies to Improve Employment Outcomes 42. Overview of Ethics 43. Project SEARCH summer training institute 44. Project SEARCH annual conference The Administration counselors underwent intensive training with training consultant, Barbara Lewis, a certified rehabilitation counselor from August of 2009 through February 2010. All aspects of the vocational rehabilitation process were covered in the training including case management, caseload management, vocational assessment, eligibility and IPE development, job placement and development. The training was approved through the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification. Six (6) intensive 2 day phases of training were conducted covering the federal regulations, ethics for rehabilitation counselors, policy and procedures and applied aspects of the VR process. Objectives of the training were multi-faceted addressing issues such as state and federal regulations, informed choice, transition services, supported employment eligibility, Order of Selection, case file documentation, intermediate objectives and service delivery coordination with employers. Additionally, the Administration launched outreach activities in the community as well as vocational training programs and colleges and universities to attract young professionals interested in embarking on a career in vocational rehabilitation counseling. Administrative staff within the Office of Human Capital have been charged with the responsibility to seek out, plan and coordinate on-site and offsite training opportunities for staff on an on-going basis. Additionally, the agency has launched outreach activities in vocational training programs and colleges and universities to attract young professionals interested in embarking in a career in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling. While none of the trainings listed above focused on training, DC RSA participants were exposed, through trainings such as the NRA convention, to rehabilitation technology. In order to ensure training on rehabilitation technology is taken by staff, DC RSA will be developing a closer relationship with the DC Assistive Technology Center in order to provide staff with more exposure to rehabilitation technology and also to provide staff with training in applicable technologies, particularly in support of students transitioning to postsecondary education. In FY13, DC RSA will be providing further training on-site through contracted vendors to continue and improve the counseling practice of the professionals who have been on staff, as well as to ensure that newly hired staff, many of whom have recently graduated from Master’s programs, possess the requisite knowledge, skills, and abilities both in the core skills of their field but also to better utilize our case management system and other management tools needed to successfully execute their job duties. 2. Acquisition and dissemination of knowledge. Currently, DC RSA is rebuilding its procedures for disseminating training knowledge. The training institute in DDS keeps data on counselors who have attended trainings. However, at present, the pre- and post-training evaluations and reports on trainings and conferences attended are not yet at a sufficient level of rigor. During FY13, DC RSA will be developing additional professional development opportunites and resources. Knowledge dissemination will be a priority.

 

The Administration will continue to employ personnel who are able to communicate in the native languages of applicants for services and clients who have limited English speaking ability. The Administration provides accommodations for special communication needs such as interpreters, specialized services and materials for individuals who are deaf, blind or deaf-blind. Sign language skills are considered a minimum qualification for positions providing services to persons who are deaf and/or hearing impaired. The Administration’s services population continues to expand because of increased outreach efforts. The agency seeks to serve individuals with disabilities from the six languages identified by the D.C. Office of Human Rights. The languages include Spanish, Chinese, French, Vietnamese, Korean and Amharic. The agency will continue emphasize the bilingual capacity of staff in recruitment efforts. The Agency is in compliance with the Language Access Act. The bilingual capacity of the DDS/RSA staff is as follows: Staff who speak Spanish 4 Counselors/VR Specialists 1 Management Analyst 1 Supervisory VR Specialist 1 Program Manager 1 Rehabilitation Assistant 1 Sign Language Interpreter Staff who are fluent in American Sign Language 1 ASL Interpreter 2 Managers/Supervisory VR Counselors 1 Program Monitor 2 Counselors/VR Specialist 1 Program Analyst Staff who speak French 2 Counselors/VR Specialists Staff who speak Ibo 1 Counselor/VR Specialist 1 Clerical assistant Staff who speak Thai 1 Counselor/VR Specialist Within DDS, in the offices shared with RSA, there are additional staff who speak some of the languages above as well as staff who speak Haitian Creole, Telugu, Hindi, German, Japanese, Yoruba, Mandarin, Portuguese and Kru.

 

The Administration staff receives training on a continuous basis. The Administration is fully committed to providing effective, coordinated transition services. The agency has created a Youth and Transition Unit that currently employs four (4) transition specialists and four (4) vocational rehabilitation counselors. The transition specialists received specific training on transition services from Mrs. Barbara Lewis, training consultant and staff from the TACE. A manger recently attended the Annual National Community of Practices in Transition Conference in North Carolina. DDS/RSA staff participates actively on DC’s Community of Practice on Transition, coordinated by the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE). DDS/RSA staff also remains active in Partners in Transition activities, which included on-going activities with DCPS, OSSE and other public and private partners who work with youth with disabilities in the District of Columbia. Staff from DDS/RSA and DCPS also engages in joint training, which included private employment service providers, on transition services for the students in Project SEARCH. Furthermore, the DDS/RSA Deputy Director, hired in November of 2011, has prior experience working in DCPS’ Office of Special Education. This will facilitate increased coordination increasing the leadership’s knowledge of transition and other IDEA-related topics.

