ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Rehabilitation Services Administration, DC Dept. on Disability Services State Plan for Fiscal Year 2012 (submitted FY 2011)

1.1 The The Department on Disability Services is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Department on Disability Services [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Director

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Director

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Laura Nuss

Title of Signatory
Director Department on Disability Services

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
08/19/2011

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2012
Yes

Comments:

The District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration (DC-RSA) assures that, no later than September 30, 2012, DC-RSA will take the necessary steps to ensure that it will:

• establish a State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the act, as required in Section 101(a)(21)(ii), so that the DC-RSA can work with the SRC to fulfill the responsibilities listed in Section 101(a)(21)(ii).

• DC-RSA further assures that it will report on a quarterly basis progress made toward fulfillment of the following outstanding assurance from the FY 2011 state plan; and that the following outstanding FY 2011 assurance must be completed by September 30, 2012:

Executing a complete interagency agreement for the coordination of transition services in accordance with Section 101 (a)(11)(D) and 34 CFR 361.22(b).

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Laura Nuss

Title of Signatory
Director Department on Disability Services

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
08/19/2011

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and includes a vocational rehabilitation unit as provided in paragraph (b) of this section (Option B was selected/Option A was not selected)

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
DDS/RSA

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. No

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

Attachment 4.2(c) Summary of Input and Recommendations of the State Rehabilitation Council; Response of the Designated State Unit; and Explanations for Rejection of Input or Recommendations

Provided by the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council (through 06/20/11)

Comments on the Proposed State Plan from the State Rehabilitation Council for the District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration for FY 2012

General Comment

How has the plan been distributed and to whom?

Administration Response:

All of the required State Plan Attachments were completed and drafts were provided to the SRC for input, revisions, and recommendations 15 days prior to placement in the District Register for Public input. The DSU has not received any input or recommendations from the SRC to be incorporated into Attachment 4.2(c) Summary of Input and Recommendations of the State Rehabilitation Council; Response of the Designated State Unit; and Explanations for Rejection of Input or Recommendations. If no information is received from the SRC, the DSU will compile summary statements from the hearing for Attachment 4.2(c) and make them available to the SRC for review, modification and revision before the Plan is submitted.

The SRC was provided all updated Attachments of the State Plan and Statements from the Public Hearing on June 30, 2011for additional review and comments. No comments were received by the DSU.

The SRC began the FY 2011 as a fully constituted council, the council received TA training through the regional TACE and was able to conduct normal business through the first two quarters of the year. However, as a result of resignations and non participation of some members’ business operations of the council was greatly hampered. There was not a sufficient number to hold a quorum; the remaining members of the council felt there no need to meet until new member could be added. All draft State Plan attachments were provided to the remaining members for their review and input. There were no comments or recommendations received from SRC members.

DCRSA worked diligently with the SRC when the membership was complete. Meetings were held reports were made and business was conducted. DERSA made every effort to continue working with the SRC and provided each member a draft copy of the State Plan Attachments 15 days prior to the public input period. Due to the fact that the SRC members decided to formal meeting should be held until new members were seated, DCRSA was unable to meet in formal group discussion.

Comment 1

There has been a delay in appointing new members to the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), so there was inadequate input into this plan and for this review process.

Administration Response:

The Administration agrees that there was inadequate input from the SRC because most of the members have not yet been reappointed. The Administration is working closely with the DC Mayor’s Office of Boards and Commissions to finalize the appointment and/or reappointment of SRC members. With the change of administration in the District of Columbia, the Office of Boards and Commissions, under new leadership, is behind in making its appointment. The Administration did send the State Plan to past SRC members as well as the people who have been on the previously-appointed SRC. Once the SRC has all of its members, the Administration will provide opportunities for new SRC members to review, discuss and comment on the 2012 State Plan. The Administration also will ensure that the TACE provides training for the newly appointed SRC so that they are clear on their role and responsibilities. If major changes to the 2012 Plan are suggested, those will be forwarded by the Administration to Federal RSA.

Comments from the Public

Comment 1

Attachment 4.8(b)2 - Development and approval of an individualized plan for employment for students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process

DDS/RSA should establish a timeline for completion of the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). The plan states that IPEs “are completed or updated as early as possible prior to the anticipated school exit to allow for a smooth transition to the student’s desired post-school outcome.” However, the commenter notes that the timing for when this should occur during the school year is unclear. The commenter suggested that the IPE is completed no later than 18 months prior to the student’s anticipated school exit.

Administration response

Ideally, the Administration would like to complete IPEs for all students early in their junior year of high school, which would be more than 18 months prior to school exit. Given the number of students, locations, and available VR Counselors, the Administration instead seeks to complete IPEs during the summer prior to a student’s senior year. This change has been made in Attachment 4.8.

Comment 2

Attachment 4.10 Comprehensive System of Personnel Development

Section (e), “Personnel to Address Individual Communication Needs,” discusses staff and translation services for people with Limited English Proficiency and people who use

American Sign Language. D.C. Official Code § 2-1934 requires covered entities such as the Department on Disability Services (DDS) to have a language access plan and a language access coordinator. Since DDS is in compliance with this DC Code, it would be helpful to reference that there is a language access plan and language access coordinator. Also, the State Plan should discuss efforts to recruit staff capacity for Chinese, Vietnamese, and Korean, which are among the 6 most spoken foreign languages in the District of Columbia.

Administration response

The Administration agrees and has added reference to its language access plan and language access coordinator as well as efforts to recruit staff members who speak Chinese, Vietnamese, and Korean.

Comment 3

Thank you for ensuring that the plan uses “People first” language when discussing people with disabilities. We appreciate the work DDS/RSA has done to promote modern terminology that respects the dignity of the individual.

Comment 4

Attachment 4.11(c)(1) Goals and Priorities for the Vocational Rehabilitation and

Supported Employment Program

All initiatives described in this section should be specific and measurable. At a minimum, it should be possible to evaluate whether each strategy has been implemented fully or partially. Many of the strategies could benefit from greater specificity. In particular, DDS/RSA should review and amend the following strategies to include quantifiable action steps and outcomes: Initiatives 1.1 and 1.3; Initiative 2.1, 2.3, and 2.4; Initiative 3.1; Initiative 4.1; Initiative 5.1 and 5.2; Initiative 6.1

Administration Response

The Administration agrees and has reviewed and revised these Initiatives to make them measurable.

Comment 5

Attachment 4.11(c)(3) Order of Selection

The State Plan should provide a fuller description of the DDS/RSA “information and referral system adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including eligible individuals who do not meet the agency’s order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance (which may include counseling and referral for job placement)…” (34 C.F.R. 361.37(a)(1)).

Administration response

The Administration agrees and has noted that it will work with and through the State Rehabilitation Council to ensure that the information and referral system is responsive to the needs of people who may not meet the Order of Selection criteria.

Comment 6

Attachment 4.11(d) Strategies

Methods to Expand and Improve Services to Individuals with disabilities, including assistive technology services

The State Plan should include a Goal to eliminate the delay for providers and individuals to receive their Pre-Authorizations from DDS/RSA when additional employment support services are needed.

Administration response

The Administration acknowledges that there are, at times, procurement delays for a wide variety of reasons. This is an issue that the Administration acknowledges as important and continues to improve, so that delays are the exception rather than the rule. However, this is not an issue that can be dealt with through the RSA State Plan.

Comment 7

Attachment 4.11 (c) 4 B -- Goal 3 – Increase outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with the most significant disabilities who have been unserved and underserved.

As noted in the DDS/RSA District-Wide Comprehensive Needs Assessment (September, 2008), DDS/RSA is challenged to serve an increasingly diverse constituency that includes many people with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) as well as people with low literacy levels. In light of this, DDS/RSA may wish to add goals and strategies that address:

? Marketing and outreach efforts to LEP individuals (e.g., creating brochures and other materials in languages other than English; outreach with and through community partners that work with LEP individuals, etc.).

? Consideration of low literacy levels when developing marketing and outreach strategies.

? Development of relationships with community partners and vendors who are experienced in working with LEP individuals and with individuals with low literacy.

Administration Response

The Administration agrees about the importance of accessible outreach to people with Limited English Proficiency and people with low literacy levels. This is in process and is reflected in the strategies for Goal 3 referenced above.

Comment 8

Attachment 4.8(b)(2) -- Performance with Respect to Evaluation, Standards and Performance Indicators

With regard to the table on the percent of transition aged youth in their junior year or later with an IPE initiated is a deplorably low 3.64%. DDS/RSA should explain the reasons for this statistic, and outline strategies for increasing it to the target of 50%.

Administration Response

The Administration agrees that the percentage of youth with IPEs initiated in their junior year or later is very low. However, the reported number is 30%, not 3.64%. Also, the plan does include information to explain why the number is so low. This number was low for this year because there was no centralized staff writing IPEs for youth, nor was there a data tracking system that ensured that youth were coded as such and counted. There now is a dedicated unit with 8 full-time transition staff and a supervisor, so that many more transitioning youth will have IPEs.

Comment 9

[Unnumbered Goal] Improving post secondary educational, employment and career opportunities for young people with disabilities through increased collaboration and innovation

As recommended earlier, DDS/RSA should add strategies as follows, to page 23 of 40: Strategy 5: Complete and implement a Memorandum of Agreement with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education.

DDS/RSA should also add the following strategy, to page 23 of 40: Strategy 6: Complete the Individualized Plan for Employment by no later than 18 months prior to the student’s anticipated school exit.

Administration Response

This is a heading, rather than a goal. The two points suggested here have been addressed previously

Comment 10

Goal 7: In fiscal year 2010 strengthen the Administration’s working relationship with the Workforce Investment system.

DDS/RSA should add the following strategies:

Strategy 3: The Deputy Director of DDS/RSA will become a member of the D.C. Workforce Investment Council.

Strategy 4: The State Rehabilitation Council will fill all mandated slots for representatives of the business community.

Administration Response

The Administration agrees and has added those two strategies, both of which are already in process.

Comment 11

Attachment 4.11(d)(2)

B. State Strategies for Title I Funds for Innovation and Expansion for Fiscal Year 2010-2013

Marketing material should also be translated into Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, and Amharic

Administration Response

The Administration has added that marketing materials will be translated into other languages upon request.

Comment 12

Attachment 4.11(d)(2)

C. Overcome Identified Barriers Related to Equitable Access to and Participation of Individuals with Disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Program and Supported Employment Services Program

As DDS/RSA knows, low literacy often creates barriers to access and participation in VR services. It would be helpful for DDS/RSA to add a strategy for strengthening partnerships with literacy providers and encouraging vendors to develop strategies for working with individuals with low literacy. It might also be helpful to add a representative from the District’s literacy community to the SRC.

Administration Response

The Administration agrees and has added a strategy to strengthen and add partnerships with literacy providers. Since SRC membership is done through the Executive Office of the Mayor, the Administration can only recommend members. However, representatives of the literacy community can be invited to SRC meetings. Also, RSA relationship with adult literacy providers will be strengthened through its MOA with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), which oversees all adult education programs.

This screen was last updated on Aug 18 2011 5:15PM by sadcalbertr

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

This screen was last updated on Sep 17 2009 5:42PM by sadcwinfieldd

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

Cooperation with Agencies and Entities Not Carrying Out Activities under the Statewide Workforce Investment System

The Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration (“Administration” or “DDS/RSA”) values its relationships with its federal, state and local partners that are outside of the Workforce Investment System. The Administration is working aggressively to finalize its cooperative agreements. As the Administration transitions under new leadership, it is simultaneously implementing corrective measures to address the deficiencies while making gradual progress in completing its outstanding agreements.

Memoranda of Agreement (MOA) with the following entities have been finalized: The University of the District of Columbia; District of Columbia Public Schools; District of Columbia; District of Columbia Department of Health Care Finance; District of Columbia Public Library; U.S. Department of Labor/ Office of Disability Employment Policy;; U.S. Department of Education; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/Administration for Children and Families; DC Department of Employment Services; and “Project SEARCH” Cincinnati. These additional MOAs are in process and/or are being updated: Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA);District of Columbia Office of Disability Rights (ODR); Office of the State Superintendent of Education; and District of Columbia Public Schools. The Administration counselors use the facilities at various itinerant sites including DC Aging and Disability Resource Center (ADRC), DC Works! Career One-Stop Centers southeast and northeast locations, Salvation Army Harbour Lights Rehabilitation Center, Unity Health Care Re-Entry Health Center, George Washington University Hospital Acute Rehabilitation Unit, N Street Village, University of the District of Columbia (UDC) and Community College of the District of Columbia (CCDC).. The Administration continues to work to achieve full compliance with its MOAs and plans to be in total compliance early in fiscal year 2012

This screen was last updated on Jul 11 2011 11:45AM by sadcalbertr

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

Attachment 4.8(b) (2) Coordination, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services.

The Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration considers service provision to high school students with disabilities and their families a major priority within the District of Columbia. The Administration is working aggressively with local educational leaders in special education to develop strategies to identify students earlier who will need transition services.

The Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration has developed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to efficiently coordinate data sharing and the early identification of students in need of transition services with the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS). DDS/RSA is working with leadership and staff from the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) to develop and implement and MOA. Finalizing this MOA has been a key goal for transition services in FY 2011.

The DDS/RSA continues to participate on the National Community of Practice (NCoP) monthly teleconferences on transition. The NCoP consists of statewide VR agencies, national organizations, community organizations, local and state education agencies, public and private organizations, and parents of students with disabilities. DDS/RSA also is active on the local transition community of practice (CoP), which is led by the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE) and includes broad public and private organizations that serve youth with disabilities.

The agency participates on the State Advisory Panel on Special Education and in Partners in Transition, which is an outgrowth of a City-Wide Transition Workgroup, started by DDS, with support from the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability for Youth, a project of the Institute for Educational Leadership. These partnerships are essential to enhance transition services in the District of Columbia. Through active coordination with OSSE, the central DCPS offices, other government agencies, and private partners, the Administration has made significant progress in identifying student, family and program needs; developing new strategies that focus on employment while in school; increasing options and opportunities that assist students in making career choices; and, increasing awareness of support services and employment opportunities in the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area.

As a result of the realignment in the Vocational Rehabilitation Services Division (VRSD) and expansion of the Transition Unit, the process of student referrals for services has been realigned to facilitate a more efficient transfer to a vocational rehabilitation counselor so that they can complete the IPE process prior to the student exiting high school. The Deputy Director of DDS/RSA appointed an Interim Coordinator while conducting a national search for a Transition Coordinator.

The provision of technical assistance to students and their families, guardians and surrogates in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from secondary school to post-school activities and inclusion in the adult community is stipulated in the amended MOA with DCPS and an OSSE January 5, 2010 Memorandum.

On January 5, 2010, the State Superintendent of Education issued a Memorandum to the Chancellor, District of Columbia Public Schools; the Public Charter School Board of Directors, the Public Charter School Directors; and principals of DC Public Schools regarding secondary transition. This document clarifies what is required of all Local Education Agencies (LEAs) to ensure the District of Columbia has in place secondary transition policies and procedures, as required by IDEA and Title 5, Chapter 30 of the District of Columbia Municipal Regulations (DCMR). The document further emphasizes the roles and responsibilities of LEAs to prepare students with disabilities for postsecondary education, vocational education, integrated employment, continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation upon graduation or exiting high school. It clearly states and defines the coordinated set of activities in the transition process. Importantly, the document instructs the LEAS to invite a representative from DC RSA to IEP meetings and to invite other public agencies that are providing transition services as well.

DDS/RSA is working with OSSE to develop and implement a formal MOA. Finalizing the MOA has been a key goal for transition services in FY 2011. The MOA is in the final stage and scheduled to be signed by all parties by September 30, 2011.

The District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS), Charter Schools, and Private Schools continue to work with the Administration in the “Transition Individual Educational Plan” process. Schools invite the appropriate representatives that may be responsible for providing or paying for transition services, when the goal of the IEP meeting is to discuss transition services.

To plan effective transition services for students with disabilities, it is essential that all invited key representatives encourage and support participation in this process by the special education coordinator (SEC) or designated special education staff in identifying students with IEPs or 504 Plans; tracking referrals for VR services during the 11th grade or junior year; contacting the DC RSA transition specialist or VR counselor assigned to the school to commence the coordination of transition services; contact the youth and family member(s) or legal guardian and maintain contact throughout the first half of the school year during the student’s junior year of secondary school; and, transferring to the vocational rehabilitation counselor referrals for all junior and seniors to ensure the vocational rehabilitation counselor determines eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services and develops the IPE prior to the student’s anticipated exit from secondary school.

The Administration allocates a large percentage of its staffing resources to transition services for students with disabilities. The staffing resources include four transition specialists and four rehabilitation counselors, who are assigned to all of the secondary schools in the District of Columbia. There also is a rehabilitation assistant and transition unit manager as part of the Transition Team.

As previously stated, the purpose of the MOA is to foster cooperation and collaboration between DCPS, DDS/RSA, and DDS/DDA. The Administration works to encourage other agencies to enter into formal agreements with DDS/RSA and DCPS to address consultation, coordination, and the provision of technical assistance to students [beginning at age 16 or earlier] and families in the development of vocational and independent living goals in preparation for the successful movement from school to employment, continuing education, and independent living.

