ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Arkansas Division of Services for the Blind State Plan for Fiscal Year 2013 (submitted FY 2012)

1.1 The Arkansas Dept. of Human Services Div. of State Services for the Blind is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Arkansas Dept. of Human Services Div. of State Services for the Blind [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Director Arkansas Dept. of Human Services Div.of State Services for the Blind

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Director Arkansas Dept. of Human Services Div.of State Services for the Blind

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Katy Morris

Title of Signatory
DSB Director

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/29/2012

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2013
No

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities (Option A was selected/Option B was not selected).

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Arkansas Dept. of Human Services Div. of State Services for the Blind

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option A was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

X This agency is requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

This agency is an independent commission.

This screen was last updated on Sep 1 2009 11:22AM by Cassondra Williams

This agency has requested a waiver of statewideness.

Identify the types of services to be provided by the program for which the waiver of statewideness is requested.

The waiver request should also include:

  • a written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the designated state unit the non-federal share of funds;
  • a written assurance that designated state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect;
  • a written assurance that all state plan requirements will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

NA

This screen was last updated on Sep 1 2009 11:22AM by Cassondra Williams

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

The Department of Human Services Division of State Services for the Blind (DSB) has cooperative agreements with the following agencies not carrying out activities under the statewide Workforce Investment system:

Arkansas Educational Television Network

Arkansas School for the Blind

33 Institutions of Higher Education

Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education

Educational Services for the Visually Impaired

DHS Division of Aging and Adult Services

DHS Division of Behavioral Health

DHS Division of Children and Family Services

DHS Division of County Operations

DHS Division of Developmental Disabilities Services

DHS Division of Volunteerism

DHS Division of Youth Services

Coordination with DHS

Co-location - DSB serves all 75 counties in Arkansas, and VR counselors have base offices in DHS offices in 10 geographic locations around the state. Referrals may be made directly to the appropriate DSB field office serving the individual’s community or through the DSB Central Office.

Leadership - DSB coordinates with other DHS Divisions by, including but not limited to, participating in “Leadership in a High Performance Culture” workshops for managers and supervisors and serving on the DHS Office of Policy and Planning Work Group.

Access – The State Rehabilitation Technologist attends Access Arkansas meetings, which involves coordination among all DHS agencies. The purpose is to develop a simplified, generic application that can be used as a starting point to apply for all DHS services. DSB was among the pilot agencies included in the initial release. Individuals who are blind or severely impaired can access the application from their home or some other location through the DHS website 24 hours per day, seven days a week. Additional DHS agencies and programs continue to be added and enhancements are ongoing. The State Rehabilitation Technologist participates in testing new enhancements for accessibility as they are developed.

The DSB Business and Technology Unit coordinates with the DHS Office of Systems and Technology to ensure its Data Loss Protection (DLP) project does not take any action that would affect access to adaptive software and accommodations by DHS employees who are blind or visually impaired.

DSB continues to collaborate with the Arkansas Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped and maintains a number of digital recorders to be used by staff to teach consumers how to access digital talking books, both by standard mail distribution and through the Braille and Audio Reading Download (BARD) website. This is a part of DSB’s initiative to train Rehabilitation Teachers to provide assistive technology instruction to consumers in their local areas. Additionally, available technology services can be offered and augmented by DSB’s technology staff and lab.

Coordination with United States Department of Agriculture

DSB refers consumers to commodity programs and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, which are under the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Faith-based and Minority Outreach Efforts

In addition to contracting with Centers for Independent Living (CILs) to reach out to faith-based groups, DSB continues to coordinate with faith-based and minority organizations, including:

• DSB staff are made aware that referrals can be made as needed to Laity Involved in Free Transportation (LIFT), a volunteer program through the First United Methodist Church of Little Rock, which provides free transportation services to individuals in Little Rock and North Little Rock who have no other means of transportation to doctor appointments and medical treatments.

• The Housing Authority of the City of Crossett in the lower Delta has a partnership with the DSB field office serving that area. A DSB representative maintains monthly contact with the Housing Authority’s “People Helping People” project and shares resources and information about VR services available to those who meet DSB guidelines.

• DSB contacted 10 churches and two faith-based missions for the homeless in Central Arkansas to inform them about DSB services and request referrals. In a separate effort, a DSB representative met with the Hispanic Ministry of St. Mary’s Catholic Church in North Little Rock regarding outreach and job placement.

• DSB has worked with the Evangelical Alliance for Immigration Service, St. Francis House, Catholic Charities Immigration Service, and St. Edwards Hispanic Outreach Program as job sites for students in its Jump Start transition program.

• Faith-based efforts continue in southwest Arkansas with the Camden Community Brotherhood, Ouachita District Laymen, the United Methodist Men, the Inter-faith Medical Clinic, and the Friendship Center of Texarkana.

• Minority outreach efforts have been coordinated with the Bi-State Coalition, the Arkansas Minority Health Commission, the Ouachita County Economic Development Council, Men Health Outreach, Camden Accelerated Business Services, the Esquire Scholarship Dinner, Macedonia Men Health Fair, Camden Chamber of Commerce’s "Business After Dark" event, the Bullying Forum, and a local diabetes awareness group.

• DSB staff have met with ministers and officials of First Baptist Church; First United Methodist Church, and the Christian Charitable Clinic, all of Hot Springs.

• A DSB representative gave a presentation about the agency and its services at Community Outreach, an event sponsored by the First Baptist Church of Harrison.

• In minority and faith-based outreach efforts in North Central Arkansas, DSB distributed fliers about the agency and its services at libraries, laundromats, diners, and lumber yards and worked with the chaplain of a local hospital to distribute information at the hospital and its affiliated clinics.

• In Southeast Arkansas, DSB is speaking to community-building groups in the Delta, such as the Desha County Hometown Self-improvement Project and the Women’s Heritage Club in Lake Village. DSB is also participating in health fairs throughout the lower Delta region.

Emergency Preparedness Collaborations

Prompted by the past events of Hurricane Katrina and 911, DSB collaborates with organizations charged with developing strategic plans for emergency preparedness; response and recovery; and maintenance of services in the aftermath of a disaster.

As part of the Emergency Preparedness Work Group, DSB is on the team responsible for the portion of the Emergency Operations Plan involving mass care, emergency assistance, housing, and human services. This necessitates DSB collaborating with other DHS divisions, state agencies, local governments, and non-governmental organizations.

DSB was involved in the initial development of the DHS Business Continuity and Contingency Plan (BCCP), which addresses continued operations in the event of a disaster. A DSB representative reviews the BCCP annually and updates the agency’s part of the plan as needed.

DSB is also participating on an internal DHS disaster team headed by the Division of Community Service and Nonprofit Support, formerly the Division of Volunteerism.

DSB’s Staff Development Coordinator has some disaster preparedness experience related to military service and has met with Arkansas Department of Emergency Management (ADEM) as part of the efforts of the statewide Disaster Preparedness Committee for Persons with Disabilities.

Coordination with Blind Agencies/Organizations

DSB collaborates with the following organizations, agencies, and non-profits through their participation on the DSB board and in the day-to-day provision of services to consumers: the Arkansas Lions; Arkansas Affiliate National Federation of the Blind (NFB); Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (AER); World Services for the Blind (WSB); Arkansas Association of Blind Business Enterprise Managers; the Blinded Veterans Association; Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ASBVI); and the Arkansas Chapter American Council of the Blind (ACB). The Disability Rights Center (DRC) and the Arkansas Independent Living Council (AILC) are routinely scheduled for presentations at each board meeting. Time is also scheduled every quarter for consumer input during DSB board meetings.

The DSB Director is a member of the AILC and Workforce Services boards. DSB staff and DSB Board members attend ACB, NFB, WSB, and AER local, state and/or national activities/events. DSB representatives are frequently asked to be presenters at these organizations’ annual state conferences, and representatives from these organizations are frequently invited to be presenters at DSB meetings and conferences. Some DSB staff are members of these organizations. VR Counselors participate in staffings regarding their consumers at WSB. Arkansas Lions Clubs assist DSB with local presentations for the annual area Consumer of the Year awards. DSB continues to work closely with consumer groups.

DSB coordinated a White Cane Safety Day planning committee comprised of blindness organizations and agencies to plan an observance on October 17, 2011. Arkansas’ First Lady Ginger Beebe, who was the keynote speaker, addressed more than 200 people about the history and importance of the white cane. Broad support was shown by organizations and individuals who traveled from around the state for the event. The observance concluded with the First Lady learning how to cross a street using a white cane. The planning committee included representatives from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Department of Counseling, Adult Education, and Rehabilitation Education; Educational Services for the Visually Impaired; WSB; Arkansas Lighthouse for the Blind; Arkansas Regional Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped; Arkansas Lions Eye Bank and Laboratory; NFB; Central Arkansas Veterans Healthcare System; Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired; Arkansas Lions; ACB; and AER.

DSB joined other blindness groups in celebrating Lighthouse for the Blind’s Founders Day events February 21-22, 2012. National Industries for the Blind President Kevin Lynch and other dignitaries were on hand to recognize the Lighthouse’s employment efforts and its new “Going Green” initiative. The Lighthouse has been an employer of DSB consumers and has provided a work site for transition students in DSB’s Jump Start program.

Support Groups

DSB staff are knowledgeable about support groups, which are located around the state in El Dorado, Fayetteville, Hot Springs, Jonesboro, Little Rock, Mountain Home, Ozark, Paragould, Pine Bluff, Springdale, Harrison, and Texarkana. Rehabilitation Teachers are available to speak to support groups on vocational topics.

CILs and Other Providers

DSB pays WSB and the Louisiana Center for the Blind on a “fee for services” case-by-case basis. At the recommendation of RSA, DSB implemented a system of performance-based contracts with Centers for Independent Living in the state. When this system took effect July 1, 2008, Sources for Community Independent Living Services Inc. (Sources Inc.) was the only CIL that participated in the first year. When DSB issued a new Request for Qualifications in May 2012, Sources Inc. and Independent Living Resources Center dba as Mainstream responded and were accepted. Historical participation data is given below:

• Sources for Community Independent Living Services for the following time periods:

o 07/15/2008 through 06/30/09 o 07/01/2009 through 06/30/10 o 10/01/2010 through 06/30/11 o 07/01/2011 through 06/30/2012 o 07/01/2012 through 06/30/2013

• Independent Living Resources Center doing business as Mainstream:

o 07/01/2009 through 06/30/10 o 07/01/2010 through 06/30/11 o 07/01/2011through 06/30/12 o 07/01/2012 through 06/30/2013

• Delta Resource Center for Independent Living:

o 07/01/2010 through 06/30/2011

Through the contract with Sources Inc., the VR Counselor in Fayetteville can be called in to assist with its Job Club if an individual who is blind or severely visually impaired shows up seeking services.

Coordination with Education-related Partners

In June, 2012, DSB conducted Jump Start, a statewide career development program for high school students who are blind or severely visually impaired. Sixteen students from across the state were accepted into the program. DSB coordinates with the Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ASBVI) in the planning and operation of Jump Start. ASBVI holds its summer learning program for youth under age 14 at the same time that DSB has Jump Start, so the two agencies share cafeteria staff, infirmary nurses, and security guards, and at least one ASBVI staff member is assigned to assist during Jump Start. DSB houses the students at ASBVI during the week (students go home on weekends). The three-week program is designed to expose Jump Start students to the world of work and assist them in transitioning from high school to employment or post-secondary education. Students are placed in part-time jobs appropriate for their skills, abilities, and interests. DSB takes students on field trips to businesses and colleges; teaches the students how to do their own shopping, cooking, and laundry; provides instruction by certified orientation and mobility specialists; teaches job search skills and computer technology; and provides recreational opportunities. Jump Start increases the students’ confidence, social skills, and self-esteem. It also strengthens DSB’s relationship with ASBVI.