This screen was last updated on Oct 31 2012 10:27AM by sadcbachandm

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Attachment 4.11(a) Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports (Sections 101(a) (15), 105(c) (2) and 625(b) (2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h) (2), .29, and 363.11(b) Attachment 4.11(a) documents the assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the District of Columbia The FY2010-2013 CSNA will be completed annually (in 2013) and it will identify and address the VR service needs of the five required populations noted in Attachment 4.11(a). The FY 2014 State Plan will include an assessment of needs for all five populations for the outstanding CSNA periods of 2008-2010 and 2010-2013. The next CSNA cycle will be 2014-2016 and the identification of VR service needs by population will be reported in the FY 2016 state plan. DC RSA will consult with its TACE Region 3 colleagues and TACE staff to ensure the implementation of an effective CSNA. The strategies used to obtain information and identify needs will include, but not be limited to: (a) public forums, (b) focus groups, (c) studies of demographic, health, and other data, (d) customer satisfaction surveys, and (e) surveys of vendors. DCRSA developed its State Plan based on needs assessment data provided by consumers at various points during their interactions with the DCRSA services system, from intake to closure, as described herein. This includes feedback to VR counselors and other RSA staff; input from hearings, forums, and State Rehabilitation Council meetings; a 2012 Satisfaction Survey; and an ongoing analysis of complaints and other customer service feedback that comes into DC government through any source. The last available CSNA for DC RSA is the FY2008 CSNA, which was conducted with the SRC and the DSU; when the current State Director began his tenure in November, 2011, the SRC had not been active for over a full year The Director of the Department on Disability Services, in concert with the Mayor’s office, recruited and obtained appointments for 14 new members for the SRC and 1 reappointment. The members were sworn in on December 6, 2011. During FY12, the DC SRC met bi-monthly, beginning 12/8/11. SRC has developed new draft bylaws, and has developed sub-committees. The dates of the meetings are as follows: 12/8/11, 1/11/12 (training), 3/8/12, 5/10/12, 7/12/12, and 9/13/12. The Administration and the SRC discussed the lack of a current CSNA beginning at the 12/8/11 meeting and have prioritized the development of a new CSNA during FY13. This new CSNA will be jointly conducted with the SRC. Currently, DDS’ Director of Procurement is working with DCRSA to develop a system for maintaining a functional SRC with the resources it requires so that the CSNA and other SRC duties can be fulfilled annually as required. Key efforts to maintain this SRC will be to develop a process for staggering SRC terms over 3 years instead of having all terms expire during the same year, which severely inhibits the continuity of the SRC. In addition to making the stabilization of the SRC a priority, the Department on Disability Services, during FY12, created a State Office of Disability Administration (SODA) to provide oversight and support for both the DSU and the SRC. There are 4 FTEs in the SODA. Staff have has been detailed with core job responsibilitieswith the DSU and the SRC to ensure the effective functioning of the DSU/SRC partnership and to support state reporting requirements. With these staff as a support, the DSU and the DCSRC will develop project plans and other management tools to ensure that the DSU is timely completing SRC and DSU activities as required in 34 CFR 361.17. What follows is a review of the needs identified in the 2008 CSNA and evidence from FY2012 that those needs are still present. As a result of the analysis of the findings reported in the 2008 District-Wide Comprehensive Needs Assessment and comparison with the existing data and sources listed above, the Administration validated the need to enhance vocational rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities in several areas. The areas of need identified were (1) increased emphasis on employment or on the execution of service delivery strategies geared toward achievement of quality employment outcomes, (2) strengthening RSA’s working relationship with the workforce investment system to better respond to the employment needs of individuals with disabilities, (3) increased collaboration with both Centers for Independent Living (CIL) and community rehabilitation programs (CRP) to promote the expansion and establishment of CIL and CRP services in designated areas of need in the District of Columbia, (4) expanded evidence-based supported employment to the entire state, and (5) addressing the perception of some residents that vocational rehabilitation services are inaccessible to African-American consumers. (1) Increased emphasis on employment. During the State Plan public meeting, several clients complained of services taking too long and the DSU’s counselor retention efforts being ineffective. For example, one consumer complained of having over 8 counselors in the last 5 years. The number of employment outcomes for FY12 also did not exceed 659; another indicator that this need is still present. (2) Integration with the Workforce system. DC RSA continues to work to integrate with DOES, but more work is needed. DC RSA does station staff at the DC Works! One Stops, but clear data on intake conducted on worksites is not present. Therefore, DC RSA still has a need for integration, as referral data and data on the number of intakes provided on site is not present. (3) Increased collaboration with the DC Centers for Independent Living and CRP services. The data from RSA-704 Part I for IL program indicates a decrease in the number of individuals served from 2010 to 2011: from 85 consumers to 54 consumers served. (4) Expanded evidence-based supported employment to the entire state. Referrals to evidence-based supported employment vendors during 2011-2012 numbered 150 referrals. However, the total number of referrals to vendors was 675: only 22% of all referrals when the target for mental health referrals was 70%. Moreover, staff reported a decrease in the number of referrals for EBSE during Q4 of FY12. (5) Perception of services as inaccessible to African Americans. The majority (52.2%, 2010 census data) of DC RSA’s cases are for African American consumers. In FY11, the monthly eligibility timeliness was 69% and the monthly IPE timeliness was 80%: the lack of timeliness alone demonstrates that customer service challenges continue to pose a problem, and that the perception of service inaccessibility to all consumers in general and African Americans in particular cannot be proven inaccurate. Annual Update Results of Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of the Rehabilitation Needs of Individuals with Disabilities and the Need to Establish, Develop or Improve Community Rehabilitation Programs The Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration, along with the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council (“Administration” or “DCSRC”) contracted with Dan Hopkins & Associates, Inc. (DHA) in fiscal year 2008 to conduct its three year comprehensive statewide needs assessment. The 2012 state plan updated the assessment in four sections: (i) individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services, (ii) individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program, (iii) individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system. (iv.) Additionally, the assessment provided information stressing the Administration’s need to establish, develop, or improve its relationship with community rehabilitation programs within the District of Columbia. As a result of the analysis of the findings reported in the 2008 District-Wide Comprehensive Needs Assessment, the Administration validated the need to enhance vocational rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities in several areas. The areas of need identified were (1) increased emphasis on employment or on the execution of service delivery strategies geared toward achievement of quality employment outcomes, (2) strengthening RSA’s working relationship with the workforce investment system to better respond to the employment needs of individuals with disabilities, (3) increased collaboration with both Centers for Independent Living (CIL) and community rehabilitation programs (CRP) to promote the expansion and establishment of CIL and CRP services in designated areas of need in the District of Columbia, (4) expanded evidence-based supported employment to the entire state, and (5) addressing the perception of some residents that vocational rehabilitation services are inaccessible to African-American consumers. These are all areas in which we continue to focus efforts for quality improvement and infrastructure development. During FY12, DC RSA increased service delivery strategies geared toward the achievement of quality employment outcomes. A dashboard was developed so that supervisors can increase the timeliness of services and can prioritize the necessary “next steps” for their teams. Management structures were put in place at the team level to focus on removing a backlog of untimely eligibilities and plans. Since the inception of these structures, monthly RSA has increased 15 percentage points on eligibilities (from 60% to 75%) and 20 percentage points on IPEs (from 73% to 93%). DC RSA has also created new relationships with CRP’s to expand services to residents receiving IL services, and will continue to find cost-effective means to grow services in FY13. A partnership with the Department of Mental Health and CRPs that specialize in services to people with mental health disabilities has increased the availability of timely referrals for evidence-based supported employment, as noted elsewhere in this plan. (i)Results regarding individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services The Administration has increased its capacity to provide supported employment services in integrated work settings to persons with serious mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injuries. The Administration has increased the number of providers it contracts with 24. The Administration has an open Human Care Agreement solicitation to further enhance its capabilities in this area that is attracting new providers. The DDS/RSA continuesto work with the DC Department on Mental Health (DMH) to bolster DMH’s provider network’s ability to provide evidence-based supported employment services with plans to serve 295 DC residents with serious mental illness in FY 2013. DDS/RSA currently works with six (6) service providers from the Department of Mental Health who are using an Evidenced-based Supported Employment Services model (EBSE) to provide supported employment services to District of Columbia residents with severe mental illnesses. The Unit supervisor meets monthly with the DC Department of Mental Health to identify strategies that agencies can implement to improve their EBSE services. The EBSE model provides rapid services to consumers with co-occurring disorders, including drug us and long term mental illnesses. There is a treatment team to ensure these consumers have medication management and counseling support. The DC Department of Mental Health pays for the services of Job Club, Social Security benefits counseling and treatment team activities and coordination. Overall, the Administration placed 501 consumers in competitive employment in FY 2012 as successful Status 26 closures. The Administration has begun the expansion of Independent Living (IL) services for individuals with the most significant disabilities. The Administration, in collaboration with the SILC and DC Center for Independent Living, developed a three-year 2011-2013 State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) to address future goals and needs of consumers with significant disabilities who reside in the District of Columbia. The Administration has begun the expansion of Independent Living (IL) services for individuals with the most significant disabilities. The Administration, in collaboration with the SILC and DC Center for Independent Living, developed a three-year 2011-2013 State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) to address future goals and needs of consumers with significant disabilities who reside in the District of Columbia. The data reported in the U.S. Department of Education, Section 704 – Annual Performance Report Revision for State Independent Living Services Program (IL) document incremental progress in this area over the past year. In FY 2010, 85 people were served. Fourteen (14) consumers were closed successfully, reaching their Independent Living outcomes for FY2009. For FY 2010, thirty-five new people developed Independent Living Plans and three (3) completed all of the goals they set. However, substantial goals were achieved by consumers served. Specifically, numbers who achieved IL goals include self-advocacy/self-empowerment – 71; communication – 47; mobility/transportation – 52; community-based living – 48; educational – 54; vocational – 3; self-care – 70; information access/technology – 29; personal resource management – 32; and community/social participation – 59. In FY2011, 54 persons were served. 