The roles and responsibilities for each partner agency are:

1. The local education agencies are responsible for the development, implementation and cost of educational and vocational/transition programs that are consistent with the mandate for the development and implementation of a transition plan as part of each student’s Individualized Education Program (IEP) under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA).

2. The Developmental Disabilities Administration will provide service coordination for all eligible students and, will refer students in DDA who are deemed eligible for supported employment or other employment services to RSA. The Administration will provide case management administration for students receiving supported employment services.

3. The Administration will provide technical assistance and consultation to the school staff, students (beginning at age 16), and families in planning for the transition of students from school to post-school activities and the development of vocational and independent living goals in preparation for the successful movement from school to employment and/or independent living.

The DDS/RSA Transition Unit staff have engaged in extensive outreach to students, their families and school staff, presenting and providing information on available vocational rehabilitation services and other resources at awareness events, exhibiting assistive technology devices; attending IEP meetings and school events (Back to School Nights, career planning fairs and assemblies), obtaining transition referrals from secondary schools for immediate submission to the vocational rehabilitation counselors; and, assisting the vocational counselors in the secondary schools.

The provision of technical assistance to students and their families, guardians and surrogates in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from secondary school to post-school activities and inclusion in the adult community is stipulated in the amended MOA and an OSSE January 5, 2010 Memorandum.

The Administration’s vocational rehabilitation counselors are assigned to the schools and are paired with transition specialists. Together they provide outreach, vocational rehabilitation referral information and orientation to students, school officials, parents, and others involved in transition services. The vocational rehabilitation counselor determines a student’s eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services, develops an approved Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), and sponsors the delivery of necessary transition services to assist the student with planning for and obtaining successful post-school employment.

The Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) is completed or updated as early as possible prior to the student’s anticipated school exit to allow for a smooth transition to the student’s desired post-school outcome. The Administration’s will make every effort to complete IPEs during the summer prior to a student’s senior year.

The Administration has a formal MOU with the DC Public Schools (DCPS), finalized on December 17, 2010, to allow transition specialists and rehabilitation counselors to gain access to the DCPS Easy IEP automated system, which will allow immediate access to retrieve the IEP and related reports on students with disabilities who are referred and who are preparing to exit secondary school. All members of the DDS/RSA transition team have been trained on the use of DCPS’s Easy IEP system. The Administration and DCPS have developed a joint Consent form, which also facilitates a referral from DCPS to RSA and the release of their information in Easy IEP.

The Youth and Transition Unit’s four (4) Transition Specialists and four (4) vocational rehabilitation counselors provide technical assistance to secondary school staff, youth with disabilities and their families. The scope of services provided by the transition staff spans a wide spectrum of outreach activities, including conducting workshops and informational sessions for parents and youth with disabilities on transition support, planning, career options, benefits considerations, independent living, accommodations, disclosure, etc.

In FY 2010, 822 youth were referred to the Administration for transition services. The percentage of transitioning youth with an IPE initiated was 30%.

Each Transition Specialist. Rehabilitation Counselor team is assigned to 17-22 secondary schools. Currently, almost 100 secondary schools have been assigned to the Youth and Transition Unit.

Aided by the transition specialists, the vocational rehabilitation counselors are providing outreach; vocational rehabilitation services; and orientation to students, school officials, parents, and others involved in the transition services process. The vocational rehabilitation counselor determines a student’s eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services, develops an approved Individualized Plan for Employment, and sponsors the delivery of necessary transition services to assist the student in planning for and obtaining successful post-school employment.

The goal of the Administration in FY 2012 continues to be to develop an Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) for students with disabilities prior to the student’s anticipated school exit to allow for smoother transition from high school to the student’s desired post-secondary outcome.

This screen was last updated on Aug 18 2011 8:23AM by sadcalbertr

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Cooperative Agreements with Private Non-Profit Organizations

The Department on Disability Services/Rehabilitation Services Administration utilizes Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) to provide services for DDS/RSA consumers. The Administration, through its Human Care Agreements (HCAs), continues working with its growing network of local private non-profit, community rehabilitation providers.

Currently, the Administration has implemented Human Care Agreements with 23 CRPs, to provide services to DDS/RSA consumers, with some providers offering multiple services. The HCAs includes six (6) service providers who provide Evidenced-Based Supported Employment services for individuals with mental health disabilities; fifteen (15) who provide supported employment, thirteen (13) service providers who provide direct job placement services, and two (2) who provide work adjustment training services. DDS also has added Benefits Analysis/Counseling as a set of services, for which three (3) providers have been approved.

The Administration is very excited about the inclusion of direct job placement service providers through Human Care Agreements awarded in Fiscal Year 2010 and 2011 to date. After the new HCAs were awarded, the Vocational Rehabilitation Services Division staff (managers, VR counselors and Transition Specialists) held several meetings for agency and vendor cross training in job readiness.

The Administration will provide one-time-only start-up funds to 6 mental health CRPs with active Human Care Agreements with DCRSA, to be used to increase each CRP’s effectiveness in providing vocational rehabilitation services to applicants or eligible individuals so that each CRP can hire a staff person to focus solely on providing job development, job placement and retention support, with all funds to be disbursed by September 30, 2011. Following this FY 2011 funding, not to exceed $500,000 of ARRA funds, the job development positions at each CRP will be sustained through the use of Title I funds consistent with federal requirements found at 34 CFR 361.5(b)(17) for a additional period not to exceed three years. During this period, DC RSA and DC DMH will also use fee for service contracts to provide services to VR consumers and to better enable the CRPs to sustain these positions.

The Administration has Contracting Officer Technical Representatives (COTR) to monitor day-to-day compliance with the HCA contracts for supported employment and job placement services. The solicitation for the Human Care Agreements is on-going, with the number of CRPs tripling in the past two years, from 7 in FY09 to 23 in FY11.

The following describes the programs and services provided to our consumers by the community rehabilitation programs that are currently working with the Administration:

Community Connections, Inc. is a private, not-for-profit mental health agency in Washington, D.C. Since 1984, Community Connections has worked with people who have been marginalized to assist them toward stable, integrated community living. Clinical programs, residential and supportive services, , and research projects play mutually supportive roles in achieving this goal.

Green Door provides vocational work adjustment training with emphasis on transitional employment for adults with significant and persistent mental illness to assist them in improving their functioning in the community, maximizing their community tenure and succeeding in obtaining and retaining employment.

Emphasis is placed on supported employment and transition consumers. Green Door has an agreement with the Administration to provide comprehensive independent living services to individuals with severe and persistent mental illness. The target population are adults eighteen years of age and older with a primary diagnosis of severe persistent mental illness, a significant number of whom have a secondary diagnosis of substance abuse. Many of these consumers are African American, Latino and Asian. The Green Door is a model psychosocial program certified by the International Center for Clubhouse Development. Program services that are offered include, but are not limited to counseling, peer and family counseling, educational program advocacy, continuing education, guidance counseling, pre-vocational skills, basic education and literacy GED training, life skills; and, information and referral for numerous support services.

Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Institute of Catholic Charities, a 501(c)3 organization, provides vocational and work adjustment training and work placement services to assist transition youth in preparing for the world of work, completing vocational evaluations and assessments, work adjustment training, supported employment, job placement and follow-along support. The Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Institute specializes in services to adults with intellectual disabilities but also provides services to individuals with physical disabilities, mobility impairments, sensory limitations, autism, mental disabilities and substance abuse. Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Institute of Catholic Charities engages students 16 and older in transition planning and career preparation, learning workplace skills, visiting a variety of places of employment, working in internships or competitive employment, and travel training. Graduating students are referred to adult service providers, Developmental Disabilities Administration, and Rehabilitation Services Administration, to ensure continued support and programming. Their staff communicates with each student’s family or residential staff to periodically clarify expectations, celebrate accomplishments, and look to the future.

Anchor Mental Health is a 501 (c) (3) not-for-profit organization, affiliated with the Archdiocese of Washington. Its mission is to provide the support necessary to empower adults recovering from mental illnesses to define and pursue their life goals. Anchor Enterprises helps consumers locate and hold competitive employment in the community. NISH contract job sites offer supported transitional employment opportunities for consumers who are not yet ready for competitive employment. Rehabilitation Services Program (RESP) is a structured day program which offers an array of rehabilitation, counseling and vocational services to help adults who have mental illnesses in their recovery efforts.

The Arc of DC, Inc., a non-profit agency, provides services to people with intellectual disabilities who may also have secondary disabilities. Services include, but are not limited to, supported employment, work adjustment training, and vocational training with an emphasis on transitional employment and job placement.

Creative Options & Employment, Inc. (COE) is a one stop non-profit community-based person-centered organization that assists people with disabilities by eliminating employment barriers, enhancing marketable skills, providing person-centered planning, fostering community inclusion and developing the necessary supports to maintain individual career and personal goals.

Deaf-Reach, Inc. was founded in 1972 by the National Health Care Foundation for the Deaf (Deaf-Reach) as a nonprofit 501(c)3 organization within the District of Columbia. Its mission is to maximize the self-sufficiency of deaf adults needing special services by providing supported employment, referral, education, advocacy, counseling, and housing.

National Children’s Center, Inc. (NCC), 501(c)3, is a recognized leader in providing comprehensive and innovative services for children and adults with developmental disabilities in the District of Columbia and Maryland. Their community-based services include early intervention, schools, employment, adult day and residential programs. These quality personalized lifespan services now benefit more than 500 infants, children and adults with developmental disabilities every day. Additionally, they offer supported employment services and long-term follow-along services for persons with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities.

Project ReDirect, Inc. has a mission to empower families to prevent child abuse, juvenile delinquency, and to work proactively to facilitate the restoration of the family. They provide supported employment and job placement services.

Psychiatric Center Chartered, Inc. is a private, certified mental health facility that has served the Washington Metropolitan area since 1973, and allows customers to remain in the community while receiving intensive therapy. The Rehabilitation and Employment Services Program continuum consists of six (6) interactive programs: psychosocial rehabilitation, prevocational training/counseling, sheltered work, work readiness, supported employment and transitional employment.

St. John’s Community Services (SJCS) is a nonprofit, community-based organization that supports children and adults with intellectual, developmental, physical and other disabilities. SJCS’s “support without walls” activist approach enables people with disabilities to fully participate in and become contributors to the communities of their choice in education, employment, adult day, and residential services. SJCS employment services in the District of Columbia, Pennsylvania (Philadelphia), Northern Virginia and West Tennessee support people with disabilities to explore career options and to acquire and retain competitive employment. People supported include those with intellectual disabilities, learning disabilities, mental health issues, visual impairment, autism, physical disabilities, traumatic brain injury, stroke survivors, as well as welfare recipients.

As individuals explore their job interests and express preferences, SJCS staff work with them to determine their goals and the support needed to do the job successfully. SJCS employment specialists provide comprehensive vocational assessments, career planning, job development and selection, on-the-job training, job coaching, and other life skills training. At the same time, SJCS supports employers and co-workers to work effectively with new employees. The SJCS staff works to meet the needs of both employees with a disability and employers, while gradually increasing the probability for a long-term employee-employer relationship. Additionally, SJCS provides consulting services to local, national and international organizations.

New Life, Incorporated provides independent living skills and recreational services for wheelchair users who are youths and adults with developmental and physical disabilities living in the Washington, DC area. Through supervised interactions with other youths and adult wheelchair users, consumers receive training in a wide variety of wheelchair sports. Over the past 30 years, many consumers have attended Special Needs summer camps and participated in wheelchair sports activities and games. Through one-on-one mentorship and motivational, life-changing experiences, youth wheelchair users have emerged better equipped to tackle the challenges of living independently in the community and seeking employment.

Capitol Hill Supportive Services Programs, Inc. provides job readiness skill training, preparing and assisting individuals to obtain employment by locating job openings, assessing job requirements, matching job requirements with the individual’s capabilities, and providing follow-up services to both the individual and the employer.

Pathways to Housing DC was founded by Dr. Sam Tsemberis in 1992, and is widely credited as being the originator of the Housing First model among people with psychiatric disabilities. Housing First provides housing first and then combines that housing with supportive treatment services in the areas of mental and physical health, substance abuse, education, and employment. Housing is provided in apartments scattered throughout a community. This “scattered site” model fosters a sense of home and self-determination, and it helps speed the reintegration of Pathways’ clients into the community. The model has been replicated in more than 40 cities across the United States, as well as in Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, Spain and Portugal. In 2009, the agency received three prestigious federal stimulus grants from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to build new programs in new communities. SAMHSA is the federal agency charged with improving rehabilitative services to reduce the impacts of substance abuse and mental illness. The vocational habilitation services program consists of pre-vocational training and supported employment, computer training, mentorship programs, GED and SAT preparation, educational training, and the enlistment and involvement of public and private service agencies, corporations, educational institutions, and governmental entities. They also are an approved DC DDA Medicaid Waiver provider of prevocational habilitation, independent habilitation and supported employment.

The Art and Drama Therapy Institute, Inc. (ADTI) is a medically supervised, therapeutic day treatment center for adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. ADTI is located in an economically deprived part of Northeast Washington, D.C., less than three miles from The White House. Its innovative approach to the care and treatment of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities through the use of art, music, movement, and drama therapies, along with innovative behavior management techniques, has been hailed by the President’s Committee on Mental Retardation and The Washington Post as “a national model.” ADTI is home to the Therapeutic Noh Theater, directed by Master Teacher, Dr. Sirkku M. Sky Hiltunen. In addition, ADTI has built its own authentic Keiko Komatsubara Noh Stage—the first of only three (3) in the United States. Dr. M. “Muggy Do” Dickinson, is the Founder and Producer of ADTI’s Inspirational Choir and Moroccan Ensemble, whose CD received two nominations for a Grammy. ADTI provides job placement and supported employment services.

Work Opportunities Unlimited, Inc. provides supported employment services that include support services, individual placements, benefit planning and asset management, vocational evaluation, situational assessments, and job readiness and job placement services. Their Career Services Team works with both the Rehabilitation Services Administration and the Developmental Disabilities Administration.

Goodwill of Greater Washington provides work adjustment training, supported employment and job placement services for adults with disabilities. For over 75 years, Goodwill of Greater Washington has provided vocational services and employment to individuals with disabilities and disadvantage. Goodwill works closely with local employers to develop programs that prepare people for jobs in a wide variety of industries. In addition to formal classroom training, Goodwill prepares clients for permanent jobs through a combination of supported, temporary or transitional employment at a Goodwill facility or in the community.

Global Business and Management Solutions provides work adjustment training, supported employment and job placement services for adults with disabilities. They also offer job training and support to employers.

SOC Enterprises provides job placement and supported employment. SOC’s employment and rehabilitation services assist, empower and support individuals with disabilities to achieve employment, independence and integration in the workplace and in the community. SOC’s comprehensive rehabilitative services promote and increase self-sufficiency, quality of life and/or occupational skill development.

RCM of Washington provides job placement services for adults with significant disabilities. They also provide community living services and supports, and individualized planning that assists people in achieving goals they set for themselves.

Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind helps people who are blind or visually impaired in the greater Washington region to overcome the challenges of vision loss. Their work enables people of all ages who are blind or visually impaired to remain independent, active and productive in society. Their programs and services include adaptive technology, professional and career services training, low vision services, rehabilitation, counseling, children’s services, independent living and older adult programs.

Innovative Concepts is a new agency providing supported employment services to DDS/RSA consumers.

Marriott Foundation Bridges from School to Work develops and supports mutually beneficial job placements to meet the workforce needs of local employers and the vocational goals of young people with disabilities. The Foundation was established to enhance employment opportunities for young people with disabilities. Their services include transition planning, career preparation support, job placement and follow-along services.

This screen was last updated on Jul 11 2011 12:10PM by sadcalbertr

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

Arrangements and Cooperative Agreements for the Provision of Supported Employment Services:

The Administration’s Supported Employment program (SE) for persons with persistent mental illness utilizes an evidenced-based approach to help individuals with the most significant disabilities to secure, retain, or regain competitive employment in an integrated setting that pays minimum or better wages, and provides benefits. Supported Employment services are individualized and include, but are not limited to:

• Counseling and guidance

• Job coaching (on–the-job training)

• Rapid job search and placement

• Short-term training

• Follow-along (unlimited supports)

• Development of natural supports.

The Administration coordinates its Supported Employment services through partnerships with DDS’s Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) and the Department of Mental Health (DMH). These partners have worked together to develop a cadre of community based providers with expertise in serving persons diagnosed with developmental disabilities and persons diagnosed with serious mental illness. DDS/RSA and DDA have continued to establish Human Care Agreements with additional supported employment providers for who serve people with developmental disabilities.

The Evidenced-Based Practice (EBP) in supported employment for persons with persistent mental illness is a model that emphasizes employment as an alternative to other models; it has been adopted by the Administration. The model allows the Administration to make supported employment services accessible to individuals with a lack of job readiness, chronic substance abuse, a history of violent behavior, minimal intellectual capacity and/ or symptoms of a mental illness. The Administration continues to improve and strengthen its partnerships with the Department of Mental Health (DMH) and the Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) to maximize the delivery of supported employment services for individuals with significant disabilities and to improve competitive employment outcomes for its shared consumers.

