ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Plan for the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and
State Plan Supplement for the State Supported Employment Services Program
Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services State Plan for Fiscal Year 2012 (submitted FY 2011)

1.1 The Alabama Dept. of Rehabilitation Services is authorized to submit this State Plan under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended [1] and its supplement under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act [2].

1.2 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services, the Alabama Dept. of Rehabilitation Services [3] agrees to operate and administer the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program in accordance with the provisions of this State Plan [4], the Rehabilitation Act, and all applicable regulations [5], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Section 111 of the Rehabilitation Act are used solely for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and the administration of the State Plan for the vocational rehabilitation services program.

1.3 As a condition for the receipt of federal funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act for supported employment services, the designated state agency agrees to operate and administer the State Supported Employment Services Program in accordance with the provisions of the supplement to this State Plan [6], the Rehabilitation Act and all applicable regulations [7], policies and procedures established by the secretary. Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, are used solely for the provision of supported employment services and the administration of the supplement to the Title I State Plan.
Yes

1.4 The designated state agency and/or the designated state unit has the authority under state law to perform the functions of the state regarding this State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.5 The state legally may carry out each provision of the State Plan and its supplement.
Yes

1.6 All provisions of the State Plan and its supplement are consistent with state law.
Yes

1.7 The (enter title of state officer below)
Yes

Commissioner

... has the authority under state law to receive, hold and disburse federal funds made available under this State Plan and its supplement.

1.8 The (enter title of state officer below)...
Yes

Commissioner ADRS

... has the authority to submit this State Plan for vocational rehabilitation services and the State Plan supplement for supported employment services.

1.9 The agency that submits this State Plan and its supplement has adopted or otherwise formally approved the plan and its supplement.
Yes

State Plan Certified By

As the authorized signatory identified above, I hereby certify that I will sign, date and retain in the files of the designated state agency/designated state unit Section 1 of the Preprint, and separate Certification of Lobbying forms (Form ED-80-0013; available at http://www.ed.gov/fund/grant/apply/appforms/ed80-013.pdf) for both the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Dr. Cary Boswell

Title of Signatory
Commisssioner

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/23/2011

Assurances Certified By

At the request of RSA, the designated state agency and/or the designated state unit provide the following assurance(s), in addition to those contained within Section 2 through 8 below, in connection with the approval of the State Plan for FY 2012
Yes

Comments:

Signed?
Yes

Name of Signatory
Dr. Cary Boswell

Title of Signatory
Commissioner

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
06/24/2011

* The signatory of the assurance with the authority to execute and submit the State Plan will maintain a signed copy of the assurance(s) with the signed State Plan.

Section 1 Footnotes

[1] Public Law 93 112, as amended by Public Laws 93 516, 95 602, 98 221, 99 506, 100-630, 102-569, 103-073, and 105-220.

[2] Unless otherwise stated, "Rehabilitation Act" means the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended.

[3] All references in this plan to "designated state agency" or to "the state agency" relate to the agency identified in this paragraph.

[4] No funds under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved State Plan in accordance with Section 101(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR part 361.

[5] Applicable regulations include the Education Department General Administrative Regulations (EDGAR) in 34 CFR Parts 74, 76, 77, 79, 80, 81, 82, 85 and 86 and the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program regulations in 34 CFR Part 361.

[6] No funds under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act may be awarded without an approved supplement to the Title I State Plan in accordance with Section 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act.

[7] Applicable regulations include the EDGAR citations in footnote 5, 34 CFR Part 361, and 34 CFR Part 363.

2.1 Public participation requirements. (Section 101(a)(16)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.10(d), .20(a), (b), (d); and 363.11(g)(9))

(a) Conduct of public meetings.

The designated state agency, prior to the adoption of any substantive policies or procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan, including making any substantive amendments to the policies and procedures, conducts public meetings throughout the state to provide the public, including individuals with disabilities, an opportunity to comment on the policies or procedures.

(b) Notice requirements.

The designated state agency, prior to conducting the public meetings, provides appropriate and sufficient notice throughout the state of the meetings in accordance with state law governing public meetings or, in the absence of state law governing public meetings, procedures developed by the state agency in consultation with the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council.

(c) Special consultation requirements.

The state agency actively consults with the director of the Client Assistance Program, the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council and, as appropriate, Indian tribes, tribal organizations and native Hawaiian organizations on its policies and procedures governing the provision of vocational rehabilitation services under the State Plan and supported employment services under the supplement to the State Plan.

3.1 Submission and revisions of the State Plan and its supplement. (Sections 101(a)(1), (23) and 625(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; Section 501 of the Workforce Investment Act; 34 CFR 76.140; 361.10(e), (f), and (g); and 363.10)

(a) The state submits to the commissioner of the Rehabilitation Services Administration the State Plan and its supplement on the same date that the state submits either a State Plan under Section 112 of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 or a state unified plan under Section 501 of that Rehabilitation Act.

(b) The state submits only those policies, procedures or descriptions required under this State Plan and its supplement that have not been previously submitted to and approved by the commissioner.

(c) The state submits to the commissioner, at such time and in such manner as the commissioner determines to be appropriate, reports containing annual updates of the information relating to the:

  1. comprehensive system of personnel development;
  2. assessments, estimates, goals and priorities, and reports of progress;
  3. innovation and expansion activities; and
  4. other updates of information required under Title I, Part B, or Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act that are requested by the commissioner.

(d) The State Plan and its supplement are in effect subject to the submission of modifications the state determines to be necessary or the commissioner requires based on a change in state policy, a change in federal law, including regulations, an interpretation of the Rehabilitation Act by a federal court or the highest court of the state, or a finding by the commissioner of state noncompliance with the requirements of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361 or 34 CFR 363.

3.2 Supported Employment State Plan supplement. (Sections 101(a)(22) and 625(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.34 and 363.10)

(a) The state has an acceptable plan for carrying out Part B, of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act that provides for the use of funds under that part to supplement funds made available under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the cost of services leading to supported employment.

(b) The Supported Employment State Plan, including any needed annual revisions, is submitted as a supplement to the State Plan.

4.1 Designated state agency and designated state unit. (Section 101(a)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.13(a) and (b))

(a) Designated state agency.

  1. There is a state agency designated as the sole state agency to administer the State Plan or to supervise its administration in a political subdivision of the state by a sole local agency.

  1. The designated state agency is a state agency that is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities (Option A was selected/Option B was not selected).

  1. In American Samoa, the designated state agency is the governor.

(b) Designated state unit.

  1. If the designated state agency is not primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities, in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(B) of this section, the state agency includes a vocational rehabilitation bureau, division or unit that:

  1. is primarily concerned with vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities and is responsible for the administration of the designated state agency's vocational rehabilitation program under the State Plan;
  2. has a full-time director;
  3. has a staff, at least 90 percent of whom are employed full-time on the rehabilitation work of the organizational unit; and
  4. is located at an organizational level and has an organizational status within the designated state agency comparable to that of other major organizational units of the designated state agency.

  1. The name of the designated state vocational rehabilitation unit is
Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services

4.2 State independent commission or State Rehabilitation Council. (Sections 101(a)(21) and 105 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.16 and .17)

The State Plan must contain one of the following assurances.

(a) The designated state agency is an independent state commission that

  1. is responsible under state law for operating or overseeing the operation of the vocational rehabilitation program in the state and is primarily concerned with the vocational rehabilitation or vocational and other rehabilitation of individuals with disabilities in accordance with subparagraph 4.1(a)(2)(A) of this section.
  1. is consumer controlled by persons who:
    1. are individuals with physical or mental impairments that substantially limit major life activities; and
    2. represent individuals with a broad range of disabilities, unless the designated state unit under the direction of the commission is the state agency for individuals who are blind;
  1. includes family members, advocates or other representatives of individuals with mental impairments; and
  1. undertakes the functions set forth in Section 105(c)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(h)(4).

(b) The state has established a State Rehabilitation Council that meets the criteria set forth in Section 105 of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.17

(c) If the designated state unit has a State Rehabilitation Council, Attachment 4.2(c) provides a summary of the input provided by the council consistent with the provisions identified in subparagraph (b)(3) of this section; the response of the designated state unit to the input and recommendations; and, explanations for the rejection of any input or any recommendation.

(Option B was selected)

4.3 Consultations regarding the administration of the State Plan. (Section 101(a)(16)(B) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.21)

The designated state agency takes into account, in connection with matters of general policy arising in the administration of the plan and its supplement, the views of:

(a) individuals and groups of individuals who are recipients of vocational rehabilitation services or, as appropriate, the individuals' representatives;
(b) personnel working in programs that provide vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(c) providers of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities;
(d) the director of the Client Assistance Program; and
(e) the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.

4.4 Nonfederal share. (Sections 7(14) and 101(a)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 80.24 and 361.60)

The nonfederal share of the cost of carrying out this State Plan is 21.3 percent and is provided through the financial participation by the state or, if the state elects, by the state and local agencies.

4.5 Local administration. (Sections 7(24) and 101(a)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47) and .15)

The State Plan provides for the administration of the plan by a local agency. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency:

(a) ensures that each local agency is under the supervision of the designated state unit with the sole local agency, as that term is defined in Section 7(24) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(47), responsible for the administration of the vocational rehabilitation program within the political subdivision that it serves; and
(b) develops methods that each local agency will use to administer the vocational rehabilitation program in accordance with the State Plan.

4.6 Shared funding and administration of joint programs. (Section 101(a)(2)(A)(ii) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.27)

The State Plan provides for the state agency to share funding and administrative responsibility with another state agency or local public agency to carry out a joint program to provide services to individuals with disabilities. No

If "Yes", the designated state agency submits to the commissioner for approval a plan that describes its shared funding and administrative arrangement. The plan must include:

(a) a description of the nature and scope of the joint program;
(b) the services to be provided under the joint program;
(c) the respective roles of each participating agency in the administration and provision of services; and
(d) the share of the costs to be assumed by each agency.

4.7 Statewideness and waivers of statewideness. (Section 101(a)(4) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.25, .26, and .60(b)(3)(i) and (ii))

This agency is not requesting a waiver of statewideness.