DSB is a charter member and one of 15 agencies participating in the Arkansas Interagency Transition Partnership (AITP), which coordinates transition services and discusses related issues. The structure has changed this year to include an executive committee, and new bylaws are being written. The partnership will sponsor a Transition Summit October 1-3, 2012, with a focus on employment-related issues for students with disabilities. The structure of the conference has been changed to better balance state and local entities. At the beginning of the Summit, representatives from disability agencies and organizations, including DSB, will address the educators and discuss their services and resources. The representatives will serve as “expert contacts” that are available to answer questions during the summit and will rove among local teams during breakout sessions.

DSB continues to coordinate services with Educational Services for the Visually Impaired. Relationships with ESVI have been strengthened by outreach and coordination initiatives put in place during FY 2010. As part of these initiatives, Rehabilitation Assistant II’s are mailing information to ESVI at least twice a year, in the fall and winter months. In FY 2011, an e-mail component was added as a supplemental method of contact. Rehabilitation Assistants maintain email addresses for ESVI contacts, and VR Counselors and their assistants will serve as agency contacts. Coordination increased with the appointment of a DSB Board member who is employed by ESVI, even though the staff member is actually representing AER on the board.

Counselors are still not consistently being notified in advance for IEP meetings as they should be, but communication with schools has greatly improved since an initiative was started in FY 2009 to increase outreach and coordination with public schools. Each DSB regional office maintains a contact list for all secondary schools in its service area and regularly sends letters and information to contacts on the list. In FY 2011, an e-mail component was added as a supplemental method of contact. Rehabilitation Assistants obtained the email addresses for school contacts, and VR Counselors and their assistants will serve as agency contacts. This process gives schools a pathway for increased communications with DSB.

The DSB Director, the Staff Development Coordinator, and an Area Supervisor meet annually with the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Advisory Board to ensure that DSB is involved with their planning for higher education needs.

In a collaborative effort with the University of Central Arkansas (UCA), the DSB Business and Technology Unit staff trained 25 UCA students on using and teaching others assistive technology. The training took place during May 2012, in the DSB Tech Lab.

Crime Victims

DSB is represented on the Crime Victims with Disabilities Council, a subset of Partners for Inclusive Communities-University of Arkansas Medical Sciences.

In April, 2012, DSB participated in the 22nd Annual National Crime Victim Services Recognition Ceremony at the William J. Clinton Presidential Center. The event was part of the National Crime Victims’ Rights Week activities sponsored by the Crime Victims Assistance Association of Arkansas.

Business Partnership Development

DSB participates in the Regional VR Business Network (ReVrb), a group established by the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Center to work on particular issues between vocational rehabilitation and business. Funded by a $30 million dollar grant from Microsoft and Points of Contacts, ReVrb brings together the 80 blind and general vocational rehabilitation agencies by region for the purpose of consumer employment. These 80 designated points of contact, through CSAVR leadership and support, form the National Employment Team or The NET.

The DSB designated point of contact attends monthly ReVrb teleconferences as well as related training at least twice a year. The group’s latest two-year project involved developing strategies to work with business partners nationwide. Out of this project will come specific, national training for VRC/CRC staff that will cover the rehabilitation process from eligibility to the developing of business relationships. The project’s first three training modules will be rolled out in 2013.

Additional Information: Cooperation with Agencies within the Statewide Workforce Investment System

DSB has cooperative agreements with local Workforce Investment Boards, which are updated as necessary. DSB also has cooperative agreements with the Department of Workforce Services (DWS) and Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (a general agreement and a deafblind agreement).

DSB, ARS, the DHS Division of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), the DHS Division of Behavioral Health Services (BHS), and the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE), Special Education Unit (SEU), Transition Unit are partners in a cooperative agreement outlining responsibilities and the provision of services, including supported employment, to transition-aged consumers.

Through the Governor’s Executive Order 10-17, DSB coordinates with other state agencies to increase employment of Arkansans with disabilities. The DSB Director serves on a task force that identified policies that created barriers and disincentives for employment of individuals who are disabled and made recommendations to the Governor. The Executive Order called for DHS to convene an Employment First Task Force comprised of disability service providers, consumer advocates, and the state agencies administering disability services, vocational rehabilitation, Workforce services, and education and to focus consumer services first toward the goal of self-sufficiency through employment.

DSB participated in the Workforce Centers Joint Managers’ state meeting entitled “Partners for a Better Workforce” March, 2012. Over 150 administrators from throughout the state convened to focus on delivering comprehensive services to build a workforce that meets the changing demands of Arkansas’ diverse businesses, citizens and economy.

One of the objectives of the meeting was to move forward with the incorporation of a successful service delivery model that encompasses the Governor’s “Employment First” mandate.

In addition to attending the conference, DSB made the following presentations:

• The Interim Field Services Administrator gave an overview of DSB programs and services.

• The Business Analyst presented information about the Small Business Program, the Vending Facility Program, and the Randolph-Shepherd Act and gave examples of consumers’ entrepreneurship.

• The State Rehabilitation Technologist talked about assistive technology in the context of success stories.

• One of the DSB Technology Specialists talked about job clubs and the various computer skills taught in the DSB Tech Lab.

Other agency partners in attendance included the EmployAbility Project, the Department of Education Transition Services, the Disability Rights Center, ARS and Workforce. The agencies presented information on the Employment First Initiative, ARS services, transition issues, Employment Networks, and Ticket to Work.

The DSB Director serves on the Arkansas Workforce Investment Board, which meets quarterly, and VR Counselors are members of the local Workforce Investment Boards, which meet quarterly across the state.

DSB has expanded its number of accessible kiosks for consumers to a total of 17 Workforce Center locations. The original 10 kiosks were placed in the same cities where DSB has offices; the second set of seven kiosks were placed in cities with either two-year or four-year Institutions of Higher Education. DSB is trying to change the culture so consumers are familiar with those locations and can access the Internet to search for jobs, the same as a sighted person.

In 2012, DSB had exhibit booths at Business Expos sponsored by Arkansas Rehabilitation Services around the state.

This screen was last updated on Aug 2 2012 2:44PM by saarcaycek

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

DSB has a cooperative agreement with the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education, regarding transition services to students who are blind or severely visually impaired and are in public schools, including Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ASBVI). The interagency agreement with the Department of Education outlines the roles and responsibilities, financial responsibility, determination of lead agency, and qualified personnel.

DSB also has cooperative agreements with:

• Arkansas School for the Blind

• Arkansas School for the Deaf

• Educational Services for the Visually Impaired (ESVI)

• 33 Institutions of Higher Education

DSB counselors assist in developing and approving Individual Plans for Employment (IPE’s) before students determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leave the school setting. Directive 08-06 was sent August 5, 2008 to field staff to remind them of the importance of developing IPE’s for students transitioning from high school to secondary education or employment and to complete the IPE before the student’s graduation.

DSB is a charter member and one of 15 agencies participating in the Arkansas Interagency Transition Partnership (AITP), which coordinates transition services and discusses related issues. The structure has changed to include an executive committee, and new bylaws are being written. The partnership will sponsor a Transition Summit October 1-3, 2012, with a focus on employment for students with disabilities. The structure of the conference has evolved to better balance state and local entities. At the beginning of the Summit, representatives from disability agencies and organizations will address the educators and discuss their services and resources. The representatives will serve as “expert contacts” that are available to answer questions during the summit and will rove among local teams during breakout sessions.

Secondary schools invite DSB to Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings to be part of the planning team to assist education agencies in preparing students who are blind or severely visually impaired for transition from school to post-school activities, such as employment, training, supported employment, and other VR services. The IEP outlines the roles and responsibilities of DSB, the student, the school, and any other agency/organization involved in providing transition services.

In regard to the development and approval of Individualized Plans for Employment (IPE), all DSB consumers, including transition students, receive services based upon their IPE. The counselor and the consumer and/or a representative, as appropriate, develop the IPE jointly and mutually approve its contents. The IPE must be designed to achieve the specific employment outcome chosen by the individual and be consistent with the individual’s unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, career interests, and informed choice. The services, service providers, and all activities selected by the consumer must be necessary to meet the employment outcome goal. The VR Counselor communicates with the consumer and other service providers, such as ARS, to avoid duplication of services and to ensure consideration of comparable benefits.

In June, 2012, DSB conducted Jump Start, a statewide career development program for high school students who are blind or severely visually impaired. DSB coordinates with the Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ASBVI) in the planning and operation of Jump Start. ASBVI holds its summer learning program for youth under age 14 at the same time that DSB has Jump Start, so the two agencies share cafeteria staff, infirmary nurses, and security guards, and at least one ASBVI staff member is assigned to assist during Jump Start. DSB houses the students at the ASBVI during the week (students go home on weekends). The three-week program is designed to expose Jump Start students to the world of work and assist them in transitioning from high school to employment or post-secondary education. Students are placed in part-time jobs appropriate for their skills, abilities, and interests. DSB takes students on field trips to businesses and colleges; teaches the students how to do their own shopping, cooking, and laundry; provides instruction by certified orientation and mobility specialists; teaches job search skills and computer technology; and provides recreational opportunities. Jump Start increases the students’ confidence, social skills, and self-esteem. It also strengthens DSB’s relationship with ASBVI.

DSB participates in the Transition Learning Collaborative (TLC), a group established by the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Center to share information and resources to improve transition at the state level. TACE Center staff researches student data collection and analyzes models used in other states and shares them with the states in the TLC collaborative. The TLC is composed of transition coordinators from both general and blind VR agencies in Region VI. Interaction with other states and TACE increases the resources available to DSB in regard to transition best practices and information. In addition to the annual TLC meeting held in Austin, DSB’s transition coordinator participates in monthly TLC teleconferences. In 2013, DSB counselors will be encouraged to enroll in the “Transition Train,” a self-paced training module developed by the TLC, which enables a counselor to earn 15 CEU’s.

In a collaborative effort with the University of Central Arkansas (UCA), the DSB Business and Technology Unit staff trained 25 UCA students on using and teaching others assistive technology. The training took place during May 2012, in the DSB Tech Lab.

Responsibilities

DSB is both a DSU and a DSA. DSB is also a division within the Department of Human Services. DSB has an RSA-approved agreement with the Department of Education/Special Education, which provides information on financial responsibilities, the lead agency, and qualified personnel.

Outreach Procedures

Field Services Directive 08-06 was developed for contacting schools and distributing information at least semi-annually. Per the directive, each DSB regional office maintains a contact list for all secondary schools in its service area and sends letters and information to contacts on the list. In 2011 an email option was added. This process gives schools a pathway for increased communications with DSB.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 6:23PM by saarcaycek

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

DSB develops agreements in response to: (1) state and federal laws and regulations, (2) results of needs assessments, (3) suggestions from consumer groups, and (4) recommendations of staff and stakeholders including those in the Workforce Services arena. DSB uses the RSA guideline template to develop cooperative agreements.

DSB has been a long-standing partner with the Arkansas Deafblindness Project, formerly known as the Deaf/Blind Consortium. DSB refers consumers to the Deafblindness Project. DSB serves on the Arkansas Advisory Committee for the Deafblindness Project, which provides training for parents and professionals to foster stronger partnerships among agencies who work with this population. The Deafblindness Project maintains a deafblind registry and requests related information from DSB. The Deafblindness Project and the Deafblind Project’s grant have been extended to run through September 2013. DSB is an affiliate of the Helen Keller National Center.