23 of those persons were new to the program and 31 were carried over from FY10. 2 of those persons completed all goals set. Those who achieved goals in 2011 included include self-advocacy/self-empowerment – 24; communication – 7; mobility/transportation – 15; community-based living – 0; educational – 0; vocational – 1; self-care – 14; information access/technology – 11; personal resource management – 15; and community/social participation – 9. At the beginning of 2011, the agency was without a Deputy Director and the agency was in transition, resulting in reduced agency capacity and impacting outcomes. Through the existing Human Care Agreement contract with the Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, IL skills training was provided to consumers with low vision or those who were legally blind or blind. For peer counseling, RSA consumers were referred to the DC Center for Independent Living (DCCIL), which runs several 6-week peer counseling training groups. Advocacy, information and referral services were provided in-house by the IL Unit staff assistant. At present, the IL Unit is increasing the number of CRP providers in order to expand the scope and reach of the IL services to district residents. Currently, DC RSA is seeking 3 additional CRP vendors. Other activities meant to increase the numbers of persons served and the quality of those services include developing a partnership with the District’s Office on Aging to increase the number of sites at which seniors are served, particularly focusing on providing services at preexisting senior sites. (ii) Results regarding individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program The Administration remains committed to providing outreach to unserved and underserved individuals and in seeking referrals from non-profit and for profit agencies serving minorities, owned or controlled by minorities and medical professionals who serve minority populations. As a result of enhanced outreach efforts, the Administration has been able to identify and provide VR services to more DC residents with disabilities. For FY 2012, the number of people applying for services at the end of the third quarter was 2416 , which represents another increase of over 15% over FY 2011. Furthermore the Administration substantially increased the number of consumers with an implemented Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), which resulted in an increase in individuals receiving employment and training related services. DDS/RSA Data for FY 2012 % Gender Male 47.3% Female 52.7% Total 100.0% Ethnic Group Am Indian/Alaskan 1.97% Asian 0.84% Black 79.60% Hispanic Origin 6.98% Pacific Islander 0.80% White 9.80% Not reported 0.01% Total 100.00% Recently released census data shows that one in five (5) DC residents live below the poverty line. Residents with disabilities are more likely to be low income than those without a disability. DC residents who have a disability are twice as likely to be low-income as those without a disability. Almost half of all DC residents with a disability are low income. (DC Fiscal Policy Institute, 2010) The Administration embarked on extensive outreach efforts during the FY2011 to expand services to minorities as well as underserved and unserved populations. During the past two years, the Administration placed counselors in over 20 outreach locations throughout the city, with an emphasis on sites with large underserved populations. Laptop computers and cell phones were purchased by the agency for the counselors at the designated sites so that they could link to the data systems at DDS/RSA. The Administration moved to 1125 15th Street, N.W. in September 2009, where it is co-located with the DC Developmental Disabilities Administration. The new location is approximately seven walking blocks from the White House, the major business district (K Street, NW), and two of the city’s largest hospitals (The George Washington University Hospital and Georgetown University Hospital), Chinatown, Dupont Circle, Foggy Bottom-Westend, Georgetown, Hillandale, Logan Circle, Mount Vernon Square, Shaw, and Sheridan Kalorama neighborhoods. Several notable local attractions are located in Ward Two, including the Charles Sumner Museum, Georgetown Library, George Washington University Library, Watergate, and Haines Point. The Administration can be reached by several major bus lines and the following Red Line and Orange/Blue Line Metro train lines; From the Orange/Blue Metro train line take the Orange/Blue line and get off at the McPherson Square Metro stop. Walk north 2 ½ blocks on 15th Street, NW From the Red Metro train line take the Red line and get off at the Farragut North Metro stop. Take the L Street exit. Turn left and walk East 3 ½ long blocks down L Street to 15th Street, NW. Cross the street, and walk to your left; 1125 15th Street, NW is in the middle of the block. Bus Lines to 1125-15th Street, NW For the bus line close to where you live, please call the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) on 202-637-7000 or go to www.wmata.com. Our counselors, transition specialists, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Unit Staff, and Blind and Visual Impaired Unit staff are assigned to the DDS/RSA location (1125 15th Street, NW) and deployed throughout the eight (8) wards of Washington, DC. The following is a listing outreach partners in Washington, DC in which DDS RSA staff have a presence. DC DDS/RSA OUTREACH LOCATIONS OUTREACH ORGANIZATION PARTNERS ADDRESS Salvation Army Harbor Lights Rehabilitation Center 2100 New York Av,NE Washington DC 20002 Unity Health Care Re-Entry Health Center 1602 Morris Rd,SE Washington, DC 20020 George Washington University Hospital Acute Rehabilitation Unit 900 23rd St, NW Washington, DC 20037 Aging and Disability Resource Center 1134 11th St,NW Washington DC 20001 N Street Village 1333 N St, NW, Washington, DC 20005 Department of Employment Services, DC Works! One-Stop Career Center, Northeast (formerly Franklin Street location) Bertie Backus Center, 5171 S. Dakota Ave. NE, Washington, DC 20017 Department of Employment Services, DC Works! One Stop Career Center, Northwest Frank D. Reeves Center, 14th and U Streets, NW, Washington, DC 20009 Department on Employment Services, DC Works Career Center, MLK Center, Southeast 3720 Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE, Washington, DC 20032 University of the District of Columbia 4200 Connecticut Avenue , Disability Resource Center, Building 44, Washington, DC 20008 Community College of the District of Columbia 801 North Capital Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002 DC Center for Independent Living 1400 Florida Avenue, Washington, DC 20002 National Rehabilitation Hospital 102 Irving Street, NW, Washington, DC 20010 DC Superior Court 500 Indiana Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001 Court Services & Offender Supervision Agency 633 Indiana Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20004 Department of Veterans Affairs/Veterans Hospital 50 Irving Street, NE, Washington, DC 20422 La Clinica del Pueblo 2831 15th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20009 Washington Hospital Center 1100 Irving Street, NW, Washington, DC 20010 Each member of the RSA Transition Team is assigned to all of the approximately 100 DC Schools in which transition-age youth are served (includes DCPS local schools, DC Public Charter Schools, and Nonpublic Schools where DCPS or a DC Public Charter School is the Local Education Agency responsible for the students. (iii) Results regarding individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system The Mayor of the District of Columbia appointed a representative of the Statewide Workforce Investment System to the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council, as mandated by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended and appointed a representative of DDS/RSA to serve on the Workforce Investment Council. A counselor is located and/or available to at each of the full-service DC Works! one-stop career centers in the District of Columbia, and at the Aging and Disability Resource Center. (b) Results regarding the Administration’s need to establish, develop, or improve its relationships with community rehabilitation programs within the District of Columbia The District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration Is continuing to enroll new CRPs into its system to broad the services and choices available to people with disabilities in DC. Primary services available to our consumers include VR work adjustment services, trial work experiences, supported employment, vocational assessment, benefits planning and analysis, and job placement. The Human Care Providers are working collaboratively with the Administration’s Business Relations Unit to provide job readiness training and supports to our consumers. The Administration has designated two (2) staff responsible for assuring the quality of services of the approved CRPs through monitoring, reviewing data, and identifying consumer needs. The Administration holds joint training with our new Human Care Agreement CRP partners to ensure our collaboration yields the desired results in supported employment, job placement, and career assessment services, leading to increased employment outcomes for consumers. Significant areas of focus are enhancing services available to individuals with developmental disabilities, chronic mental illness, acquired brain injury, deaf/hard of hearing, blind/vision impaired, transitioning youth, and Hispanic and Asian individuals with disabilities. Since FY11, the Administration moved from an hourly rate system to a milestone based system of payment for many of its services in order to reduce the administrative burdens on CRPs. As a result, less CRP time is spent performing paperwork and allowing them to take on more consumers or to serve the consumers they do serve more effectively. CUSTOMER SURVEY RESULTS AND COMMENTS The data reflected in the Statewide Satisfaction Survey conducted in September 2010 showed that 83% of consumers served were satisfied with the with the help they received from RSA staff; and ratings were 85% or higher on questions about being treated with respect, feeling that they were listened to, that the process was explained to them, that their counselor was easy to talk to, and that their counselor understood their needs. This is a marked improvement over last year, where 45% did not feel that their counselor understood their needs and felt that their interactions were unacceptable. Consumers who were not satisfied with the Administration suggested decreasing wait time in the reception area, more promptly returning telephone calls, and improved services. The 2012 Satisfaction Survey indicated that 94% of the people surveyed were satisfied with the services they received. Specific feedback has been incorporated in the process improvements that have been and will be implemented within DDS/RSA. During FY 2013, the Administration, in conjunction with the DC State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), will conduct another Statewide Needs Assessment in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations CFE (361.17). Working with the Council, the Administration will collect and analyze the data in order to ascertain consumer satisfaction with the vocational rehabilitation services provided and the employment outcomes achieved by the consumers. The conclusions and recommendations of this assessment will be incorporated into the Administration’s goals and priorities to improve services to persons with disabilities, and more effectively meet their needs. Specifically, in fiscal year 2013 the Administration will be working collaboratively with the Council to conduct a survey to determine the effectiveness of, and consumer satisfaction with: 1) the functions performed by the Administration; 2) the vocational rehabilitation services provided by the administration and other private and public entities responsible for providing vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under the Rehabilitation Act; and, 3) the employment outcomes achieved by eligible individuals receiving services under the Rehabilitation Act, including the availability of health and other employment benefits in connection with the employment outcomes. Since FY 2010, DCRSA has been implemented a vendor satisfaction survey for use by counselors with active consumers who recently completed training in a CRP vendor agency. Vendor report cards will be created to assist new consumers with program selection and the exercise of informed choice.