(a) Services provided under the State Plan are available in all political subdivisions of the state.
(b) The state unit may provide services in one or more political subdivisions of the state that increase services or expand the scope of services that are available statewide under this State Plan if the:

  1. nonfederal share of the cost of these services is met from funds provided by a local public agency, including funds contributed to a local public agency by a private agency, organization or individual;

  1. services are likely to promote the vocational rehabilitation of substantially larger numbers of individuals with disabilities or of individuals with disabilities with particular types of impairments; and

  1. state, for purposes other than the establishment of a community rehabilitation program or the construction of a particular facility for community rehabilitation program purposes, requests in Attachment 4.7(b)(3) a waiver of the statewideness requirement in accordance with the following requirements:

  1. identification of the types of services to be provided;

  1. written assurance from the local public agency that it will make available to the state unit the nonfederal share of funds;

  1. written assurance that state unit approval will be obtained for each proposed service before it is put into effect; and

  1. written assurance that all other State Plan requirements, including a state's order of selection, will apply to all services approved under the waiver.

(c) Contributions, consistent with the requirements of 34 CFR 361.60(b)(3)(ii), by private entities of earmarked funds for particular geographic areas within the state may be used as part of the nonfederal share without the state requesting a waiver of the statewideness requirement provided that the state notifies the commissioner that it cannot provide the full nonfederal share without using the earmarked funds.

4.8 Cooperation, collaboration and coordination. (Sections 101(a)(11), (24)(B), and 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.22, .23, .24, and .31, and 363.11(e))

(a) Cooperative agreements with other components of statewide work force investment system.

The designated state agency or the designated state unit has cooperative agreements with other entities that are components of the statewide work force investment system and replicates those agreements at the local level between individual offices of the designated state unit and local entities carrying out the One-Stop service delivery system or other activities through the statewide work force investment system.

(b) Cooperation and coordination with other agencies and entities.

Attachment 4.8(b) (1)-(4) describes the designated state agency's:

  1. cooperation with and use of the services and facilities of the federal, state, and local agencies and programs, including programs carried out by the undersecretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture and state use contracting programs, to the extent that those agencies and programs are not carrying out activities through the statewide work force investment system;

  1. coordination, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 4.8(c) of this section, with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. establishment of cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers, in accordance with the requirements of paragraph 5.10(b) of the State Plan; and,

  1. efforts to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and entities with respect to the provision of supported employment and extended services for individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with the requirements of subsection 6.5 of the supplement to this State Plan.

(c) Coordination with education officials.

  1. Attachment 4.8(b)(2) describes the plans, policies and procedures for coordination between the designated state agency and education officials responsible for the public education of students with disabilities that are designed to facilitate the transition of the students who are individuals with disabilities from the receipt of educational services in school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services under the responsibility of the designated state agency.

  1. The State Plan description must:

  1. provide for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment in accordance with 34 CFR 361.45 as early as possible during the transition planning process but, at the latest, before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting; and

  1. include information on a formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency that, at a minimum, provides for:

  1. consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to postschool activities, including vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and the educational agency for students with disabilities that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs under Section 614(d) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

  1. roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services; and

  1. procedures for outreach to students with disabilities as early as possible during the transition planning process and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

(d) Coordination with statewide independent living council and independent living centers.

The designated state unit, the Statewide Independent Living Council established under Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364, and the independent living centers described in Part C of Title VII of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 366 have developed working relationships and coordinate their activities.

(e) Cooperative agreement with recipients of grants for services to American Indians.

  1. There is in the state a recipient(s) of a grant under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of vocational rehabilitation services for American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing on or near federal and state reservations. No

  1. If "Yes", the designated state agency has entered into a formal cooperative agreement that meets the following requirements with each grant recipient in the state that receives funds under Part C of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act:

  1. strategies for interagency referral and information sharing that will assist in eligibility determinations and the development of individualized plans for employment;

  1. procedures for ensuring that American Indians who are individuals with disabilities and are living near a reservation or tribal service area are provided vocational rehabilitation services; and

  1. provisions for sharing resources in cooperative studies and assessments, joint training activities, and other collaborative activities designed to improve the provision of services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities.

4.9 Methods of administration. (Section 101(a)(6) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.12, .19 and .51(a) and (b))

(a) In general.

The state agency employs methods of administration, including procedures to ensure accurate data collection and financial accountability, found by the commissioner to be necessary for the proper and efficient administration of the plan and for carrying out all the functions for which the state is responsible under the plan and 34 CFR 361.

(b) Employment of individuals with disabilities.

The designated state agency and entities carrying out community rehabilitation programs in the state, who are in receipt of assistance under Part B, of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and this State Plan, take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment qualified individuals with disabilities covered under and on the same terms and conditions as set forth in Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act.

(c) Facilities.

Any facility used in connection with the delivery of services assisted under this State Plan meets program accessibility requirements consistent with the provisions, as applicable, of the Architectural Barriers Rehabilitation Act of 1968, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and the regulations implementing these laws.

4.10 Comprehensive system of personnel development. (Section 101(a)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.18)

Attachment 4.10 describes the designated state agency's procedures and activities to establish and maintain a comprehensive system of personnel development designed to ensure an adequate supply of qualified state rehabilitation professional and paraprofessional personnel for the designated state unit. The description includes the following:

(a) Data system on personnel and personnel development.

Development and maintenance of a system for collecting and analyzing on an annual basis data on qualified personnel needs and personnel development with respect to:

  1. Qualified personnel needs.

  1. The number of personnel who are employed by the state agency in the provision of vocational rehabilitation services in relation to the number of individuals served, broken down by personnel category;

  1. The number of personnel currently needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services, broken down by personnel category; and

  1. Projections of the number of personnel, broken down by personnel category, who will be needed by the state agency to provide vocational rehabilitation services in the state in five years based on projections of the number of individuals to be served, including individuals with significant disabilities, the number of personnel expected to retire or leave the field, and other relevant factors.

  1. Personnel development.

  1. A list of the institutions of higher education in the state that are preparing vocational rehabilitation professionals, by type of program;

  1. The number of students enrolled at each of those institutions, broken down by type of program; and

  1. The number of students who graduated during the prior year from each of those institutions with certification or licensure, or with the credentials for certification or licensure, broken down by the personnel category for which they have received, or have the credentials to receive, certification or licensure.

(b) Plan for recruitment, preparation and retention of qualified personnel.

Development, updating on an annual basis, and implementation of a plan to address the current and projected needs for qualified personnel based on the data collection and analysis system described in paragraph (a) of this subsection and that provides for the coordination and facilitation of efforts between the designated state unit and institutions of higher education and professional associations to recruit, prepare and retain personnel who are qualified in accordance with paragraph (c) of this subsection, including personnel from minority backgrounds and personnel who are individuals with disabilities.

(c) Personnel standards.

Policies and procedures for the establishment and maintenance of personnel standards to ensure that designated state unit professional and paraprofessional personnel are appropriately and adequately prepared and trained, including:

  1. standards that are consistent with any national- or state-approved or recognized certification, licensing, registration, or, in the absence of these requirements, other comparable requirements (including state personnel requirements) that apply to the profession or discipline in which such personnel are providing vocational rehabilitation services.

  1. To the extent that existing standards are not based on the highest requirements in the state applicable to a particular profession or discipline, the steps the state is currently taking and the steps the state plans to take in accordance with the written plan to retrain or hire personnel within the designated state unit to meet standards that are based on the highest requirements in the state, including measures to notify designated state unit personnel, the institutions of higher education identified in subparagraph (a)(2), and other public agencies of these steps and the time lines for taking each step.

  1. The written plan required by subparagraph (c)(2) describes the following:

  1. specific strategies for retraining, recruiting and hiring personnel;

  1. the specific time period by which all state unit personnel will meet the standards required by subparagraph (c)(1);

  1. procedures for evaluating the designated state unit's progress in hiring or retraining personnel to meet applicable personnel standards within the established time period; and

  1. the identification of initial minimum qualifications that the designated state unit will require of newly hired personnel when the state unit is unable to hire new personnel who meet the established personnel standards and the identification of a plan for training such individuals to meet the applicable standards within the time period established for all state unit personnel to meet the established personnel standards.

(d) Staff development.

Policies, procedures and activities to ensure that all personnel employed by the designated state unit receive appropriate and adequate training. The narrative describes the following:

  1. A system of staff development for professionals and paraprofessionals within the designated state unit, particularly with respect to assessment, vocational counseling, job placement and rehabilitation technology.

  1. Procedures for the acquisition and dissemination to designated state unit professionals and paraprofessionals significant knowledge from research and other sources.

(e) Personnel to address individual communication needs.

Availability of personnel within the designated state unit or obtaining the services of other individuals who are able to communicate in the native language of applicants or eligible individuals who have limited English speaking ability or in appropriate modes of communication with applicants or eligible individuals.

(f) Coordination of personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

Procedures and activities to coordinate the designated state unit's comprehensive system of personnel development with personnel development under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.

4.11. Statewide assessment; annual estimates; annual state goals and priorities; strategies; and progress reports.

(Sections 101(a)(15), 105(c)(2) and 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.17(h)(2), .29, and 363.11(b))

(a) Comprehensive statewide assessment.

  1. Attachment 4.11(a) documents the results of a comprehensive, statewide assessment, jointly conducted every three years by the designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council (if the state has such a council). The assessment describes:

  1. the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  1. individuals with the most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;

  1. individuals with disabilities who are minorities and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program carried out under this State Plan; and

  1. individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide work force investment system.

  1. The need to establish, develop or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

  1. For any year in which the state updates the assessments, the designated state unit submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding updates to the assessments.

(b) Annual estimates.

Attachment 4.11(b) identifies on an annual basis state estimates of the:

  1. number of individuals in the state who are eligible for services under the plan;

  1. number of eligible individuals who will receive services provided with funds provided under Part B of Title I of the Rehabilitation Act and under Part B of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection in accordance with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of this State Plan, estimates of the number of individuals to be served under each priority category within the order; and

  1. costs of the services described in subparagraph (b)(1), including, if the designated state agency uses an order of selection, the service costs for each priority category within the order.

(c) Goals and priorities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(1) identifies the goals and priorities of the state that are jointly developed or revised, as applicable, with and agreed to by the State Rehabilitation Council, if the agency has a council, in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.

  1. The designated state agency submits to the commissioner a report containing information regarding any revisions in the goals and priorities for any year the state revises the goals and priorities.