DSB has a system of performance-based contracts with the Centers for Independent Living in the state. When this system took effect July 1, 2008, Sources for Community Independent Living Services Inc. (Sources Inc.) was the only CIL that participated. When DSB issued a new Request for Qualifications in May 2012, Sources Inc. and Independent Living Resources Center dba as Mainstream responded and were accepted.

DSB operates the Arkansas Information Reading Services (AIRS), which began as a private non-profit organization and is now part of the state agency. The organization’s founders formed Friends of AIRS (FAIRS) to continue its support of the station. DSB leases facilities for AIRS from the Arkansas Educational Television Network (AETN), which provides DSB with in-kind services in the form of engineering services and other technology.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 6:25PM by saarcaycek

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

DSB, Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS), the DHS Division of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), the DHS Division of Behavioral Health Services (BHS), and the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE), Special Education Unit (SEU), Transition Unit are partners in a cooperative agreement outlining responsibilities and the provision of services, including supported employment, to transition-aged consumers. The agreement produced an interagency steering committee which works on supported employment issues. During its formulation, the steering committee was facilitated by the EmployAbility Project, a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) program housed in the DHS Division of Aging and Adult Services.

Through the Governor’s Executive Order 10-17, DSB coordinates with other state agencies to increase employment of Arkansans with disabilities. The DSB Director serves on a task force that identified policies that created barriers and disincentives for employment of individuals who are disabled and made recommendations to the Governor. The Executive Order called for DHS to convene an Employment First Task Force comprised of disability service providers, consumer advocates, and the state agencies administering disability services, vocational rehabilitation, Workforce services, and education and to focus consumer services first toward the goal of self-sufficiency through employment.

Executive Order 10-17 also calls for the training of staff and counseling of consumers on Social Security work incentives, the Ticket to Work program, and employment and navigation services for individuals with disabilities who want to work. It aims to increase the availability and use of supported employment through interagency collaboration and reallocation of existing funds to better meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

As part of this effort, DSB participated in the Workforce Centers Joint Managers’ state meeting March, 2012. Over 150 administrators from throughout the state convened to focus on delivering comprehensive services to build a workforce that meets the changing demands of Arkansas’ diverse businesses, citizens and economy. One of the objectives of the meeting was to move forward with the incorporation of a successful service delivery model that encompasses the Governor’s “Employment First” mandate.

DSB partnered with the EmployAbility Project of the DHS Division of Aging and Adult Services and the Arkansas chapter of APSE: Advancing Employment, Connecting People to develop the second annual Arkansas Disability Employment Conference held in March 2012, in North Little Rock. The conference was attended by SE providers, CRP’s, DSB Counselors, and other stakeholders. DSB staff had opportunities to network with providers and potential partners. Major conference topics included employment services, best SE practices, work incentives, Ticket to Work, and Employment Networks.

The Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Center conducted a focus group on Supported Employment for DSB’s vocational rehabilitation counselors and rehabilitation teachers March, 2012.

DSB uses a performance-based reimbursement system for services provided by Community Rehabilitation Programs located around the state.

Extended Services

As with the rest of the nation, DSB is struggling to secure CRPs willing to provide extended services. DSB will continue working with other state agencies and CRPs to develop a network of CRPs committed to the provision of ongoing support. DSB and other agencies have encouraged CRPs to become Employment Networks (ENs).

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 6:27PM by saarcaycek

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

The Arkansas Division of State Services for the Blind (DSB) supports a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) as required by Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1992. DSB’s CSPD Plan is aimed at securing and maintaining an adequate supply of qualified rehabilitation professionals and paraprofessionals to provide rehabilitation services to blind and severely visually impaired individuals. DSB requires VR Counselors to be certified by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) or at minimum be qualified to be certified and working toward certification. DSB requires Rehabilitation Teachers to be certified by the Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation and Education Professionals (ACVREP) or at minimum be qualified to be certified and working toward certification. These state standards are consistent with national standards requiring recognized certifications for personnel providing vocational rehabilitation services.

Procedures for evaluating progress

The Field Services Administrator and area Field Supervisors monitor progress by staff to meet CSPD standards. The Field Services Administrator works in cooperation with the Staff Development Coordinator to report on CSPD progress. An employee that declares retirement receives a lower priority in attaining the CSPD standard, but is required to complete a course which will increase expertise but not satisfy the federal requirement. Newly hired counselors have established timeframes (seven years from date of hire) to meet the requirements or face reclassification and demotion or other measures. Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors receive priority in training for CSPD requirements, and Rehabilitation Teachers for the Blind are given second priority. DSB is exploring ways to assist VR Counselors, Rehabilitation Teachers, and Rehabilitation Assistants with the costs of tuition to meet CSPD standards.

DHS Division of Services for the Blind is dedicated to ensuring an adequate supply of qualified professionals and support staff. DSB has a strong commitment to providing and making available training programs especially for staff that provide direct services to consumers.

Current Staffing Levels

DHS Division of Services for the Blind has sufficient staff on hand to staff the VR Program. DSB works aggressively to fill vacancies promptly. DSB has 13 authorized VR Counselors. Field Services has 18 support staff. In Counseling and Guidance, there are two CRC Counselors and two starting their practicum for CRC. DSB has 14 extra help positions; eight are filled as of submission of the State Plan.

Caseload Data

The 13 VR caseloads had an average caseload of 115 individuals as of October 1, 2011, with a statewide total of 937 active cases and a total of 1497 served during the preceding 12 months.

Projected Number of Replacement Staff in the Next Five Years

DSB anticipates an elevated level of retirement among its experienced staff in the next five years. It is expected that there will be a fairly regular replacement rate for staff during the next five years.

The number of staff on hand as of May 14, 2012 and projected annual number of replacements by category are as follows:

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Administrative Staff 13 1 2
2 Counselor Staff 43 6 4
3 Staff Supporting Counselor Activities 7 1 1
4 Other Staff 2 1 0
5 0 0 0
6 0 0 0
7 0 0 0
8 0 0 0
9 0 0 0
10 0 0 0

 

The Staff Development Coordinator maintains contact with the institutions of higher education and gathers data. The Coordinator reports this data to the Field Services Administrator and the Assistant Director. Below is the most recent information available from the institutions of higher education that have programs preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals:

The University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR) has two Masters programs for preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, a Masters in Rehabilitation Teaching (MRT) and a Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling Education (RCE) with Emphasis in Rehabilitation Counseling. The MRT also offers an Emphasis in Orientation and Mobility (O&M). Both programs are housed in the Counseling, Adult and Rehabilitation Education (CARE) degree Masters of Arts. Currently, one DSB staff (with a disability) is enrolled in these programs. The MRT program will dissolve after current students complete their curriculum, but the O&M program will continue.

The O&M program has a total of 65 students, all enrolled part-time. Of these, 13 are minorities, three have disabilities, 14 are males, and 51 are females. Of the six students who graduated this year, all are employed in vocational rehabilitation in various states.

The RCE program at UALR has 238 students; of these students there are 86 minorities; 178 full-time, 60 part-time, 24 males, and 153 females. The college did not report the number of students with disabilities. The RCE program had 70 graduates in spring 2012; no employment data was available.

The University of North Texas (UNT) was awarded a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) grant in April, 2009 and will fund up to 18 VR Counselors outside of Texas. In FY 2012, DSB had one employee pursuing this online training opportunity to complete a Master’s degree. A total of 154 full and part time students are enrolled in UNT’s program. Of these, 115 are female, 38 are male, 29 have disabilities, and 60 are minorities. UNT graduated 29 students during the summer 2011 – spring 2012 period. Graduate employment statistics: 20 are employed in VR settings, three in non-profit/community-based programs, one in private industry, and five in university settings.

The University of Arkansas at Fayetteville (U of A) offers a Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling through the Rehabilitation Education and Research Program housed in the Department of Rehabilitation, Human Resources and Communication Disorders. Of the 51 students enrolled in FY 2012, there are 14 males, 37 females, two international students, no Native American students, four African-American students, 41 Caucasian students, no Latino students, and 12 students with disabilities. Of the 20 students who graduated this past year, 11 received both their Certified Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) and Licensed Accredited Counselor (LAC). After graduation, 17 students were employed in private rehabilitation and three in state rehabilitation services, all at Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (ARS).

Arkansas State University (ASU) at Jonesboro offers a Masters Rehabilitation Counseling program, which is housed in the Psychology and Counseling Department. The most recent statistics available from ASU are for summer 2010 through spring 2011, and the graduate data is for summer 2009 through spring 2010. Of the 29 students enrolled during that period, there were 12 full-time, 17 part-time, and 15 minorities. None of the full-time students were disabled, and five of the part-time students had disabilities.

The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) and Arkansas Tech University (ATU) at Russellville do not offer Master’s degree programs in Rehabilitation Services, but do offer Bachelor degree programs in Rehabilitation Science.

The Rehabilitation Services curriculum at UAPB offers a comprehensive program designed to prepare students for employment in a wide range of rehabilitation-related positions. Students who graduate from the program usually minor in criminal justice or social work. Other students become rehabilitation generalists or enter a Master’s program in rehabilitation counseling or other related programs. The most recent statistics available from UAPB are for spring 2011 and show a total of 19 students enrolled, of which 17 were full-time, two were part-time, and 19 were minorities.

The Rehabilitation Services curriculum at ATU has a total of 99 students enrolled in the vocational rehabilitation area of emphasis. Of these, there are 79 full-time students, 20 part-time students, and 23 minority students. Eighteen students graduated, but their employment information is not known.

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 0 0 0 0
2 0 0 0 0
3 0 0 0 0
4 0 0 0 0
5 0 0 0 0

 

DSB has cooperative agreements with each of the 33 colleges/universities in Arkansas in order to promote the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education to recruit and prepare individuals for careers in rehabilitation.

To address current needs for qualified personnel, the DHS personnel office posts DSB vacancies on the DHS website, the state employment website arstatejobs.com, the DHS Intranet site, the statewide newspaper, Workforce Services offices, other state agencies, and college and university recruitment bulletins. Recruitment efforts are ongoing to colleges and universities in the region, including those with a predominately minority enrollment. Universities in Arkansas with Rehabilitation Counseling Programs include:

Institution: University of Arkansas at Little Rock (UALR)

Location: Little Rock

Programs: Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling Education (RCE) with Emphasis in Rehabilitation Counseling

Institution: University of Arkansas at Fayetteville (UofA)

Location: Fayetteville

Programs: Masters in Rehabilitation Counseling and doctoral degrees in Rehabilitation and in Counseling Education

Institution: Arkansas State University (ASU)

Location: Jonesboro

Programs: Masters Rehabilitation Counseling

Institution: University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB)

Location: Pine Bluff

Programs: Bachelor degree in Rehabilitation Science

Institution: Arkansas Tech University (ATU)

Location: Russellville

Programs: Bachelor degree program in Rehabilitation Science

 

The Arkansas Office of Personnel Management (OPM) continues to recommend the minimum qualifications, job descriptions and salary rates for specific classifications, based upon labor market surveys, which are then reviewed and approved by the legislature.