This screen was last updated on Oct 31 2012 10:27AM by sadcbachandm

The District of Columbia labor force data indicates that there are 396,111 working age residents . Of those who are of working age (16-64), 43,850 are estimated to have a disability, which represents 11.1%. Of those, 32.4% are estimated to be employed in full or part-time positions. Additionally, 21,608 are estimated to have an employment disability. • Source: U.S.Census Bureau, 2006 American Community Survey (factfinder.census.gov) The following chart shows the Title I and Title VI funds, estimated number of individuals to be served in the state fiscal year 2013 by priority category and the average cost of services.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Priority Category I Title I $8,679,000 3,900 $2,225
Priority Category II Title I $2,993,000 2200 $1,360
Priority Category III Title I $888,000 800 $1,110
Title VI Part B Title VI $300,000 300 $1,000
Totals   $12,860,000 7,200 $1,786

This screen was last updated on Oct 31 2012 10:27AM by sadcbachandm

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Goals and Priorities for the Vocational Rehabilitation and Supported Employment Program The Goals and priorities for the Vocational Rehabilitation and Supported employment program are set annually and are in response to both National and State issues, as mandated by Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. The focus of their goals and activities includes but are not limited to consumer satisfaction, statewide needs assessment, state plan and amendments, policy, extent/scope/effectiveness of services, interagency agreements, and District of Columbia employment programs. These goals were developed, reviewed, and approved by DC RSA and the SRC. Planned program goals to be accomplished by the DC Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration were based on agency performance on standards and indicators. Goal 1: Increase the number of employment outcomes with successful closures in the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan to 660, with priority given to those with significant and most significant disabilities. Baseline: FY2011: 659 (504 in FY2012) Goal 2: Improve the efficiency of RSA operations so that 90% of clients have a plan developed within 90 calendar days of eligibility determination by 09/30/13 and that 90% of clients have an eligibility determination within 60 days of application by 9/30/13. Baseline: FY2011: 53% Eligibility timeliness; 73% IPE timeliness Goal 3: Improve RSA’s overall customer service to individuals with disabilities, as evidenced by response to complaints within 5 business days and tracking/trending feedback related to customer satisfaction to managers on a monthly basis. Baseline: not tracked. Goal 4: Build and strengthen the capacity of DCRSA providers to provide quality VR by expanding the pool of available qualified employers by 5. Baseline: 2011: 23 CRP providers. Goal 5: Strengthen and expand existing collaboration and coordination of transition services to improve vocational, post-secondary employment and career opportunities for youths between the ages of 16-22 transitioning from school to work, jointly providing opportunities for at least 50 youth by 09/30/13. Baseline: 2011: 7 youth Goal 6: Provide specialized vocational rehabilitation and independent living services to individuals with blindness and visual impairments, expanding specialized independent living, transition, and technology services by 25%, to over 250 individuals by the end of FY13. Baseline: 2011 (200 individuals) Background: Over the last federal fiscal year, the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council experienced changes and challenges, welcomed an entirely new appointed Council on 12/06/11 , attended a comprehensive one-day orientation and training session conducted by consultants from The George Washington University Technical Assistance Continuing Education Center (TACE) regarding the purpose and structure of state rehabilitation councils, immersed itself in learning the operations of the state vocational rehabilitation agency and continued conducting business between its regular quarterly meetings. During this same time period, the DDS/Rehabilitation Services Administration has continued to experience changes and challenges as well, pursuing new opportunities and continuing to work to provide services for Washingtonians to assist them in obtaining quality employment outcomes. The Deputy Director and his leadership team has made significant strides in stabilizing an Administration that had experienced higher than usual levels of staff and leadership turnover during the past two years. The DDS/Rehabilitation Services Administration is rebounding. FY 2009 saw three major and pivotal transitions. The first was the relocation of the Administration to a centralized location within the Department on Disability Services; the second, the implementation of a new electronic case management system that allows its vocational rehabilitation counselors to better manage their caseloads and track caseload activity during the months and years to come and enables managers to assess program and manage performance; and, the third, the initiation of aggressive outreach to deepen the Administration’s collaborative relationships with their partners and the community at large. Location in the new centralized office space has enabled the sharing of resources and information. Additionally, the Administration has implemented other major initiatives aimed at improving outreach and services to consumers and broadening employment opportunities for people with disabilities over the next several years. In FY 2010, staff have become accustomed to using the new electronic case management system, and new Youth Transition and Business Relations Units have brought resources and focus on these two priority areas. See “Major Program Accomplishments” below. Council Purpose The purpose of the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council is to provide the District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration (DDS/RSA) with an external, consumer-oriented perspective. The Council advises DDS/RSA on the needs of Washingtonians with disabilities concerning programs, policy, services and other issues. They also collaborate with DDS/RSA to identify key challenges and opportunities; advise and assist in the preparation of the State Plan, including identification of challenges and opportunities, and the setting goals and priorities; and assess consumer satisfaction as it relates to the effectiveness of DDS/RSA’s programs and services. Mission Statement for the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council The responsibilities of the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council (DCSRC or “Council”) are defined in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. It is authorized to review, analyze and advise the DC Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration (DDS/RSA) on the performance of the Vocational Rehabilitation Program. In partnership with the Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration, the Council develops and reviews state goals and priorities, evaluates the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program, assists in the preparation of the annual State Plan to the Federal government, reviews customer satisfaction, and prepares and submits an annual report to the Mayor of the District of Columbia and U.S. Department of Education Commissioner on Rehabilitative Services on the status of the state vocational rehabilitation program. The Council, on behalf of the community it represents, reviews, analyzes, and advises the District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration (DDS/RSA) regarding the performance of its responsibilities. The Council represents a broad spectrum of individuals who are concerned with the vocational needs of people with disabilities and who support the objectives of the public vocational rehabilitation program in the District of Columbia. The Administration and the SRC have agreed that the priorities for FY13 will be to bid out and implement the statewide needs assessment required by the Rehabilitation Act, developing the policy and procedural changes needed within RSA to improve service consistency and outcomes, and improving the overall quality of the consumer experience with the Administration. The State Rehabilitation Counsel currently has over 16 members, with 5 members in renewal or in need of replacement on the Council. The Administration is working with the city government to fill these remaining vacancies. At the same time, every effort is made to provide a variety of avenues for public input whenever issues, concerns, or policy changes are considered. Four quarterly meetings are held at our District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Administration offices at 1125 15th Street, NW, Second Floor Conference Room and First Floor Training Room, Washington, D.C. 20005. The public hearing on the District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration 2011 State Plan was be held on June 15th,, 1:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. at the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), 600 Fifth Street, NW, First Floor Meeting Room. A notice was published in the D.C. Register, as required by law. The DDS/RSA VR program goals were jointly developed, jointly reviewed and agreed to by DDS/RSA and the SRC. Attachment 4.2(c) (Summary of Input and Recommendations of the State Rehabilitation Council, Response of the Designated State Unit, and Explanations for Rejection of Input or Recommendations) states the following regarding DDS/RSA goals for FY12: “Due to the recent reconstitution of District of Columbia’s State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) in November, 2011, and the changes in management of the District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA), both parties support the decision to only make minimal changes to the Proposed FY 2013 State Plan. Instead, we agree that our attention and energy needs to be focused on conducting the Comprehensive Statewide Needs Assessment and Consumer Satisfaction Surveys as mandated by the Rehabilitation Act.” The SRC also strongly recommended that RSA prioritize the following issues: (a) Comprehensive Needs Assessment, (b) improve the implementation of the case management system, (c) recruit and retain staff, (d) improve coordination with LEAs to increase transition outcomes, and (e) increase the use of adult basic education. Attachment 4.2(c) includes RSA’s responses to each of these items, as well as 10 other items, are included in that attachment. DC RSA. Major program accomplishments are: 1. DDS/RSA services were provided at its headquarters and locations throughout the city. These included multiple and single-employee outstations in one-stop career centers, high schools, and at various itinerant locations. Over 8,900 Washingtonians with disabilities received vocational rehabilitation services during FY 2011. Of these, 659 were placed into permanent jobs. 2. The Administration implemented additional data tracking systems in its case management system that allows its vocational rehabilitation counselors to better manage their case loads and track caseload activity, and managers to track outcomes. 3. The Youth and Transition Program is making progress through its partnership with the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) and the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) to identify high school youth with disabilities for employment or career related post secondary education/training/job placement. During FY 2010 and FY 2011, Youth Transition Program specialists and Rehabilitation Counselors operated in almost 100 local high schools. DDS/RSA also actively participated in DC’s Secondary Transition Community of Practice, working on systemic improvements for youth in transition across public and private agencies in the District of Columbia. 4. The Administration strengthened its Division of Services for the Blind to increase its outreach and vocational outcomes for individuals with low vision and blindness. Rehabilitation teachers have been hired and we are currently working to implement 3 new Human Care Agreements so that the older blind population can have services brought to them, instead of having to travel to services. 5. The Administration completed its third year of Project SEARCH in collaboration with DCPS. Sites include U.S. Department of Education, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the U.S. Department of Labor. 6. The Administration offered a variety of information sessions for youth with disabilities and their families, some of which were in collaboration with DCPS, staff from DC Works! One-Stop Career Centers, and Partners in Transition. 7. In partnership with DC’s Department of Employment Services, DC Works! One-Stop Career Centers, DDS/RSA submitted a successful grant application to receive a year of technical assistance on Universal Design in the workforce system so that these systems and services are more accessible to people with disabilities and others with employment barriers. Because of this project, both agencies are also receiving technical assistance on Ticket to Work. The Administration continues to pursue projects to strengthen the DOES partnership. Because of our partnership, referrals from (and to) DOES are rising. Additionally, major issues to be addressed: • Revise and update the District of Columbia regulations, as needed, to reflect federal mandated programs and services pursuant to the Rehabilitation Act, the Employment Opportunities Act, and the Workforce Investment Act. • Develop strategies to increase participation by District of Columbia residents in DC State Rehabilitation Council meetings and the State Plan public hearings. • Build the Administration’s capacity to work collaboratively with the business community to increase employers’ access to qualified workers with disabilities. • Improve accessibility of the annual report to the public. • Assess the Administration’s new locations accessibility to consumers, including easy access by public transportation. • Identify the best sites to place vocational rehabilitation counselors in the community. • Evaluate the anticipated impact on the state vocational rehabilitation program of the decrease in local funds for the Administration’s programs. • Work with the DC State Rehabilitation Council to update its bylaws. • Evaluate the possibility of conducting the State Plan hearing as one or more community forums rather than using a public hearing format. • Explore ways to assess and promote vendor quality and provide more information about service quality to consumers. • Support DDS/RSA in its efforts to hire, train and retain qualified counselors and supervisors who meet the federal certification standards. • Continue planned issuance and type of public notices and regulations: • Publication of regulations for thirty day (30) notice and comment period • Final publication of new regulations after conclusion of notice and comment period • Notice of meetings of DC State Rehabilitation Council and of state plan amendments in traditional and new internet access formats

This screen was last updated on Oct 31 2012 10:27AM by sadcbachandm

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on Aug 18 2011 9:55AM by sadcalbertr

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

4.11 (c) (4) -- Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds Attachment 4.11(c)4 Disability of Individuals Number to be Served % Number to be Rehabilitated Supported Employment Model Projected Funding Mental Illness 295 70% 70 Job Coaching Evidenced-Based Model 150,000.00 Cognitive Disabilities 71 17% 13 Job Coaching Supported Employment 50,000.00 Traumatic Brain Injury 29 7% 3 Job Coaching 70,000.00 Other 25 6% 5 Job Coaching 30,000.00 TOTAL 420 100% 91 $300,000.00 Goals for attachment 4.11(c)4 Goal 1: Provide continued support to six (6) mental health supported employment providers to increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with mental health disabilities The Administration will continue to support the Human Care Agreements with six (6) providers of mental health supported employment services to support staff at each site to assist in increased referrals to DDS/RSA and the development of placement and employment opportunities through supported employment. Goal 2: Provide improved supported employment services resulting in increased employment outcomes. The Administration will continue to solicit Human Care Providers to provide supported employment and Evidenced-Based Supported Employment with a focus on individuals with developmental disabilities, increasing the number of referrals from the DC Developmental Disabilities Administration and people with traumatic brain injury and supporting capacity-building activities through an Employment First Community of Practice.

This screen was last updated on Oct 26 2012 7:18PM by sadcbachandm

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Goal 1: Increase the number of employment outcomes in the District of Columbia by 100 through increased application requests for VR services, which expand across disability type and minority groups that are un-served and underserved. Goal 2: Improve Assistive Technology Program services and devices through each phase of the rehabilitation process to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis. Strategy 1: Increase community outreach by deploying VR counselors strategically throughout the District of Columbia, with a presence in at least 2 new sites per quarter. Strategy 2: Increase enrollment of DDS/RSA consumers for specialized vocational and/or postsecondary college training by 10% over FY 2012. Strategy 3: Ensure VR counselors are provided with ongoing performance data using a dashboard to increase timeliness metrics, meet employment outcome standards and meet a minimum standard for customer employment outcomes. Strategy 4: Improve and expand the Assistive Technology (AT) Resource Center. Ensure that all applicants and eligible individuals for services are assessed to determine the need for assistive technology and/or AT services. Continue to increase staff knowledge and skill of AT services. Strategy 5: Provide expanded supported employment services in integrated work settings to our DDS/RSA consumers with serious mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injuries.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

DC RSA will improve and expand the Assistive Technology (AT) Resource Center by moving it out of the RSA office to a location closer to DC RSA consumers--particularly those attending the Community College of the District of Columbia. DC RSA will also developing procedures and trainings for counselors working with transitioning youth so they can integrating AT closely with RSA services, particularly for youth transitioning to postsecondary services. DC RSA will develop procedures that ensure that all applicants and eligible individuals for services are assessed for the need of technology services. CRC-credit and other training will be used to continue to increase staff knowledge and skill of AT services. RSA will expand, through both its own in-house AT specialist and the AT subgrantee, the outreach to entities in DC that provide AT services, such as the Target Center at the Department of Agriculture.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