  1. Order of selection.
    If the state agency implements an order of selection, consistent with subparagraph 5.3(b)(2) of the State Plan, Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order; and

  1. identifies the service and outcome goals, and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds.
    Attachment 4.11(c)(4) specifies, consistent with subsection 6.4 of the State Plan supplement, the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for the provision of supported employment services.

(d) Strategies.

  1. Attachment 4.11(d) describes the strategies, including:

  1. the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities, including how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to those individuals at each stage of the rehabilitation process and how those services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis;

  1. outreach procedures to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities in accordance with subsection 6.6 of the State Plan supplement, and individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program;

  1. as applicable, the plan of the state for establishing, developing or improving community rehabilitation programs;

  1. strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. strategies for assisting other components of the statewide work force investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the designated state agency uses these strategies to:

  1. address the needs identified in the assessment conducted under paragraph 4.11(a) and achieve the goals and priorities identified in the State Plan attachments under paragraph 4.11(c);

  1. support the innovation and expansion activities identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) of the plan; and

  1. overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and State Supported Employment Services Program.

(e) Evaluation and reports of progress.

  1. The designated state unit and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state unit has a council, jointly submits to the commissioner an annual report on the results of an evaluation of the effectiveness of the vocational rehabilitation program and the progress made in improving the effectiveness of the program from the previous year.

  1. Attachment 4.11(e)(2):

  1. provides an evaluation of the extent to which the goals identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3) were achieved;

  1. identifies the strategies that contributed to the achievement of the goals and priorities;

  1. describes the factors that impeded their achievement, to the extent they were not achieved;

  1. assesses the performance of the state on the standards and indicators established pursuant to Section 106 of the Rehabilitation Act; and

  1. provides a report consistent with paragraph 4.12(c) of the plan on how the funds reserved for innovation and expansion activities were utilized in the preceding year.

4.12 Innovation and expansion. (Section 101(a)(18) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.35)

(a) The designated state agency reserves and uses a portion of the funds allotted to the state under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for the:

  1. development and implementation of innovative approaches to expand and improve the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to individuals with disabilities under this State Plan, particularly individuals with the most significant disabilities, consistent with the findings of the statewide assessment identified in Attachment 4.11(a) and goals and priorities of the state identified in Attachments 4.11(c)(1) and, if applicable, Attachment 4.11(c)(3); and

  1. support of the funding for the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 105(d)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.17(i), and the funding of the Statewide Independent Living Council, consistent with the resource plan prepared under Section 705(e)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 364.21(i).

(b) Attachment 4.11 (d) describes how the reserved funds identified in subparagraph 4.12(a)(1) and (2) will be utilized.
(c) Attachment 4.11(e)(2) describes how the reserved funds were utilized in the preceding year.

4.13 Reports. (Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.40)

(a) The designated state unit submits reports in the form and level of detail and at the time required by the commissioner regarding applicants for and eligible individuals receiving services under the State Plan.
(b) Information submitted in the reports provides a complete count, unless sampling techniques are used, of the applicants and eligible individuals in a manner that permits the greatest possible cross-classification of data and protects the confidentiality of the identity of each individual.

5.1 Information and referral services. (Sections 101(a)(5)(D) and (20) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.37)

The designated state agency has implemented an information and referral system that is adequate to ensure that individuals with disabilities, including individuals who do not meet the agency's order of selection criteria for receiving vocational rehabilitation services if the agency is operating on an order of selection, are provided accurate vocational rehabilitation information and guidance, including counseling and referral for job placement, using appropriate modes of communication, to assist such individuals in preparing for, securing, retaining or regaining employment, and are referred to other appropriate federal and state programs, including other components of the statewide work force investment system in the state.

5.2 Residency. (Section 101(a)(12) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.42(c)(1))

The designated state unit imposes no duration of residence requirement as part of determining an individual's eligibility for vocational rehabilitation services or that excludes from services under the plan any individual who is present in the state.

5.3 Ability to serve all eligible individuals; order of selection for services. (Sections 12(d) and 101(a)(5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.36)

(a) The designated state unit is able to provide the full range of services listed in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, as appropriate, to all eligible individuals with disabilities in the state who apply for services. Yes

(b) If No:

  1. Individuals with the most significant disabilities, in accordance with criteria established by the state, are selected first for vocational rehabilitation services before other individuals with disabilities.

  1. Attachment 4.11(c)(3):

  1. shows the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services;

  1. provides a justification for the order of selection; and

  1. identifies the state's service and outcome goals and the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.

  1. Eligible individuals who do not meet the order of selection criteria have access to the services provided through the designated state unit's information and referral system established under Section 101(a)(20) of the Rehabilitation Act, 34 CFR 361.37, and subsection 5.1 of this State Plan.

5.4 Availability of comparable services and benefits. (Sections 101(a)(8) and 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.53)

(a) Prior to providing any vocational rehabilitation services, except those services identified in paragraph (b), to an eligible individual or to members of the individual's family, the state unit determines whether comparable services and benefits exist under any other program and whether those services and benefits are available to the individual.
(b) The following services are exempt from a determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits:

  1. assessment for determining eligibility and vocational rehabilitation needs by qualified personnel, including, if appropriate, an assessment by personnel skilled in rehabilitation technology;

  1. counseling and guidance, including information and support services to assist an individual in exercising informed choice consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act;

  1. referral and other services to secure needed services from other agencies, including other components of the statewide work force investment system, through agreements developed under Section 101(a)(11) of the Rehabilitation Act, if such services are not available under this State Plan;

  1. job-related services, including job search and placement assistance, job retention services, follow-up services, and follow-along services;

  1. rehabilitation technology, including telecommunications, sensory and other technological aids and devices; and

  1. post-employment services consisting of the services listed under subparagraphs (1) through (5) of this paragraph.

(c) The requirements of paragraph (a) of this section do not apply if the determination of the availability of comparable services and benefits under any other program would interrupt or delay:

  1. progress of the individual toward achieving the employment outcome identified in the individualized plan for employment;

  1. an immediate job placement; or

  1. provision of vocational rehabilitation services to any individual who is determined to be at extreme medical risk, based on medical evidence provided by an appropriate qualified medical professional.

(d) The governor in consultation with the designated state vocational rehabilitation agency and other appropriate agencies ensures that an interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination that meets the requirements of Section 101(a)(8)(B)(i)-(iv) of the Rehabilitation Act takes effect between the designated state unit and any appropriate public entity, including the state Medicaid program, a public institution of higher education, and a component of the statewide work force investment system to ensure the provision of the vocational rehabilitation services identified in Section 103(a) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.48, other than the services identified in paragraph (b) of this section, that are included in the individualized plan for employment of an eligible individual, including the provision of those vocational rehabilitation services during the pendency of any dispute that may arise in the implementation of the interagency agreement or other mechanism for interagency coordination.

5.5 Individualized plan for employment. (Section 101(a)(9) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.45 and .46)

(a) An individualized plan for employment meeting the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and implemented in a timely manner for each individual determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services, except if the state has implemented an order of selection, and is developed and implemented for each individual to whom the designated state unit is able to provide vocational rehabilitation services.
(b) Services to an eligible individual are provided in accordance with the provisions of the individualized plan for employment.

5.6 Opportunity to make informed choices regarding the selection of services and providers. (Sections 101(a)(19) and 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.52)

Applicants and eligible individuals or, as appropriate, their representatives are provided information and support services to assist in exercising informed choice throughout the rehabilitation process, consistent with the provisions of Section 102(d) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.52.

5.7 Services to American Indians. (Section 101(a)(13) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.30)

The designated state unit provides vocational rehabilitation services to American Indians who are individuals with disabilities residing in the state to the same extent as the designated state agency provides such services to other significant populations of individuals with disabilities residing in the state.

5.8 Annual review of individuals in extended employment or other employment under special certificate provisions of the fair labor standards act of 1938. (Section 101(a)(14) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.55)

(a) The designated state unit conducts an annual review and reevaluation of the status of each individual with a disability served under this State Plan:

  1. who has achieved an employment outcome in which the individual is compensated in accordance with Section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 214(c)); or

  1. whose record of services is closed while the individual is in extended employment on the basis that the individual is unable to achieve an employment outcome in an integrated setting or that the individual made an informed choice to remain in extended employment.

(b) The designated state unit carries out the annual review and reevaluation for two years after the individual's record of services is closed (and thereafter if requested by the individual or, if appropriate, the individual's representative) to determine the interests, priorities and needs of the individual with respect to competitive employment or training for competitive employment.
(c) The designated state unit makes maximum efforts, including the identification and provision of vocational rehabilitation services, reasonable accommodations and other necessary support services, to assist the individuals described in paragraph (a) in engaging in competitive employment.
(d) The individual with a disability or, if appropriate, the individual's representative has input into the review and reevaluation and, through signed acknowledgement, attests that the review and reevaluation have been conducted.

5.9 Use of Title I funds for construction of facilities. (Sections 101(a)(17) and 103(b)(2)(A) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.49(a)(1), .61 and .62(b))

If the state elects to construct, under special circumstances, facilities for community rehabilitation programs, the following requirements are met:

(a) The federal share of the cost of construction for facilities for a fiscal year does not exceed an amount equal to 10 percent of the state's allotment under Section 110 of the Rehabilitation Act for that fiscal year.
(b) The provisions of Section 306 of the Rehabilitation Act that were in effect prior to the enactment of the Rehabilitation Act Amendments of 1998 apply to such construction.
(c) There is compliance with the requirements in 34 CFR 361.62(b) that ensure the use of the construction authority will not reduce the efforts of the designated state agency in providing other vocational rehabilitation services other than the establishment of facilities for community rehabilitation programs.

5.10 Contracts and cooperative agreements. (Section 101(a)(24) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.31 and .32)

(a) Contracts with for-profit organizations.

The designated state agency has the authority to enter into contracts with for-profit organizations for the purpose of providing, as vocational rehabilitation services, on-the-job training and related programs for individuals with disabilities under Part A of Title VI of the Rehabilitation Act, upon the determination by the designated state agency that for-profit organizations are better qualified to provide vocational rehabilitation services than nonprofit agencies and organizations.

(b) Cooperative agreements with private nonprofit organizations.