As the program progresses, the Administration continues its role on the Interagency Committee on Supported Employment (ICSE) reviewing DDA consumers being considered for supported employment. The ICSE, comprised of DDA, DMH and the Administration, is working to increase the number of referrals for supported employment. The Administration’s supported employment staff continues to streamline the application process to ensure that notification of appointments, eligibility determinations, and the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE) are completed in accordance with federal requirements.

Long term follow-along services for consumers are provided by DDA and DMH. DDS/DDA administers a Medicaid Home and Community Based waiver, which includes long term supports for consumers with developmental disabilities in Supported Employment as well as an array of other services, such as residential, transportation, and homemaker services that may be required to support an individual. DMH provides on-going support through its core mental health agencies.

Six (6) private non-profit organizations (Anchor Mental Health; Community Connections, Inc.; Deaf-Reach, Inc.; Green Door; Pathways to Housing; and Psychiatric Center Chartered Inc.) are providing people with persistent mental illness with Evidenced Based Supported Employment. Seventeen (17) providers (Goodwill of Greater Washington; Arc of DC, Inc.; Creative Options & Employment, Inc.; National Children’s Center, Inc.; Pride Industries; Project ReDirect, Inc.; St. John’s Community Services, Lt. Joseph P. Kennedy Institute; RCM of Washington; SOC Enterprises; New Life; Innovative Concepts; Global Business and Management Solutions; Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind; Capital Hill Supportive Services Programs, Inc.; Art & Drama Therapy Institute; and Work Opportunities Unlimited), provide supported employment services that include, but are to limited to, work adjustment training, job coaching, and job placement services .

This screen was last updated on Jul 11 2011 12:28PM by sadcalbertr

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

A training consultant was hired by DDS/RSA in fiscal year 2009 to assist the agency in the development of an in-house data system to analyze and track annual personnel needs and personnel development. The data system includes a CSPD Annual Individual Training Plan, Instructions for completion of the Training Plan and CSPD College Checklist. The Administration maintains annual employee profiles within the Office of Vocational Supports. The Office of Vocational Supports, in conjunction with DDS’s Human Resources, tracks and documents counselor college courses and in-service training credits for CRC certification and/or maintenance. In addition, the Office of Vocational Supports provides information to supervisors, counselors and support staff on relevant training opportunities to enhance service delivery to our customers.

(1) Qualified Personnel Needs

A. Number of personnel in relation to the number of individuals served

The total number of personnel employed by the Administration in the provision of providing vocational rehabilitation service is. The Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) Counselor total number is 39. The total number of support staff for VR counselors is 6 . Total population served in FY 2010 was 6896 individuals with disabilities. Therefore, the average counselor ratio currently is 175:1- The agency is working aggressively to fill the 6 vacant VR counselor positions, which will bring all VR counselor’s caseloads below RSA’s target of 150:1.

B. Number of personnel currently needed by the agency to provide vocational services by personnel category

The total number of personnel vacancies in positions currently needed by the Administration to provide VR Services

Supervisors: 1

Counselors: 6

Support staff: 1

During FY 10, the agency lost 8 counselors due to resignations or other reasons.

C. Projections of the number of personnel, by personnel category

The estimate of the number of persons needed by the agency to provide VR services over the next five years is based on the estimate of the number of persons expected to retire or leave the agency and the projected number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, over the next five years.

STAFF PROGRAM ATTRITION RETIREMENT

7 Supervisors VR 0 2

47 VR Counselors VR 5 7

7 Rehab Assistants VR 0 0

At this time, there are two (2) individuals in supervisory positions and seven (7) vocational rehabilitation counselors planning for retirement in the next five (5) years. A total of 9 staff are expected to retire or leave the field.

Several current staff members are completing courses and course requirements to sit for the CRC. The Administration will continue vigorous recruitment efforts to attract CRC’s and prepare current VR staff to become certified.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Current VR Counselors 39 6 6
2 Projected VR Counselors 47 5 7
3 VR Supervisors 7 1 2
4 Rehab Assistants 7 0 0
5 0 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

The following institutions of higher education prepare vocational rehabilitation professionals: The George Washington University; University of Maryland, College Park; University of Maryland, Eastern Shore; and, Coppin State University. A number of on-line programs are available across the country without regard to physical jurisdiction.

Several current staff members are completing courses and course requirements to enable them to sit for the CRC.

Currently, two (2) VR counselors are enrolled in the Master’s Program at The George Washington University in rehabilitation counseling. Six (6) VR counselors have been enrolled in core courses that will prepare them to sit for the CRC. Two passed the CRC exam in April 2011 and the other four (4) will be taking the CRC exam this year. The Administration is also engaging in vigorous recruitment to fill the current VR counselor vacancies with people with their CRC or who will be able to site for the CRC exam. All 39 VR Counselors have Master’s Degrees.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 George Washington University 2 2 0 2
2 University of Maryland, Eastern Shore 2 0 0 2
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

The Administration recently began recruiting counselors at the desired grade 12 pay level, the highest grade level for a rehabilitation counselor. Applicants at this level must have completed a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling with at least two (2) years of experience and CRC.

The Administration has formally established a recruitment plan that addresses the hiring of a sufficient number of vocational rehabilitation counselors within DDS/RSA. Current recruitment efforts include (1) posting vacancy announcements on the D.C. Office of Personnel website, and (2) posting vacancy announcements at community programs and through professional organizations.

The recruitment plan consists of two major goals:

Goal 1: Expand recruitment efforts

Objective 1.1 Contact graduate school programs and develop relationships with the program chairs. Maintain appropriate contact information to mail notices of job openings

Objective 1.2 Schedule attendance at job fairs at colleges and universities

Objective 1.3 Develop opportunities for paid and non-paid internships with colleges and universities

Goal 2: Increase retention efforts

Objective 2.1 Continue DDS/RSA new counselor orientation program

Objective 2.1 Increase opportunities for professional growth through increased opportunities for continuous learning through in-service training and workshops

Objective 2.3 Expand opportunities for employee recognition

The Department on Disability Services (DDS) Office of Human Capital has established a formalized exit interview process with all staff leaving the agency. The purpose of the interview is to determine the reason an employee is separating from employment with the agency, if they have recommendations to improve the quality of services, and to learn about their experience with the agency.

The Administration encompasses a uniquely diverse staff. Currently, it has 16 bilingual staff. We are continuing to expand our outreach to attract employees proficient in Spanish and sign language and all languages served by the District of Columbia and covered entities identified by the D.C. Office of Human Rights. Languages in which current staff are bilingual include French, Spanish, Ebo, American Sign Language (ASL), Thai, and Mandarin.

 

(1) Standards consistent with nationally or state approved certification

The Administration bases its personnel standards for VR counselors on the degree needed to meet the national CRC requirements through CRCC. New hires as a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor must have a master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or Counseling. To-date, all of our counseling staff have master’s degrees. We have approximately 14 counselors who can sit for the CRCC examination.

of Certified Rehabilitation Counselors of Counselors eligible to sit for the CRC of Counselors staff with Master Degrees of staff with Bachelor Degrees

There are:

12 - Certified Rehabilitation Counselors

6 - Supervisors

1 - QA Monitor

3 - Administrators/Managers 12

All 39 Counselors have Master degrees 0

(2) Strategies to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet the standards

The Office of Vocational Supports requested copies of staff transcripts and copies of their master degrees. The majority of the staff complied and submitted this information. There has been discussion with the CRCC and with a representative on the committee from The George Washington University to determine if the staff determined eligible under D4 will still be eligible to sit for the CRCC examination.

A DDS Human Resources Specialist notified the ASME Local 2401 union about the pending letters that were given to the Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists because of the CSPD requirements. Last fiscal year, staff were notified and given their CSPD letter and were asked to return their letters to the Office of Human Capital with their plan to pursue certification. The Administration has established and continues to implement the following process to assist counselors to meet CSPD requirements:

1. The Administration will pay for 3 credit hours a semester including books for on-line or classroom courses.

2. The Administration will pay the one-time cost of the CRC examination.

3. The Administration will allot hours during the work day for staff to attend training.

4. After negotiation with a university offering the rehabilitation counseling program, the Administration will arrange to offer courses on site.

(3) Plan for retraining , recruitment and hiring of personnel

(A) Specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel

Agency jobs are listed on the D.C. Department of Human Resources website. The Administration currently collaborates with The George Washington University and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore. The Administration has hosted interns from both universities and has recruited numerous staff from both of these Rehabilitation Counseling programs.

The Administration will assist counselors with Master’s degrees in taking core courses that will allow them to sit for the CRC exam. In addition, the Administration will encourage staff to enroll in Master’s degree programs in rehabilitation counseling. The Administration will assist staff with 3 credit hours per semester and pay for staff to sit for the CRC examination.

Additionally, the Administration has launched outreach activities in the community as well as at vocational training programs, colleges and universities to attract young professionals interested in embarking on a career in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling.

B.Time frames to meet the standards

The Administration notified counselors by letter of the CSPD requirement in March, 2010. The labor union was notified of the federal requirements. All staff must complete CSPD requirements by October 1, 2015. The Administration will implement incremental time frames to ensure that all staff who pledge to complete university programs can do so before the deadline. Follow-up contact will be made with each counselor on an individual basis to formalize the proposed training plan and checklist of required college courses based on the formal analysis of their transcripts from the selected university program. As of October 1, 2015, any remaining VR counselor who does not meet the CSPD requirement can no longer perform the duties of a “qualified rehabilitation counselor.”

C. Procedures for evaluating progress in hiring and retraining personnel

1. Finalize and clarify any remaining issues with Human Resources and the local union

2. Finalize review of counselor transcripts and initiate follow-up contact with counselors to develop a formalized training plan.

3. Clarify procedures for requesting training with all staff.

4. Clarify responsibilities of designated staff within the Office of Vocational Supports related to monitoring and evaluating CSPD performance for all employees.

5. Maintain up-to-date records of training activities.

6. Complete annual training plans on all staff.

Annually, all DDS/RSA staff receives an e-performance evaluation from their immediate supervisor. The employee will update the training plan along with their supervisor as part of e-performance reviews. The Office of Vocational Supports will track receipt of the plans and monitor compliance.

D. Identification of initial minimum requirements

The desired minimum state requirement for the Administration is a Master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling and having a CRC or being CRC eligible. If, after extensive recruitment efforts, the Administration is unable to find acceptable candidates meeting the desired qualifications, new hires will be limited to candidates with Master’s degrees in counseling, special education, social work or one of the 13 human service categories recognized by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification under Category R. A condition of employment will require the candidate to enroll in an approved graduate program in rehabilitation counseling with the goal of obtaining a Master’s degree and CRC certification. The agency will pay a minimum of three credit hours per semester.

 

(1) System of Staff Development with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

Over the last two years, supervisors and staff have received intensive training, attended conferences and received incentives to enhance their knowledge of best practices for quality service delivery. Training received through TACE at The George Washington University included supported employment and independent living, ethics and VR case management.

Additional training included:

1. Employment Issues in Multiple Sclerosis: Implications of Adult Onset Disabilities

2. Independent Living: Indentifying IL vs. VR Cases

3. Part 1: Medical Aspects of Psychiatric Disabilities

4. Part 2: Medical Aspects of Psychiatric Disabilities

5. Ethics in the Real World

6. Medical Aspects of Disabilities/Neurological Conditions

7. Window-Eyes Training

8. Cost Participation Regulation Training

9. Ethical Workplace Culture and Rehabilitation Counseling Practice

10. George Washington University’s 12th Annual Rehabilitation Counseling Symposium

11. Social networking Ethics and Best Practices

12. Case management information system: Libera System 7 database training

13. Secondary transition workshop

14. Documentation training

15. Disability awareness conference

16. City-wide transition workgroup training

17. MRA DORS training conference

18. COTR training

19. Employer contact training

20. Mini-training on informed choice/eligibility

21. Mini-training on job development

22. Supervisory training

23. Asset development for people with disabilities summit

24. Independent living/Supported Living training

25. National Association of Convenience Stores training

26. Policy training

27. Phase II: Case Management training

28. Phase III: Case Management training

29. Annual CSAVR Meeting and Training sessions

30. MD Division of Rehabilitation Services-Scaling the Heights of Excellence

31. CSUN Annual Conference

32. ILLOWA AHEAD Regional Conference

33. National Transition Community of Practice Meeting

34. National Rehabilitation Association (NRA) Convention

35. ASPE National Conference

36. American Council for Blind Conference

37. National Federation of the Blind Conference

38. National Association of the Deaf (NAD) 50th Biennial Conference

39. Regional disability meeting for SSA Supervisors in Philadelphia

40. DCRSA Regulation Training: Review of Regulation Requirements

41. DCRSA Regulation Training: Strategies to Improve Employment Outcomes

42. Overview of Ethics

43. Project SEARCH summer training institute

44. Project SEARCH annual conference

The Administration counselors underwent intensive training with training consultant, Barbara Lewis, a certified rehabilitation counselor from August of 2009 through February 2010. All aspects of the vocational rehabilitation process were covered in the training including case management, caseload management, vocational assessment, eligibility and IPE development, job placement and development. The training was approved through the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification. Six (6) intensive 2 day phases of training were conducted covering the federal regulations, ethics for rehabilitation counselors, policy and procedures and applied aspects of the VR process.

Objectives of the training were multi-faceted addressing issues such as state and federal regulations, informed choice, transition services, supported employment eligibility, Order of Selection, case file documentation, intermediate objectives and service delivery coordination with employers. Additionally, the Administration launched outreach activities in the community as well as vocational training programs and colleges and universities to attract young professionals interested in embarking on a career in vocational rehabilitation counseling.

Administrative staff within the Office of Vocational Supports have been charged with the responsibility to seek out, plan and coordinate on-site and offsite training opportunities for staff on an on-going basis.

Additionally, the agency has launched outreach activities in the community as well as in vocational training programs and colleges and universities to attract young professionals interested in embarking in a career in Vocational Rehabilitation Counseling.

 

The Administration will continue to employ personnel who are able to communicate in the native languages of applicants for services and clients who have limited English speaking ability. The Administration provides accommodations for special communication needs such as interpreters, specialized services and materials for individuals who are deaf, blind or deaf-blind. Sign language skills are considered a minimum qualification for positions providing services to persons who are deaf and/or hearing impaired. The Administration’s services population continues to expand because of increased outreach efforts. The agency seeks to serve individuals with disabilities from the six languages identified by the D.C. Office of Human Rights. The languages include Spanish, Chinese, French, Vietnamese, Korean and Amharic. The agency will continue emphasize the bilingual capacity of staff in recruitment efforts. The Agency is in compliance with the Language Access Act. That is, DDS has a language access plan and language access coordinator, who tracks the multi-lingual capacity of DDS’s staff and seek to expand the languages with which staff can communicate with customers. The bilingual capacity of the DDS/RSA staff is as follows:

Staff who speak Spanish

5 Counselors/VR Specialists

1 Social Insurance Specialist

1 Program Analyst

1 Supervisory VR Specialist

1 Program Manager

1 Rehabilitation Assistant

1 Sign Language Interpreter

Staff who are fluent in American Sign Language

1 ASL Interpreter

2 Managers/Supervisory VR Counselors

1 Program Monitor

1 Counselors/VR Specialist

1 Program Analyst

Staff who speak French

2 Counselors/VR Specialists

1 Social Insurance Specialist

Staff who speak Ebo

1 Counselor/VR Specialist

1 Clerical assistant

Staff who speak Thai

1 Counselor/VR Specialist

Staff who speak Amheric

1 Social Insurance Specialist

Staff who speak Iranian

1 Counselor/VR Specialist

Within DDS, in the offices shared with RSA, there are additional staff who speak some of the languages above as well as staff who speak Haitian Creole, Telugu, Hindi, German, Japanese, Yoruba, Mandarin, Portuguese and Kru. DDS is seeking additional staff who speak Chinese, Vietnamese and Korean.

 

The Administration staff receives training on a continuous basis. The Administration is fully committed to providing effective, coordinated transition services. The agency has created a Youth and Transition Unit that currently employs four (4) transition specialists and four (4) vocational rehabilitation counselors. The transition specialists received specific training on transition services from Mrs. Barbara Lewis, training consultant and staff from the TACE. Several managers and staff attended the Annual National Community of Practices in Transition Conference in North Carolina. Two (2) agency staff, a program manager and counselor along with a representative from the District of Columbia Public Schools visited the California Department of Rehabilitation Services and several public school sites to observe and review cooperative agreements and collaborative working relationships in the implementation of transition services. DDS/RSA staff participate actively on DC’s Community of Practice on Transition, coordinated by the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE). DDS/RSA staff also remain active in Partners in Transition activities, which included on-going activities with DCPS, OSSE and other public and private partners who work with youth with disabilities in the District of Columbia. Staff from DDS/RSA and DCPS also engage in joint training, which included private employment service providers, on transition services for the students in Project SEARCH.