Goal 3: Increase outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with the most significant disabilities who have been un-served and underserved Goal 4: In fiscal year 2013 expand the range of choices available to individuals who require supported employment services. Since FY 2010, the Administration continued an aggressive outreach/public relations campaign to recruit job seekers with disabilities to assure that people in all wards of the city and disability groups are aware of the services provided by the administration. The campaign included a mass media campaign (television, radio and printed advertisements); brochures printed in several languages and alternative formats, business cards for staff, and face-to-face meetings in the community. As a result of the outreach campaign and the out-stationing of staff described above, the number of clients services in FY 20122 was 8900 compared to 6896 in FY 2010. Year-to-date for FY 2012, there already have been 7422 people served. Staff are in areas of the District with the highest percentages of people with disabilities and in locations at which people who are underserved or un-served are likely to frequent. There also has been a small increase in the number of RSA providers available to provide services, with active recruitment of additional providers that started at the end of FY 2012 and will continue into FY 2013. The Administration now has a certified Work Incentives/Benefits Counselor to provide work incentive counseling to VR consumers. With assistance from DC’s Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, DC now has six benefits counselors and four vendors who provide Benefits Counseling through a Human Care Agreement with DCRSA. Certified Benefits Counselors are part of a Benefits Network, through which staff can be trained and services can be provided. The RSA Benefits Counselor coordinates referrals to certified approved benefits counselors who are part of the network. The Administration’s priority is to continue to expand and develop additional human care and cooperative agreements, which now includes benefits analysis and counseling and which will enhance and facilitate services to a broad range of consumers, expand the counselor’s knowledge so that people do not leave jobs for fear of losing benefits, and create a larger pool of qualified motivated applicants for jobs. Through this initiative, the Administration seeks to provide our consumers with needed employment/training supports that highlight the value of employment and reduced dependency on public assistance. Our goal is to increase significantly the percentage of DDS/RSA consumers using federal work incentives and the number of such persons who are employed for at least 90 days. During fiscal year 2012, the Administration had 24 approved community rehabilitation providers under the Performance Based Contract category and increased supported employment Status 26 closures In FY11, 197 individuals were employed using CRP’s for supported employment, job development, and job placement. For supported employment, specifically, 525 individuals were referred to CRP providers, a dramatic increase in the use of CRPs to use supported employment. 85 of these 525 cases closed successfully, with many cases still open. The Administration continues to work closely with six (6) service providers from the Department of Mental Health and using the Evidenced-based Supported Employment Services model (EBSE) to provide SE to assist District of Columbia residents with severe mental illnesses. A designated supervisor meets monthly with the DC Department of Mental Health to strategize ways the agencies can implement to improve the EBSE services. The EBSE model provides rapid services to consumers with co-occurring disorders, substance abuse, and long term mental illnesses. There is a treatment team to ensure these consumers have medication compliance support and receive regular counseling. The number of persons served in EBSE during FY12 was 150 people, with 50 successful closures. The Administration and the DC Department of Mental Health work jointly with these six (6) providers of Evidenced-Based Supported Employment to maximize the benefits and services that are provided to client with a history of severe mental illness. The DC Department of Mental Health also pays for the services of Job Club, job coaching and benefits counseling. Strategy 1: Increase the number of consumers receiving Benefits Planning Strategy 2: Continue to solicit providers for Human Care agreements Strategy 3: Utilize public service announcements, public forums, and parent and employer workshops to increase the visibility of the Administration

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

The District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration continues to add new Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) that partner with us to provide an array of vocational rehabilitation services to consumers. Additional services available to our consumer through the Human Care agreements include VR work adjustment services, trial work experiences, job placement and benefits analysis and planning. The human care providers are now working collaboratively with the agency’s Business Relations Unit to provide job readiness training and supports to our consumers, and to link consumers to potential employers. The Administration has designated two (2) staff responsible for supporting the network of approved CRPs and to monitor, identify needs, and maintain and improve their quality. The Administration provides joint training with our Human Care Agreement CRP partners, to ensure that our collaboration yields the desired results in supported employment, job placement, and career assessment services and increased employment outcomes for consumers, particularly those with developmental disabilities, chronic mental illness, acquired brain injury, deaf/hard of hearing, blind/vision impaired, transitioning youth, and Hispanic and Asian individuals with disabilities. This happens, in part, through monthly meetings in addition to other training. Strategy 1: Use training and technical assistance to ensure that both DC RSA and CRP staff are knowledgeable of best practices and promising practices that increase the effectiveness of CRP providers and lead to employment outcomes. Encourage and promote increased collaboration of the CRP with the Administration in continuous job readiness activities. Strategy 2: Focus CRP-related process reforms on providing training to Administration staff on how counselors evaluate CRP information and provide that information to consumers so that they can exercise informed choice. Increasing counselors’ support to CRPs, assessment of CRP services, and ability to maintain constant contact with CRP providers regarding referred consumers will, the Administration believes, increase CRP effectiveness.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Goal 5: Develop a three year plan during FY 2013 to improve overall quality of services and employment outcomes. Goal 6: In fiscal year 2013, maintain an internal review system within the Administration to assess and improve program performance and compliance. The bottom line measure of the effectiveness of a state VR agency is the degree to which it increases the number of persons with disabilities who are able to work at good jobs in good paying career fields. We are working more collaboratively with employers in the District and surrounding areas to make them aware of the work we are doing. We have been working with the DC Business Leadership Network, APSE and CSAVR’s employment committee. We have been working with our counselors to ensure that they are getting up-to-date information on the job market so that we are more capable of providing relevant information to our clients. Strategy 1: Focus on improving Administration processes and procedures so that counselors can provide more timely, effective guidance and counseling to consumers through the use of data visualization tools, job aides, and outreach and counseling collateral materials to provide consumers with unambiguous, easily understood labor market information. Strategy 2: Expand services to employers in the district so that disability management and job retention of workers acquiring disabilities due to and event or natural aging processes can be served by RSA, thus helping higher-wage earning consumers maintain their employment and quality of life. Strategy 3: Develop specific processes and programs to inform our cooperative agreements with employers to create more job opportunities for transition-age students, including increasing our use of Project SEARCH sites.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Goal 7: In fiscal year 2013, strengthen the Administration’s working relationship with the Workforce Investment system. Strategy 1: Increase the number of referrals received by the agency from the One Stop Centers Strategy 2: Expand access to the services provided by the Department of Employment Services to our Department on Disability Services/Rehabilitation Services Administration consumers. Strategy 3: Fulfill the Administration’s role in supporting a new workforce intermediary in DC. There is a representative of the Statewide Workforce Investment System to on the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council, as mandated by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended and the Deputy Director of DDS/RSA serves on the Workforce Investment Board. Both serve together on Raise DC, a Mayoral taskforce charged with improving employment outcome for youth, including youth with disabilities and disconnected youth. A counselor is assigned to each of the full-service one-stop career centers in the District of Columbia to facilitate referrals to and from RSA. The Administration has a current memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Employment Services (DOES) This MOU was signed on 9/30/11 and will be renewed in an unmodified state for FY13. The Administration also wrote a successful grant application, in collaboration with DOES, to jointly receive technical assistance on Universal Design so that their settings, outreach, processes and services are accessible to all, and to receive joint technical assistance on ticket to work. DDS/RSA’s Business Relations Unit is working with VR Counselors to encourage them to have their consumers register with DOES’s Virtual One-Stop. They also are meeting regularly with representatives from DOES’s Veteran’s unit, Business Services Group, and DC Works! One-Stop Career Center staff. In March, 2010, the Mayor of the District of Columbia appointed a representative of the Statewide Workforce Investment System to serve on the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council, as mandated by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. A counselor is assigned to each of the full-service one-stop centers in the District of Columbia. The Administration initiated a memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Employment Services (DOES). The Administration also wrote a successful grant application, in collaboration with DOES, to jointly receive technical assistance on Universal Design so that their settings, outreach, processes and services are accessible to all, and joint technical assistance on ticket to work. DDS/RSA’s Business Relations Unit is working with VR Counselors to encourage them to have their consumers register with DOES’s Virtual One-Stop. They also are meeting regularly with representatives from DOES’s Veteran’s unit, Business Services Group, and DC Works! One-Stop Career Center staff.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

The Administration continues to utilize the summary of the District Wide Comprehensive Needs Assessment compiled by Dan Hopkins and Associates, Inc., September 5, 2008 and the Fiscal Year 2008 Monitoring Report on the Vocational Rehabilitation and Independent Living Programs in the District of Columbia by the U.S. Department of Education, RSA, September 12, 2008. Both note that the Administration faces enormous but surmountable challenges as it seeks to improve its performance and the quality of VR services provided to individuals in the District of Columbia. Among these barriers, the most critical is maintaining sufficient qualified staffing in all areas to ensure that quality vocational rehabilitation services are provided to individuals while maintaining sufficient staffing levels in other program operations to support the Administration’s overall performance. The Administration is enhancing its efforts to address the following barriers through the following strategies: These goals were developed, reviewed, and approved by DC RSA and the SRC. Planned program objectives and initiatives to be accomplished by the DC Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration were based on agency performance on standards and indicators. Goal 1: Increase the number of employment outcomes with successful closures in the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan to 660, with priority given to those with significant and most significant disabilities. Baseline: FY2011: 659 (504 in FY2012) Strategy 1.1: Continue outreach efforts within the community by expanding services and diversifying referrals sources to other sites that serve people with disabilities including medical facilities, colleges and universities, and DC Works! One-Stop Career Centers. Strategy 1.2: Increase the number of approved RSA service providers by 5. Goal 2: Improve the efficiency of RSA operations so that 90% of clients have a plan developed within 90 calendar days of eligibility determination by 09/30/13 and that 90% of clients have an eligibility determination within 60 days of application by 9/30/13. Baseline: FY2011: 53% Eligibility timeliness; 73% IPE timeliness Strategy 2.1: Increase monitoring of counselor case management to track numbers monthly by unit and individual staff member, providing support where needed. Strategy 2.2: Improve management support to staff to ensure that they have the ability to achieve their individual and unit benchmarks. Goal 3: Improve RSA’s overall customer service to individuals with disabilities, as evidenced by response to complaints within 5 business days and tracking/trending feedback related to customer satisfaction to managers on a monthly basis. Baseline: not tracked. Strategy 3.1: Conduct an internal review and analysis of consumer satisfaction with vocational services by April 1, 2013. Strategy 3.2: Continue to centralize complaints and to provide data and data analyses to managers on a monthly basis. Goal 4: Build and strengthen the capacity of DCRSA providers to provide quality VR by expanding the pool of available qualified employers by 5. Baseline: 2011: 23 CRP providers. Strategy 4.1 Use Human Care Agreements to add 5 (five) new providers to RSA’s provider rolls by 9/30/13 Strategy 4.2: Develop an Employment First Community of Practices to provide ongoing professional development and technical assistance support to VR providers that convenes monthly in person or electronically (i.e., webinar, conference call, etc.). Strategy 4.3: Increase outreach to employers through DDS/RSA’s Business Relations Unit (BRU), establishing at least one new business relationship per quarter that leads to employment, pre-employment work or internship experiences for at least 50 job seekers with disabilities, and at least quarterly, participating in an employer networking event by 09/30/13. Strategy 4.4: Increase benefits counseling services by providing benefits counseling orientation, benefits analysis and/or benefits counseling to at least 100 consumers with disabilities per quarter through 09/30/13. Goal 5: Strengthen and expand existing collaboration and coordination of transition services to improve vocational, post-secondary employment and career opportunities for youths between the ages of 16-22 transitioning from school to work, jointly providing opportunities for at least 50 youth by 09/30/13. Baseline: 2011: 7 youth Strategy 5.1: Improve youth employment outcomes for youth in transition by providing work experiences and career guidance through partnerships with DC’s Department of Employment Services and their Summer Youth and Year-Round Youth employment programs. Strategy 5.2: Improve employment outcomes for transition students with disabilities attending DCPS, charter and private schools through Project SEARCH and other business partnerships. Goal 6: Provide specialized vocational rehabilitation and independent living services to individuals with blindness and visual impairments, expanding specialized independent living, transition, and technology services by 25%, to over 250 individuals by the end of FY13. Baseline: 2011 (200 individuals) Strategy 6.1: Increase the number of blind, low vision or deaf/blind consumers served in the District, through relationships with DC Center for Independent Living and the Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, MLK DC Public Library Adaptive Services Center, The Metropolitan Washington Ear, the National Federation of the Blind’s News Line and the DC Office on Aging. Strategy 6.2: Identify and establish three new relationships with service providers to total five providers that offer recreational support, information and referral services to individuals with blindness or low vision. Innovation will be fostered through three specific areas: (a) the increased use of job aides and counselor data visualization tools to use during the guidance and counseling processes; (b) the increased collaboration with schools to ensure appropriate AT "follows the student" from secondary school to postsecondary education, and (c) expanding the Administration’s reach into the workforce system through playing a role as a key partner through the new workforce intermediary being pursued by the district. By improving how counselors provide services to consumers, the Administration will be better able to respond to consumer concerns in general, and those barriers relating to equitable access in particular.