Attachment 4.8(b)(3) describes the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private nonprofit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

Section 6: Program Administration

6.1 Designated state agency. (Section 625(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(a))

The designated state agency for vocational rehabilitation services identified in paragraph 1.2 of the Title I State Plan is the state agency designated to administer the State Supported Employment Services Program authorized under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.2 Statewide assessment of supported employment services needs. (Section 625(b)(2) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(b))

Attachment 4.11(a) describes the results of the comprehensive, statewide needs assessment conducted under Section 101(a)(15)(a)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and subparagraph 4.11(a)(1) of the Title I State Plan with respect to the rehabilitation needs of individuals with most significant disabilities and their need for supported employment services, including needs related to coordination.

6.3 Quality, scope and extent of supported employment services. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(c) and .50(b)(2))

Attachment 6.3 describes the quality, scope and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive supported employment services. The description also addresses the timing of the transition to extended services to be provided by relevant state agencies, private nonprofit organizations or other sources following the cessation of supported employment service provided by the designated state agency.

6.4 Goals and plans for distribution of Title VI, Part B, funds. (Section 625(b)(3) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(d) and .20)

Attachment 4.11(c)(4) identifies the state's goals and plans with respect to the distribution of funds received under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act.

6.5 Evidence of collaboration with respect to supported employment services and extended services. (Sections 625(b)(4) and (5) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(e))

Attachment 4.8(b)(4) describes the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities to assist in the provision of supported employment services and other public or nonprofit agencies or organizations within the state, employers, natural supports, and other entities with respect to the provision of extended services.

6.6 Minority outreach. (34 CFR 363.11(f))

Attachment 4.11(d) includes a description of the designated state agency's outreach procedures for identifying and serving individuals with the most significant disabilities who are minorities.

6.7 Reports. (Sections 625(b)(8) and 626 of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(h) and .52)

The designated state agency submits reports in such form and in accordance with such procedures as the commissioner may require and collects the information required by Section 101(a)(10) of the Rehabilitation Act separately for individuals receiving supported employment services under Part B, of Title VI and individuals receiving supported employment services under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

7.1 Five percent limitation on administrative costs. (Section 625(b)(7) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.11(g)(8))

The designated state agency expends no more than five percent of the state's allotment under Section 622 of the Rehabilitation Act for administrative costs in carrying out the State Supported Employment Services Program.

7.2 Use of funds in providing services. (Sections 623 and 625(b)(6)(A) and (D) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 363.6(c)(2)(iv), .11(g)(1) and (4))

(a) Funds made available under Title VI, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act are used by the designated state agency only to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities who are eligible to receive such services.
(b) Funds provided under Title VI, Part B, are used only to supplement and not supplant the funds provided under Title I, Part B, of the Rehabilitation Act, in providing supported employment services specified in the individualized plan for employment.
(c) Funds provided under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act are not used to provide extended services to individuals who are eligible under Part B of Title VI or Title I of the Rehabilitation Act.

8.1 Scope of supported employment services. (Sections 7(36) and 625(b)(6)(F) and (G) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54), 363.11(g)(6) and (7))

(a) Supported employment services are those services as defined in Section 7(36) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.5(b)(54).
(b) To the extent job skills training is provided, the training is provided on-site.
(c) Supported employment services include placement in an integrated setting for the maximum number of hours possible based on the unique strengths, resources, priorities, concerns, abilities, capabilities, interests and informed choice of individuals with the most significant disabilities.

8.2 Comprehensive assessments of individuals with significant disabilities. (Sections 7(2)(B) and 625(b)(6)(B); 34 CFR 361.5(b)(6)(ii) and 363.11(g)(2))

The comprehensive assessment of individuals with significant disabilities conducted under Section 102(b)(1) of the Rehabilitation Act and funded under Title I of the Rehabilitation Act includes consideration of supported employment as an appropriate employment outcome.

8.3 Individualized plan for employment. (Sections 102(b)(3)(F) and 625(b)(6)(C) and (E) of the Rehabilitation Act; 34 CFR 361.46(b) and 363.11(g)(3) and (5))

(a) An individualized plan for employment that meets the requirements of Section 102(b) of the Rehabilitation Act and 34 CFR 361.45 and .46 is developed and updated using funds under Title I.
(b) The individualized plan for employment:

  1. specifies the supported employment services to be provided;

  1. describes the expected extended services needed; and

  1. identifies the source of extended services, including natural supports, or, to the extent that it is not possible to identify the source of extended services at the time the individualized plan for employment plan is developed, a statement describing the basis for concluding that there is a reasonable expectation that sources will become available.

(c) Services provided under an individualized plan for employment are coordinated with services provided under other individualized plans established under other federal or state programs.

Required annually by all agencies except those agencies that are independent consumer-controlled commissions.

Identify the Input provided by the state rehabilitation council, including recommendations from the council's annual report, the review and analysis of consumer satisfaction, and other council reports. Be sure to also include:

  • the Designated state unit's response to the input and recommendations; and
  • explanations for the designated state unit's rejection of any input or recommendation of the council.

ATTACHMENT 4.2(c)

Summary of Input and Recommendations of the State Rehabilitation Council; Response of the DSU, and Explanations for Rejection of Input or Recommendations

The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services continues to have a State Rehabilitation Council which meets on a quarterly basis. Council membership is representative of the state and includes a cross section of disabilities and minorities. Local vocational rehabilitation advisory councils, created by the SRC to obtain direct consumer input at the local level and to provide easier access, continue to meet across the state, and there continues to be a report on information or advice from these councils at some quarterly SRC meetings. The councils also continue to serve as recruitment grounds for future SRC members due to member training provided during meetings.

The SRC continues to advise the Designated State Unit or DSU on a variety of issues. Specific activities and advice of the SRC for FY 2011 include the following:

(1) Review and comment on the State Plan. As in prior years, the SRC reviewed the state plan and attachments, and the DSU asked for comments. The SRC Chair again appointed a subcommittee to assist in setting goals for the State Plan and in writing it. This subcommittee ratified the goals and priorities proposed by the agency, and the SRC approved adoption of the State Plan as written. SRC members were also invited to attend and submit comments at public hearings on the State Plan. No other comments were obtained on the State Plan or attachments, nor were there any additional recommendations for changes or revisions.

(2) Review and comment on the Agency’s CSPD. The SRC received information on the CSPD and recommended no significant changes to the recruitment or retention plan. The SRC also received information on current training programs for VRS staff and consumers and recommended no significant changes.

(3) Employment Subcommittee. The SRC Employment Subcommittee made the following recommendations:.

Recommendation: An EEOC and affirmative action statement should be added to the ABLE Network brochure.

Agency response: The Agency accepts this recommendation and will implement it as soon as possible.

Recommendation: The Agency should split the employer survey into 2 parts: (1) satisfaction by employers with VR products and services and (2) needs assessment of employers.

Agency response: The Agency accepts this recommendation and will implement it as soon as possible.

Recommendation: The employer survey should be sent to existing employer accounts and expanded to include other employers.

Agency response: The Agency accepts this recommendation and will implement it as soon as possible.

Recommendation: Language should be added to the employer survey to explain satisfaction, not just in terms of numbers.

Agency response: The Agency accepts this recommendation and will implement it as soon as possible.

Recommendation: Questions should be added to the employer survey that allow for open comments from employers.

Agency response: The Agency accepts this recommendation and will implement it as soon as possible.

Recommendation: The Agency’s new business intelligence system should include consumer profiles that have skills, job goals, expertise and labor pool data.

Agency response: The Agency will take this recommendation under advisement.

Recommendation: The Agency’s new business intelligence system should include business profiles that have trends, patterns, success rates, retentions, and turnovers.

Agency response: The Agency will take this recommendation under advisement.

(4) Review and comment on Impartial Hearing Officer List: The SRC continued to monitor the list for vacancies and recommend replacements where appropriate. No revisions to the list were recommended for FY 2011.

(5) SRC Training. Council members received training and/or informational materials on the following areas:

a. ABLE Network Website Demonstration b. Business Intelligence Program c. CSPD d. VR Process

(6) Revision of SRC bylaws. Since there were no changes to the Rehabilitation Act during FY 2011, the SRC did not amend its bylaws.

(7) Development of a resource plan and budget. The SRC Executive Subcommittee updated a resource plan listing all resources the Agency provides for operation of the SRC and amended it to include the most recent reimbursement rate for SRC travel. The subcommittee will continue to update this plan as needed. The SRC Executive again recommended that the SRC have a budget for operation of the SRC.

(8) SRC Deaf Advisory Subcommittee. This Subcommittee made the following recommendations:

Recommendation: The Agency should hire deaf counselors and deaf persons in support services for the deaf.

Agency response: The Agency accepts this recommendation and will implement it to the extent possible.

Recommendation: The Agency’s Deaf Satisfaction Survey should be given to both deaf and hard of hearing clients and should include a survey of physical office space.

Agency response: The Agency accepts this recommendation and will implement it to the extent possible.

(9) Review and comment on VRS Consumer Satisfaction Survey The SRC Consumer Services/Program Evaluation Subcommittee met to review a proposed consumer satisfaction survey and statewide needs assessment and process recommended by Auburn University, which has a contract to conduct the VR satisfaction survey and statewide needs assessment for the general VR program. The SRC Consumer Services/Program Evaluation Subcommittee also reviewed the order of selection and most significant disability processes outlined by VR staff. The SRC adopted the Subcommittee’s recommendations as outlined below.

Recommendation: The Agency should hold consumer satisfaction and focus groups at conferences.

Agency response: The Agency accepts this recommendation and will implement it as soon as possible.

Recommendation: In consultation with the SRC, the Agency should develop order of selection and most significant disability processes that will go into effect when necessary and after input from the SRC.

Agency response: The Agency accepts this recommendation and will implement it.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2011 4:20PM by Jim Harris Iii

This agency has not requested a waiver of statewideness.

This screen was last updated on Sep 15 2009 2:30PM by rsacoclopeinj

Describe interagency cooperation with and utilization of the services and facilities of agencies and programs that are not carrying out activities through the statewide workforce investment system with respect to

  • Federal, state, and local agencies and programs;
  • if applicable, Programs carried out by the Under Secretary for Rural Development of the United States Department of Agriculture; and
  • if applicable, state use contracting programs.