Internships are available to students in the rehabilitation programs across the state. In FY 2012, two DSB counselors started their practicums for CRC, working in DSB offices. Both are women, and one is blind. During FY 2012, DSB has been the practicum site for two students from World Services for the Blind who are training to teach technology. Of these, one was a woman who is blind and completed a four-month practicum. The other student is a non-minority male who is blind and expects to complete his practicum in June, 2012. In FY 2012, DSB did not have any students apply as interns. In FY 2011, DSB had two interns, but no practicum students. In 2010, DSB had two practicum students, but did not have any students apply as interns. In 2009, DSB had both interns and practicum students.

DSB recruits, and, to the degree possible, hires counselors with a Master’s Degree in Rehabilitation Counseling or other closely related degree. DSB implements individual education plans for existing personnel to be retrained to meet certification standards for Council on Rehabilitation Counselor (CRC) and Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC).

DSB established September 30, 2011 as the deadline for Vocational Rehabilitation Masters Degree Counselors currently employed to meet Comprehensive System of Personnel Development (CSPD) requirements. Newly hired counselors will have seven years to meet CSPD requirements from date of hire.

The current CSPD status for VR Counselors is:

• One CRC

• One LPC

• Two starting their practicum for CRC

• One taking classes in preparation to take CRC exam

• One planning to take CRC exam in April

• One currently enrolled in school

• Two starting class in August

• One starting class in January

• One in DROP retirement program

• Two VCR vacancies

CRC Senior Counselors are mentoring new counselors to comply with RSA’s prior approval standards regarding eligibility determination, approval of IPE’s, and closure determinations.

 

DSB staff must possess specific knowledge concerning the problems of blindness and be allowed the opportunity for career development as related to the delivery of vocational rehabilitation services.

DSB actively assesses the training needs of its employees and solicits their input regarding training needs. DSB surveys staff annually to determine the training or resources they require to perform their duties more efficiently and effectively. DSB also uses a state-approved personnel performance evaluation document to review an employee’s performance and to identify individual training needs.

Leadership development and capacity-building opportunities are offered through a wide variety of methods:

• The Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Center periodically surveys rehabilitation staff regarding training needs and develops courses and conferences based on the results or on requests by DSB and other agencies. In FY 2012, TACE offered face-to-face trainings and teleconferences on topics including: Mental Illness Issues and Treatment Planning in VR Services for Consumers with Low Vision and Blindness; Job Success with Young Adults Diagnosed with Cognitive Disabilities; Using Test Scores to Help Make Job Recommendations; The ABC’s of Soft Skills – The Secret to Successful Employment and Business Ownership; Partners in Transition: Collaborations Between Rehabilitation Counselors and Campus Disability Resources Providers; Learn How to Create a Culture of Access Which Will Productively Impact Your Work and Market Place; TBI and Stroke – What You Need to Know?; Motivational Interviewing Overview: Using MI in the VR Process; Clients with Kidney Disease: Untapped Vocational Rehabilitation Candidates; Secondary Transition: Comparison and Clarification; Rehabilitation of Persons with Psychiatric Disabilities: Major Depression, Bipolar Disorder, and Schizophrenia; Four Generations, One Workplace; Partners in Transition: Collaborations Between Rehabilitation Counselors and the Campus Disability Resource Provider; and The Radical Leap – Reignite Your Passion for Your Work.

• The Oklahoma and Texas Departments of Rehabilitation Services have given DSB staff four spots in their leadership training program Wicked Innovation: Next Generation Solutions (WINGS) , which was developed in conjunction with TACE.

• In-house training is provided through DSB’s Staff Development Coordinator and its Vocational Instructor; the DHS Organizational Development and Training Unit; DSB’s annual Statewide meeting; the annual Field Services meeting; quarterly training meetings; and one-on-one training which is made available to all staff depending upon the need. The agency is also developing a DSB Leadership Academy to prepare for succession and give future supervisors and managers the necessary skills to succeed. Information is also distributed at Director’s meetings, Supervisors’ meetings, various staff meetings, emails, the agency website, and DHS SharePoint.

• Staff are encouraged to participate in professional organizations, such as the National Rehabilitation Association, Lions Clubs, the National Federation of the Blind, the American Council of the Blind, and the Arkansas Association for the Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (AER), and opportunities are available to attend organizations’ state and national conferences.

Retention of qualified personnel is addressed through CEU credit for staff training, as well as opportunities for expanding skills and knowledge in a variety of areas.

 

Appropriate modes of communication, including sign language interpreters, are available on a contractual basis. The directive to utilize the contracts has been provided to all staff and is on file in each DSB office; it is also in DSB policy and on the DSB website.

DSB serves on the Arkansas Advisory Committee for the Arkansas Project for Children with Deafblindness and is an affiliate of the Helen Keller National Center. The Deaf/Blind Consortium has developed information in Spanish and provided training for parents and professionals to foster stronger partnerships among agencies who work with this population.

DSB provides interpreter services for communication with persons with limited English speaking ability on a contractual basis. DSB brochures are available in Spanish, and a supply is available in each office. One of the field supervisors speaks Spanish and French and understands Portuguese from having lived in Brazil (Central Arkansas has a community of Brazilians). DSB also has one VR Counselor who is fluent in Spanish, and DHS has an in-house, certified Spanish interpreter in Miller County. These communication resources can be utilized as needed to serve consumers.

Reader service, guide service, and any special adaptive equipment are made available to applicants for services, DSB consumers, and DSB personnel. Information is also available in the medium of choice for persons making application for DSB services and for persons with disabilities who are employed by DSB.

 

DSB is a charter member of the Arkansas Interagency Transition Partnership (AITP), which has approximately 15 member agencies and is coordinated by Arkansas Transition Services in affiliation with the Arkansas Department of Education, Special Education Unit. The AITP discusses transition issues, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and other legislation, at its quarterly meetings and its Transition Summits. The next Transition Summit will be October 1-3, 2012, and will focus on employment-related issues for students with disabilities Quarterly meetings also facilitate the coordination of services among the member agencies at a state level. Transition goals and services must be in place by the time a child reaches age 16, as mandated by the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA 2004). Local issues are addressed by local teams.

DSB participates in the Transition Learning Collaborative (TLC), a group established by the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Center to share information and resources to improve transition at the state level. TACE Center staff researches student data collection and analyzes models used in other states and shares them with the states in the TLC collaborative. The TLC is composed of transition coordinators from both general and blind VR agencies in Region VI. Interaction with other states and TACE increases the resources available to DSB in regard to best practices and information about Section 101, IDEA, ADA and the Individual Education Plan (IEP). In addition to the annual TLC meeting held in Austin, DSB’s transition coordinator participates in monthly TLC teleconferences. In 2013, DSB counselors will be encouraged to enroll in the “Transition Train,” a self-paced training module developed by the TLC, which enables a counselor to earn 15 CEU’s.

A DSB policy directive instructs Counselors to contact transition professionals twice a year to identify any transition needs.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 6:44PM by saarcaycek

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

DSB conducts a comprehensive, statewide needs assessment at least every three years and the results are used in developing goals. The next Comprehensive Needs Assessment will be conducted in FY 2013. The most recently completed Comprehensive Needs Assessment was conducted in 2010, and its results can be found in the FY 2011 State Plan. In recent years there has been a marked increase in participation:

• 72 respondents in 2007

• 190 in 2009

• 356 in 2010

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 6:44PM by saarcaycek

Basis for Estimates

DSB uses census data, population growth, the incidence of blindness, and historical data as the basis to project the number of individuals to be served through Part B of Title I. Historical data is used to estimate the number of supported employment cases to be served through Part B of Title VI.

Estimates for Part B of Title I for FY 2013:

DSB estimates it will serve a projected total of 2,043 consumers at a total cost of $10,236,871 ($5,011 per consumer). Of this number, it is projected that 912 will be minorities. By comparison, in the last completed year DSB served 1,428 VR consumers.

Note: In addition to a growing Hispanic population, Arkansas has one of the highest Marshallese populations in the United States. In the 2010 Census count for Arkansas, 4,324 people identified themselves as Marshallese, placing the state as having the highest Marshallese population in the continental United States and the second highest overall (with Hawaii having 7,412). The Compact of Free Association, which allows the Marshallese to live and travel freely and at-will between the Marshall Islands and the United States, will end in 2023.

In addition to increasing the number of consumers served, DSB plans to enhance its services by budgeting to utilize carry-over funds to:

• Re-design the technology needs assessment and database process for the DSB central Tech Lab to better align it with RSA guidelines on Rehabilitation Engineering.

• Develop skills and credentials for Rehabilitation Teachers.

• Establish an information clearinghouse and scheduled demonstration lab on selected college campuses to inform Transition Partner organizations of the needs of students with significant vision problems, and the cost-effective resources available to them.

• Increase the skills, credentials and professional affiliations of its novice Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors as they move to assume senior counseling responsibilities in connection with DSB overall succession planning.

• Contract with local providers to secure select VR services to capitalize on the established relationships of such contractors with local employers, to secure appropriate employment for DSB clients in geographic proximity to their homes. A secondary benefit to this initiative will be expanded awareness of DSB services to employers.

• Establish multi-layered support systems for clients by developing performance based contracts with Faith-Based Organizations (FBOs) and other providers across the state, as an extension of their missions, to provide depth to volunteer employment-related transportation and other services in rural areas of the state.

• Convert the DSB client data system to a web-based product.

Estimates for Part B of Title VI for FY 2013:

Averaging the number of consumers in supported employment over the past two completed years, DSB estimates it will serve 16 consumers in supported employment in FY 2013, at a total cost of $320,000 ($20,000 per consumer). By comparison, in the last completed year, six consumers were in supported employment.

The anticipated increase in SE consumers is also based on the emphasis placed on supported employment in the current Technical Assistance Plan (TAP), which was developed following the 2011 RSA monitoring review. In the development of the TAP, partners agreed that DSB will use part of its carry-over funds to significantly expand the capacity of World Services for the Blind and Arkansas Lighthouse for the Blind (as Community Rehabilitation Programs) to provide Supported Employment services to individuals who are blind. This strategy can also be found in Attachment 4.11(c)(4) Goals and Plans for Distribution of Title VI, Part B, under Goal 1: Increase the number of Supported Employment Providers to better serve DSB consumers.

As part of this expansion, WSB and the Lighthouse will work with DSB and the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Center to develop a curriculum for training SE consumers and their natural support network and provide an opportunity for On-the-Job Training (OJT) prior to placement of both the consumer and the job coach.

Estimates of Eligible Consumers for FY 2012:

Based on statistical reporting derived from Prevent Blindness America, an overall rate of 2.7% for the prevalence of blindness was applied to the latest available population growth figures for Arkansas population aged 15 to 64, and DSB estimates that there are approximately 56,307 persons in Arkansas who might be eligible for and could receive vocational rehabilitation services.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
0
Totals   $0 0

This screen was last updated on Aug 28 2012 7:07PM by saarcaycek

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

DSB developed the following goals based on RSA guidance for the State Plan FY 2012, recommendations by the DSB Board, and the 2010 comprehensive, statewide needs assessment, which is done at least every 3 years. Below are the goals, as approved by the DSB Board:

Goal 1: DSB will increase the employment opportunities for people who are blind or severely visually impaired.

Strategy: VR Counselors and Rehabilitation Teachers will make job contacts with employers.

Performance Measure: Each VR Counselor and Rehabilitation Teacher will make two face-to-face job contacts with employers per month.

Strategy: DSB will encourage and support viable self-employment.

Performance Measures:

• All self-employment proposals will be reviewed by a team composed of the Business and Technology Unit Manager, the Field Services Administrator, and the VR Counselor to ensure that a proposal is realistic and sustainable before it is approved and any funds are provided.