 

This screen was last updated on Oct 31 2012 10:27AM by sadcbachandm

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

A. Progress in achieving goals and priorities for fiscal year 2011

Goal 1: Achieve 600 employment outcomes in the Washington, DC Metropolitan area, with priority given to those with significant and most significant disabilities

Progress Achieved:

DC RSA achieved 660 employment outcomes in 2011, and exceeded this goal by 10%.

Initiative 1.1: Increase community outreach by developing 10 additional intake site at medical clinics and hospital in the District of Columbia.

Progress achieved: DC RSA increased, by 10, the number of intake sites during FY2011. However, data on the efficacy of each individual site was not tracked, so fluctuations in the use by individuals with disabilities has not allowed the targeted use of sites based on the demand for services at each site. DC RSA is in the process of improving how intake, referral, and other services at offsites are provided so that further increases in the number of sites are possible without adding new staff.

Initiative 1.2: Increase the number of DDS/RSA consumers for receiving specialized vocational and/or postsecondary college training by 30%

Postsecondary college training numbers have increased by 30% since 2011, but data tracking that shows the ratio of training to postsecondary college has not yet been completed. DC RSA recognizes a need to provide greater specialized vocational training, in particular, as the number of transition-aged youth in the district who would choose career readiness over college readiness is still higher than the number DC RSA can effectively serve.

Initiative 1.3: Increase the percentage of referrals under job placement Human Care Agreements that achieve employment outcomes to 20%.

The number of referrals to job placement has increased steadily over the last 2 years—exceeding 20%. 2011 was the first year that job development and job placement were utilized under human care agreements, and the adjusted rehab rate for those services was 54%.

Initiative 1.4: Increase the percentage of clients receiving Assistive Technology Services by 15%

DC RSA staff report that consumers consistently demand assistive technology services, but the assistive technology center continues to report a lack of contact with counselors to use these services.

Impediments:

A lack of standard operating procedures and business processes has depressed counselor referrals to the DC Assistive Technology Center. DC RSA understands the need to incorporate more rigorous case management practices and procedures so that counselors are monitored in their timely and appropriate use of AT services.

Initiative 1.5: Increase the percentage of clients served under supported employment services with employment outcomes to 80%, with emphasis on services to clients with serious mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injuries

Supported employment rates are not yet at 80%: the overall rehab rate for job placement, development, and supported employment was 54% in 2011. Clients with serious mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injuries are still referred to RSA too infrequently, the follow-up procedures are too lax. DC RSA is in the process of reengineering its business processes to better control these referrals in order to improve outcomes.

Impediments:

The lack of standard operating procedures and business processes has kept counselors and supervisors from adequately managing the referrals into DC RSA and out to other city government partners.

Initiative 1.6 Increase the number of referrals for disability management services

DC RSA has not made significant progress in this area due to lack of staff expertise. Consultants who can help DC RSA launch a disability management practice will be sought in FY2013.

Impediments:

DC RSA does not have the requisite in-house expertise in launching a disability management practice. This will be a FY2013 initiative.

Initiative 1.7 Increase the number of referrals of individuals with low literacy levels and Limited English Proficiency (LEP) to literacy programs.

DC RSA does not have data on the number and efficacy of such referrals at this time.

Impediments:

DC RSA’s business processes for referral and management of service provision for these services are inadequate. While ample resources appear to be available in the district, DC RSA does not, at present, provide comprehensive information about these services to counselors so that they can effectively refer clients for services.

Goal2: Improve the efficiency of DDS/RSA operations

Progress Achieved: DC RSA only achieved a 53.2% eligibility timeliness during FY11, and therefore did not make significant progress on this goal in FY11. However, new business processes for following up with eligibility timeliness were introduced in FY2012 and, as of 9/30/12, the monthly timeliness of eligibility determinations had risen to 84% and aggregate eligibility timeliness for FY2012 was 69%--higher than 2010 or 2011 by 15.8 percentage points.

Impediments: The lack of standard operating procedures and business processes had kept counselors and supervisors from adequately managing eligibility and IPE timeliness. However, the institution of innovations in FY12 has led to improvements and more effective management will lead to a solution.

Initiative 2.1: Increase supervision and monitoring of the service delivery process

Progress: DC RSA has not developed the internal metrics beyond the federal indicators necessary to manage the service delivery process down to the line staff level. Furthermore, FY2011 efforts undertaken by an internal process improvement team identified 6 major projects to streamline DC RSA business processes and facilitate supervision and monitoring. This initiative will continue in FY12 and beyond.

Impediments: The lack of standard operating procedures and business processes had kept counselors and supervisors from adequately managing service delivery. Also, the lack of a sufficient number of DC RSA staff in both line positions and in support positions has impeded progress.

Initiative 2.2: Finalize implement and full utilization of the new VR case management system

During FY11, RSA made progress in implementing the new case management system, but challenges remain. User adoption issues, imprecise business processes, and a lack of policy clarity contributed to staff struggles with effectively using the case management system to its full effectiveness.

Impediments: FY12, DDS saw its Chief Information Officer and IT Management Analyst leave the agency, which impeded progress on rectifying the above challenges. This initiative will resume in FY13.

Objective 3: Improve DDS/RSA’s overall customer service to individuals with disabilities.

Initiative 3.1: Increase the number of Certified Rehabilitation Counselors (CRC) to fifteen (15)

Since FY11, DC RSA has seen the number of CRC’s serving as counselors rise to 15. Also, recent recruitment efforts have resulted in all new hires being eligible to sit the CRC exam. Several counselors are currently awaiting the results of their CRC exam, as well.

Initiative 3.2: Actively recruit bilingual staff in Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, French, Amharic and American Sign Language and increase the number of bilingual staff from 16 to 20 to create a more culturally diverse workforce that meets the vocational rehabilitation needs of all populations.

DCRSA continues to recruit staff who speak our greatest linguistic need, Spanish. Currently, 5 FTE have Spanish fluency. DCRSA also continues to recruit vendors who speak Spanish, as well as the other languages listed above. Overall, DC RSA has a linguistically diverse staff, but continues to struggle with maintaining an adequate number of staff who speak Spanish fluently.

Impediments: DC RSA lacks adequate networks amongst Spanish-speakign human services professionals in the DC area. Also, the number of qualified VR counselor applicants who speak Spanish is currently too low for DC RSA to meet its need.

Initiative 3.3 Achieve full compliance with the DC Language Access Act as measured by the D.C. Office of Human Rights Annual Compliance Review.

DC RSA is still not fully compliant with the DC Language Access Act.

Impediments: Current business processes are insufficient to guarantee that staff are appropriately accessing the necessary resources. The business process reengineering projects that began in FY12 and will continue in FY13 will address this shortcoming.

Initiative 3.3: Address the concerns of DDS/RSA consumers in a timely manner

DC RSA has instituted a customer service single phone line, dedicated a staff member to resolving complaints in a timely manner. The number of complaints against RSA staff has decreased since the beginning of 2011. Also, annual timeliness of both IPEs and eligibility determinations has increased, leading to gains in customer service.

Objective 4: Build and strengthen the capacity of DDS/RSA providers to provide quality VR services to a diverse group of individuals across disability types, and expand the pool of available qualified employer candidates

Initiative 4.1: Hire a Benefits Counselor to provide benefits and work incentive counseling to VR consumers with disabilities receiving SSI, SSDI, TANF and other forms of public assistance to prepare these individuals for placement in competitive employment.

DC RSA has hired a benefits counselor and has seen a steady increase in the number of benefits counseling referrals.