ATTACHMENT 4.8(b)(1)

COOPERATION AND COORDINATION WITH OTHER

AGENCIES AND ENTITIES

The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services has cooperative agreements and working relationships with entities outside of the state Workforce Investment System. These agreements provide the agency with the opportunity to extend services to people with disabilities referred by other agencies, as well as the chance to utilize the services of other agencies for its consumers.

Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind (AIDB) ADRS enjoys an excellent working relationship with AIDB. AIDB is charged with the responsibility of providing elementary and high school residential education for blind and deaf students in Alabama. Also, through its E. H. Gentry Technical Facility, it provides vocational assessment and training for adults with visual, hearing, and other disabilities. ADRS refers consumers to E. H. Gentry for vocational services. Also, the agency works very cooperatively with AIDB in providing appropriate services to students in the AIDB high schools for the blind and deaf. ADRS works collaboratively with the School for the Deaf and School for the Blind to provide deaf and blind students with summer employment opportunities. ADRS also works actively with the Helen Keller School for Deaf and Blind which is also a part of the AIDB system. ADRS assists AIDB in transitioning these students into employment when they have completed school or, when appropriate, assists the students with further education.

ADRS has a collaborative agreement with AIDB to jointly fund Rehabilitation Teachers who provide special teaching services to people with visual disabilities. Also, the agency jointly funds Interpreters, Randolph-Sheppard Specialists, and Orientation and Mobility Instructors.

Department of Corrections ADRS is cooperating with the Alabama Department of Corrections. ADRS receives referrals on inmates who are in the prison system who will be transitioning back into their home areas. ADRS has established a system to handle these referrals and provide services to eligible individuals when they return home. An ADRS staff specialist in the State Office is overseeing this initiative.

Department of Risk Management ADRS works cooperatively with Alabama’s Risk Management program. We receive referrals of individuals injured on the job to assist Risk Management in helping various state agencies retain individuals in employment who may have been injured.

Governor’s Office ADRS receives, on a regular basis, referrals from the Governor’s office. The Governor’s office contacts ADRS to make referrals of individuals who have contacted the Governor’s office regarding various problems. These referrals are received by an Assistant Commissioner of ADRS, and forwarded to the appropriate local supervisor for follow-up and assessment. Understandably, many of these referrals are for services beyond the scope of ADRS; however, efforts are made to provide the Governor’s staff with an appropriate service outlet to address the needs of the consumer.

Bureau of Indian Affairs ADRS recognizes the need for services to Native Americans. The agency has liaison counselors assigned to various tribes throughout the state to receive referrals and to extend our services to Native Americans within Alabama.

Department of Youth Services (DYS) Alabama has a Department of Youth Services. This Department is established to work with delinquent youth. It is hoped that the services of DYS will prevent delinquent youth from eventually advancing to the adult correctional system. ADRS has a specialist who is very actively involved with DYS. This individual receives referrals on a regular basis from DYS and forwards those referrals to the appropriate field staff.

Department of Mental Health (DMH) The Agency maintains an ongoing relationship with DMH. ADRS serves numerous consumers with mental illness. ADRS works on cooperative initiatives to ensure services are provided to eligible consumers. ADRS maintains a relationship with the DMH Division of Substance Abuse and a network of residential aftercare service providers.

Alabama Head Injury Foundation (AHIF) ADRS continues its relationship with the Alabama Head Injury Foundation. This relationship is directed towards maintaining a service delivery system to address the needs of consumers affected by traumatic brain injury.

Community Rehabilitation Programs ADRS continues an excellent working relationship with a wide network of community rehabilitation programs throughout the state. These CRPs are a critical link in our service delivery effort.

Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs (ADECA) ADRS has an ongoing partnership with the ADECA. The agency has worked cooperatively to pursue grants to serve people with disabilities.

Alabama’s Special Camp for Children and Adults with disabilities (CAMP ASSCA) Camp ASCCA is a totally accessible outdoor camp designed to address the special needs of people with disabilities.

The Alabama Disability Advocacy Program (ADAP) ADAP is the Alabama arm of the Protection and Advocacy program for people with disabilities. ADAP makes referrals to Alabama’s toll free number for information on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The Birmingham Independent Living Center (BILC) and the Mobile Independent Living Center (MILC) BILC and the MILC provide independent living services. The two centers assisted ADRS with the distribution of the Statewide Needs Assessment survey in 2008. The agency also receives referrals from the Independent Living Centers.

Governor’s Office on Disability (GOOD) GOOD serves as a clearinghouse for resources related to people with disabilities. ADRS maintains an ongoing relationship with the Office and its director, Graham Sisson.

Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) ADRS partners with OFCCP to provide affirmative action training to employers on issues related to hiring and retaining workers with disabilities.

Federal Office of Personnel Management (OPM) The OPM state director is actively involve in ADRS consumer employment activities including new services to employers and implementation of federal mandates to hire people with disabilities into federal jobs.

Social Security Administration (SSA) The Agency maintains an excellent working relationship with the SSA. An agency state office specialist in Social Security, Donna Bowden, is very knowledgeable regarding Social Security issues. She has given numerous presentations on the Ticket to Work, Work Incentives Improvement Act, not only to ADRS staff, but other agencies staff.

Veterans Administration (VA) The agency is collaborating with the VA to serve and place into employment veterans completing the VA vocational rehabilitation program. The VA is able to provide many rehabilitation services, but needs assistance with job placement. A cooperative agreement was completed in 2006. The agreement defines the role of the agency and the VA in the referral process. The agency has a group of liaison counselors who will receive referrals and disburse them to local counselors throughout the state.

Rural Development Office of Alabama The agency established contact with the Rural Development Office of Alabama in FY 2010. The invitation was made to provide referrals to the agency of people with disabilities in rural areas who may need agency services.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2011 4:26PM by Jim Harris Iii

  • Describe the designated state unit's plans, policies, and procedures for coordination with education officials to facilitate the transition of students with disabilities from school to the receipt of vocational rehabilitation services, including provisions for the development and approval of an individualized plan for employment before each student determined to be eligible for vocational rehabilitation services leaves the school setting or, if the designated state unit is operating on an order of selection, before each eligible student able to be served under the order leaves the school setting.
  • Provide information on the formal interagency agreement with the state educational agency with respect to
    • consultation and technical assistance to assist educational agencies in planning for the transition of students with disabilities from school to post-school activities, including VR services;
    • transition planning by personnel of the designated state agency and educational agency that facilitates the development and completion of their individualized education programs;
    • roles and responsibilities, including financial responsibilities, of each agency, including provisions for determining state lead agencies and qualified personnel responsible for transition services;
    • procedures for outreach to and identification of students with disabilities who need transition services.

ATTACHMENT4.8(b)(2)

COORDINATION WITH EDUCATION OFFICIALS

The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) has a history of placing special emphasis on coordination of school-to-work activities. ADRS is committed to assisting students with disabilities in making a smooth transition to the world of work. ADRS Transition programs are coordinated with state and local education officials.

At the state level, ADRS participates as an equal partner in the State of Alabama Interagency Team (SITT). The SITT is an interagency work group led by the State Department of Education, Special Education Services Division. The purpose of this group is to identify any existing barriers to effective transition services, develop state and local policies/procedures that eliminate or reduce those barriers and promote a comprehensive, coordinated transition service system. The SITT collaborates to host an annual Transition Conference. The lead agency for this effort is Auburn University.

In addition to the SITT, continuous joint planning is conducted with state education officials. Alabama has implemented a diploma option available to special education students. The diploma option is known as the Alabama Occupational Diploma (AOD). The AOD requires a specified number of hours of paid competitive work in the exiting year of school. ADRS works closely with the State Department of Education to ensure students meet the requirements for paid work.

Another initiative at the state level is the collaboration of ADRS and the State Department of Education in the development of a formal interagency agreement which specifies how VR staff and local education agency personnel will cooperate. The agreement describes scope of services to be provided by the State Department of Education (SDE) and ADRS; the financial responsibilities of each party; the methods of consultation and technical services needed to formulate IEPs; the role of each agency in transition planning; and methods and strategies for identification of students needing transition services. Transition planning, sharing of student information, and consultation activities are stated in the agreement. All activities described in this attachment, regarding working with educational institutions are formalized in the interagency agreement.

ADRS sponsored many members’ attendance at the annual Transition Conference. This conference provides an opportunity for counselors and transition staff to be updated on the latest successful trends and practices related to transition. It is well attended by education officials. This allows ADRS staff excellent interaction opportunities with education staff and teachers. Dates have been set for the Transition Conference in the upcoming fiscal year. ADRS will utilize this conference as a training conference for staff serving transition students.

At the local level, the ADRS has procedures in place to ensure the agency is actively involved in the transition of students with disabilities from school to work. The agency has a counselor assigned to each high school to act as transition counselor. The counselor visits the school on a regularly scheduled basis to meet with teachers and guidance counselors in order to receive referrals of students with disabilities in need of rehabilitation services. The VR counselor meets with the student and parents in order to explain rehabilitation services to enable a student’s informed choice regarding these services. School records and other information needed for eligibility determination is obtained. Once eligibility is determined efforts are made to begin determining rehabilitation needs and a vocational goal. Counselors make every effort to participate in IEP meetings. This provides the counselor the opportunity to have issues addressed in the IEP related to disability. The counselor also provides some level of expertise regarding accommodations the student may need related to disability. Counselors develop the IPE prior to a student’s exit from school and coordinates the IPE with the IEP. Transition students represent 35% of all people served by ADRS and 35% of all people placed into successful employment.

At the local level, as well, ADRS is committed to providing jointly funded (half funded by the local school system) job coaches in local education agencies. This is accomplished through cooperative agreements with local education agencies. The job coaches are responsible for helping meet the AOD requirement for paid work and assisting students in their exiting year in finding competitive paid employment. Currently, ADRS has 66 jointly funded job coaches in place through 52 cooperative agreements. This program will be expanded and improved in the future.

The VR Transition counselor may utilize a vocational evaluation provided by a community rehabilitation program to obtain specific information regarding the student’s vocational potential and possibilities. If needed, this is usually completed after the junior year, but may occur earlier. Results of such an evaluation are shared with the school for use in formulating subsequent IEPs. The counselor follows the student through to graduation. When the student has completed high school the next phase of the rehabilitation process is implemented. This may include college, vocational training, community rehabilitation services, or employment, depending on the needs of the individual student.