This screen was last updated on Aug 18 2011 8:26AM by sadcalbertr

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Statewide Assessments; Annual Estimates; Annual State Goals and Priorities; Strategies and Progress Reports

(a) Results of Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of the Needs

of Individuals with Disabilities and Need to Establish,

Develop, or Improve Community Rehabilitation Programs

Annual Update Results of Comprehensive Statewide Assessment of the Rehabilitation Needs of Individuals with Disabilities and the Need to Establish, Develop or Improve Community Rehabilitation Programs

OVERVIEW

The Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration (DCRSA), along with the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council (“Administration” or “DCSRC”) contracted with Dan Hopkins & Associates, Inc. (DHA) in fiscal year 2008 to conduct its three year comprehensive statewide needs assessment. In 2012, DCRSA and the DCSRC will conduct a new comprehensive needs assessment. The 2008 needs assessment focused on four sections: (i) individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services, (ii) individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program, (iii) individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system. (iv.) Additionally, the assessment provided information stressing the Administration’s need to establish, develop, or improve its relationship with community rehabilitation programs within the District of Columbia.

As a result of the analysis of the findings reported in the 2008 District-Wide Comprehensive Needs Assessment, the Administration validated the need to enhance vocational rehabilitation services to persons with disabilities in several areas. The areas of need identified were (1) increased emphasis on employment or on the execution of service delivery strategies geared toward achievement of quality employment outcomes, (2) strengthening RSA’s working relationship with the workforce investment system to better respond to the employment needs of individuals with disabilities, (3) increased collaboration with both Centers for Independent Living (CIL) and community rehabilitation programs (CRP) to promote the expansion and establishment of CIL and CRP services in designated areas of need in the District of Columbia, (4) expanded evidence-based supported employment to the entire state, and (5) addressing the perception of some residents that vocational rehabilitation services are inaccessible to African-American consumers.

(i)Results regarding individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services

Over the past year, the Administration has dramatically increased its capacity to provide supported employment services in integrated work settings to persons with serious mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injuries. The Administration has increased the number of providers it contracts with from 5 to 22 during this period. The Administration has an open Human Care Agreement solicitation to further enhance its capabilities in this area. The DDS RSA also is providing up to $500,000 of its one-time American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) funding to work with the DC Department on Mental Health (DMH) to bolster that DMH’s provider network’s ability to provide evidence-based supported employment services to at least 250 more DC residents with serious mental illness.

Since the beginning of fiscal year 2010, the Administration has approved 17 new providers under the Performance Based Contract category.. The Unit is currently working with six (6) service providers from the Department of Mental Health who are using an Evidenced-based Supported Employment Services model (EBSE) to provide supported employment services to District of Columbia residents with severe mental illnesses. The Unit supervisor meets monthly with the DC Department of Mental Health to identify strategies that agencies can implement to improve their EBSE services. The EBSE model provides rapid services to consumers with co-occurring disorders, including drug use and long term mental illnesses. There is a treatment team to ensure these consumers have medication management and counseling support.

The Administration and the DC Department of Mental Health are currently working with the six (6) providers of Evidence-Based Supported Employment to maximize the benefits and services that are provided to clients with a history of severe mental illness. To that end, the DC Department of Mental Health pays for the services of Job Club, Social Security benefits counseling and treatment team activities and coordination.

The number of clients served through the Supported Employment program continues to increase. To date in FY 2011, over 350 consumers already are being served. The Administration is on track to exceed the previous year’s numbers.

Overall, the Administration placed 475 consumers in competitive employment in FY 2010 as successful Status 26 closures.

The Administration has begun the expansion of Independent Living (IL) services for individuals with the most significant disabilities. The Administration, in collaboration with the SILC and DC Center for Independent Living, developed a three-year 2011-2013 State Plan for Independent Living (SPIL) to address future goals and needs of consumers with significant disabilities who reside in the District of Columbia. DC CIL is working to establish offices in additional locations in the District to serve the needs of the emerging Hispanic population and other emerging multicultural population, utilizing American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) funding.

The data reported in the U.S. Department of Education, Section 704 – Annual Performance Report Revision for State Independent Living Services Program (IL) document incremental progress in this area over the past year. 2009 was the first year the Independent Living Services Program (IL) had a separate unit within the Administration. The IL Unit began to create a plan with goals specifically targeted to outreach and case find consumers living in the unserved and underserved neighborhoods of the District of Columbia. In FY2008, the IL Unit began operation with 36 records and ended FY2009 with 62 records. In FY 2010, 85 people were served. Fourteen (14) consumers were closed successfully, reaching their Independent Living outcomes for FY2009. For FY 2010, thirty-five new people developed Independent Living Plans and three (3) completed all of the goals they set. However, substantial goals were achieved by consumers served. Specifically, numbers who achieved IL goals include self-advocacy/self-empowerment – 71; communication – 47; mobility/transportation – 52; community-based living – 48; educational – 54; vocational – 3; self-care – 70; information access/technology – 29; personal resource management – 32; and community/social participation – 59.

The IL Unit staff was very active throughout the city; and, therefore, able to add 15 more consumers to the existing IL caseload of 70. Through the existing Human Care Agreement contract with the Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, IL skills training was provided to consumers with low vision or those who were legally blind or blind. For peer counseling, RSA consumers were referred to the DC Center for Independent Living (DCCIL), which runs several 6-week peer counseling training groups. Advocacy, information and referral services were provided in-house by the IL Unit staff assistant.

The IL Unit, along with all DC Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration staff, participated in monthly training sessions conducted by DDS/RSA Trainer and Operations Manager, Barbara Lewis and local partners. The sessions focused on the policies and procedures governing the provision of VR services, as well as e-performance training; work incentive and benefits overview training at The George Washington University by the National Disability Institute; Cultural Dialogue training: Asian cultures; Mayor’s Annual Disability Awareness Conference; DC Language Access Act Conference; Policy and Procedures for Drug Testing DC Employees Forum; and, the DC Mental Health Conference training. Requests for information and referral were generally related to the following issues: Special Transportation (enrollment in Metro Access and registering complaints concerning delays in their services); how to apply for health insurance; how to apply for subsidized housing; how to apply and enroll in Medicaid/Medicare services; how to apply for and receive food stamps and Income Maintenance Administration (IMA) services; how to obtain personal care assistants and home health aides; and, how to receive home delivered meals.

The IL staff received a letter of commendation from the Mayor of the District of Columbia for providing “outstanding customer services.” IL services provided included: Orientation and Mobility Training; computer skills; Braille training; low vision aids including glasses; aids and devices (hearing aids, amplifiers, Cap Tel phones) for individuals with communication impairments and those who are deaf and hard of hearing; aids to improve mobility and self-care; customized training on how to use the low vision aids and aids for individuals who are deaf and hard of hearing; personal care assistants; home health aides; home delivered meals; customized prosthesis and customized orthopedic shoes; and, customized wheelchairs to improve mobility and self-care.

(ii) Results regarding individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program

The Administration remains committed to providing outreach to unserved and underserved individuals and in seeking referrals from non-profit and for profit agencies serving minorities, owned or controlled by minorities and medical professionals who serve minority populations.

As a result of enhanced outreach efforts, the Administration has been able to identify and provide VR services to more DC residents with disabilities. A comparison between the end of second quarter of FY 2009 and the end of second quarter of FY 2010, shows a fifteen percent (15%) increase in the number of individuals applying for vocational rehabilitation services (1140 individuals to 1342 individuals). For FY 2011, the number applying for services at the end of the second quarter was 1,584, which represents another increase of over 15% over FY 2010.

Furthermore the Administration substantially increased the number of consumers with an implemented Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE), which resulted in an increase in individuals receiving employment and training related services.

DDS/RSA Data for FY 2010 %

Gender

Male 47.2%

Female 52.8%

Total 100.0%

Ethnic Group

Am Indian/Alaskan 1.61%

Asian 0.76%

Black 79.91%

Hispanic Origin 7.24%

Pacific Islander 0.51%

White 9.88%

Not reported 0.09%

Total 100.00%

In looking at access to VR services by unserved, underserved and minority populations, the 2008 Census data showed that people with disabilities in the District of Columbia were fairly equal in gender, primarily single, with the data showing 91.3% Black, 7.7% White, and 5.2% Hispanic; while survey data revealed 85% being Black/non-Hispanic. The 2008 data revealed two-thirds of consumers served were coded as having a mental disability as the primary disability.

Recently released census data shows that one in five (5) DC residents live below the poverty line. Residents with disabilities are more likely to be low income than those without a disability. DC residents who have a disability are twice as likely to be low-income as those without a disability. Almost half of all DC residents with a disability are low income. (DC Fiscal Policy Institute, 2010)

The economic profile for the District of Columbia cited from the 2008 American Community Survey (ACS) compiled by the U.S. Census Bureau and reported in the September 5, 2008 District-Wide Comprehensive Needs Assessment remains the latest data available. Washington, DC is first among 40 American cities with the largest gap between the poor and the rich. The employment rates for District of Columbia residents with a disability over 18 years of age was reported as 31.8% by the 2008 American Community Survey.

The Administration embarked on extensive outreach efforts during the current fiscal year to expand services to minorities as well as underserved and unserved populations. During the past two years, the Administration placed counselors in 17-21 itinerant outreach locations throughout the city, with an emphasis on site with large underserved populations. Laptop computers and cell phones were purchased by the agency using ARRA funds for the counselors at the designated sites.

The Administration moved to 1125 15th Street, N.W. in September 2009, where it is co-located with the DC Developmental Disabilities Administration. The new location is approximately seven walking blocks from the White House, the major business district (K Street, NW), and two of the city’s largest hospitals (The George Washington University Hospital and Georgetown University Hospital), Chinatown, Dupont Circle, Foggy Bottom-Westend, Georgetown, Hillandale, Logan Circle, Mount Vernon Square, Shaw, and Sheridan Kalorama neighborhoods. Several notable local attractions are located in Ward Two, including the Charles Sumner Museum, Georgetown Library, George Washington University Library, Watergate, and Haines Point. The Administration can be reached by several major bus lines and the following Red Line and Orange/Blue Line Metro train lines;

From the Orange/Blue Metro train line take the Orange/Blue line and get off at the McPherson Square Metro stop. Walk north 2 ½ blocks on 15th Street, NW

From the Red Metro train line take the Red line and get off at the Farragut North Metro stop. Take the L Street exit. Turn left and walk East 3 ½ long blocks down L Street to 15th Street, NW. Cross the street, and walk to your left; 1125 15th Street, NW is in the middle of the block.

Bus Lines to 1125-15th Street, NW

For the bus line close to where you live, please call the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) on 202-637-7000 or go to www.wmata.com.

Our counselors, transition specialists, Deaf and Hard of Hearing Unit Staff, and Blind and Visual Impaired Unit staff are assigned to the DDS/RSA location (1125 15th Street, NW) and deployed throughout the eight (8) wards of Washington, DC.

The following is a listing outreach partners in Washington, DC in which DDS RSA staff have a presence.

DC DDS/RSA OUTREACH LOCATIONS

OUTREACH ORGANIZATION PARTNERS ADDRESS

Salvation Army Harbor Lights Rehabilitation Center 2100 New York Av,NE Washington DC 20002

Unity Health Care Re-Entry Health Center 1602 Morris Rd,SE Washington, DC 20020

George Washington University Hospital Acute Rehabilitation Unit 900 23rd St, NW Washington, DC 20037

Aging and Disability Resource Center 1134 11th St,NW Washington DC 20001

N Street Village 1333 N St, NW, Washington, DC 20005

Department of Employment Services, DC Works! One-Stop Career Center, Northeast (formerly Franklin Street location) Bertie Backus Center, 5171 S. Dakota Ave. NE, Washington, DC 20017

Department of Employment Services, DC Works! One Stop Career Center, Northwest Frank D. Reeves Center, 14th and U Streets, NW, Washington, DC 20009

Department on Employment Services, DC Works Career Center, MLK Center, Southeast 3720 Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE, Washington, DC 20032

University of the District of Columbia 4200 Connecticut Avenue , Disability Resource Center, Building 44, Washington, DC 20008

Community College of the District of Columbia 801 North Capital Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002

DC Center for Independent Living 1400 Florida Avenue, Washington, DC 20002

National Rehabilitation Hospital 102 Irving Street, NW, Washington, DC 20010

DC Superior Court 500 Indiana Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001

Court Services & Offender Supervision Agency 633 Indiana Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20004

Department of Veterans Affairs/Veterans Hospital 50 Irving Street, NE, Washington, DC 20422

La Clinica del Pueblo 2831 15th Street, NW, Washington, DC 20009

Washington Hospital Center 1100 Irving Street, NW, Washington, DC 20010

The following is a list of all of the public, charter and non-public schools in which RSA staff are assigned.

RSA TRANSITION Assignments FY 2011

Evelyn Maye (202) 590-7713 Cheryl Thorpe (202) 590-7560

Shonda Sissoko (202) 527-5103 Shontae Waldrip (202) 503-8212

Accotink (VA) Coolidge

Anacostia Harbour School of Baltimore/Annapolis (MD)

Ballou (on site location) High Roads of Beltsville (MD)

Ballou High School Stay Program Hospitality High School

BLDG For the Future Academy Kennedy Institute

Booker T. Washington Kennedy Krieger (VA, MD)

Common Wealth Academy Galex (VA) Kingsbury

High Road-Capitol Heights (MD) National Children’s Center

Hyde Leadership Next Step

IDEA Patterson High School (MD)

Ivymount (MD) Phillips (VA, MD)

Mamie D. Lee Rock Creek Academy

MSSD Roosevelt

New Beginning Vocational Roosevelt Stay

Sharpe Health Spingarn

Sharpe Health Satelite RHS Spingarn Stay

SEED Washington Math & Science

St. Johns Community Woodson (on Site location)

Thurgood Marshall Youth and Transition

Village Academy (VA)

Wye River Upper School (MD)

Youth Build

Toni Cowans – (202) 590-7713 Joyce Coker-Johnson- (202) 590-7714

Catherine Smith- (202) 253-8242 Jessica Okanlawon- (202) 271-1220

Advanced Pathways @ Shadd Academy for Ideal Education

Banneker Bell Multicultural High School

Cardozo SHS Center City Charter School

Chelsea (MD) Cesar Chavez (Capitol Hill)

Children’s Guild in Baltimore (MD) Cesar Chavez (Parkside)

Eastern HS CHOICE Academy

Edison-Friendship Duke Ellington

Florence Bertrel (MD) Dunbar

Foundations (MD) Frost School (MD)

Gywn Park (MD) Ideal Public Charter School

High Roads (DC, MD) Lab School

Katherine Thomas (MD) Leary School (VA)

McKinley Technology Luke Moore Academy

Monroe School Maya Angelou (Shaw Campus)

Options Public Charter Maya Angelou (E. Capitol Campus)

Pathways (MD) Washington Metropolitan

School Without Walls Wilson

St. Coletta Special Education Public

Transition Academy @ Shadd

William E. Doar, Jr., PCS

(iii) Results regarding individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system

In March, 2010, the Mayor of the District of Columbia appointed a representative of the Statewide Workforce Investment System to the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council, as mandated by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

A counselor is located and/or available to at each of the three (3) full-service DC Works! one-stop career centers in the District of Columbia, and at the Aging and Disability Resource Center. In FY 2010, there were almost 200 referrals from DC Works! One Stop Career Centers.

b) Results regarding the Administration’s need to establish, develop, or improve its relationships with community rehabilitation programs within the District of Columbia

The District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration added 17 new Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) for a total of 23 in less than 2 years, who partner with RSA to provide an array of vocational rehabilitation services to our consumers. Additional services available to our consumers through the newly initiated Human Care agreements include VR work adjustment services, trial work experiences, benefits planning and analysis, and job placement. The Human Care Providers are working collaboratively with the Administration’s Business Relations Unit to provide job readiness training and supports to our consumers. The Administration has designated two (2) staff responsible for assuring the quality of services of the approved CRPs through monitoring, reviewing data, and identifying consumer needs.

The Administration holds joint training with our new Human Care Agreement CRP partners to ensure our collaboration yields the desired results in supported employment, job placement, and career assessment services, leading to increased employment outcomes for consumers. Significant areas of focus are enhancing services available to individuals with developmental disabilities, chronic mental illness, acquired brain injury, deaf/hard of hearing, blind/vision impaired, transitioning youth, and Hispanic and Asian individuals with disabilities.

CUSTOMER SURVEY RESULTS AND COMMENTS

The data reflected in the Statewide Needs Assessment conducted in September 2008 showed that 83% of consumers served were satisfied with the with the help they received from RSA staff; and ratings were 85% or higher on questions about being treated with respect, feeling that they were listened to, that the process was explained to them, that their counselor was easy to talk to, and that their counselor understood their needs. This is a marked improvement over last year, where 45% did not feel that their counselor understood their needs and felt that their interactions were unacceptable. Consumers who were not satisfied with the Administration suggested decreasing wait time in the reception area, more promptly returning telephone calls, and improved services

During FY 2012, the Administration, in conjunction with the DC State Rehabilitation Council (SRC), will conduct another customer satisfaction survey in compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations CFE (361.17). Working with the State Rehabilitation Council during the past year, the Administration developed a Scope of Work for an organization to conduct this evaluation of RSA’s services, for which they have received proposals. The Administration will collect and analyze the data in order to ascertain consumer satisfaction with the vocational rehabilitation services provided and the employment outcomes achieved by the consumers. The conclusions and recommendations of this assessment will be incorporated into the Administration’s goals and priorities to improve services to persons with disabilities, and more effectively meet their needs.