• In addition to the goal and steps of self-employment being on the IPE, the consumer must complete a written business plan with the DSB business-ownership team described above.

• A brochure will be developed to provide interested consumers with information about DSB’s small business self-employment program.

• Staff will receive training in Operation Jump Start, a hands-on, microenterprise development program designed to help entrepreneurs test the feasibility of their business ideas and plan to launch new ventures. DSB’s Operation Jump Start’s mission is to help consumers who have expressed an interest in starting their own business, explore the possibility, develop a business plan, and start their own business. In doing so we help them become economically independent and be an active part of their communities.

Strategy: Based upon consumer response and effectiveness, DSB will continue to hold Job Clubs to assist participants in acquiring job seeking skills and improving their probability of securing employment.

Performance Measure: Job Clubs will be held at least once a month at the DSB Tech Lab and field offices.

Strategy: DSB will continue to refer individuals for benefits counseling.

Performance Measures:

• Area Supervisors will monitor caseloads to ensure that VR Counselors will refer 100% of VR consumers for benefits counseling.

• Counselors will make consumers aware of benefits counseling at the time of application, at the time of IPE’s, and at the time of closure.

Strategy: DSB will continue to refer Older Blind individuals who are interested in employment to VR and will ensure its OIB contractor will as well.

Performance Measure: DSB and its OIB contractor will refer 100% of Older Blind individuals who are interested in employment to VR.

Strategy: DSB will continue to recognize successful consumers and their employers.

Performance Measures:

• Each counselor who has been in his/her position for at least a year will nominate one individual from his/her caseload as a candidate for state Consumer of the Year.

• DSB will award Consumer of the Year candidates and their employers with trophies/plaques and related publicity.

Strategy: DSB will continue to expand its assistive technology services and improve access to these services and equipment.

Performance Measures:

• DSB will acquire specialized training to develop the skills and credentials of Rehabilitation Teachers.

• DSB will continue to assign new Rehabilitation Teachers to assistive technology training as vacant positions are filled, so that staff can provide basic technology support to consumers in their respective geographic areas statewide. Supervisors will schedule veteran RTs for remedial training as a formal part of their professional development plan.

• DSB will continue to provide training to new Workforce Services staff as vacancies occur in order to increase their knowledge of accessible technology and the needs of consumers.

• DSB staff will continue to meet consumers at Workforce Services offices, including DSB-sponsored accessible kiosks, in order to assist consumers in their job searches and in becoming more comfortable interacting with the public in an employment setting.

Strategy: DSB will increase the skills, credentials and professional affiliations of its novice Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors as they move to assume senior counseling responsibilities in connection with DSB overall succession planning.

Performance Measures:

• Novice counselors will attend a specific orientation to VR issues and will participate in specialized training, through the Arkansas Rehabilitation Association or other qualified sources.

• Novice counselors will be exposed to professional organizations each year, as documented in their professional development plans.

Strategy: DSB will contract with local providers to secure select VR services to capitalize on the established relationships of such contractors with local employers, to secure appropriate employment for DSB clients in geographic proximity to their homes.

Performance Measure: Deliverables within the contracts will be met.

Strategy: DSB will establish multi-layered support systems for clients by developing performance based contracts with Faith-Based Organizations (FBOs) and other providers across the state, as an extension of their missions, to provide depth to volunteer employment-related transportation and other services in rural areas of the state.

Performance Measure: Deliverables within the contracts will be met.

Strategy: DSB will establish an information clearinghouse and scheduled demonstration lab on selected college campuses to inform Transition Partner organizations of the needs of students with significant vision problems, and the cost-effective resources available to them.

Performance Measure: An information clearinghouse and scheduled demonstration lab will be established on at least one college campus.

Strategy: DSB will explore ways to better utilize the DSB central Tech Lab.

Performance Measure: DSB will re-design the technology needs assessment and database process for the DSB central Tech Lab to better align it with RSA guidelines on Rehabilitation Engineering. This is a specific initiative of the DSB Leadership Training Team, in partnership with the Oklahoma Wicked Innovation: Next Generation Solutions (WINGS) leadership training project.

Strategy: DSB will convert its client data MIS system to a web-based environment.

Performance Measures:

• Counselors will be able to enter client data and gather signatures during local visits, which will streamline the flow of services.

• The new system will facilitate the production of statistical reports.

Strategy: To augment the efforts of DSB staff, DSB will use peer mentoring in a variety of situations to allow experienced consumers to provide information, advice, and support to less experienced consumers, often leading and guiding by example of his/her success in an area.

Performance Measures:

• Peer mentoring will be used to connect consumers interested in self-employment with individuals who have owned small businesses and can offer advice and support.

• Consumers of the Year will be encouraged to provide peer mentoring to other individuals who are blind and severely visually impaired that are trying to manage their rehabilitation plans, gain marketable skills, and secure good jobs.

• Participants in Job Club will be encouraged to mentor each other in their searches for employment and development of job readiness skills.

Goal 2: DSB will increase its services to transition students.

Strategy: DSB will support training and the exchange of information among state transition partner organizations.

Performance Measure: DSB will sponsor or participate in at least one training or event that will bring together transition partners for the purpose of exchanging information that will specifically benefit students who are blind or severely visually impaired.

Strategy: DSB will update the collaborative database of transition students as needed.

Performance Measure: The Field Services Administrator will review the database to insure it is being maintained by Rehabilitation Assistants, who input local information.

Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.

Performance Measure: Area Supervisors will monitor this during case reviews to insure that no transition student will graduate without a current IPE.

Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits around the state to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings.

Performance Measure: In FY 2013, DSB will invite ESVI Consultants and transition parents to Parent Summits with VR Counselors and Rehabilitation Teachers, to provide information about students’ rights and accommodations.

Strategy: VR Counselors or Rehabilitation Teachers will make face-to-face visits to each school counselor assigned to students who are blind or visually impaired in their territories.

Performance Measure: VR Counselors or Rehabilitation Teachers will have from the beginning of the school year to December 1, to complete the face-to-face visits to school counselors described above.

Strategy: DSB will continue to provide assessments to transition students specifically focused on activities of daily living, including but not limited to, mobility, knowledge of available transportation resources, self-advocacy, acquisition of a variety of reading options, awareness of job opportunities, and rights and responsibilities as an informed consumer.

Performance Measure: All transition students will be referred to Rehabilitation Teachers for assessment of daily living skills and needed instruction.

Strategy: DSB will continue to strengthen relationships with public schools, including Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired.

Performance Measure: DSB will continue its system of mail-outs and emails to public schools.

Strategy: DSB will continue to strengthen relationships with Educational Services for the Visually Impaired (ESVI).

Performance Measures:

• DSB will continue its system of mail-outs and emails to area ESVI representatives. In addition to the local networking efforts, the Transition Coordinator will dialogue with ESVI at a state level to discover any transition students that need services and should be referred to DSB.

• DSB will refer young consumers to ESVI and will encourage referrals from ESVI to DSB.

Goal 3: DSB will expand its outreach efforts to include the general public, as well as the unserved, underserved, minorities, and stakeholders.

Strategy: DSB will use exhibit booths to educate the public about DSB services and their availability.

Performance Measure: Each VR Counselor or Rehabilitation Teacher will staff at least one DSB exhibit at a widely attended or significantly relevant event in his/her territory.

Strategy: DSB will contract with CIL’s to reach out to faith-based organizations and inform them of DSB VR services.

Performance Measure: CIL’s will submit to DSB copies of minutes of meetings with faith-based groups, reports on trainings, and monthly reports, including the number of faith-based referrals.

Strategy: DSB will increase its services to minorities.

Performance Measures: DSB will make at least one minority outreach effort to Hispanic, Asian, or other ethnic groups in each of its geographic areas in FY 2013.

Strategy: Area Supervisors and DSB administrative staff will continue to attend the state conferences of blindness consumer groups, and opportunities will be offered to direct service staff as well.

Performance Measure: DSB will continue to send at least five supervisors/administrators to these conferences and will make presentations as requested.

This screen was last updated on Aug 28 2012 7:40PM by saarcaycek

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on Sep 10 2009 9:58AM by Cassondra Williams

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

DSB will allocate funding from Title VI, Part B to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities. These funds are a supplement to the funds provided under Title I of the Act. Title VI, Part B funds will only be used in the provision of supported employment services to those individuals determined eligible through assessments determining that it is an appropriate objective. Supported employment services will be customer-driven through the setting of goals in the consumer’s Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). In FY 2011, DSB provided supported employment services to six individuals. Of this number, one case was closed without an employment outcome. No cases were closed competitively employed not in supported employment; closed competitively employed in supported employment; or closed not competitively employed-not in supported employment. FY 2013 Projections: Averaging the number of consumers in supported employment over the past two completed years, DSB estimates it will serve 16 consumers in supported employment.

Issues affecting supported employment in Arkansas include: the limited number of service providers statewide; the rural nature of the state; the lack of consistent available funding for extended services; and the lack of knowledge, experience, and training SE providers have in the provision of supported employment services and placement for individuals who are blind or severely visually impaired. Many providers do not have and are unwilling to expend time, monies and resources to train staff in this specialty area of expertise.

DSB provides assistive technology services and devices based upon assessments and recommendations by the DSB Technology Unit, availability of funds, and the consumer’s IPE.

DSB has set the following goals for the utilization and distribution of Title VI, Part B Funds, based on the most recent comprehensive needs assessment and the recommendations of the DSB Board:

Goal 1: Increase the number of Supported Employment Providers to better serve DSB consumers.

Strategy: DSB will provide resources to significantly expand the capacity of its partners World Services for the Blind (WSB) and Arkansas Lighthouse for the Blind (LFB) as Community Rehabilitation Programs to provide Supported Employment services to DSB consumers.

Performance Measure: WSB and LFB will begin providing SE services to at least half of the DSB consumers in supported employment during FY 2013.

Strategy: DSB will continue to collaborate with other agencies, such as Arkansas chapter of APSE: Advancing Employment, Connecting People, to expand the number of SE providers.

Performance Measure: At least two new potential SE providers will be identified and contacted.

Strategy: DSB will encourage consumers’ family members and other natural support individuals to become SE providers.

Performance Measure: DSB will collaborate with TACE and other organizations to develop training for the family support member and consumer.

Strategy: DSB will continue to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks (ENs).

Performance Measure: A meeting will have taken place with at least one CRP to discuss the possibility of its becoming an EN.

Goal 2: Increase the quality of SE Providers for individuals who are blind or severely visually impaired.

Strategy: DSB will collaborate with TACE and other organizations to develop training for the family support member and consumer.

Performance Measures: At least one training on SE will be offered to family support personnel and SE consumers.

Strategy: Orient DSB staff to new program design.

Performance Measures: At least one staff training on SE program design will be conducted in FY 2013.

This screen was last updated on Aug 28 2012 6:40PM by saarcaycek

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

DSB has developed the following strategies to expand and improve services to its consumers. These strategies were developed in regard to its goals for the State Plan FY 2013, which are to: increase the employment opportunities for people who are blind or severely visually impaired; increase services to transition students; and expand outreach efforts to include the general public, as well as the unserved, underserved and minorities.

The performance measures are included with the goals in 4.11(c) (1). Here are the strategies:

Strategy: VR Counselors and Rehabilitation Teachers will make job contacts with employers.

Strategy: DSB will encourage and support viable self-employment.

Strategy: Based upon consumer response and effectiveness, DSB will continue to hold Job Clubs to assist participants in acquiring job seeking skills and improving their probability of securing employment.