ADRS recognizes the roles and responsibilities of each agency. Educational responsibilities rest with educational agencies which includes the cost of accommodations for students with disabilities. Transition counselors are trained to be sure responsibilities of the education agency are not transferred to ADRS while the student is in school. The educational agency is responsible for ensuring students with disabilities are provided equal access to education. The school is responsible for providing school records to be used in determining eligibility and planning a rehabilitation program. ADRS utilizes school records and other available information in order to develop a rehabilitation program.

Outreach efforts by the agency are very strong in the area of transition. As noted above, a counselor is assigned to each school. Most often, working with transition cases will be the exclusive work assignment of a counselor that the agency refers to as a ‘transition counselor’. In the more rural areas, a counselor may work with other cases in addition to transition cases. The performance evaluation of a transition counselor is based on their success in working with transition consumers.

The Transition Program also continued the College Prep and Career Prep Programs for students with disabilities. These programs are offered by ADRS through collaboration with the Alabama Department of Post-Secondary Education and Higher Education. ADRS continues efforts in the following transition initiatives:

• Development of a model transition program for students with autism.

• Development of a model transition program for students who are deaf and/or blind and have other disabilities in conjunction with the Helen Keller School, Alabama School for the Deaf, and Alabama School for the Blind (Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind).

• Development of a “dual enrollment” program for students of E.H. Gentry Rehabilitation Facility (AIDB) and Central Alabama Community College.

• Continuation of the Alabama Governor’s Youth Leadership Forum in collaboration with the Troy University Institute for Leadership Development, the Alabama Governor’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities, the Alabama State Department of Education and the Alabama Department of Mental Health.

• Continuation of a Prison Transition Program (PTI) for young transition-aged (16 - 21) prison inmates with disabilities who are eligible for special education services under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act. The program, developed in cooperation with the Department of Education and the Alabama Department of Corrections, will link these young people to transition and employment services available through Vocational Rehabilitation Service. Through this program, inmates will receive information about ADRS services, be connected with an ADRS office in their home communities and have an appointment scheduled with a VR counselor prior to release from incarceration.

• Continuation and expansion of specialty Teen Transition Clinics for students with special health care needs. These clinics bring together staff with various skills and from diverse disciplines to address the special needs of these youth.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2011 4:27PM by Jim Harris Iii

Describe the manner in which the designated state agency establishes cooperative agreements with private non-profit vocational rehabilitation service providers.

ATTACHMENT 4.8(b)(3)

COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH PRIVATE, NONPROFIT VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION SERVICE PROVIDERS

The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) maintains a viable working partnership with 20 Community Rehabilitation Providers (CRPs) statewide. The CRPs play a vital role in assisting the department to meet its mission of providing quality employment outcomes for individuals with severe disabilities.

Currently, the Accreditation Commission (CARF) accredits 18 of the CRPs in Alabama, with one in the process of seeking reaccreditation and one provider who is in a “provisional status” and has agreed to meet CARF standards in a twelve month time frame. As the nature of services provided by CRPs continues to change, the options regarding standards and accreditation requirements will change.

The CRP division of the agency currently has four staff members. This includes an Assistant Commissioner and two Rehabilitation Specialists and a clerical support person. One of the Rehabilitation Specialists is assigned to specifically enhance the agency’s supported employment program. The specialists are responsible for initiating agreements with non-profits and for profits from which agency consumers receive services. CRP division staff review the qualifications of both nonprofits and for profits, meet to discuss fees and payment rates, and monitor service delivery through management/data reports and field visits. In 2005 the agency instituted a system to ensure that all community based service providers who desire to provide services meet CARF standards and maintain their accreditation. This requirement provides some assurance that CRP’s address issues like ADA accessibility, accountability, safety, staff qualifications, accommodations, and affirmative action in hiring persons with disabilities and address any special communication needs of consumers.

Currently, agency staff meets with CRP staff to discuss services and formulate an agreement that establishes agreed upon fees for each CRP. This information is shared with local counselors so that appropriate service authorizations can be made to the CRPs.

The department has formally developed and implemented the “Stages to Employment Payment System” (STEPS), which is a three-step outcome based payment schedule that is efficient, requires minimal paperwork, and focuses on the individual needs of the consumer served. To date this effort has met with positive feedback and all CRPs are utilizing this service/payment system.

The department continues to work cooperatively with CRPs statewide to improve services at the local level. There is a continuous need for services. The development and establishment of new programs will change with the assessment of consumer needs.

Based on an assessment of the capacity and effectiveness of vocational rehabilitation services currently provided by CRPs statewide, a number of trends appear to be taking place:

• Increased emphasis on serving individuals that are considered underserved, individuals with the most significant disabilities, and individuals residing in rural areas of the state

• Increased emphasis on consumer choice

• Increased emphasis on serving AVRS consumers in their home communities

• Increased emphasis on integrated employment

• Increased incentives based on performance

• Increased emphasis on community based services

• CRPs are becoming more diversified regarding services provided and funding streams

• More options regarding accreditation requirements as providers and the nature of service provision changes

• Increase of supported employment long term supports

The department’s commissioner, the assistant commissioner for community rehabilitation programs, the assistant commissioners for general field services and blind/deaf services, and the CRP specialists meet regularly with all community rehabilitation program directors. These meetings provide the opportunity to discuss issues of mutual concern, improve communication, and focus on the continuous improvement of the partnership.

Supported employment is available in Alabama to individuals who require intensive and extended support services for an appropriate and successful employment outcome. Supported employment services are available through some 30 community based providers in the state. These services are currently provided in all regions of the state through cooperative agreements with community-based organizations and agencies. The availability of job coach services is provided in most of the state’s network of 21 community rehabilitation programs. Additionally, specialized center based services for blind and deaf consumers are being expanded and developed in local communities throughout the state.

The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services continues to stay abreast of national issues regarding community rehabilitation facilities through its attendance and participation in conferences of state and national significance including the International Conference on Employment and Community Services sponsored by the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities.

Collaborative efforts between ADRS Computer Services and the CRP section have recently developed computer generated reports that assist the CRP section in tracking targeted CRP goals and outcomes such as numbers of individuals successfully employed, cost per successful closure, and average wage.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2011 4:28PM by Jim Harris Iii

Describe the efforts of the designated state agency to identify and make arrangements, including entering into cooperative agreements, with other state agencies and other appropriate entities in order to provide the following services to individuals with the most significant disabilities:

  • supported employment services; and
  • extended services.

ATTACHMENT 4.8(b)(4)

EVIDENCE OF COLLABORATION REGARDING SUPPORTED

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES AND EXTENDED SERVICES

Supported Employment is available in Alabama to individuals with the most significant disabilities who require intensive support services, and extended support services for an appropriate and successful employment outcome. These services are provided in all regions of the state by 31 approved community-based organizations.

Supported Employment services are available to individuals regardless of their disability. Currently, the primary disabilities served include significant intellectual disabilities, severe mental illness, cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorders, visual and hearing impairments, severe orthopedic impairments, traumatic brain injury, and other severe disabilities.

The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services is currently in its twelfth year of utilizing the Milestones service and payment process. Milestones, a service and outcome based payment system, has significantly improved the quality of supported employment throughout the state, while proving to be more cost effective for the Agency. Providers of supported employment are paid for successful outcomes achieved by individuals participating in supported employment. The Milestones program segments the rehabilitation process into four distinct areas: (1) Determination of Needs and the Discovery Process, (2) Hire, (3) Job Retention/Coaching and (4) Closure.

Each provider agency agrees to facilitate the provision of extended supports, which may include natural supports available at the job site. Additionally, they are required to document twice monthly contact with each consumer successfully working in the community, and to maintain this documentation in case files for the duration of that consumer’s job. This information is also reported monthly to the ADRS Supported Employment Coordinator for tracking purposes.

To ensure the highest quality of services, training is provided throughout the year to address issues related to supported employment, including the provision of extended services. This training is available to providers as well as other agencies that may collaborate to provide supports to an individual working in the community. Some of these agencies include the Alabama Department of Mental Health, The Alabama Department of Education, the Social Security Administration, and the Department of Veterans Affairs.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2011 4:28PM by Jim Harris Iii

Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development

ATTACHMENT 4.10

COMPREHENSIVE SYSTEM OF PERSONNEL DEVELOPMENT

The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) maintains a Comprehensive System of Personnel Development. This system is based on finding candidates who possess prescribed levels of specific education and experience for available positions/job classifications. After employment, a second phase of this comprehensive system of personnel development is initiated. This includes an initial orientation to the department, its goals, and mission. A regular system of personnel appraisal and staff development is tailored to suit the needs of each staff member.

2.) Recruitment and Retention Issues: ADRS has worked diligently over the past years to implement strategies necessary to address personnel issues. Since 2002, the department has a dedicated staff specialist devoted to the issues of recruitment and retention. This individual worked with the executive leadership team and task forces to create and implement strategic plans in both areas. However, ultimately the State Department of Personnel is the entity that provides and oversees hiring practices, salary schedules, and staff vacancies among other personnel issues. Within the strategic planning and implementation process, the following issues were/are seen as critical:

1.) Maintaining a strong relationship with key personnel at the State Department of Personnel and universities offering educational opportunities for potential ADRS employees. Unpaid internships will continue to be offered as a recruiting tool for students in the field of rehabilitation. Paid internships will be re-instated once the hiring freeze is lifted. The professional trainee job class will be used to attract individuals to pursue professions in rehabilitation requiring experience such as rehabilitation teacher and Business Relations Consultant. This will allow dedicated individuals to train while gaining the experience needed to be eligible for hire. A hiring procedure known as ‘disability preference’ will continue to enable ADRS to recruit qualified individuals with disabilities. Other avenues to recruit individuals with disabilities are made possible through specialty areas such as orientation and mobility.

2.) Continuation of promotions of deserving rehabilitation counselors to the senior rehabilitation counselor level. Promotion will be based on exemplary performance of job duties and the ability to take on additional duties within the unit. It is anticipated this will provide some incentive for younger counselors to remain with the department. The department believes this will help address the issue of supervisory succession planning. If counselors are promoted and retained, then they will be in line to fill supervisory vacancies, with proper training.