Specifically, in fiscal year 2012, the Administration will be working collaboratively with the Council to conduct a survey to determine the effectiveness of, and consumer satisfaction with: 1) the functions performed by the Administration; 2) the vocational rehabilitation services provided by the administration and other private and public entities responsible for providing vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under the Rehabilitation Act; and, 3) the employment outcomes achieved by eligible individuals receiving services under the Rehabilitation Act, including the availability of health and other employment benefits in connection with the employment outcomes.

In FY 2010, DCRSA modified its vendor satisfaction survey for use by counselors with active consumers who recently completed training in a CRP vendor agency. Vendor report cards will eventually be created to assist new consumers with program selection and the exercise of informed choice.

This screen was last updated on Aug 18 2011 8:31AM by sadcalbertr

The District of Columbia labor force data indicates that there are 396,111 working age residents . Of those who are of working age (16-64), 43,850 are estimated to have a disability, which represents 11.1%. Of those, 32.4% are estimated to be employed in full or part-time positions. Additionally, 21,608 are estimated to have an employment disability.

• Source: U.S.Census Bureau, 2006 American Community Survey (factfinder.census.gov)

The following chart shows the Title I and Title VI funds, estimated number of individuals to be served in the state fiscal year 2011 by priority category and the average cost of services.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Priority Category I Title I $8,030,000 3,700 $2,170
Priority Category II Title I $2,380,000 1750 $1,360
Priority Category III Title I $714,000 600 $1,190
Priority Category IV Title I $476,000 450 $1,057
Title VI Part B Title VI $300,000 300 $1,000
Totals   $11,900,000 6,800 $1,750

This screen was last updated on Jul 11 2011 3:37PM by sadcalbertr

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

Goals and Priorities for the Vocational Rehabilitation and

Supported Employment Program

Updated priorities of the vocational rehabilitation state agency and the state rehabilitation council

In Fiscal Year 2011, the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council scheduled four meetings a year. Their sessions are public forums structured to gather information about the employment of persons with disabilities. Every effort is made to provide a variety of avenues for public input whenever issues, concerns, or policy changes are considered. Meetings are held at our District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Administration offices at 1125 15th Street, NW, Second Floor Conference Room and First Floor Training Room, Washington, D.C. 20005. The public hearing on the District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration 2011 State Plan was held on May 26, 2010, 1:00 P.M. to 4:00 P.M. at the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA), 600 Fifth Street, NW, First Floor Meeting Room. A notice was published in the D.C. Register, as required by law.

DCRSA worked diligently with the SRC when the membership was complete. Meetings were held reports were made and business was conducted. DERSA made every effort to continue working with the SRC and provided each member a draft copy of the State Plan Attachments 15 days prior to the public input period. Due to the fact that the SRC members decided to formal meeting should be held until new members were seated, DCRSA was unable to meet in formal group discussion.

Major Program Goals and Objectives of the DC State Rehabilitation Council (“DCSRC”)

The District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council goals and activities are set annually and are in response to both National and State issues, as mandated by Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. The focus of their goals and activities includes but is not limited to consumer satisfaction, statewide needs assessment, state plan and amendments, policy, extent/scope/effectiveness of services, interagency agreements, and District of Columbia employment programs.

Planned program objectives and initiatives to be accomplished by the DC Department on Disability Services, Rehabilitation Services Administration are:

OBJECTIVE 1: Increase the number of employment outcomes in the Washington, D.C., Metropolitan area, with priority given to those with significant and most significant disabilities. DCRSA produce 625 successful closures in FY 2012

Strategy:

• The Administration will give priority to those individuals with significant and most significant disabilities (amputation, arthritis, autism, visually impaired, burn injury, cancer, cerebral palsy, cystic fibrosis, deafness, head injury, heart disease, hemiplegia, hemophilia, respiratory or pulmonary dysfunction, intellectual disabilities, mental illness, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, muscular-skeletal disorders, neurological disorders (including stroke and epilepsy), paraplegia, quadriplegia and other spinal cord conditions, sickle cell anemia, specific learning disabilities, end-stage renal disease). Creating programs and services directed specifically to youth with disabilities, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and people with significant mental illness through enhance supported employment and evidence-based supported employment models.

• The Administration will focus on increasing employment opportunities for individuals who are blind, deaf-blind, deaf or hearing impaired. To assist the agency in this effort, the agency will expand outreach efforts to all areas of the city. The agency will place an increased emphasis on outreach and extended services to employers through creating opportunities for on the job training and disability management services.

• RSA’s VR Specialists who are now deployed in seventeen (17) community locations and almost 100 local schools, to increase outreach to people with significant and most significant disabilities. Develop 5 additional outreach sites in the community.

OBJECTIVE 2: Improve the efficiency of RSA operations.

The Administration has completed the implementation of the new case management system, which enables efficient tracking of cases throughout the VR process to improve timeliness of services. The implementation of the Quality Assurance component of DDS/RSA has enabled the state vocational rehabilitation agency to effectively monitor case compliance to federal performance indicators.

The Administration will implement a vendor report card process to provide information and support to RSA customers in exercising informed choice when selecting vendors and providers for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the Authority of Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as Amended in 1998; CFR § 361.52. Within 30 days of completion of a RSA sponsored training program, the counselor shall meet with the customer to solicit his/her comments regarding the training experience. The consumer shall provide comments on the RSA Vendor Satisfaction Survey. Surveys are available in English, English-Large Print, Spanish, Chinese and Cantonese. The counselor shall provide assistance if needed and shall ensure completion of all applicable sections of the survey. The counselor shall assure the customer that his/her identity will not be shared with the vendor or with other customers. The original copy of the survey shall be placed in the case record and a copy shall be forwarded to the Office of Quality Assurance and Federal Compliance. Comments will be made available to customers seeking similar training.

The Administration plans to implement a customer satisfaction survey for clients to complete based on their experience in the Reception/Intake area. The survey will be available in the eight languages recognized by the Office of Human Rights.

Strategy:

• To ensure continuous improvement, the DDS/RSA Office of Quality Assurance and Federal Compliance will conduct quarterly caseload reviews on active (St.10-18) and closed (St. 26 and 28) cases. Unit supervisors will conduct monthly reviews on randomly selected cases.

Performance Measures by September 30, 2012:

• 100% of eligibility determinations (without waivers) will be completed within 60 days of application for VR services.

• 100% of IPEs will be developed with 90 days of eligibility determination.

Strategy:

• DDS/RSA will prepare a recruitment/employment plan that will support the hiring and retention of qualified and dedicated counselors.

Performance Measure by September 30, 2012:

• Eighty (80) percent of the counselor vacancies will be filled by counselors with CRCs or by counselors eligible to take the CRC exam.

Strategy

• DDS/RSA will implement a vendor report card process to provide information and support to RSA customers in exercising informed choice when selecting vendors and providers for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services.

Performance Measure by September 30, 2012:

• Within thirty (30) days of completing a training program, etc. consumers will be contacted by their assigned counselor or staff from the Office of Quality Assurance and Federal Compliance and provided an opportunity to share their training experience by completing the Vendor Satisfaction Survey. The resulting “scores” will be made available to customers seeking similar training.

Strategy:

• The Administration will implement a customer satisfaction survey for consumers to complete based on their experience in the Reception/Intake area. The survey will be available in the eight languages recognized by the Office of Human Rights.

Performance Measure by September 30, 2012:

The survey forms will be tallied monthly. The target is an average monthly rating of 90% or above.

OBJECTIVE 3: Improve RSA’s overall customer service to individuals with disabilities.

The Administration’s priority in this area is to increase the number of Certified Rehabilitation Counselors (CRC) hired by the agency, support current staff in completing their CRC requirements, and provide training to all staff on policy and procedures including compliance with federal regulations. The Administration will place greater emphasis on creating a “customer-friendly” environment and timely delivery of services. The Administration wrote a successful grant to obtain a year of technical assistance on Universal Design, which will support this goal as well.

Strategy:

• Increase 5 additional CRC’s.

• Development of client applications within 5 days of initial contact with referrals

OBJECTIVE 4: Build and strengthen the capacity of RSA providers to provide quality VR services to a diverse group of individuals across disability types, and expand the pool of available qualified employer candidates.

The Administration now has a certified Work Incentives/Benefits Counselor to provide work incentive counseling to VR consumers. With assistance from DC’s Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, DC now has five certified Benefits Counselors, who are available to serve RSA consumers as part of a Benefits Network. The RSA Benefits Counselor coordinates referrals to certified approved benefits counselors who are part of the network. The Administration’s priority is to continue to expand and develop various human care and cooperative agreements, which now includes benefits analysis and counseling and which will enhance and facilitate services to a broad range of consumers, expand the counselor’s knowledge base of employers, and create a larger pool of qualified applicants for jobs. The new Business Relations Unit’s activities support this objective as well.

Strategy:

• Provide benefits orientation to 200 individuals

OBJECTIVE 5: Strengthen and expand existing collaboration and coordination of transition services to improve vocational, post-secondary employment and career opportunities for youths between the ages of 16-22 transitioning from school to work.

The Administration plans to improve and enhance a seamless service delivery process through collaboration with District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) to ensure that students with disabilities have an IPE developed before graduation. Transition services to students and parents are planned through parent workshops, increased information dissemination to parent organizations, outreach to schools and the DDS/RSA website and public service announcements. RSA now also has a data-sharing MOA and has developed a joint consent/referral form with DCPS, both of which should facilitate youth referrals to RSA.

Strategy:

• Provide transition services to 500 students from the DC school system

The Youth and Transition Unit is now staffed with four (4) Transition Specialists, four (4) VR Specialists/Counselors and a Rehabilitation Assistant, more than doubling the number of staff dedicated exclusively to youth transition.

OBJECTIVE 6: Provide specialized vocational rehabilitation and independent living services to individuals with blindness and visual impairments.

RSA has strengthened and expanded the unit working with people who are blind, low-vision or deaf/blind. This unit is working aggressively to expand service options for people who are blind, low-vision or deaf/blind.

Strategy:

• Provide expanded and specialized services to 332 individuals

This screen was last updated on Aug 18 2011 9:29AM by sadcalbertr

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

Justification for order of selection

The Administration continues to project an influx of 250 to 300 new applicants monthly for the remainder of fiscal year 2011 and into fiscal year 2012. The increase in referrals and new applications are a result of the Administration’s aggressive outreach campaign to the unserved and underserved populations in the District of Columbia as recommended in the 2008 Statewide Needs Assessment completed in fiscal year 2008.

An Order of Selection was established in fiscal year 2008 to ensure that individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected first for the provision of services; those with significant disabilities second and individuals with a non-significant disability third.

The decision to close Priority Categories will be based on availability of funds during these challenging economic times, projected number and types of referrals; and, the number of eligible individuals and counselor case loads. All Priority Categories remain open at this time. If the Order of Selection is implemented, RSA will work with the SRC to develop an effective information and referral system to ensure that individuals with disabilities who do not meet the agency’s order of selection criteria have access to information, referrals, and guidance so that they can access other workforce development support.

Despite the best efforts of an improved salary structure and a focused recruiting campaign, the Administration continues to have a significant number of counselor vacancies. While this area is improving, most of the staff is new and inexperienced. Based on the current hiring rate to fill all available positions, the Administration still anticipates challenges in this area.

 

Description of Priority categories

Priority Category I: An individual with a most significant disability is an individual who has a severe physical or mental impairment that seriously limits three or more functional capacities. (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time (3 months).

Priority Category II: an individual with a most significant disability is an individual who has a severe physical or mental impairment that seriously limits one or more functional capacity. (mobility, communication, self-care, self-direction, interpersonal skills, work tolerance, or work skills) in terms of an employment outcome; whose vocational rehabilitation can be expected to require multiple vocational rehabilitation services over an extended period of time (3 months).

Priority III: an individual with a physical or mental impairment no serious limits to functional capacity whose vocational rehabilitation is expected to require multiple services over an extended period of time ( 3 months)

 

Priority of categories to receive VR services under the order

The DDS/RSA established Order of Selection priority categories as follows: Depending upon agency resources, the categories are closed for services in order beginning with Priority III, then II and, finally Priority Category I. Categories may be closed based on the following circumstances (1) Counselor vacancies (2) Limitations of case service dollars. At the present time, neither the agency counselor-client ratio nor case service funds are significant to present the need to close categories. All categories are currently open. If it appears the agency may need to close categories, the public will be notified through the District of Columbia Federal Register, the DDS/RSA website and other means of communication.

 

Service and outcome goals and the time within which the goals will be achieved

The following chart shows the estimated number of individuals to be served in the state fiscal year 2011 by priority category and the estimated number of successful employment outcomes (Status 26 closures).

Number to be Served Employment Outcomes (Status 26 Closures) Projected Cost of Services

Priority Category I 3700 340 $8,030,000

Priority Category II 1750 160 $2,380,000

Priority Category III 1050 100 $1,919,000

Total Costs

Total 26 Closures 6500 600 $11,600,000

Priority Category Number of individuals to be served Estimated number of individuals who will exit with employment after receiving services Estimated number of individuals who will exit without employment after receiving services Time within which goals are to be achieved Cost of services
1 6,500 600 2,800 October 1, 2011-Sept 30, 2012 $11,600,000

This screen was last updated on Aug 18 2011 9:55AM by sadcalbertr

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

Disability of Individuals Number to be Served % Number to be Rehabilitated Supported Employment Model Projected Funding

Mental Illness

295 70% 70 Job Coaching

Evidenced-Based Model 150,000.00

Cognitive Disabilities 71 17% 13 Job Coaching

Supported Employment 50,000.00

Traumatic Brain Injury 29 7% 3 Job Coaching 70,000.00

Other

25 6% 5 Job Coaching 30,000.00

TOTAL 420

100% 91 $300,000.00

Goal 1: Utilize American Recovery Reinvestment Act (AARA) to increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with mental health disabilities

The Administration developed Human Care Agreements with six (6) providers of mental health supported employment services to hire additional staff at each site to assist in increased referrals to DDS/RSA and develop placement and employment opportunities through supported employment.

• Beginning in FY 2012 ARRA funds will end, the funds were used to help build capacity for providers to establish the mean to maintain the level of service provision. The providers will cover the cost for employees.

Goal 2: Provide improved supported employment services resulting in increased employment outcomes.

The Administration will continue to solicit Human Care Providers to provide supported employment and Evidenced-Based Supported Employment with a focus on individuals with developmental disabilities by increasing the number of referrals from the DC Developmental Disabilities Administration.

This screen was last updated on Aug 18 2011 9:59AM by sadcalbertr

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

Strategies

A. Methods to Expand and Improve Services to Individuals with disabilities, including assistive technology services

Goal 1: Increase the number of employment outcomes in the District of Columbia through increased application requests for VR services which expand across disability type and minority groups that are un-served and underserved.

Goal 2: Improve Assistive Technology Program services and devices through each phase of the rehabilitation process to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Strategy 1: Increase community outreach by deploying VR counselors strategically throughout the District of Columbia

Strategy 2: Increase funding and enrollment of DDS/RSA consumers for specialized vocational and/or postsecondary college training

Strategy 3: Ensure VR counselors are managed by, meet employment outcome standards and meet a minimum standard for customer employment outcomes

Strategy 4: Improve and expand the Assistive Technology (AT) Resource Center. Ensure that all applicants and eligible individuals for services are assessed for the need of technology services. Continue to increase staff knowledge and skill of AT services.

Strategy 5: Provide expanded supported employment services in integrated work settings to our DDS/RSA consumers with serious mental illness, intellectual disabilities, and traumatic brain injuries.

B. Outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals who have been un-served or under-served

Goal 3: Increase outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with the most significant disabilities who have been unserved and underserved

The Administration has been working on additional outreach materials that will be translated into several languages and are designed for people with low literacy levels. Additional strategies include:

Strategy 1: Develop and disseminate marketing materials and outreach efforts to individuals with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) (e.g., creating brochures and other materials in languages other than English; outreach with and through community partners that work with LEP individuals, etc.) in language that is accessible to people with low literacy levels.

Strategy 2: Develop and/or strengthen relationships with at least 3 community partners and vendors who are experienced in working with LEP individuals and with individuals with low literacy.

Goal 4: In fiscal year 2011 expand the range of choice available to individuals who require supported employment services.

In FY 2010, the Administration launched an aggressive outreach/public relations campaign to recruit qualified candidates for its vacancies to assure all wards of the city and disability groups are aware of the services provided by the administration. The campaign included a mass media campaign (television, radio and printed advertisements); brochures printed in several languages and alternative formats, business cards for staff, and face-to-face meetings in the community. As a result of the outreach campaign and the out-stationing of staff described above, at the end of the Second Quarter of FY 2010, the Administration had experienced an eleven percent (11%) increase in applicants for services over this same time period in FY 2009. In Fiscal Year 2009, the Administration completed 2577 applications for services. In the first two quarters of FY 2010, the Administration completed 1342 applications. In Fiscal Year 2010, the Administration completed 3,111 new applications and, in the first two quarters of FY 2011, completed 1,584, representing 19% and 15% increases over FY 2010 respectively.