Strategy: DSB will continue to refer individuals for benefits counseling.

Strategy: DSB will continue to refer Older Blind individuals who are interested in employment to VR and will ensure its OIB contractor will as well.

Strategy: DSB will continue to recognize successful consumers and their employers.

Strategy: DSB will continue to expand its assistive technology services and improve access to these services and equipment.

Strategy: DSB will increase the skills, credentials and professional affiliations of its novice Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors as they move to assume senior counseling responsibilities in connection with DSB overall succession planning.

Strategy: DSB will contract with local providers to secure select VR services to capitalize on the established relationships of such contractors with local employers, to secure appropriate employment for DSB clients in geographic proximity to their homes.

Strategy: DSB will establish multi-layered support systems for clients by developing performance based contracts with Faith-Based Organizations (FBOs) and other providers across the state, as an extension of their missions, to provide depth to volunteer employment-related transportation and other services in rural areas of the state.

Strategy: DSB will establish an information clearinghouse and scheduled demonstration lab on selected college campuses to inform Transition Partner organizations of the needs of students with significant vision problems, and the cost-effective resources available to them.

Strategy: DSB will explore ways to better utilize the DSB central Tech Lab.

Strategy: DSB will convert its client data MIS system to a web-based environment.

Strategy: To augment the efforts of DSB staff, DSB will use peer mentoring in a variety of situations to allow experienced consumers to provide information, advice, and support to less experienced consumers, often leading and guiding by example of his/her success in an area.

Strategy: DSB will support training and the exchange of information among state transition partner organizations.

Strategy: DSB will update the collaborative database of transition students as needed.

Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.

Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits around the state to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings.

Strategy: VR Counselors or Rehabilitation Teachers will make face-to-face visits to each school counselor assigned to students who are blind or visually impaired in their territories.

Strategy: DSB will continue to provide assessments to transition students specifically focused on activities of daily living, including but not limited to, mobility, knowledge of available transportation resources, self-advocacy, acquisition of a variety of reading options, awareness of job opportunities, and rights and responsibilities as an informed consumer.

Strategy: DSB will continue to strengthen relationships with public schools, including Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired.

Strategy: DSB will continue to strengthen relationships with Educational Services for the Visually Impaired (ESVI).

Strategy: DSB will use exhibit booths to educate the public about DSB services and their availability.

Strategy: DSB will contract with CIL’s to reach out to faith-based organizations and inform them of DSB VR services.

Strategy: DSB will increase its services to minorities.

Strategy: Area Supervisors and DSB administrative staff will continue to attend the state conferences of blindness consumer groups, and opportunities will be offered to direct service staff as well.

A broad range of assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals who are blind or severely visually impaired as appropriate at each stage of the rehabilitation process in accordance with the individual’s employment goal and IPE. The provision of assistive technology services and devices is based upon assessments and recommendations by the DSB Technology Unit, availability of funds, and the consumer’s IPE. DSB will continue to offer assistive technology training to Rehabilitation Teachers in FY 2013, so that staff can continue to provide basic technology support to consumers in their local areas.

DSB has developed the following strategies to expand and improve supported employment services to its consumers. These strategies were developed in regard to its SE goals for FY 2013, which are: to increase the number of Supported Employment Providers to better serve DSB consumers and to increase the quality of SE Providers for individuals who are blind or severely visually impaired. The performance measures are included with the goals in 4.11(c) (4). Here are the strategies for those goals:

• Strategy: DSB will continue to collaborate with other agencies, such as Arkansas chapter of APSE: Advancing Employment, Connecting People, to expand the number of SE providers.

• Strategy: DSB will encourage consumers’ family members and other natural support individuals to become SE providers.

• Strategy: DSB will continue to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks (ENs).

• Strategy: DSB will collaborate with TACE and other organizations to develop training for the family support member and consumer.

• Strategy: Orient DSB staff to new program design.

General Education Provisions Act

DSB complies with Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA) by ensuring equitable access and participation to its programs and that consumers are not discriminated against by gender, race, national origin, color, disability, or age.

Use of Title I Funds for Innovation and Expansion Activities

In FY 2013, DSB will use its Title I funds for innovation and expansion to purchase a web-based data management system and contract with an information technology firm to act as a liaison between DSB and the data management system company. DSB will also use Title 1 funds to expand its partnership with NFB-NEWSLINE® available through DSB’s Arkansas Information Reading Services (AIRS) to consumers who are blind and severely visually impaired.

 

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

A broad range of assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals who are blind or severely visually impaired as appropriate at each stage of the rehabilitation process in accordance with the individual’s employment goal and IPE. The provision of assistive technology services and devices is based upon assessments and recommendations by the DSB Technology Unit, availability of funds, and the consumer’s IPE. DSB will continue to offer assistive technology training to Rehabilitation Teachers in FY 2013, so that staff can continue to provide basic technology support to consumers in their local areas.

 

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

DSB will expand its outreach efforts to include the general public, as well as the unserved, underserved, minorities, and stakeholders.

Strategy: DSB will use exhibit booths to educate the public about DSB services and their availability.

Performance Measure: Each VR Counselor or Rehabilitation Teacher will staff at least one DSB exhibit at a widely attended or significantly relevant event in his/her territory.

Strategy: DSB will contract with CIL’s to reach out to faith-based organizations and inform them of DSB VR services.

Performance Measure: CIL’s will submit to DSB copies of minutes of meetings with faith-based groups, reports on trainings, and monthly reports, including the number of faith-based referrals.

Strategy: DSB will increase its services to minorities.

Performance Measures: DSB will make at least one minority outreach effort to Hispanic, Asian, or other ethnic groups in each of its geographic areas in FY 2013.

Strategy: Area Supervisors and DSB administrative staff will continue to attend the state conferences of blindness consumer groups, and opportunities will be offered to direct service staff as well.

Performance Measure: DSB will continue to send at least five supervisors/administrators to these conferences and will make presentations as requested.

 

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

DSB has developed the following strategies to expand and improve supported employment services to its consumers. These strategies were developed in regard to its SE goals for FY 2013, which are: to increase the number of Supported Employment Providers to better serve DSB consumers and to increase the quality of SE Providers for individuals who are blind or severely visually impaired. The performance measures are included with the goals in 4.11(c) (4). Here are the strategies for those goals:

• Strategy: DSB will provide resources to significantly expand the capacity of its partners World Services for the Blind (WSB) and Arkansas Lighthouse for the Blind (LFB) as Community Rehabilitation Programs to provide Supported Employment services to DSB consumers.

Strategy: DSB will continue to collaborate with other agencies, such as Arkansas chapter of APSE: Advancing Employment, Connecting People, to expand the number of SE providers.

Strategy: DSB will encourage consumers’ family members and other natural support individuals to become SE providers.

Strategy: DSB will continue to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks (ENs).

Strategy: DSB will collaborate with TACE and other organizations to develop training for the family support member and consumer.

Strategy: Orient DSB staff to new program design.

 

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

DSB has met the standards and performance indicators with the exception of Indicator 1.6. DSB has identified the following contributing factors for failure to meet Indicator 1.6 and will implement these strategies to address the issue:

• Currently, DSB does not require consumers to verify their income at the time of application. Verification of income for the purpose of Indicator 1.6 will be conducted; income will not be considered for eligibility.

• DSB identified a problem in that the status of consumers who report their own income as the largest single source of support at the time of application was not being updated when consumers exited the program due to employment. Area Supervisors will continue to instruct and remind Counselors to update case records and will monitor cases to ensure the necessary action was taken.

• DSB will continue to serve homemakers with ILRS funds in an effort to reduce the number of VR homemaker closures and improve performance in this indicator.

 

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

DSB has cooperative agreements with local Workforce Investment Boards, which are updated as necessary. DSB also has cooperative agreements with the Department of Workforce Services (DWS) and Arkansas Rehabilitation Services (a general agreement and a deafblind agreement).

DSB, ARS, the DHS Division of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), the DHS Division of Behavioral Health Services (BHS), and the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE), Special Education Unit (SEU), Transition Unit are partners in a cooperative agreement outlining responsibilities and the provision of services, including supported employment, to transition-aged consumers.

Through the Governor’s Executive Order 10-17, DSB coordinates with other state agencies to increase employment of Arkansans with disabilities. The DSB Director serves on a task force that identified policies that created barriers and disincentives for employment of individuals who are disabled and made recommendations to the Governor. The Executive Order called for DHS to convene an Employment First Task Force comprised of disability service providers, consumer advocates, and the state agencies administering disability services, vocational rehabilitation, Workforce services, and education and to focus consumer services first toward the goal of self-sufficiency through employment.

DSB participated in the Workforce Centers Joint Managers’ state meeting entitled “Partners for a Better Workforce” March, 2012. Over 150 administrators from throughout the state convened to focus on delivering comprehensive services to build a workforce that meets the changing demands of Arkansas’ diverse businesses, citizens and economy.

One of the objectives of the meeting was to move forward with the incorporation of a successful service delivery model that encompasses the Governor’s “Employment First” mandate.

The DSB Director serves on the Arkansas Workforce Investment Board, which meets quarterly, and VR Counselors are members of the local Workforce Investment Boards, which meet quarterly across the state.

DSB has expanded its number of accessible kiosks for consumers to a total of 17 Workforce Center locations. The original 10 kiosks were placed in the same cities where DSB has offices; the second set of seven kiosks were placed in cities with either two-year or four-year Institutions of Higher Education. DSB is trying to change the culture so consumers are familiar with those locations and can access the Internet to search for jobs, the same as a sighted person.

 

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

DSB has developed the following strategies to expand and improve services to its consumers. These strategies were developed in regard to its goals for the State Plan FY 2013, which are to: increase the employment opportunities for people who are blind or severely visually impaired; increase services to transition students; and expand outreach efforts to include the general public, as well as the unserved, underserved and minorities.

The performance measures are included with the goals in 4.11(c) (1). Here are the strategies:

•Strategy: VR Counselors and Rehabilitation Teachers will make job contacts with employers.

Strategy: DSB will encourage and support viable self-employment.

Strategy: Based upon consumer response and effectiveness, DSB will continue to hold Job Clubs to assist participants in acquiring job seeking skills and improving their probability of securing employment.

Strategy: DSB will continue to refer individuals for benefits counseling.

Strategy: DSB will continue to refer Older Blind individuals who are interested in employment to VR and will ensure its OIB contractor will as well.

Strategy: DSB will continue to recognize successful consumers and their employers.

Strategy: DSB will continue to expand its assistive technology services and improve access to these services and equipment.

Strategy: DSB will increase the skills, credentials and professional affiliations of its novice Vocational Rehabilitation Counselors as they move to assume senior counseling responsibilities in connection with DSB overall succession planning.

Strategy: DSB will contract with local providers to secure select VR services to capitalize on the established relationships of such contractors with local employers, to secure appropriate employment for DSB clients in geographic proximity to their homes.

Strategy: DSB will establish multi-layered support systems for clients by developing performance based contracts with Faith-Based Organizations (FBOs) and other providers across the state, as an extension of their missions, to provide depth to volunteer employment-related transportation and other services in rural areas of the state.

Strategy: DSB will establish an information clearinghouse and scheduled demonstration lab on selected college campuses to inform Transition Partner organizations of the needs of students with significant vision problems, and the cost-effective resources available to them.

Strategy: DSB will explore ways to better utilize the DSB central Tech Lab.

Strategy: DSB will convert its client data MIS system to a web-based environment.