Initiative 4.2: Expand the service capacity of DDS/RSA through increased partnerships with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to provide direct VR employment counseling, job training, and other services to clients

At present, DC RSA has expanded the service capacity of CRPs. 54% of all CRP referrals in FY11 resulted in competitive employment.

Impediments:

A lack of joint training between DC RSA counselors and vendors has prevented the widespread adoption of best and promising practices in vendor/counselor/consumer relationship management. Such training will occur in FY13.

Initiative 4.3 Develop relationships and establish Memorandums of Agreement with community partners and vendors who are experienced in working with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) and individuals with low literacy.

This initiative has not been completed. See explanation under Initiative 1.7

Initiative 4.4 Expand outreach efforts and create partnerships with programs serving the deaf and hearing impaired population.

DC RSA has made progress connecting deaf services with services for individuals with visual impairments and blindness, particularly in the area of transition. However, DC RSA has to continue expanding these services through the use of the TACE and the resources available to the statewide coordinator for services to individuals who are deaf/hearing impaired.

Impediments:

The State Coordinator for DHOH services is also a line manager: service delivery inefficiencies have impeded her progress on the statewide coordination goals because of time constraints.

Objective 5: Strengthen and expand collaboration and coordination of transition services to improve vocational, post-secondary employment and career opportunities for youths transitioning from school to work

Initiative 5.1: Complete Individual Plans for Employment (IPE) earlier for transition students, by December 31st of the year prior to their senior year of high school. Earlier development will improve the likelihood that students will have a comprehensive, completed plan upon graduation.

DC RSA converted 78% of all referrals for transition students into an IPE during FY12, which both resulted in more students receiving services, but also in a lower number of students to serve in future years. However, FY11 and FY12 saw continued struggles to capture enough referrals or to convert those referrals to IPE’s by the timeline indicated.

Impediments:

Staff turnover and difficulty in partnering directly with Charter Schools have impeded progress.

Initiative 5.2: Build partnerships to provide summer or year round employment to at least 35 students with disabilities.

DC RSA served 35 youth with through the Summer Youth Employment Program in both FY11 and FY12. However, not all of these youth had disabilities. DC RSA will develop further partnerships with DOES youth services as well as with partners such as the Marriot Bridges foundation to provide such employment opportunities.

Impediments:

A lack of quality pre-vocational and vocational options for non-college-going students still exists, even as our college enrollment has grown.

Initiative 5.3 Complete and implement a Memorandum of Agreement with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education

This MOA was completed and signed in January of 2012.

Initiative 5.4 Complete and implement a Memorandum of Agreement with the District of Columbia Public Schools. This MOA was completed in FY2011 and has been renewed through FY2013.

 

A. Progress in achieving goals and priorities for fiscal year 2011

Goal 1: Utilize American Recovery Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with mental health disabilities.

Performance: The administration developed Human Care Agreements with six providers of mental health supported employment services to hire additional staff at each site to assist in increased referrals to DDS/RSA and develop placement and employment opportunities through supported employment.

Status Update: During FY12, the first full year with these agreemetns in place, The six providers successfully closed 42 cases. DC RSA will continue to build its relationships with these providers and to further provide services to individuals with mental health disabilities.

Goal 2: Provide improved supported employment services resulting in increased employment outcomes.

Performance: Administration will continue to solicit Human Care Providers to provide supported employment and evidence-based supported employment with a focus on individuals with developmental disabilities by increasing the number of referrals from the DC Developmental Disabilities Administration.

Status Update: DC RSA has maintained the six human care agreement (HCA) providers for Evidence-Based Supported Employment (EBSE) since FY11. To date in FY12, 150 people were referred from DC RSA to the EBSE providers with 50 successful closures. DC RSA continues to work with our partners at the Department of Mental Health to improve the referral process for counselors, consumers, and vendors.

Progress Achieved:

DC RSA achieved 660 employment outcomes in 2011, and exceeded this goal by 10%.

Initiative 1.1: Increase community outreach by developing 10 additional intake site at medical clinics and hospital in the District of Columbia.

Progress achieved: DC RSA increased, by 10, the number of intake sites during FY2011. However, data on the efficacy of each individual site was not tracked, so fluctuations in the use by individuals with disabilities has not allowed the targeted use of sites based on the demand for services at each site. DC RSA is in the process of improving how intake, referral, and other services at offsites are provided so that further increases in the number of sites are possible without adding new staff.

Initiative 1.2: Increase the number of DDS/RSA consumers for receiving specialized vocational and/or postsecondary college training by 30%

Postsecondary college training numbers have increased by 30% since 2011, but data tracking that shows the ratio of training to postsecondary college has not yet been completed. DC RSA recognizes a need to provide greater specialized vocational training, in particular, as the number of transition-aged youth in the district who would choose career readiness over college readiness is still higher than the number DC RSA can effectively serve.

Initiative 1.3: Increase the percentage of referrals under job placement Human Care Agreements that achieve employment outcomes to 20%.

The number of referrals to job placement has increased steadily over the last 2 years—exceeding 20%. 2011 was the first year that job development and job placement were utilized under human care agreements, and the adjusted rehab rate for those services was 54%.

Initiative 1.4: Increase the percentage of clients receiving Assistive Technology Services by 15%

DC RSA staff report that consumers consistently demand assistive technology services, but the assistive technology center continues to report a lack of contact with counselors to use these services.

Impediments:

A lack of standard operating procedures and business processes has depressed counselor referrals to the DC Assistive Technology Center. DC RSA understands the need to incorporate more rigorous case management practices and procedures so that counselors are monitored in their timely and appropriate use of AT services.

Initiative 1.5: Increase the percentage of clients served under supported employment services with employment outcomes to 80%, with emphasis on services to clients with serious mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injuries

Supported employment rates are not yet at 80%: the overall rehab rate for job placement, development, and supported employment was 54% in 2011. Clients with serious mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injuries are still referred to RSA too infrequently, the follow-up procedures are too lax. DC RSA is in the process of reengineering its business processes to better control these referrals in order to improve outcomes.

Impediments:

The lack of standard operating procedures and business processes has kept counselors and supervisors from adequately managing the referrals into DC RSA and out to other city government partners.

Initiative 1.6 Increase the number of referrals for disability management services

DC RSA has not made significant progress in this area due to lack of staff expertise. Consultants who can help DC RSA launch a disability management practice will be sought in FY2013.

Impediments:

DC RSA does not have the requisite in-house expertise in launching a disability management practice. This will be a FY2013 initiative.

Initiative 1.7 Increase the number of referrals of individuals with low literacy levels and Limited English Proficiency (LEP) to literacy programs.

DC RSA does not have data on the number and efficacy of such referrals at this time.

Impediments:

DC RSA’s business processes for referral and management of service provision for these services are inadequate. While ample resources appear to be available in the district, DC RSA does not, at present, provide comprehensive information about these services to counselors so that they can effectively refer clients for services.

Goal2: Improve the efficiency of DDS/RSA operations

Progress Achieved: DC RSA only achieved a 53.2% eligibility timeliness during FY11, and therefore did not make significant progress on this goal in FY11. However, new business processes for following up with eligibility timeliness were introduced in FY2012 and, as of 9/30/12, the monthly timeliness of eligibility determinations had risen to 84% and aggregate eligibility timeliness for FY2012 was 69%--higher than 2010 or 2011 by 15.8 percentage points.

Impediments: The lack of standard operating procedures and business processes had kept counselors and supervisors from adequately managing eligibility and IPE timeliness. However, the institution of innovations in FY12 has led to improvements and more effective management will lead to a solution.

Initiative 2.1: Increase supervision and monitoring of the service delivery process

Progress: DC RSA has not developed the internal metrics beyond the federal indicators necessary to manage the service delivery process down to the line staff level. Furthermore, FY2011 efforts undertaken by an internal process improvement team identified 6 major projects to streamline DC RSA business processes and facilitate supervision and monitoring. This initiative will continue in FY12 and beyond.

Impediments: The lack of standard operating procedures and business processes had kept counselors and supervisors from adequately managing service delivery. Also, the lack of a sufficient number of DC RSA staff in both line positions and in support positions has impeded progress.

Initiative 2.2: Finalize implement and full utilization of the new VR case management system

During FY11, RSA made progress in implementing the new case management system, but challenges remain. User adoption issues, imprecise business processes, and a lack of policy clarity contributed to staff struggles with effectively using the case management system to its full effectiveness.

Impediments: FY12, DDS saw its Chief Information Officer and IT Management Analyst leave the agency, which impeded progress on rectifying the above challenges. This initiative will resume in FY13.

Objective 3: Improve DDS/RSA’s overall customer service to individuals with disabilities.

Initiative 3.1: Increase the number of Certified Rehabilitation Counselors (CRC) to fifteen (15)

Since FY11, DC RSA has seen the number of CRC’s serving as counselors rise to 15. Also, recent recruitment efforts have resulted in all new hires being eligible to sit the CRC exam. Several counselors are currently awaiting the results of their CRC exam, as well.

Initiative 3.2: Actively recruit bilingual staff in Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, French, Amharic and American Sign Language and increase the number of bilingual staff from 16 to 20 to create a more culturally diverse workforce that meets the vocational rehabilitation needs of all populations.

DCRSA continues to recruit staff who speak our greatest linguistic need, Spanish. Currently, 5 FTE have Spanish fluency. DCRSA also continues to recruit vendors who speak Spanish, as well as the other languages listed above. Overall, DC RSA has a linguistically diverse staff, but continues to struggle with maintaining an adequate number of staff who speak Spanish fluently.

Impediments: DC RSA lacks adequate networks amongst Spanish-speakign human services professionals in the DC area. Also, the number of qualified VR counselor applicants who speak Spanish is currently too low for DC RSA to meet its need.

Initiative 3.3 Achieve full compliance with the DC Language Access Act as measured by the D.C. Office of Human Rights Annual Compliance Review.

DC RSA is still not fully compliant with the DC Language Access Act.