During the first quarter of FY 2010, the Administration realigned three specialty units to general caseload units to allow VR counselors to become more versatile and increase and promote outreach efforts to under-served and unserved populations. Units included in the realignment were the Social Security Unit, the Independent Living Unit and the Supported Employment Unit. The realignment is expected to result in an enhancement of the counselors’ knowledge and skills in serving all consumer populations and an overall increase in the number of consumers served by the agency.

The Administration now has a certified Work Incentives/Benefits Counselor to provide work incentive counseling to VR consumers. With assistance from DC’s Medicaid Infrastructure Grant, DC now has five certified Benefits Counselors, who are available to serve RSA consumers as part of a Benefits Network. The RSA Benefits Counselor coordinates referrals to certified approved benefits counselors who are part of the network. The Administration’s priority is to continue to expand and develop various human care and cooperative agreements, which now includes benefits analysis and counseling and which will enhance and facilitate services to a broad range of consumers, expand the counselor’s knowledge base of employers, and create a larger pool of qualified applicants for jobs. Through this initiative, the Administration seeks to provide our consumers with needed employment/training supports that highlight the value of employment and reduced dependency on public assistance. Our goal is to increase significantly the percentage of DDS/RSA consumers using federal work incentives and the number of such persons who are employed for at least 90 days.

Since the beginning of fiscal year 2010, the Administration has approved 17 new providers under the Performance Based Contract category and increased supported employment Status 26 closures from 35 in 2009 to 43, and 112 for FY 2010. The Unit is currently working with six (6) service providers from the Department of Mental Health and using the Evidenced-based Supported Employment Services model (EBSE) to provide SE to assist District of Columbia residents with severe mental illnesses. The Unit supervisor meets monthly with the DC Department of Mental Health to strategize ways the agencies can implement to improve the EBSE services. The EBSE model provides rapid services to consumers with co-occurring disorders, substance abuse, and long term mental illnesses. There is a treatment team to ensure these consumers have medication compliance support and receive regular counseling.

The Administration and the DC Department of Mental Health are currently working with the six (6) providers of Evidenced-Based Supported Employment to maximize the benefits and services that are provided to client with a history of severe mental illness. The DC Department of Mental Health also pays for the services of Job Club and Social Security benefits.

Strategy 1: Increase the number of consumers receiving Benefits Planning

Strategy 2: Continue to solicit providers for Human Care agreements

Strategy 3: Utilize public service announcements, public forums, and parent and employer workshops to increase the visibility of the Administration

C. Establishing, Developing or Improving Community Rehabilitation Programs

The District of Columbia Rehabilitation Services Administration currently has added 17 new Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP) that partner with us to provide an array of vocational rehabilitation services to consumers. Additional services available to our consumer through the newly initiated Human Care agreements include VR work adjustment services, trial work experiences, job placement and benefits analysis and planning. The human care providers are now working collaboratively with the agency’s Business Relations Unit to provide job readiness training and supports to our consumers, and to link consumers to potential employers. The Administration has designated two (2) staff responsible for assuring the network of approved CRP and to monitor, identify needs, and maintain and improve their quality.

The Administration had joint training with our new Human Care Agreement CRP partners, to ensure that our collaboration yields the desired results in supported employment, job placement, and career assessment services and increased employment outcomes for consumers, particularly those with developmental disabilities, chronic mental illness, acquired brain injury, deaf/hard of hearing, blind/vision impaired, transitioning youth, and Hispanic and Asian individuals with disabilities.

Strategy 1: Ensure that staff are knowledgeable of the services of all Human Care Providers and promote continuous dialogue with providers through quarterly meetings.

Strategy 2: Continue to expand the job placement, work adjustment services and trial work services provided through the Community Rehabilitation programs (CRPs).

Strategy 3: Encourage and promote increased collaboration of the CRP with the Administration in continuous job readiness activities.

Strategy 4: Provide one-time-only start-up funds to 6 mental health CRPs with active Human Care Agreements with DCRSA, to be used to increase each CRP’s effectiveness in providing vocational rehabilitation services to applicants or eligible individuals so that each CRP can hire a staff person to focus solely on providing job development, job placement and retention support, with all funds to be disbursed by September 30, 2011. Following this FY 2011 funding, not to exceed $500,000 of ARRA funds, the job development positions at each CRP will be sustained through the use of Title I funds consistent with federal requirements found at 34 CFR 361.5(b)(17) for an additional period not to exceed three years. During this period, DC RSA and DC DMH will also use fee for service contracts to provide services to VR consumers and to better enable the CRPs to sustain these positions.

D. Performance with Respect to Evaluation, Standards and Performance Indicators

Goal 5: Develop a three year plan to improve overall quality of services and employment outcomes by fiscal year 2012.

Goal 6: In fiscal year 2011 maintain an internal review system within the Administration to assess and improve program performance and compliance.

Strategy 1: Implement a disability management program for employers

Strategy 2: Expand services to persons with physical disabilities

Strategy 3: Develop cooperative agreements with the Office of the State Superintendent for Education, the public schools and employers to create more job opportunities for transition-age students.

The bottom line measure of the effectiveness of a state VR agency is the degree to which it increases the number of persons with disabilities who are able to work at good jobs in good paying career fields. We are working more collaboratively with employers in the District and surrounding areas to make them aware of the work we are doing. We have been working with the DC Business Leadership Network and CSAVR’s employment committee. We have been working with our counselors to ensure that they are getting up to date information on the job market so that we are more capable of providing relevant information to our clients.

In the past two years, we have seen the greatest levels of unemployment and lack of job growth nationwide since the 1930s. Nonetheless, DDS RSA helped 475 of its clients gain jobs for 90 days or more in FY 2010. Fully one-fourth of those who went to work were on SSDI or SSI and another 8 percent were on TANF. Ultimately, one of our strongest objectives is to ensure that all those individuals served by RSA who want to work are afforded the opportunity and supports to do so. We believe the reforms we are making across the agency are positioning us to provide quality services to all so that employment will be seen as an achievable objective. The Administration has established specific measurements for Fiscal Year 2011 and has established on-going monitoring to evaluate progress.

Measure FY 2011 - Target

Number of clients served 6800

Total referrals 2500

Number of applicants classified as having the most significant disabilities 1000

Clients graduating from vocational training 100

Number of clients employed for 90 days or more 600

Percent of cases exceeding Federal timeframes from eligibility to plan development 20%

Average time taken for development of Individualized Plan (in days) 75

Number of Certified Rehabilitation Counselors 10

Number of bilingual staff members 15

Number of CRPs available to provide services 22

Percent of transition students with an IPE initiated in their junior year or later 50%

Percent of cases where eligibility is determined within 60 calendar days 85%

Percent of transition students who exit the system with a successful employment outcome 25%

Percent of clients receiving post-secondary education services who graduate 40%

Percent of job placement with through Human Care Agreement achieving employment 40%

Improving post secondary educational, employment and career opportunities for young people with disabilities through increased collaboration and innovation.

The Administration is placing great emphasis on expanding and improving the Transition services that we are offering to District of Columbia residents with disabilities who are in their junior and senior years of high school. The Administration is working closely with the District of Columbia Public Schools’ high school students with disabilities and their families to make certain that a youth’s transition to adulthood goes as smoothly and successfully as possible. The DC Rehabilitation Services Administration staff is currently working with all high schools that are serving residents with disabilities in the District of Columbia so we can identify and assist students in planning and better preparing for their futures. We have received 822 referrals for transition and employment services for youth ages 14 to 21, over the course of FY 2010. The Administration is conducting quarterly meetings in different parts of the District of Columbia to meet with parents to explain to them the purpose of the work we are doing in the area transition. From feedback we have received from student and parent participants, all of our meetings have been very informative and successful in providing them with useful information.

In August of 2009, the DC Rehabilitation Services Administration, DC Public Schools and the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) launched a small Project SEARCH pilot (based upon the original Project SEARCH Cincinnati, in which secondary transition students in their last year of school were placed into work experiences within a major hospital, where they were trained, motivated to seek employment, and, ultimately, hired to work in the health care industry in jobs that paid at competitive market levels). Our pilot supported 10 students with disabilities, who spent their last school year gaining work experience in different agencies and offices throughout DOL. The students went to the U.S. Department of Labor everyday and were supported by a teacher from DCPS, job coaches from the Kennedy Institute, and an RSA counselor. The students had 3 work experiences lasting 10-12 weeks each. The project was successful and, in collaboration with DCPS, we expanded the program to two (2) other Federal sites. DOL hosted the program again and the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services hosted students for SY 2010-2011. We are working closely with DCPS to replicate it in other federal agencies and businesses as well. Project SEARCH has more than 150 sites in the United States and internationally. Our Federal project was the first in a Federal agency. However, there now are projects being planned in other Federal agencies in other parts of the country. Similarly, the Administration is more effectively collaborating with the DC Department of Employment Services to work with transitioning youth throughout the city. For example, last summer we helped recruit and support youth with disabilities for the Mayor’s summer youth employment program. All transition students being served by RSA were contacted and encouraged to apply for the program. We had a number of summer youth with disabilities at the Department on Disability Services as well. At this time, we are successfully working with a number of our fellow Government of the District of Columbia agencies to provide internships within DC Government for people with disabilities, so that they gain work experience and can be hired by their host agency.

In FY 2010, DDS/RSA completed and MOA for data sharing and collaboration with DCPS. They also jointly developed a consent form and referral protocol to expedite student referrals from school to adult services. DDS/RSA also launched a Business Relations Unit, which in part will focus on disability management for employers, and outreach into the business community in general. Administration leadership is working with leadership from OSSE to finalize an MOA to support youth transition and adult continuing education.

Goal 7: In fiscal year 2011 strengthen the Administration’s working relationship with the Workforce Investment system.

Strategy 1: Increase the number of referrals received by the agency from the One Stop Centers

Strategy 2: Expand access to the services provided by the Department of Employment Services to our Department on Disability Services/Rehabilitation Services Administration consumers.

Strategy 3: Work with the Executive Office of the Mayor, Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development to have the Deputy Director of DDS/RSA become a member of the D.C. Workforce Investment Council.

Strategy 4: Work with the Executive Office of the Mayor, Office of Boards and Commissions to finalize appointment of people to file all mandated position on the State Rehabilitation Council, including representatives of the business community.

In March, 2010, the Mayor of the District of Columbia appointed a representative of the Statewide Workforce Investment System to serve on the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council, as mandated by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

A counselor is assigned to each of the full-service one-stop centers in the District of Columbia.

The Administration initiated a memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Employment Services (DOES).

The Administration also wrote a successful grant application, in collaboration with DOES, to jointly receive technical assistance on Universal Design so that their settings, outreach, processes and services are accessible to all, and joint technical assistance on ticket to work.

DDS/RSA’s Business Relations Unit is working with VR Counselors to encourage them to have their consumers register with DOES’s Virtual One-Stop. They also are meeting regularly with representatives from DOES’s Veteran’s unit, Business Services Group, and DC Works! One-Stop Career Center staff.

Attachment 4.11 (d) (2) How the agency uses these strategies to

A. Address the Needs Identified in the Statewide Comprehensive Needs Assessment

Goal 8: Ensure staff is adequately trained to perform the functions of their duties.

Goal 9: Eliminate all barriers to timely service delivery by the end of fiscal year 2011.

Goal 10: Increase and improve working relationships with stakeholders and other community service organizations

Goal 11: Improve transition services

Strategy 1: Organize and conduct informational workshops and seminars for parents and the community

Strategy 2: Utilize MIG funds for staff training and to augment the Business Relations Unit staff to increase cooperative partnerships with the business community and employers

Strategy 3: Enhance partnership with DCPS to facilitate employment outcomes for transition students

The Administration currently employs 39 Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists (Counselors) and is recruiting to fill position vacancies. We have established a higher standard of qualifications for those VR Specialists. As part of our efforts to improve services and increase efficiencies, the Administration continues to strengthen our relationships with area employers including private industry and the District of Columbia and federal governments. As demonstrated in Attachment 4.10, our staff is participating in extensive training and workshops designed to increase employment opportunities for targeted disability groups. Partnerships are being forged between the Administration and local employers to provide work experiences to state vocational rehabilitation agency consumers through On-the-Job Training, Internships, Supported Employment, and Customized Employment.

The Administration continues to work on streamlining the time it takes for people to move through the system from application for services to the time they develop an Individualized Plan for Employment. During the first two quarters of FY 2011, 67.2% of consumers had their eligibility determined within 60 days. Now that DDS/RSA staff have access to DCPS student information through Easy IEP, this number should improve significantly due to past difficulties in getting documentation on a student’s disability. Also year-to-date, the time it has taken for IPE development is 50.3 days, which is a marked improvement over last year’s 89 days.

The Administration has placed Vocational Rehabilitation Specialists at 17 outreach locations throughout the city and almost 100 schools in DC and nearby Maryland and Northern Virginia, thereby expanding outreach and services to underserved and un-served populations and improving the efficiency of service delivery.

Over the past three years, the Administration has increased access to college and other training programs for our consumers. We adopted rules that allow in-state tuition rates to be paid at many public colleges and universities, thus freeing up more funds for our state rehabilitation agency services. In FY 2009, the Administration supported 358 DC residents with disabilities to receive a higher education. In FY 2010, 539 people received support for post-secondary education.

Throughout Fiscal Year 2009-2010, the Administration worked aggressively to replace a very antiquated case management data system by purchasing a new online case management system that enables staff and managers to better track and manage all stages of the vocational rehabilitation process, and to analyze data to better track progress and plan for the future. Training and implementation of the new system began in April 2010 and went live on May 3, 2010. All staff have been trained, and staff and managers are using the data to track progress toward employment and for performance improvement for the Administration.

We are collaborating with the DC Business Leadership Network, the DC Jobs Council, and other local partners to expand the employment opportunities and career choices available to the people served by DDS. We also have initiated a Customized Employment Public Intern Project within DC government, which is creating part-time paid positions in different DC government departments for youth and adults with disabilities. We are started with three (3) departments and are expanding to three to five additional DC government agencies in FY 2011.

The administration is working closely with DCPS, high school students with disabilities and their families and the Partners in Transition program to make certain that the transition from school to adulthood goes as smoothly and successfully as possible. The Administration staff now works with all high schools that are serving students with disabilities in DC. The Administration staff helps students develop transition plans that better prepare them for a positive, successful future after high school. We have provided transition and employment services to a total of 1173 students, ages 16 to 21 during FY2010. There was a carryover of 351 students from FY 2009. RSA and DCPS are holding quarterly meetings in different parts of the District and meeting with parents and their children to share information about our services and the options available to their sons and daughters as they prepare to transition from school to adulthood. All of our meetings have been very well-attended and successful.

The Administration, in collaboration with DCPS, has continued and expanded Project SEARCH to three Federal agencies (i.e., the U.S. Departments of Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services). Cohorts of up to 12 students spend their entire school year at the work site gaining work experience in different offices and administrations. This project will continue next school year at all three sites and may expand to one additional Federal agency. The students report to their work site everyday, master transferable marketable skills and explore possible careers, all with the support of a DPCS teacher, job coaches from a community provider and a DDS/RSA Vocational Rehabilitation Specialist.

B. State Strategies for Title I Funds for Innovation and Expansion for Fiscal Year 2010-2013

Based on findings of the Statewide Comprehensive Needs Assessment, the Administration’s goals and priorities reinforce our commitment to serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities and to ensuring equal access to underserved and un-served groups. In fiscal years 2010-2013, the Administration will continue to implement services using Innovation and Expansion (I&E) funds and program strategies in the following areas:

• Develop an assortment of marketing materials in (English Spanish,and French), including tabletop displays, brochures, pamphlets, and flyers to market the RSA employment services to businesses, referral sources, potential consumers, and their families. Materials an be translated into other languages upon request.

• Use I&E funds to sponsor Transition workshops intended to target rehabilitation counselors, educators, high school personnel, and community rehabilitation providers working with youth and parents.

• Support the District of Columbia State Rehabilitation Council and the Statewide Independent Living Council as required in Section 101(18)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended in 1998 and consistent with their resource plans prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR §364.21 (i).

C. Overcome Identified Barriers Related to Equitable Access to and Participation of Individuals with Disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Program and the State Supported Employment Services Program.

The Administration continues to utilize the summary of the District Wide Comprehensive Needs Assessment compiled by Dan Hopkins and Associates, Inc., September 5, 2008 and the Fiscal Year 2008 Monitoring Report on the Vocational Rehabilitation and Independent Living Programs in the District of Columbia by the U.S. Department of Education, RSA, September 12, 2008. Both note that the Administration faces enormous but surmountable challenges as it seeks to improve its performance and the quality of VR services provided to individuals in the District of Columbia. Among these barriers, the most critical is maintaining sufficient qualified staffing in all areas to insure that quality vocational rehabilitation services are provided to individuals while maintaining sufficient staffing levels in other program operations to support the Administration’s overall performance.