Strategy: To augment the efforts of DSB staff, DSB will use peer mentoring in a variety of situations to allow experienced consumers to provide information, advice, and support to less experienced consumers, often leading and guiding by example of his/her success in an area.

Strategy: DSB will support training and the exchange of information among state transition partner organizations.

Strategy: DSB will update the collaborative database of transition students as needed.

Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.

Strategy: DSB will hold Parent Summits around the state to assist parents and other stakeholders in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings.

Strategy: VR Counselors or Rehabilitation Teachers will make face-to-face visits to each school counselor assigned to students who are blind or visually impaired in their territories.

Strategy: DSB will continue to provide assessments to transition students specifically focused on activities of daily living, including but not limited to, mobility, knowledge of available transportation resources, self-advocacy, acquisition of a variety of reading options, awareness of job opportunities, and rights and responsibilities as an informed consumer.

Strategy: DSB will continue to strengthen relationships with public schools, including Arkansas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired.

Strategy: DSB will continue to strengthen relationships with Educational Services for the Visually Impaired (ESVI).

Strategy: DSB will use exhibit booths to educate the public about DSB services and their availability.

Strategy: DSB will contract with CIL’s to reach out to faith-based organizations and inform them of DSB VR services.

Strategy: DSB will increase its services to minorities.

Strategy: Area Supervisors and DSB administrative staff will continue to attend the state conferences of blindness consumer groups, and opportunities will be offered to direct service staff as well.

A broad range of assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals who are blind or severely visually impaired as appropriate at each stage of the rehabilitation process in accordance with the individual’s employment goal and IPE. The provision of assistive technology services and devices is based upon assessments and recommendations by the DSB Technology Unit, availability of funds, and the consumer’s IPE. DSB will continue to offer assistive technology training to Rehabilitation Teachers in FY 2013, so that staff can continue to provide basic technology support to consumers in their local areas.

Strategy: DSB will provide resources to significantly expand the capacity of its partners World Services for the Blind (WSB) and Arkansas Lighthouse for the Blind (LFB) as Community Rehabilitation Programs to provide Supported Employment services to DSB consumers.

Strategy: DSB will continue to collaborate with other agencies, such as Arkansas chapter of APSE: Advancing Employment, Connecting People, to expand the number of SE providers.

Strategy: DSB will encourage consumers’ family members and other natural support individuals to become SE providers.

Strategy: DSB will continue to encourage CRPs to become Employment Networks (ENs).

Strategy: DSB will collaborate with TACE and other organizations to develop training for the family support member and consumer.

Strategy: Orient DSB staff to new program design.

General Education Provisions Act

DSB complies with Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA) by ensuring equitable access and participation to its programs and that consumers are not discriminated against by gender, race, national origin, color, disability, or age.

Use of Title I Funds for Innovation and Expansion Activities

In FY 2013, DSB will use its Title I funds for innovation and expansion to purchase a web-based data management system and contract with an information technology firm to act as a liaison between DSB and the data management system company. DSB will also use Title 1 funds to expand its partnership with NFB-NEWSLINE® available through DSB’s Arkansas Information Reading Services (AIRS) to consumers who are blind and severely visually impaired.

 

This screen was last updated on Aug 28 2012 7:34PM by saarcaycek

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

Below are the evaluation and reports of progress for the most recently completed FY 2011 VR Goals and Priorities, covering October 1, 2010 – September 30, 2011:

Goal 1: DSB will increase the employment opportunities for people who are blind or severely visually impaired.

Strategy: DSB will evaluate the effectiveness of the job developers and job coaches hired with stimulus money and, if productive in terms of consumer employment, will absorb the positions into the formula VR funding, adjusting purchased services to absorb these costs.

Performance Measure: A job development unit will be established.

Goal Met: Job developers and job coaches were found to be effective, but due to state personnel restrictions, additional employees could not be hired. Therefore, the job development and job coaching duties were added to the responsibilities of the VR Counselors and Rehabilitation Teachers.

Strategy: Based upon consumer response and effectiveness, DSB will continue to hold Job Clubs to assist participants in acquiring job seeking skills and improving their probability of securing employment.

Performance Measure: Weekly Job Clubs will be held at the DSB Tech Lab.

Goal Met: The Rehabilitation Teacher stationed in the Little Rock office held Job Clubs each Wednesday in the DSB Tech Lab.

Strategy: DSB will continue to expand employment services to minorities in the underserved Delta area through the new West Memphis office.

Performance Measure: DSB will see a rising number of cases from this new area.

Goal Mixed Result: Although there was a decrease in the number of cases from the new area from 344 to 329, a decrease of 15 consumers served, there was an increase of closures due to employment in this area, from 54 to 64, an increase of 10.

Evaluation of FY 2011 VR Goals:

Strategy: DSB will continue to refer individuals for benefits counseling.

Performance Measure: Area Supervisors will monitor caseloads to ensure that VR Counselors will refer at least 10 consumers per caseload for benefits counseling.

Goal Met: Counselors are referring at least 10 consumers per caseload for benefits counseling.

Strategy: DSB will continue to refer eligible Older Blind individuals to VR.

Performance Measure: DSB will refer 100% of eligible Older Blind individuals to VR.

Goal Met: Counselors are referring all Older Blind individuals who are interested in employment to the VR program.

Strategy: DSB will continue to recognize successful consumers and their employers and will encourage peer mentoring.

Performance Measures:

• Each counselor who has been in his/her position for at least a year will nominate one individual from his/her caseload as a candidate for Consumer of the Year and encourage the individual to serve as a peer mentor to other people who are blind or severely visually impaired.

• DSB will award Consumer of the Year candidates and their employers with certificates/plaques and related publicity.

Goal Met: Even Counselors who had not been in their positions for a year nominated consumers from their caseloads for the Consumer of the Year. DSB recognized 13 area winners and their employers at award presentations at Lions Clubs and civic groups around the state. The DSB Board selected an overall state winner from the area nominees and held a reception in recognition of the state winner and her employer.

Strategy: DSB will continue to expand its assistive technology services and improve access to these services and equipment.

Performance Measures:

• DSB will continue to offer assistive technology training to new Rehabilitation Teachers as vacant positions are filled, so that staff can provide basic technology support to consumers in their respective geographic areas statewide.

• DSB will continue to provide training to new Workforce Services staff as vacancies occur in order to increase their knowledge of accessible technology and the needs of consumers.

• DSB staff will continue to meet consumers at DSB-sponsored accessible kiosks at 10 Workforce Services centers in order to assist them in their job searches.

Goal Met: Rehabilitation Teachers received technology training; Workforce staff were trained as turnover occurred; and DSB staff met consumers at the kiosks.

Goal 2: DSB will increase its services to transition students.

Strategy: DSB will update the collaborative database of transition students as needed.

Performance Measure: The Transition Coordinator will review the database to insure it is being maintained by Rehabilitation Assistants, who input local information.

Goal Met: The Transition Coordinator reviewed the database as needed and saw that it was being maintained.

Strategy: VR Counselors will continue to track transition students on their caseloads to insure that the IPE is developed or updated before a student graduates from high school.

Performance Measure: Area Supervisors will monitor this during case reviews to insure that no transition student will graduate without a current IPE.

Goal Met: Case reviews showed students had current IPE’s prior to graduation.

Strategy: DSB will continue to provide assessments to transition students specifically focused on activities of daily living, including but not limited to, mobility, knowledge of available transportation resources, self-advocacy, acquisition of a variety of reading options, awareness of job opportunities, and rights and responsibilities as an informed consumer.

Performance Measure: All transition students will be referred to Rehabilitation Teachers for assessment of daily living skills and needed instruction.

Goal Met: All students received assessments.

Strategy: DSB will hold an Information Summit to assist parents in becoming more knowledgeable and better prepared to advocate for their children at Individualized Education Plan (IEP) meetings.

Performance Measure: In FY 2011, DSB will invite ESVI and transition parents to an Information Summit with VR Counselors and Rehabilitation Teachers, to provide information about students’ rights and accommodations.

Goal Deferred: ESVI held a similar conference, but DSB decided to rename and defer its Information Summit until 2012. DSB will have one or more Parent Summits.

Strategy: DSB will continue to strengthen relationships with ESVI.

Performance Measure: In addition to the current mail-outs, in FY 2011 an e-mail component will be added as a supplemental method of outreach. In addition to the local networking efforts, the Transition Coordinator will dialogue with ESVI at a state level to discover any transition students that need services and should be referred to DSB.

Goal Met: DSB strengthened its relationship with ESVI through this system and communications were improved.

Goal 3: DSB will expand its outreach efforts to include the general public, as well as the unserved, underserved, minorities, and stakeholders.

Strategy: DSB will use exhibit booths at highly populated events to educate the public about DSB services and their availability.

Performance Measure: A pilot project will be initiated to participate in two mid-sized festivals, alternating locations around the state, in spring and fall.

Goal Met: DSB participated in the St. Paul A.M.E. Church Second Annual Health Conference entitled “Mind, Body and Soul” on June 4, 2011, and the Senior Citizens Health Fair on November 20, 2010, both in Northeast Arkansas, and the Disability Awareness Day celebration at the State Capitol in Little Rock on October 19, 2011.

Strategy: DSB will increase its contacts with faith-based organizations.

Performance Measure: DSB will make at least one faith-based outreach effort in each of its geographic areas in FY 2011.

Goal Met: Each area exceeded the number of faith-based efforts.

Strategy: DSB will increase its services to minorities.

Performance Measures: DSB will make at least one minority outreach effort to Hispanic, Asian, or other ethnic groups in each of its geographic areas in FY 2011.

Goal Met: Each area exceeded the number of faith-based efforts.

Strategy: Area Supervisors and administrative staff will continue to attend the state conferences of blindness consumer groups, and opportunities will be offered to direct service staff as well.

Performance Measure: DSB will continue to send at least five supervisors/administrators to these conferences and will make presentations as requested.

Goal Met: More than five supervisors and administrators attended state conferences of blindness consumers groups, including the American Council of the Blind and the National Federation of the Blind state conferences. DSB direct service staff also accepted opportunities to attend state consumer conferences.

 

Below are the evaluation and reports of progress for the most recently completed FY 2011 SE Goals and Priorities, covering October 1, 2010 – September 30, 2011:

Goal 1: Increase the number of Supported Employment Providers to better serve DSB consumers.

Strategy: DSB will continue to collaborate with other agencies to expand the number of SE providers.

Performance Measures: At least two new potential SE providers will be identified and contacted.

Goal Met: Goodwill of North East Texas and Genesis Global Network were contacted and provided services.

Strategy: A new faith-based Request for Qualifications (RFQ) will be issued to recruit SE providers, along with VR providers.

Performance Measure: At least two providers will be recruited through the RFQ.

Goal Met: The RFQ was issued, and these providers participated during the evaluation period:

• Sources for Community Independent Living Services: 10/01/2010 through 06/30/11.

• Independent Living Resources Center doing business as Mainstream: o 07/01/2010 through 06/30/11 o 07/01/2011through 06/30/12

• Delta Resource Center for Independent Living: o 07/01/2010 through 06/30/2011

Strategy: DSB will investigate the possibility of having CRPs become Employment Networks (ENs).

Performance Measure: A meeting will have taken place with at least one CRP to discuss the possibility of its becoming an EN.

Goal Met: DSB partnered with a representative from the EmployAbility Project of the DHS Division of Aging and Adult Services, who contacted CRP’s to gauge their interest in providing SE services to DSB consumers and discuss the possibility of becoming EN providers.