Impediments: Current business processes are insufficient to guarantee that staff are appropriately accessing the necessary resources. The business process reengineering projects that began in FY12 and will continue in FY13 will address this shortcoming.

Initiative 3.3: Address the concerns of DDS/RSA consumers in a timely manner

DC RSA has instituted a customer service single phone line, dedicated a staff member to resolving complaints in a timely manner. The number of complaints against RSA staff has decreased since the beginning of 2011. Also, annual timeliness of both IPEs and eligibility determinations has increased, leading to gains in customer service.

Objective 4: Build and strengthen the capacity of DDS/RSA providers to provide quality VR services to a diverse group of individuals across disability types, and expand the pool of available qualified employer candidates

Initiative 4.1: Hire a Benefits Counselor to provide benefits and work incentive counseling to VR consumers with disabilities receiving SSI, SSDI, TANF and other forms of public assistance to prepare these individuals for placement in competitive employment.

DC RSA has hired a benefits counselor and has seen a steady increase in the number of benefits counseling referrals.

Initiative 4.2: Expand the service capacity of DDS/RSA through increased partnerships with Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to provide direct VR employment counseling, job training, and other services to clients

At present, DC RSA has expanded the service capacity of CRPs. 54% of all CRP referrals in FY11 resulted in competitive employment.

Impediments:

A lack of joint training between DC RSA counselors and vendors has prevented the widespread adoption of best and promising practices in vendor/counselor/consumer relationship management. Such training will occur in FY13.

Initiative 4.3 Develop relationships and establish Memorandums of Agreement with community partners and vendors who are experienced in working with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) and individuals with low literacy.

This initiative has not been completed. See explanation under Initiative 1.7

Initiative 4.4 Expand outreach efforts and create partnerships with programs serving the deaf and hearing impaired population.

DC RSA has made progress connecting deaf services with services for individuals with visual impairments and blindness, particularly in the area of transition. However, DC RSA has to continue expanding these services through the use of the TACE and the resources available to the statewide coordinator for services to individuals who are deaf/hearing impaired.

Impediments:

The State Coordinator for DHOH services is also a line manager: service delivery inefficiencies have impeded her progress on the statewide coordination goals because of time constraints.

Objective 5: Strengthen and expand collaboration and coordination of transition services to improve vocational, post-secondary employment and career opportunities for youths transitioning from school to work

Initiative 5.1: Complete Individual Plans for Employment (IPE) earlier for transition students, by December 31st of the year prior to their senior year of high school. Earlier development will improve the likelihood that students will have a comprehensive, completed plan upon graduation.

DC RSA converted 78% of all referrals for transition students into an IPE during FY12, which both resulted in more students receiving services, but also in a lower number of students to serve in future years. However, FY11 and FY12 saw continued struggles to capture enough referrals or to convert those referrals to IPE’s by the timeline indicated.

Impediments:

Staff turnover and difficulty in partnering directly with Charter Schools have impeded progress.

Initiative 5.2: Build partnerships to provide summer or year round employment to at least 35 students with disabilities.

DC RSA served 35 youth with through the Summer Youth Employment Program in both FY11 and FY12. However, not all of these youth had disabilities. DC RSA will develop further partnerships with DOES youth services as well as with partners such as the Marriot Bridges foundation to provide such employment opportunities.

Impediments:

A lack of quality pre-vocational and vocational options for non-college-going students still exists, even as our college enrollment has grown.

Initiative 5.3 Complete and implement a Memorandum of Agreement with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education

This MOA was completed and signed in January of 2012.

Initiative 5.4 Complete and implement a Memorandum of Agreement with the District of Columbia Public Schools. This MOA was completed in FY2011 and has been renewed through FY2013.

 

In FY 2011, DDS/RSA exceeded all RSA requirements for performance on the standards and indicators except indicators 1.2 and 1.5 Indicator 1.1: Difference in the number of individuals with employment outcomes from prior year for general and combined agencies or prior two years for blind agencies DC RSA exceeded the prior year employment outcomes by 185 (FY10: 475; FY11: 660), and passed the indicator. Indicator 1.2: Percent with employment outcomes after services DC RSA only saw 35.52% of its individuals served (1858) achieve an employment outcome (660) after services and failed this indicator. (660/1858 = 35.52%) Indicator 1.3: Percent of all employment outcomes that were competitively employed 84.24% of DC RSA’s individuals who were employed (660) were employed competitively (556) and therefore passed this indicator. 556/660 = 84.24% Indicator 1.4: Percent of individuals with competitive employment outcomes who had a significant disability 94.60% of DC RSA’s individuals with competitive employment (556) had a significant disability (526). 526/556 = 94.60% DC RSA passed this indicator. Indicator 1.5: Ratio of average hourly VR wage to average state hourly wage The average hourly wage of competitively employed individuals ($13.46) did not exceed the minimum performance level (.52) and therefore failed this indicator. ($13.46/$39.33 = .342). DC RSA passed this indicator. Indicator 1.6: Difference Between Percent Self-Supporting at Closure and Application DC RSA exceeded the target for self-supporting individuals at closure by 67.45%. At application, the percentage was 26.80%. At closure, the percentage was 94.24%. This exceeded the target of 53 by 14.45 percentage points. DC RSA passed this indicator. Indicator 2.1: Ratio of minority to non-minority service rate The minority/non-minority service rate target for DC RSA was .80. DC RSA achieved a performance level of .868. DC RSA passed this indicator.

 

Major program accomplishments: A more detailed account of how the Administration has continued to deliver improved services over the past year is provided. In terms of locations and staffing, DDS/RSA services were provided at its new headquarters and locations throughout the city. These included multiple single employee outstations in one-stop career centers, high schools, and at various itinerant locations. In FY 11, over 8700 Washingtonians with disabilities received vocational rehabilitation services. Of these, 659 were placed into competitive jobs in which they stayed for at least 90 days, compared to 475 in FY 2009. (1) The Administration has installed a new electronic case management system that allows its vocational rehabilitation counselors to better manage the case load and track caseload activity during the months and years to come. (2) The Youth Transition Program is making progress through its partnership with the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) to identify high school youth with disabilities for employment or career related post secondary education/training. During 2011, Youth Transition Program specialists operated in approximately 100 local high schools, serving over 900 youth. (3) The Administration has improved its Division Services for the Blind to increase its outreach and vocational outcomes for individuals with low vision and blindness.

This screen was last updated on Nov 1 2012 10:21AM by sadcbachandm

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Attachment 6.3 Quality, Scope and Extent of Supported Employment Services Supported Employment services are guided by an inter-agency committee. Members of the Committee are representatives from the vendor CRP community, the extended service provider community, the Vocational Rehabilitation Services Division, and DDS/Rehabilitation Services Administration staff. All decisions are made jointly and include the following: (1) Entrance (2) Fading and (3) Extended Services. DDS/RSA has identified two populations that require the use of supported employment services: persons with severe and persistent mental illness and persons with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The community rehabilitation providers provide supported employment services to these two populations Other people may require a job coach model for their initial placement but do not require the extended services as provided under the provisions of supported employment services. During the State Change Grant, a decision was made that a natural support model was the most normalizing. Each provider provides individualized services to consumers. Their efforts are geared toward competitive placements in an integrated work environment. At times, a company or a government agency may hire several customers, but the customers are not placed within the same work area to ensure that they are in an integrated work setting. With their rehabilitation counselor’s assistance, consumers make informed choices to select their vocational goals. If a consumer chooses to change that goal during the supported employment process, their counselor assist and the new goal is implemented. Every effort is made to ensure customers are placed in jobs that are consistent with their interests and abilities. An "any job will do" attitude is never acceptable. Employment Specialists/Job Coaches spend valuable time with consumers teaching them about the workplace’s expectations and the required tasks, assuring also that they know who to ask when assistance is needed. Time is spent with the person on the worksite who is identified as the natural support person as well to ensure that they are comfortable and prepared to provde workplace support as needed. The person identified as the natural support completes training in techniques and strategies to assist the assigned consumer to complete tasks required and identify the areas in which prompting or feedback may be appropriate in order to assure accurate completion of all assigned work tasks. The consumer is also provided with the name and telephone number of the Employment Specialist/Job Coach in the event of questions or problems. The workplace supervisor also receives training in order to assure that, if the primary natural support person leaves, another person can be identified who is willing to accept that role. Contacts are made by the Employment Specialist/Job Coach with the consumer on an as-needed basis. Additional follow-up contacts are made each month with the supervisor to ensure problems are identified early in the employment process and consumers receive the assistance they need to maintain employment. The Employment Specialist/Job Coach also provides travel training as needed. The Employment Specialist/Job Coach makes certain that transportation funds are available to assist the consumer in his/her job retention as needed. Additionally, all decisions are discussed jointly by the committee and with the consumer. Issues are seldom presented to consumers by only one party to ensure consumers see the group as united toward their goal of employment. Supported Employment providers are monitored, as are all providers. Some visits are announced while some are unannounced. The services being provided are reviewed and a report is returned to the Administration’s Vocational Rehabilitation Services Division that includes the monitors’ observations regarding the program. Problems are discussed with the provider and, when necessary, a corrective action plan is developed and implemented. A consumer may transition to extended services after receiving supported employment services from the vocational rehabilitation program. Long-term funding for extended services may be provided through cooperative agreements with public agencies, nonprofit agencies or organizations; employers; natural supports; and any resource other than federal vocational rehabilitation funds. DC RSA will not exceed 18 months of supported employment services with the exception of rare cases.

This screen was last updated on Oct 31 2012 10:27AM by sadcbachandm

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on 11/01/2012 at 10:41 AM

Last updated by sadcbachandm

Completed on 11/01/2012 at 10:41 AM

Completed by sadcbachandm

Approved on 11/01/2012 at 10:56 AM

Approved by rscopopec

Published on 11/06/2012 at 7:28 AM

Published by kschelle

The following documents have been identified as being related to the information you are viewing.

  • Monitoring Report for District of Columbia — as of May 3, 2013
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