The Administration is enhancing its efforts to address the following barriers:

• Increasing the number of individuals who apply to the program, are served by the program and achieve high quality employment outcomes as a result of receiving services;

• Serving more transition-age youth.

• Providing Supported Employment Services to more individuals

• Providing high quality VR services, either directly or through CRPs;

• Managing our fiscal resources to avoid interruption of services during the fiscal year;

• Maintaining sufficient staffing levels in all areas to insure the quality of services provided to individuals;

• Reporting and tracking of fiscal obligations;

• Coordinating staffing resources and functional assignments under the new organizational structure;

• Collaborating with a newly constituted SRC to ensure that the newly appointed members understand their roles and responsibilities.

• Strengthening partnerships with literacy providers.

 

This screen was last updated on Jul 12 2011 6:38PM by sadcalbertr

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

A. Progress in achieving goals and priorities for fiscal year 2010

Goal 1: The DDS/RSA will create programs and services directed specifically to youth with disabilities in the District of Columbia in cooperation and coordination with other youth entities to develop creative and innovative projects.

Performance:

DDS/RSA led an effort, in collaboration with DCPS, and the U.S. Departments of Labor, Education and Health and Human Services, coordinating the development of a youth transition program option for youth in their final year of special education eligibility. This program called “Project SEARCH” is a replica of the successful model that was implemented at the Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. DDS/RSA is working with Project SEARCH Cincinnati to develop a replication manual for implementing Project SEARCH in the Federal government.

DDS/RSA and DCPS, through a Memorandum of Agreement, has provided training to the DDS/RSA transition specialists, VR specialists, and supervisors on accessing the DCPS Easy IEP automated system. This training will allow the transition specialists and VR Couinselors to review and retrieve the IEPs of youth sixteen to twenty-two, with an emphasis on those who will be exiting secondary school and transitioning to the VR program. The MOA is completed and has been implemented

DDS/RSA hosted quarterly transition forums for parents and transition-age students in different parts of the District, to provide up-to-date information on transition services, eligibility, options, roles, and responsibilities, with support from DCPS and DOES. These sessions were very well-attended and were well-received.

DDS/RSA has collaborated with DC Partners in Transition, a coalition of public and private services and advocacy organizations working to advance transition outcomes for youth with disabilities. DDS/RSA has provided staff support and support for their website, through which families, students, service providers and other partners can access resources and information.

DDS/RSA has created internships opportunities within DC government (DC Public Libraries, Office of Contracting and Procurement, Department on Mental Health and Department on Disability Services, with plans to expand to up to 10 DC government departments.

DDS/RSA’s Business Relations Unit is creating partnerships with area employers and continuing to work with the DC Business Leadership Network to create internship experiences for youth in local area businesses.

DDS/RSA is building a Benefits and Work Incentive Planning Network for DC to remove barriers to employment for with job seekers with disabilities. There already are five (5) certified Benefits and Work Incentive Counselors who are part of the network.

Strategies that contributed to achievements

1.1 Strengthen RSA’s relationship with the Department of Employment Services’ Youth Program

• Funded internships opportunities within DC government (DC Public Libraries, Office of Contracting and Procurement, Department on Mental Health and Department on Disability Services).

• DDS/RSA established agreement with the DC Business Leadership Network to create internship experiences for youth in local area businesses.

• DDS/RSA is building a Benefits and Work Incentive Planning Network for DC to remove barriers to employment for with job seekers with disabilities

1.2 Re-evaluate existing transition programs to ensure we are effectively incorporating best practices (early identification, provision of work experiences, building leadership skills and focusing on personal interests).

• DDS/RSA and DCPS, through a Memorandum of Agreement, provided training to the DDS/RSA transition staff on accessing the DCPS Easy IEP automated system. This will expedite the referral of youth and enhance the provision of work experience

1.3 Partner with DCPS to expand the Project SEARCH Transition Program in the District of Columbia with additional Federal departments.

• The DDS/RSA led an effort, in collaboration with DCPS, and the U.S. Departments of Labor to establish a pilot program at the Department and expand it to the Departments of Education and Health and Human Services. DDS/RSA is working with Project SEARCH Cincinnati to develop a replication manual for implementing Project SEARCH in the Federal government.

1.4 Conduct comprehensive training with all VRSD staff to ensure staff understands the role of the transition services unit.

• Hired a training consultant to provide extensive training and used resources from the TACE and through DDS’s Medicaid Infrastructure Grant to expand training opportunities for RSA staff.

Goal 2: The DDS/RSA will create a work environment that value continuous improvement and has as its goal to meet or exceed all federal standards and indicators.

Performance:

The Visually Impaired Program was realigned to centralize all vocational rehabilitation services. Blind counselors casework and documentation is evaluated and reported on within the overall field operation. Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement is evaluated by DDS/RSA Quality Assurance Unit.

DDS/RSA implemented customer service standards across Divisions and Units that focus on meeting internal performance standards and federal and District of Columbia requirements for the Administration’s customers.

DDS/RSA established a Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement component that links program outcomes and employee performance. Employee performance goals are linked directly to desired program outcomes.

The DDS/RSA was able to purchase and implement a new Case Management Information System. The system went live in May 2010, all direct service staff were trained on how to operate and manage data.

In keeping with the findings from the 2008 City-Wide Comprehensive Needs Assessment, DDS/RSA continues in its efforts to develop individualized staff development plans to ensure that the vocational rehabilitation specialist/counselors and support staff are fully trained to perform their duties.

In August 2010, DDS/RSA developed a new Policy and Procedure Manual to provide clear guidance to staff on service delivery, in accordance with federal regulation. Training within the policy and procedures manual included: case management, case documentation, case planning, assessment, job development, job placement, assistive technology, ethics, follow-up, and services. Training began September 2010, and is continuing through fiscal year 2011.

The DDS/RSA Quality Assurance and Federal Compliance Office monitored and evaluating case management activities, service delivery, customer satisfaction, and employment outcomes during fiscal year 2010 and will continue to do so in FY 2011.

Strategies that contributed to achievements

2.1 Realign DDS/RSA, with emphasis on centralizing all vocational rehabilitation services, creating and elevating the Visually Impaired Program activities to include program reports on Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement.

• Blind counselors’ casework and evaluation of performance is monitored under the same guidelines as general VR.

2.2 Purchase and implement a new Management Information System

• Implement a new Case Management Information System, which went live in May 2010. Training on system operations continued through FY 2011.

2.3 Train all staff on policies and procedures including compliance with federal and District regulations.

• In August 2010, DDS/RSA, implemented a new Policy and Procedure Manual to provide clear guidance to staff in service delivery in accordance with federal regulation.

2.4 Develop and implement customer service standards across Divisions and Units focused on meeting internal performance standards and federal and District of Columbia requirements for the Administration’s customers.

• Established a quality control process to resolve consumer complaints. Also, all employees were provided written guidelines of District of Columbia telephone messaging.

2.5 Develop a best practice Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement component of DDS/RSA that links program outcomes and employee performance.

• Counselor E- Performance Evaluations are linked directly to service quality and production.

2.7 Develop a best practice Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement component

of DDS/RSA that links program outcomes and employee performance.

• The DDS/RSA Office of Quality Assurance and Federal Compliance (OQAFC) and the administrator of the Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program monitor program outcomes and employee performance. Employee performance is reviewed and analyzed monthly by senior managers and unit supervisors via an electronic performance database developed by the DDS Office of Information and Data Management. In addition, senior managers meet monthly to review program outcomes generated by Performance Reporting Online (PRO), an electronic performance system.

OQAFC also conducts periodic case reviews including reviewing caseloads vacated due to counselor resignations/retirements and cases closed with employment outcomes.

2.8 Create employee performance goals that link directly to desired program outcomes.

• Performance goals were revised to link directly to desired program outcomes. The goals focus on case movement, case compliance, employment outcomes and customer service. The performance measure assigned to each goal is determined by the employee’s grade level and performance level. Employees receive a minimum of two evaluations per year: mid-year and annual.

2.9 Create automated database that generates federal reports for compliance and timely reporting.

• As a result of installing a new case management system, DDS/RSA is now able to create an automatic database for the following federal reports: RSA 2, RSA 113, and RSA 911.

Impediments:

2.6 Establish and implement a VR Counselor Awards Program for meeting federal and District of Columbia indicators and standards.

• District of Columbia government policy restricts and limits the rewarding and recognition of individual employees.

Goal 3: Create new relationships and improve existing relationships with its mandated partners and stakeholders that include the WIC, SRC, SILC, and the BVC.

Performance:

During fiscal year 2011 DDS/RSA staff recommended candidates for appointment to the SRC and the SILC to the Mayor’s Office on Boards and Commissions to facilitate the appointment process of members to both Councils.

During fiscal year 2011 the SRC and SILC both established and published publicly scheduled meeting dates. The Deputy Director and DDS/RSA staff have reported and participated in each meeting. The SRC received a copy of the DDS/RSA draft policy and procedure manual and made suggestion and recommendations that were incorporated. The SRC also made recommendations that were incorporated into State Plan.

During fiscal year 2011, DDS/RSA leadership assisted the SILC in obtaining autonomous status as a commission by Mayor’s Order. This status allows the SILC to operate as an independent council within the District.

In January 2009, the Administration hired a manager to head the Blind and Visually Impaired Services Unit. The Chief of the Blind and Visually Impaired Services Unit’s tireless efforts improved the existing relationship between DDS/RSA and the BVC through a series of meetings with the BVC to address their concerns. Additionally, the Chief, in collaboration with the General Services Administration, is developing a five (5) year strategic plan to improve customer service and to obtain recommendations on facility upgrades to keep pace with the current workforce and market trends.

The Director of the Department on Disability Services has been attending the WIC meetings but has not yet been appointed to the WIC.

Strategies:

3.1 Review the legal mandates for working with partner entities and develop long term strategies to maximize the benefits for DDS/RSA consumers.

• Submitted recommendation for appointment to the SRC and the SILC to the Mayor’s Office on Boards and Commissions.

• The Deputy Director and DDS/RSA staff reported at and participated in each council meeting.

• Provided the SRC a copy of the DDS/RSA draft policy and procedure manual for their input.

• SRC made recommendations DDS/RSA, which were incorporated into State Plan.

3.2 Develop relationships with D.C. Office of Ex-Offender Affairs and Goodwill

Industries.

• A Memorandum of Agreement was developed and signed between DCRSA and CSOSA to provide coordinated services to disable ex-offender within the District of Columbia.

• A Human Care Agreement was developed between DCRSA and Goodwill.

3.3 Work with city officials to develop Randolph-Sheppard Vending Facility Program vending sites on District of Columbia properties.

• The Randolph Sheppard Vending Facility Program (RSVFP) entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the Department of Real Estate Services for the construction of two manned vending locations on District Government properties. The first location scheduled to open in September 2011 will be located in the Department of Employment Services, 4058 Minnesota Ave NE building. The second location is scheduled open in fiscal year 2012, will be located in the food court of One Judiciary Square (OJS) 441 4th St NW. RSVFP has entered into an agreement with a local franchisee that will occupy three of the stalls in the OJS food court. Monthly commissions will be paid by the franchisee to support the RSVFP. The franchisee will also cover remodeling cost of the OJS food court and pay leasing cost to DRES.

Goal 4: DDS/RSA will increase the number of employment outcomes that are meaningful and consistent with the customer’s IPE.

Performance:

During fiscal year 2011, DDS/RSA is on track to meet its employment outcomes set during the previous year.

Strategies:

4.1 Establish relationships with federal and district selective placement coordinators and increase the utilization of special hiring authorities to facilitate employment in the federal and District governments.

• Developed a pilot employment program within a federal government agency.

• Working with regional VR and disability agencies to establish joint relationships with Federal Human Resources officers in Federal agencies to create linkages to qualified candidates with disabilities.

4.2 Implement Job Readiness programs to improve “soft skills”.

• Implemented an in house evaluation of customer Job Readiness Skills.

• Established agreement with private sector CRP programs to provide services.

4.3 Develop marketing strategies for employer services provided by DDS/RSA.

• Established a Business Relations Unit within the agency to market customers ready for employment.

4.4 Evaluate the effectiveness of training provided by vendors.

• Establishing a customer satisfaction survey to monitor and measure vendors effectiveness.

4.5 Employ a Benefits Counselor to counsel with consumers about how work affects health insurance and benefits and to coordinate a Benefits and Work Incentives Network

• Utilized MIG Funds to establish the position and train the Benefits network members.

4.6 Strengthen DCRSA partnership with DOES (MOA).

• DC RSA has finalized a new MOA with DOES, which creates a strong working partnership between RSA’s Business Relations Unit and DOES’s Business Services Group; cements their collaboration around Universal Design in the Workforce System; and more joint service for job seekers with disabilities in DC.

4.7 Leverage the District’s participation on the Board of Trade to present our issues.

• DCRSA, through its new Business Relations Unit, has created partnerships with a variety of business organizations, including the DC Business Leadership Network, DC Chamber of Commerce, Greater Washington Board of Trade, and other sector-based organizations. The Board of Trade provides great information on labor market projections and offers events for employers. RSA will leverage their connections with all of these groups to open doors to employment to job seekers with disabilities.

4.8 Increase the number of consumers receiving Work Adjustment training to

increase job retention.

• DCRSA developed a Human Care agreement with Kennedy Institute a Community Rehabilitation Program to provide this service as needed.

4.9 Evaluate effectiveness of training provided by vendors.

• DCRSA developed an evaluation tool and has tracked the performance of provider through participant satisfaction and provider performance.

4.10 Increase the purchase of Work Adjustment training services to

improve job preparation and retention.

• DCRSA has purchased Work Adjustment services for approximately 200 client during FY 11.

4.11 Train vocational rehabilitation counselors to do job development and job placement.

• DCRSA staff has attended trainings on job development and job placement through Region III TACE.

4.12 Identify ways to utilize infomercials to increase employment outcomes.

• DC RSA is working with the Think Beyond the Label campaign to promote employment, through advertisements on radio, print media, on public transportation, etc. They also are working with a public relations firm to update and develop new outreach materials that have been effective in reaching people throughout DC.

4.13 Become active members of the WIC.

• The new Mayoral Administration has reconstituted the WIC. DCRSA will now be represented on the WIC

4.14 Employ a Benefits Counselor to counsel with consumers about how work affects

health insurance and benefits.

• DCRSA has a full-time Benefits Counselor, who conducts orientations, provides individual benefits counseling, maintains a data base of people who have received benefits/work incentive-related services, and collaborates with other CWICs to coordinate outreach and service provision. RSA also has formal agreements with several agencies who employ CWICs, so that they can provide RSA-funded benefits services.

Goal 5: The DDS/RSA will improve, through creative and innovative program services including improved assistive technology services, programs for supported employment for people with severe mental illness and traumatic brain injury, youth and adult offenders, and those with limited literacy skills.

Performance:

DDS/RSA is working with the University of the District of Columbia to identify and enhance outreach that is tailored to adults with disabilities interested in high-demand high-growth careers.

DDS/RSA is working with a public relations firm to develop marketing strategies and materials for outreach and has developed a working committee made up of both DDS/RSA and provider staff to enhance services.

The expansion of the Assistive Technology Resource Center was put on hold due to relocation within a very limited space. The possibility of relocating the center is under consideration for fiscal year 2011.

Strategies:

5.1 Establish, and enhance partnerships with the Child and Family Services Administration, Department of Employment Services, District of Columbia Public Schools, Department Mental Health, Addiction Prevent Rehabilitation Administration, and Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services.

• DDS/RSA has assigned a representative to serve on the Advisory Committee for TBI, who has regularly attended meetings.

5.2 Research and develop best practice programs and services for traumatic brain injury and limited literacy

skills.

• DDS/RSA has been consulting with the National Rehabilitation Hospital in DC on best practices for working with job seekers with TBI, including planning processes, personal assistance options, and wrap-around support services.

5.3 Develop relationships with community partners and vendors who are experienced in working with

individuals with low literacy levels.

• Working with UDC and the Community College of DC, including establishment of MOAs.

5.4 Ensure DDS/RSA representation on the Advisory Committee for TBI.

5.5 Develop and implement an “on the job training” internship program that is tailored to the preparatory needs

of the persons we serve resulting in their employment.

• DDS/RSA has created and supported a number of on-the-job-training internships, including 25 internships for youth exiting school through Project SEARCH in 3 Federal government agencies. They also created internships in 7 DC government departments to open doors to employment for adults with disabilities in DC government or elsewhere, through a Customized Employment Public Internship Project.

5.6 Expand supported employment services and informed choice by increasing the number of service

providers that provide supported employment services.

• DCRSA has expanded the number of organizations that can offer supported employment, increases its number of providers from 5 to 22, thereby increasing the choices available to job seekers.