Goal 2: Address the lack of knowledge and training that SE Providers have in the provision of SE Services and placement for individuals who are blind or severely visually impaired.

Strategy: DSB will collaborate with the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Center and other agencies to train SE Providers.

Performance Measures: At least one training on SE will be conducted in FY 2011.

Goal Met: VR Counselors provided training to providers on SE services and placement for individuals who are blind or severely visually impaired individually in their areas. DSB also worked with the Arkansas chapter of the Association for Persons in Supported Employment (AAPSE) and the EmployAbility Project to develop the second annual Arkansas Disability Employment Conference, which was tentatively scheduled in Little Rock September 26-27, 2011, but was postponed until March 7-9, 2012, and held in North Little Rock.

Strategy: DSB will collaborate with Arkansas School for the Blind to produce a video to increase SE providers’ awareness of the capability of DSB consumers and introduce SE Providers to blindness issues and how consumers can be placed on jobs often with only slight modifications/adaptations.

Performance Measures: The video will be shown at least once in each DSB service area during FY 2011.

Goal Dismissed: During the school year, the ASB instructor found he did not have the same level of students to produce a video as he had in the past, when a media class won an award at the state’s international documentary film festival. Instead DSB continued to use a PowerPoint presentation developed with another agency as needed.

 

Evaluation and Report of Progress on the Performance Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators

Below is the evaluation and report of progress on the Performance Evaluation Standards and Performance Indicators established by the Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) in the reporting of data to comply with the 34 CFR 361, Subpart E, 361.80 through 361.89 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended in 1998. In FY 2011, DSB missed Indicator 1.6 regarding self-support.

The information below describes DSB performance for Standard 1 and Standard 2:

Evaluation Standard 1 - Employment Outcomes:

A Designated State Unit (DSU) must assist any eligible individual, including an individual with a significant disability, to obtain, maintain, or regain high-quality employment.

In order to pass Standard 1 a state VR agency must meet or exceed the performance level for four of the six indicators including meeting or exceeding the performance level for two of the three primary indicators. Primary indicators are 1.3, 1.4 and 1.5.

• Performance Indicator 1.1: Change in the number of employment outcomes

The number of individuals exiting the VR program who achieved an employment outcome during the current performance period compared to the number of individuals who exit the VR program after achieving an employment outcome during the previous performance period.

FY 2011 305

FY 2010 278

Result +27 Individuals

Required Performance Level: DSU’s performance in current period must equal or exceed performance in previous period.

• Performance Indicator 1.2: Percent Employed

Of all individuals who exit the VR program after receiving services, the percentage who are determined to have achieved an employment outcome.

419 Individuals exited after receiving services

305 Individuals or

72.79% exited with an employment outcome

Required Performance Level: For the general and combined DSU’s, the level is 55.8%; for agencies serving individuals who are blind, the level is 68.9%

• Performance Indicator 1.3: Employed Competitively

Of all Individuals determined to have achieved an employment outcome, the percentage who exit the VR program in competitive, self-, or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the federal minimum wage.

305 Individuals exited the VR Program with an employment outcome

228 Individuals or

74.75% exited the VR Program with an employment outcome earning at least federal minimum wage ($7.25)

Required Performance Level: For the general and combined DSU’s, the level is 72.6%; for agencies serving individuals who are blind, the level is 35.4%.

• Performance Indicator 1.4: Significant Disability

Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self, or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the federal minimum wage, the percentage who are individuals with significant disabilities.

228 Individuals exited the VR Program with an employment outcome earning at least federal minimum wage ($7.25)

228 Individuals or

100% with significant disabilities exited the VR Program with an employment outcome earning at least federal minimum wage ($7.25)

Required Performance Level: For the general and combined DSU’s, the level is 62.4%; for agencies serving individuals who are blind, the level is 89.0%

• Performance Indicator 1.5: Earning Ratio

The average hourly earnings of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-, or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the federal minimum wage as a ratio to the State’s average hourly earnings for all individuals in the State who are employed (as derived from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports “State Average Annual Pay” for the most recent available year).

228 Individuals exited the VR Program with an employment outcome earning at least federal minimum wage ($7.25)

$12.36 Average hourly wage of individuals who exited the VR Program with an employment outcome earning at least federal minimum wage ($7.25)

$17.43 State’s average hourly earnings

.71 Ratio

Required Performance Level: For the general and combined DSU’s, the level is a ratio of .52; for agencies serving individuals who are blind, the ratio is .59.

• Performance Indicator 1.6: Self-support

Of all individuals who exit the VR program in competitive, self-, or BEP employment with earnings equivalent to at least the minimum wage, the difference between the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of economic support at the time they exit the VR program and the percentage who report their own income as the largest single source of support at the time they apply for VR services.

203 or 89.04% Individuals reported their own income as the largest single source of support at time of exit

147 or 64.47% Individuals reported their own income as the largest single source of support at time of application

56 or 24.57% Difference between the two percentages

Required Performance Level: For the general and combined DSU’s, the level is an arithmetic difference of 53.0; for agencies serving individuals who are blind, the level is a difference of 30.4.

Evaluation Standard 2: Equal Access to Services

2.1 Service Rate

The service rate for all individuals with disabilities from minority backgrounds as a ratio to the service rate for all individuals with disabilities from non-minority backgrounds.

184 Minorities exited the VR Program

139 Minorities exited the VR Program after receiving services

75.54% Service rate of minority individuals

389 Non-minorities exited the VR Program

318 Non-minorities exited the VR Program after receiving services

81.75% Service rate of non-minority individuals

.92 Ratio level of service rate

Required Performance Level: All agencies must attain a ratio level of .80.

DSB has identified the following contributing factors for failure to meet Indicator 1.6 and will implement these strategies to address the issue:

• Currently, DSB does not require consumers to verify their income at the time of application. Verification of income for the purpose of Indicator 1.6 will be conducted; income will not be considered for eligibility.

• DSB identified a problem in that the status of consumers who report their own income as the largest single source of support at the time of application was not being updated when consumers exited the program due to employment. Area Supervisors will continue to instruct and remind Counselors to update case records and will monitor cases to ensure the necessary action was taken.

• DSB will continue to serve homemakers with ILRS funds in an effort to reduce the number of VR homemaker closures and improve performance in this indicator.

 

DSB continued to compare providers and systems to convert its Blind Services Information System (BSIS) to a web-based application that would allow the completion of case service reports during home visits to consumers. DSB delayed its purchase of notebook computers pending the selection of a provider and software application to enable DSB staff to document consumer needs and services and acquire related signatures on-site during visits in the consumer’s home or on the job. This technology would minimize the number of return appointments. DSB staff routinely travel to consumer homes and worksites, rather than requiring consumers to visit DSB Offices, because of the difficulty consumers face in making dependable transportation arrangements in a rural state.

DSB made NFB-NEWSLINE® available through DSB’s Arkansas Information Reading Services (AIRS) to consumers who are blind and severely visually impaired. This service allows consumers to listen to the newspaper over a standard touch-tone telephone, through the Internet, or by download to a digital talking-book player or mp3-playing device. Through the service, Arkansas consumers can independently access over 300 newspapers and magazines and decide how, when, and where they wish to read their favorite publications.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 7:19PM by saarcaycek

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

DSB, ARS, the DHS Division of Developmental Disabilities Services (DDS), the DHS Division of Behavioral Health Services (BHS), and the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE), Special Education Unit (SEU), Transition Unit partner through an interagency cooperative agreement outlining responsibilities and the provision of supported employment and other services to transition-aged consumers. The agreement produced an interagency steering committee which works on supported employment issues. During its formulation, the steering committee was facilitated by the EmployAbility Project, a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) program housed in the DHS Division of Aging and Adult Services.

The DSB Director serves on a task force established by the Governor’s Executive Order 10-17, which calls for state agencies to increase employment of Arkansans with disabilities. The task force identified policies that created barriers and disincentives for employment of individuals who are disabled and made recommendations to the Governor. The Executive Order called for DHS to convene an Employment First Task Force comprised of disability service providers, consumer advocates, and the state agencies administering disability services, vocational rehabilitation, Workforce services, and education and to focus consumer services first toward the goal of self-sufficiency through employment.

Executive Order 10-17 also calls for the training of staff and counseling of consumers on Social Security work incentives, the Ticket to Work program, and employment and navigation services for individuals with disabilities who want to work. It aims to increase the availability and use of supported employment through interagency collaboration and reallocation of existing funds to better meet the needs of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

As part of this effort, DSB participated in the Workforce Centers Joint Managers’ state meeting March, 2012. Over 150 administrators from throughout the state convened to focus on delivering comprehensive services to build a workforce that meets the changing demands of Arkansas’ diverse businesses, citizens and economy. One of the objectives of the meeting was to move forward with the incorporation of a successful service delivery model that encompasses the Governor’s “Employment First” mandate.

DSB partnered with the EmployAbility Project of the DHS Division of Aging and Adult Services and the Arkansas chapter of APSE: Advancing Employment, Connecting People to develop the second annual Arkansas Disability Employment Conference held in March 2012, in North Little Rock. The conference was attended by SE providers, CRP’s, DSB Counselors, and other stakeholders. DSB staff had opportunities to network with providers and potential partners. Major conference topics included employment services, best SE practices, work incentives, Ticket to Work, and Employment Networks. DSB staff also received Supported Employment training at the quarterly Field Services meeting in February, 2012.

The Technical Assistance and Continuing Education (TACE) Center conducted a focus group on Supported Employment for DSB’s vocational rehabilitation counselors and rehabilitation teachers March, 2012.

The state has a limited number of service providers and a relatively low number of consumers who need SE services, particularly those who are blind or severely visually impaired. These consumers are spread throughout the rural parts of the state. Providers often consider these barriers as cost prohibitive. Added to this, providers want assurances of consistent available funding for continuing extended services, perhaps for the life of the consumer, and want payments for less tangible results than job placement, such as improving the consumers’ social interaction. Another barrier that has been identified is the lack of knowledge, experience, and training SE providers have in the provision of supported employment services and placement for individuals who are blind or severely visually impaired. This is a specialty area of expertise that many providers do not have and are unwilling to expend time, monies and resources to train staff in this area.

Between March, 2011 and March 2012, DSB used the following organizations to provide supported employment services to its consumers: Easter Seals HIRE Division; Miller County Health Department; Goodwill of North East Texas; Arkansas Easter Seal Society, Inc.; Genesis Global Network; Amerson Demetrious; Goodwill Industries of Arkansas Inc.; Abilities Unlimited; Arkansas Support Network, and Sources for Community Independent Living Services Inc. (Sources Inc.).

Transitioning from DSB services to extended services will not occur until at least 90 days after the case is placed into status 22 (employment), but should occur no later than 18 months after the case is placed into status 22. The time frame for moving a case into extended services will be determined by the VR Counselor’s monitoring of the consumer’s adjustment to the work environment and will be outlined in the Individualized Plan for Employment (IPE). Supervisors review this process monthly, and the outcome is subject to case audit semi-annually.

In FY 2011, DSB provided supported employment services to six individuals. Of this number, one case was closed without an employment outcome. No cases were closed competitively employed not in supported employment; closed competitively employed in supported employment; or closed not competitively employed-not in supported employment. FY 2013 Projections: Averaging the number of consumers in supported employment over the past two completed years, DSB estimates it will serve 16 consumers in supported employment.

This screen was last updated on Jun 28 2012 7:27PM by saarcaycek

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