3.) Regularly scheduled exhibits at various professional and disability organization meetings to share employment opportunities with potential candidates. Exhibits are used for recruiting students into the field of rehabilitation and for recruiting professionals into positions within the department. Several ADRS administrators serve on advisory boards for rehabilitation counseling programs and also sit on interviewing panels for RSA scholarship recipients.

4.) Maintaining an active role on the advisory committees of Alabama A&M University and Alabama State University. Both universities are known as historically black colleges/universities and provide an opportunity to recruit students from more diverse backgrounds to positions within the department. An effort is being made to increase the percentage of counselors from diverse backgrounds by 30%. A new mentoring program places rehabilitation counselors with students from diverse backgrounds as a tool to educate and recruit them into the field of rehabilitation.

5.) Develop more marketing tools, created through annual meetings with educators, to increase interest in the field of rehabilitation from high school students and encourage undergraduate students to pursue Master’s level work in one of the rehabilitation programs. Similar to the initiative which created the marketing brochure and DVD, there is an initiative being developed to use the contacts of departmental transition counselors to recruit high school students across the state.

3.) Personnel Standards: The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services has adopted a standard which states rehabilitation counselors will be “eligible to sit” for the CRC exam by October 2009. This standard is easily obtainable by a majority of new staff, because they are graduating from rehabilitation specific programs. Almost all other staff hold related degrees, which fortunately contain coursework in the theories and techniques of counseling, a critical component in an individual’s ability to be “eligible to sit” under current CRCC reviewing practices. Transcripts are required as part of the state personnel application process allowing coursework to be reviewed by the hiring supervisor and the human resource division of the department. All staff hired that possess related degrees have transcripts reviewed to determine their ‘eligibility to sit’ for the exam.

61 possess CRC certification

103 possess a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling (CORE program) or required coursework and experience to sit for the CRC exam

3 require additional coursework to meet the CSPD standard:

1 requires a community resources course

1 requires a medical aspects of disability course

1 requires a medical aspects of disability and community resources course

1 possesses non-related master’s degrees

1 does not possess a master’s degree

The five employees who either do not possess a master’s degree, possess a master’s degree in a non-related field, or possess a related degree but without the necessary coursework are in a revised job classification and have been presented with opportunities to acquire a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling through RSA long term training grant programs or obtain the necessary coursework through the RSA in-service training grant. One of the five is eligible to retire through service year requirements. All were made aware of the requirement to meet the state standard. Those who chose to remain or were hired on with the department beyond the required timeframe have had their signature authority removed for determinations of eligibility and rehabilitation plans. These rehabilitation counselor specific duties must be reviewed, approved, and signed by a senior counselor or supervisor meeting the CSPD standard. Current and closed consumer files are now reviewed by the department’s Quality Assurance section to assure compliance with this policy until the staff meets the CSPD requirement.

While the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services has adopted a standard which states rehabilitation counselors will be “eligible to sit” for the CRC exam, the minimum qualifications currently adopted by the State Personnel Department of Alabama require a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling, rehabilitation services, rehabilitation administration, vocational evaluation, or counseling to be placed on the counselor register of candidates. Rehabilitation counselors wishing to work with the deaf must score intermediate or higher on the Sign Language Proficiency Interview. These minimum qualifications from the State Personnel Department have created training issues with staff already in place with related degrees or staff placed in the more rural counties where rehabilitation specific candidates are more difficult to recruit. Fortunately, individuals with master’s degrees in rehabilitation counseling are more abundant due to the large number of educational programs within the state. It is also the preference of the department to hire these individuals before others who do not meet the state’s CSPD standard; however, it would be difficult to hire in rural areas of the state if the State Personnel Department minimum qualifications were made more stringent. As mentioned earlier in this document, ADRS and state personnel are working to strengthen the application process by requiring that qualified candidates must be eligible to sit for the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) by the end of their probationary period, which can be extended up to one year. ADRS anticipates this new qualification to be in effect by the fall of 2011.

The listed salary range of our beginning rehabilitation counselor positions is $33,902.40- $51,376.80. The senior rehabilitation counselor pay range is $37,389.60-$56,685.60. Each pay range consists of eighteen steps. A new counselor would normally be hired at step one of the rehabilitation counselor classification; however, steps were taken to allow a beginning counselor to start at step three of the eighteen step range, or $35,589.60, in order to help in recruiting efforts.

4.) Staff Development and Training: The department has an extensive in-service training program. Each staff member completes a professional development plan (PDP) with his/her supervisor at the time of the annual performance appraisal. The PDP focuses on deficit areas where training is needed to enable an individual to better perform his/her job. The department uses information gathered through the PDP process to develop necessary and appropriate training programs. The department also maintains a departmental training team. This team meets to identify, plan, and coordinate training. A department wide training plan, reviewed by this team on an on-going basis, targets core subjects as well as new topics related to particular job classifications or specialty areas. These topics may include, but are not limited to, the Americans with Disabilities Act, case management, Social Security work incentives, employment development, WIA, medical aspects of disability, assistive technology and multicultural issues.

The department utilizes Registrar? learning management software to track training records for each staff member. This software allows for input from both field and state office staff. Registrar? will track an individual’s training record, training dates, and future training needs.

Video on demand capabilities, and internal intranet site allow the department to disseminate information from the federal level to the local level at speeds often much faster than standard personnel meetings and supervisory instruction. Training and program evaluation staff are currently exploring the use of SharePoint as a training tool. Although instructor led training will continue to be important, these technologies do have definite benefits when timing is critical.

The department’s Leadership Training Institute (LTI) has been continuously changed and updated since 1994 to include new approaches and concepts of leadership. This training, offered seven times since its inception has proven to sufficiently meet the changing needs of the department by preparing staff to fill vacant leadership positions statewide.

The RSA technical assistance and continuing education (TACE) regional partnership is currently offering web based courses for continuing education opportunities and is working with ADRS leadership to develop specific training to address policy and procedure changes in the VR program.

The State Department of Personnel continues to offer supervisory training in the areas of performance appraisal, progressive discipline, FMLA, sexual harassment, employment law, interview and selection, and the dynamics of supervision. A portion of these trainings are required for all new supervisors.

5.) Communication with diverse populations: ADRS maintains regular communication with programs providing specialized training in the areas of deafness and blindness. Communication is maintained with Western Oregon University to train staff in the area of deafness. Staff members serving the deaf and hard of hearing populations attend an annual training conference to address issues relative to deaf services and to meet with students at the Alabama School for the Deaf. The department also remains actively involved with Mississippi State University’s blind program. Mississippi State also assists the blind program with consumer satisfaction surveys. Staff members serving the blind and low vision populations attend training programs annually to address issues relative to blind services. The department possesses Braille and large print producing capabilities in local offices to address the needs of Braille and large print users. UbiDuos are available for deaf and hard of hearing consumers in the reception areas of all local offices and resource rooms.

ADRS has partnered with Alabama A&M University to target and recruit candidates for the rehabilitation counseling program in either the blindness or deafness tract. This two year Master’s program includes the second year in Mississippi or Tennessee for the specialized training. ADRS and the A&M faculty have committed to having 5 candidates for the fall 2012 academic year. Priority to receive the RSA scholarship will be given to students interested in pursuing sensory specialties. Also, ADRS rehabilitation counselors with general caseloads but with an interest in working with consumers with sensory impairments may qualify for specialty training through the RSA in-service training grant.

ADRS applicants and eligible individuals who speak limited English can be provided interpreters or are encouraged to access the Language Line. The ADRS consumer guide has been translated into Spanish. Spanish instruction is being explored by using technology and individual instruction either online or in person for staff.

6.) Coordination with IDEA initiatives: More than one-third of ADRS cases served and the closures obtained, involved transition students. This year, 17,051 transition students received services and 1,709 were successfully employed. The department continues to strengthen the jointly funded job coach program with more than 67 local school systems across the state. This program is designed to place students with disabilities who are in their final year of school into competitive jobs in their local communities before they leave school. The program is cooperatively managed by local VR service staff and school system staff and employs 68 full-time job coaches. Students, parents, rehabilitation counselors, local school special and regular education staff, and the job coaches, work together to plan for students’ successful and smooth transitions to adult life and work.

ADRS has continued efforts to develop and improve transition partnerships, programs and service models to meet the needs of students with more-significant disabilities and overcome barriers to employment and community living. In 2010, College Prep Program services were offered at five sites around the state, with more than 200 students participating. ADRS is represented on the State Interagency Transition Team (SITT). This is an interagency work group designed to identify existing interagency barriers to effective transition services and develop appropriate remedies. This group consists of representatives from ADRS, Division of Special Education, Auburn University, University of Alabama, Department of Mental Health, Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Alabama Association of Higher Education and Disability, and the Young Adults in Transition (YAIT) group.

The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is annually provided an opportunity to give input about the department’s CSPD initiatives. Current and future personnel issues are presented by field services program directors. Detailed information is presented through discussions, handouts and questions and answers. Comments and suggestions are requested at any time throughout the year.

 

Row Job Title Total positions Current vacancies Projected vacancies over the next 5 years
1 Rehabilitation Counselors (Caseload) 160 14 116
2 Rehabiliation Specialists 27 0 5
3 Assisstant Commissioners 3 0 3
4 Interpreters 8 1 1
5 Orientation/Mobility Specialists 3 1 0
6 Business Relations Consultants 17 2 1
7 Clerical Support 141 18 20
8 Unit Supervisors 20 0 2
9 Rehabilitation Teachers 10 2 3
10 Rehab Technology Specialists 6 1 0

 

1.) Data System on Personnel and Personnel Development: ADRS maintains a comprehensive system of data on personnel needs. This is maintained within the agency’s human resource division. This data system allows for the input of personal information about each staff member and includes all possible training opportunities for staff to attend. It can also record historical information about each training, maintain participant lists, and track continuing education credit hours as needed.

As reported in the latest RSA-2 information, ADRS has 555 individuals providing vocational rehabilitation services throughout the four personnel reporting categories. The total number of consumers served by the staff was 45,918. The majority (87%) of individuals served were coded in case files as having significant disabilities.