5.7 Increase referrals for youth and adults to remedial programs that focus specifically on low literacy.

• In the past year, the University of the District of Columbia (UDC) started a Community College, which expanded the options for adults with low literacy. RSA assigned a VR Counselor to UDC to assist with support to students with disabilities. DCRSA also established an MOU with the Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), which oversees all of the adult education providers in DC and the Department of Employment Services (DOES), which funds and oversees job training programs, many of which have adult literacy components.

5.8 Increase assistive technology expenditures to ensure consumers have access to AT devices and equipment

as needed to complete their VR programs.

• There has been several staffing with the Director and line staff of University Legal Services (ULS) to discuss the needs and course of direction the Assistive Technology Center will move towards. After defining the core needs, a wish list was compiled and merged between RSA and ULS. Monies will be allotted annually for the upgrade and purchase of assistive technology to ensure the enhancement, interaction and demonstration of devices for RSA clients and other constituents that utilize the Technology Center.

5.9 Expand the demonstration of assistive technology benefits to consumers through a state-of-the-art Assistive

Technology Resource Center.

• Through joint research from RSA and the Resource Specialist of the AT Center, assistive technology devices and equipment has been purchased towards the concept of revitalizing and enhancing the Resource center. We have verbally discussed the physical location of the resource center citing the need for the room to be user friendly and accessible. Some older items that are not being utilized will be purged to make provisions for the newer items.

5.10 Improve the assistive technology knowledge of staff through attendance at Assistive Technology

conferences and specialized AT training.

• The Resource Specialist currently sends emails to invite RSA staff and counselors to mini symposiums and presentations of devices. The notion is designed to introduce staff to the latest assistive technology and to expand their knowledge base for devices which could assist their clientele. It has also been discussed to have mini demonstrations during the orientation and intake sessions to showcase to incoming and potential clients and outside sources (i.e. service providers and families) what technology is about.

Goal 6: DDS/RSA will continue to work collaboratively with its partners to update all Memoranda of Agreement and Understanding by the end of September 2011.

Performance:

DDS/RSA was able to identify MOAs and MOUs that require updating. The agency was successful in updating the MOA with the University of District Columbia, Department of Health Care Finance, Department of Employment Services, and the District of Columbia Public Schools, as well as joint MOA’s with the Departments of Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services.. Additional MOAs and MOUs are currently being developed and/or updated and will be signed and implemented during fiscal year 2011.

Strategies:

6.1 Develop a tracking document to identify all memoranda of agreement and understanding that require development or updating, including Action Steps.

• DDS/RSA attorneys work on the development of MOAs and MOUs.

6.2 Contact University of the District of Columbia, Court Services Offender Supervision Agency, Department of Human Services, Office of the State Superintendent, and Department of Employment Services regarding development or revision of MOUs or MOAs, and schedule meetings to review and discuss the revision of these documents.

• DDS/RSA has a VR counselor in 17 sites and almost 100 public, charter and non-public schools, including UDC and CCDC, as part of the agreement.

Impediments:

6.3 Revise all memoranda of agreement and understanding that require updating.

• DDS/RSA is able to develop agreements but is dependent on other partners to sign, after lengthy internal review processes.

6.4 Provide training for staff on the MOUs or MOAs through DDS Training Institute.

• Given the nature of individual MOUs and MOAs, training for staff occurred on an individual basis with involved staff rather than as coordinated training through the DDS Training Institute.

Goal 7: The DDS/RSA will continue to recruit and retain a diverse and qualified staff that is committed to the DDS/RSA mission and vision for the District of Columbia.

Performance:

DDS/RSA is continually recruiting new counselors that meet the established requirement of CRC or CRC eligible. The agency has been successful through outreach to colleges and universities in the District’s geographical area. The agency has been hampered due to a lack of staff who can concentrate fully on consumer needs and recruitment activities.

Strategies:

7.1 Draft and send letters of introduction to all universities and college offering Graduate Rehabilitation Counseling

Programs to establish a relationship that can result in the successful recruitment of VR staff.

• Letters of introduction are developed for disbursement.

• The PR firm under contract will be utilized in this effort.

7.3 Request information from the colleges and universities on their career days or job

fairs for graduating students for presentations from DDS Human Resource staff and request the use of their web-

sites to post our vacancy announcements

• DDS Human Resources developed relationships with Colleges and Universities for staff recruitment, and were able to post vacancies on their career websites and through a variety of professional organizations in which potential employees are likely to be members.

7.5 Create a cross cutting VR Counselor Network Team to discuss, model and share best/ promising practice

interventions and troubleshooting strategies.

• The position of Vocational Rehabilitation Administrator was open for most of the past year, making it difficult to establish and sustain a cross-cutting VR Counselor Network. That positions wasn’t filled until Spring 2011. Even though there wasn’t a formal network, training on best practices was available through the TACE, National Disability Institute, APSE, CSAVR, TransCen, and others to ensure that staff have opportunities to explore the state-of-the-art practices that have been successful elsewhere.

Impediments:

7.2 Implement the recruitment plan.

• As a result of budget cuts within the District’s budget, the training coordinator position for DDS/RSA was RIFed. This has presented some problems in planning and recruitment of staff.

7.4 Establish and implement a VR Counselor Awards Program to meet federal and District of Columbia standards and indicators.

• District regulations restrict DDS/RSA’s ability to implement these strategies.

Goal 8: DDS/RSA will continue to meet with the DDS public information officer and update all program area brochures, fact sheets, and displays to increase our community awareness and enhance our visibility in the District of Columbia.

Performance:

DDS/RSA entered in an agreement with a professional public relations firm to market, brand and enhance the image of the agency. As a result of budget cuts within the DSA, the agency’s public information office support was RIFed.

Strategies:

8.1 Complete a Request for Professional Support and obtain the signature of Director.

• Contacted with public relations firm to assist with marketing and materials development.

Impediments:

8.2 Meet with the DDS Public Information Officer and discuss a work plan.

• Position was eliminated

8.3 Draft a work plan for implementation.

• Lack of staff support

8.4 Implement the work plan.

• Lack of staff support

Goal 9: The DDS/RSA, in conjunction with the DDS Systems Planning Committee, will continue to upgrade the infrastructure of the Management Information System.

Performance:

DDS/RSA, in conjunction with DDS’s Chief Administrative Officer and Chief of Information Technology, was able to analyze and evaluate the information technology needs of the agency. We were able to explore the best/most-promising practices from other states. After extensive evaluation and demonstration of 3 different Management Information Systems software, one was selected and implemented. The System was fully implemented May 2010, training began immediately after implantation.

Strategies:

9.1 DDS/RSA, in conjunction with DDS’s, Chief Administrative Officer and Chief of Information Technology has established a Systems Planning Committee.

• Committee is made up of individuals from direct service delivery, service delivery support, management and Information Technology.

9.2 The committee is exploring the best/most promising practices from other states, developing a Request for Information (RFI) to assist in evaluating the current market conditions, costs of VR case management software, determination of vendor qualifications, and survey of business processes applicable to software selection, software product type and project timelines.

• Three software companies presented their products and bids

9.4 The committee will conduct on-site visits to other state agencies.

• The DDS Systems Planning Committee reviewed a variety of other database systems.

9.5 The committee will review and analyze RFI from vendors and develop action plan.

• The committee completed the RFI review process in June 11, 2009.

9.6 The committee will create an automated database that generates federal reports for compliance and timely

reporting.

• DCRSA has created an automated database that generates Federal reports for compliance and timely reporting.

9.7 The committee will train staff on the new MIS system.

• Training was conducted through a train the trainer method.

9.8 The committee will implement the new MIS system.

• The new MIS system was launched in May 2010, and has been in use since that date.

Goal 10: Utilize American Recovery Reinvestment Act (AARA) to increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with mental health disabilities

Performance:

The Administration developed Human Care Agreements (HCA) with six (6) providers of mental health supported employment services to hire additional staff at each site to assist in increased referrals to DDS/RSA and develop placement and employment opportunities through supported employment.

.

Strategies:

10.1 The Administration developed Human Care Agreements with six (6) providers of mental health supported

employment services to hire additional staff at each site to assist in increased referrals to DDS/RSA and

develop placement and employment opportunities through supported employment.

• DDS/RSA was able to provide Stimulus Funds to six (6) CRPs to hire employees to specifically work with DDS/RSA clients in job development and placement.

Goal 11: Provide improved supported employment services resulting in increased employment outcomes.

Performance:

The Administration will continue to solicit Human Care Providers to provide supported employment and Evidenced-Based Supported Employment with a focus on individuals with developmental disabilities by increasing the number of referrals from the DC Developmental Disabilities Administration.

Increase services to individuals with traumatic brain injury.

Strategies:

11.1 The Administration will continue to solicit Human Care Providers to provide supported employment and

Evidenced-Based Supported Employment. Increase services to individuals with traumatic brain injury.

• DDS/RSA was able to add an additional four (4) HCA providers during FY 2011.

• DDS/RSA was able to begin the development of working relationships with community organizations that provide services to TBA.

Major program accomplishments are:

1. DDS/RSA services were provided at its headquarters and locations throughout the city. These included multiple and single-employee outstations in one-stop career centers, high schools, and at various itinerant locations. Almost 7,000Washingtonians with disabilities received vocational rehabilitation services during FY 2010. Of these, 475 were placed into permanent jobs.

2. The Administration implemented a new case management system that allows its vocational rehabilitation counselors to better manage their case loads and track caseload activity.

3. The Youth and Transition Program is making progress through its partnership with the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) to identify high school youth with disabilities for employment or career related post secondary education/training. During FY 2010 Youth Transition Program specialists and Rehabilitation Counselors operated in almost 100 local high schools, and served 822 youth.

4. The Administration strengthened its Division of Services for the Blind to increase its outreach and vocational outcomes for individuals with low vision and blindness.

5. During the fourth quarter of FY 2010, the Administration conducted a customer satisfaction survey designed to assess the level of satisfaction with training and services provided to customers with successful employment outcomes in FY 2009.

6. The Administration completed its first year of Project SEARCH at the U.S. Department of Labor and expanded it to two additional Federal agencies in FY 2010. This program, offered in collaboration with DCPS, is also at the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

7. The Administration launched a Customized Employment Public Intern Project, which is making paid internship opportunities available within D.C. government, using ARRA funds, providing training and orientation while positions are being developed in the host departments or elsewhere.

8. The Administration offered a variety of information sessions for youth with disabilities and their families, some of which were in collaboration with DCPS, staff from DC Works! One-Stop Career Centers, and Partners in Transition.

9. In partnership with DC’s Department of Employment Services, DC Works! One-Stop Career Centers, DDS/RSA submitted a successful grant application to receive a year of technical assistance on Universal Design in the workforce system so that these systems and services are more accessible to people with disabilities and others with employment barriers. Because of this project, both agencies are also receiving technical assistance on Ticket to Work.

 

Utilize American Recovery Reinvestment Act (AARA) to increase successful employment outcomes for individuals with mental health disabilities

Performance:

The Administration developed Human Care Agreements (HCA) with six (6) providers of mental health supported employment services to hire additional staff at each site to assist in increased referrals to DDS/RSA and develop placement and employment opportunities through supported employment.

.

Strategies:

10.1 The Administration developed Human Care Agreements with six (6) providers of mental health supported

employment services to hire additional staff at each site to assist in increased referrals to DDS/RSA and

develop placement and employment opportunities through supported employment.

• DDS/RSA was able to provide Stimulus Funds to six (6) CRPs to hire employees to specifically work with DDS/RSA clients in job development and placement.

Goal 11: Provide improved supported employment services resulting in increased employment outcomes.

Performance:

The Administration will continue to solicit Human Care Providers to provide supported employment and Evidenced-Based Supported Employment with a focus on individuals with developmental disabilities by increasing the number of referrals from the DC Developmental Disabilities Administration.

Increase services to individuals with traumatic brain injury.

Strategies:

11.1 The Administration will continue to solicit Human Care Providers to provide supported employment and

Evidenced-Based Supported Employment. Increase services to individuals with traumatic brain injury.

• DDS/RSA was able to add an additional four (4) HCA providers during FY 2011.

• DDS/RSA was able to begin the development of working relationships with community organizations that provide services to TBA.

 

In FY 2010, DDS/RSA exceeded all RSA requirements for performance on the standards and indicators except indicators 1.2 and 1.5.

• Indicator 1.2: Of the 952 cases closed after receiving services in FY 2010, 475 (49.89%) of the cases were closed with employment outcomes. To pass this measure at least 55.80% of the annual closures must be successful employment outcomes. Between FY 2009 and FY 2010, RSA lost 10 VR specialists, resulting in the need to transfer approximately 1,500 cases. Recipients of the transferred cases determined that 477 of the cases were inactive and proceeded to close the case records Status 28 which reflects an unsuccessful closure after development of the Individualized Plan for Employment.

• Indicator 1.5: RSA also did not pass indicator 1.5 which required that consumers achieving competitive employment outcomes earn at least 52% ($19.82) of the average hourly wage in the District. The average hourly wage in the District in FY 2010 was $38.12. The average hourly wage for RSA consumers placed in competitive employment was $12.79 or 347% of the average hourly wage in the District. RSA is working to enhance the skills sets and employment opportunities of its consumers.

 

In fiscal year 2010 there funds set aside to assist the SRC and SILC in conducting their required responsibilities.

This screen was last updated on Sep 16 2011 12:52PM by dcsalonr

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

Quality, Scope and Extent of Supported Employment Services

Supported Employment services are guided by an inter-agency committee. Members of the Committee are representatives from the vendor CRP community, the extended service provider community, the Vocational Rehabilitation Services Division, and DDS/Rehabilitation Services Administration staff. All decisions are made jointly and include the following: (1) Entrance (2) Fading and (3) Extended Services. DDS/RSA has identified two populations that require the use of supported employment services: persons with severe and persistent mental illness and persons with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. The community rehabilitation providers provide supported employment services to these two populations Other people may require a job coach model for their initial placement but do not require the extended services as provided under the provisions of supported employment services. During the State Change Grant, a decision was made that a natural support model was the most normalizing.

Each provider provides individualized services to consumers. Their efforts are geared toward competitive placements in an integrated work environment. At times, a company or a government agency may hire several customers, but the customers are not placed within the same work area to ensure that they are in an intergrated work setting.

With their rehabilitation counselor’s assistance, consumers make informed choices to select their vocational goals. If a consumer chooses to change that goal during the supported employment process, their counselor assist and the new goal is implemented. Every effort is made to ensure customers are placed in jobs that are consistent with their interests and abilities. An "any job will do" attitude is never acceptable.

Employment Specialists/Job Coaches spend valuable time with consumers teaching them about the workplace’s expectations and the required tasks, assuring also that they know who to ask when assistance is needed. Time is spent with the person on the worksite who is identified as the natural support person as well to ensure that they are comfortable and prepared to provde workplace support as needed. The person identified as the natural support completes training in techniques and strategies to assist the assigned consumer to complete tasks required and identify the areas in which prompting or feedback may be appropriate in order to assure accurate completion of all assigned work tasks. The consumer is also provided with the name and telephone number of the Employment Specialist/Job Coach in the event of questions or problems.

The workplace supervisor also receives training in order to assure that, if the primary natural support person leaves, another person can be identified who is willing to accept that role. Contacts are made by the Employment Specialist/Job Coach with the consumer on an as-needed basis. Additional follow-up contacts are made each month with the supervisor to ensure problems are identified early in the employment process and consumers receive the assistance they need to maintain employment.

The Employment Specialist/Job Coach also provides travel training as needed. The Employment Specialist/Job Coach makes certain that transportation funds are available to assist the consumer in his/her job retention as needed. Additionally, all decisions are discussed jointly by the committee and with the consumer. Issues are seldom presented to consumers by only one party to ensure consumers see the group as united toward their goal of employment.

Supported Employment providers are monitored, as are all providers. Some visits are announced while some are unannounced. The services being provided are reviewed and a report is returned to the Administration’s Vocational Rehabilitation Services Division that includes the monitors’ observations regarding the program. Problems are discussed with the provider and, when necessary, a corrective action plan is developed and implemented.

This screen was last updated on Jul 13 2011 3:13PM by sadcalbertr

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on 09/16/2011 at 12:55 PM

Last updated by dcsalonr

Completed on 09/16/2011 at 12:55 PM

Completed by dcsalonr

Approved on 09/16/2011 at 3:15 PM

Approved by rscowilliamsm

Published on 09/27/2011 at 10:52 AM

Published by jack

The following documents have been identified as being related to the information you are viewing.

  • Monitoring Report for District of Columbia — as of May 3, 2013
    DOC (461KB) | PDF (497KB)

  • "A Better Bottom Line: Employing People with Disabilities" — A blueprint for Governors has been issued by the National Governors Association (NGA).
    PDF (4.13M)

  • TAC-14-02 — Submission of the FY 2015 State Plan for the Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and Supplement for the Supported Employment Services Program. (May 28, 2014)
    DOC (247KB) | PDF (233KB)

  • ED-80-0013 - Certification Regarding Lobbying — 34 CFR 82.110(b) requires each State VR agency to submit for approval a signed certification regarding lobbying for each program for which federal funds are requested. In other words, one certification must be submitted for the VR program and another for the Supported Employment program.
    MS Word (24KB)

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