RSA-2 Personnel Reporting Categories:

Administrative Staff 15

Counselor Staff 199

Staff Supporting Counselor Activities 303

Other Staff 38

Total 555

The 199, classified as “counselor staff”, can be somewhat deceiving because it takes into account specialty staff that may not be considered actual vocational rehabilitation counselors. This number is currently closer to 149 rehabilitation counselors who provide services through our field offices and One-Stop Career Center sites. Each of these counselors currently averages a caseload of approximately 182 consumers. New vocational rehabilitation counselor positions are not being requested in next year’s budget because all of the current vacancies cannot be filled due to the mandated statewide hiring freeze. The department was able to fill some vacancies in 2010 with a hiring freeze exception. However, that exception was removed in January 2011 and currently the department can only fill positions through an approved critical needs request.

A database is used to track the educational backgrounds and experience of the 169 active counselors and supervisors within the department for the express purpose of encouraging and enabling all staff to reach the state’s highest definition of ‘qualified rehabilitation professionals.’ This database supports already existing systems and contains information gathered from educational transcripts required upon application to this job classification.

The agency also employs orientation and mobility instructors, interpreters, rehabilitation teachers and Business Relations Consultants. A qualification for orientation mobility instructor is an ACVREP or NOMC certification. Interpreters must be licensed by the Alabama Licensure Board for Interpreters and Transliterators. A rehabilitation teacher must have at least a bachelor’s degree and one year experience; however, many of the rehabilitation teachers have a master’s degree. The business relations consultants may come from a business background or a vocational rehabilitation service background with appropriate degrees.

Eighty “counselor staff” and thirteen “administrative staff” will be eligible to retire within the next five years. These numbers represent actual positions currently filled and do not include those budgeted positions presently not filled. There are many unfilled positions due to the hiring freeze. This number also does not represent the average turnover rate among these personnel categories. In addition, counselors are often promoted into supervisory positions. Therefore, we can project the need for approximately 116 counselors over the next five years to remain staffed at the current budgeted level. The average turnover rate for rehabilitation counselor in the last year was 1.04%, and for senior rehabilitation counselor, 1.14%. Fifty percent (50%) of the turnover was related to retirements, the other 50%, due to resignations and dismissals.

It is difficult to project the number of ‘Staff Supporting Counselor Activities’ and ‘Other’ staff. An estimate would be 103 supporting staff and eleven other staff over the next five years. This is based on the approximate departmental turnover rate of .66%, projected retirements, and unfilled positions.

Another significant staffing factor includes the Deferred Retirement Option Plan (DROP) bill passed by the Alabama Legislature in 2002. This bill allowed an employee to technically retire, but remain on the job at their regular salary. Their retirement benefits were deposited in an account. The employee could retire completely after five years, drawing retirement funds that accumulated while they continued working under the DROP plan. The opportunity to maintain experienced employees for a period of five years past their usual retirement date was an advantage for the department. Unfortunately, the Alabama Legislature passed a bill ending enrollment in the DROP program beginning May 2011. Though some staff still remain in the DROP, it is no longer an option for others and could affect the separation dates of those staff that are eligible to retire, but have not. Consequently, the department continues to be actively involved in succession planning, despite the current hiring and merit raise freeze mandated statewide by the governor’s office. The department’s Leadership Training Institute (LTI) has 87 graduates still working for the department. This training works to prepare existing staff to assume leadership roles. These graduates actively compete for leadership roles when openings have occurred due to retirements.

Another method of preparing LTI graduates for leadership roles is involving them in departmental task forces and special assignments. It gives current leadership the chance to see how well LTI graduates perform and what strengths they possess.

All rehabilitation counselors hired to work with the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services must possess master’s degrees from an accredited university in rehabilitation counseling, rehabilitation services, rehabilitation administration, vocational evaluation, or counseling. Only one counselor, hired years ago, still works for the department and does not possess master’s degrees. One other counselor, hired before this standard, has a master’s degree but in a non-related field of study. Three counselors have master’s degrees in counseling, but lack one course to be eligible to sit for the CRC. All have been offered educational opportunities in cooperation with one of the state’s accredited Master’s in Rehabilitation Counseling Programs.

Currently, Alabama has five universities to offer the Master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling. The universities, recent enrollment figures, and last year’s graduation numbers are listed below. (As reported by the universities)

University: Students Enrolled Graduated

Auburn University (distance ed. & campus) 32 10 University of Alabama 24 7

Alabama A&M 17 3

Troy University (combined campuses) 100 10

*Alabama State University 15 8

*This program is not CORE accredited but just completed its site visit in February and expects a final

announcement in July.

The above institutions provide excellent candidates for available counseling positions. This often translates into increased candidates for the department to recruit into employment. All graduates obtain the necessary credentials to apply for and/or test for certification and licensure.

Three of the universities also offer an undergraduate program in rehabilitation. These programs produce graduates who can fill Business Relations Consultant vacancies and jointly funded job coach positions between ADRS and the local school systems. The universities, recent enrollment figures, and last year’s graduation numbers are listed below. (as reported by the universities)

University: Students Enrolled Graduated

Auburn University 50 10

Troy University 40 5

Alabama State University 45 0

Alabama State University’s undergraduate program officially began in April 2010 with 30 students. They anticipate 62 students in the fall of 2011. They are also developing a certificate program in Rehabilitation Counseling to meet Category R of the CRCC.

Alabama is fortunate to have this number of universities providing rehabilitation education. Although there is a statewide hiring freeze mandated for all state agencies, it is anticipated there will be an adequate pool of applicants available for hire when this freeze is lifted or when the hiring exceptions are approved.

The state personnel department’s qualifications for rehabilitation counselor currently require specific master’s degrees; therefore, ADRS will not be presented with candidates without appropriate degrees. In addition, ADRS and state personnel are working to strengthen the application process by setting a time limit to be “eligible to sit” for the CRCC (the end of their probationary period which can be extended up to one year).

 

Row Institutions Students enrolled Employees sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates sponsored by agency and/or RSA Graduates from the previous year
1 Auburn University 32 0 7 10
2 University of Alabama 24 0 0 7
3 Alabama A&M 17 0 3 3
4 Troy University 100 0 9 10
5 Alabama State University (CORE Pending) 15 0 8 8

 

2.) Recruitment and Retention Issues: ADRS has worked diligently over the past years to implement strategies necessary to address personnel issues. Since 2002, the department has a dedicated staff specialist devoted to the issues of recruitment and retention. This individual worked with the executive leadership team and task forces to create and implement strategic plans in both areas. However, ultimately the State Department of Personnel is the entity that provides and oversees hiring practices, salary schedules, and staff vacancies among other personnel issues. Within the strategic planning and implementation process, the following issues were/are seen as critical:

1.) Maintaining a strong relationship with key personnel at the State Department of Personnel and universities offering educational opportunities for potential ADRS employees. Unpaid internships will continue to be offered as a recruiting tool for students in the field of rehabilitation. Paid internships will be re-instated once the hiring freeze is lifted. The professional trainee job class will be used to attract individuals to pursue professions in rehabilitation requiring experience such as rehabilitation teacher and Business Relations Consultant. This will allow dedicated individuals to train while gaining the experience needed to be eligible for hire. A hiring procedure known as ‘disability preference’ will continue to enable ADRS to recruit qualified individuals with disabilities. Other avenues to recruit individuals with disabilities are made possible through specialty areas such as orientation and mobility.

2.) Continuation of promotions of deserving rehabilitation counselors to the senior rehabilitation counselor level. Promotion will be based on exemplary performance of job duties and the ability to take on additional duties within the unit. It is anticipated this will provide some incentive for younger counselors to remain with the department. The department believes this will help address the issue of supervisory succession planning. If counselors are promoted and retained, then they will be in line to fill supervisory vacancies, with proper training.

3.) Regularly scheduled exhibits at various professional and disability organization meetings to share employment opportunities with potential candidates. Exhibits are used for recruiting students into the field of rehabilitation and for recruiting professionals into positions within the department. Several ADRS administrators serve on advisory boards for rehabilitation counseling programs and also sit on interviewing panels for RSA scholarship recipients.

4.) Maintaining an active role on the advisory committees of Alabama A&M University and Alabama State University. Both universities are known as historically black colleges/universities and provide an opportunity to recruit students from more diverse backgrounds to positions within the department. An effort is being made to increase the percentage of counselors from diverse backgrounds by 30%. A new mentoring program places rehabilitation counselors with students from diverse backgrounds as a tool to educate and recruit them into the field of rehabilitation.

5.) Develop more marketing tools, created through annual meetings with educators, to increase interest in the field of rehabilitation from high school students and encourage undergraduate students to pursue Master’s level work in one of the rehabilitation programs. Similar to the initiative which created the marketing brochure and DVD, there is an initiative being developed to use the contacts of departmental transition counselors to recruit high school students across the state.

 

3.) Personnel Standards: The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services has adopted a standard which states rehabilitation counselors will be “eligible to sit” for the CRC exam by October 2009. This standard is easily obtainable by a majority of new staff, because they are graduating from rehabilitation specific programs. Almost all other staff hold related degrees, which fortunately contain coursework in the theories and techniques of counseling, a critical component in an individual’s ability to be “eligible to sit” under current CRCC reviewing practices. Transcripts are required as part of the state personnel application process allowing coursework to be reviewed by the hiring supervisor and the human resource division of the department. All staff hired that possess related degrees have transcripts reviewed to determine their ‘eligibility to sit’ for the exam.

61 possess CRC certification

103 possess a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling (CORE program) or required coursework and experience to sit for the CRC exam

3 require additional coursework to meet the CSPD standard:

1 requires a community resources course

1 requires a medical aspects of disability course

1 requires a medical aspects of disability and community resources course

1 possesses non-related master’s degrees

1 does not possess a master’s degree

The five employees who either do not possess a master’s degree, possess a master’s degree in a non-related field, or possess a related degree but without the necessary coursework are in a revised job classification and have been presented with opportunities to acquire a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling through RSA long term training grant programs or obtain the necessary coursework through the RSA in-service training grant. One of the five is eligible to retire through service year requirements. All were made aware of the requirement to meet the state standard. Those who chose to remain or were hired on with the department beyond the required timeframe have had their signature authority removed for determinations of eligibility and rehabilitation plans. These rehabilitation counselor specific duties must be reviewed, approved, and signed by a senior counselor or supervisor meeting the CSPD standard. Current and closed consumer files are now reviewed by the department’s Quality Assurance section to assure compliance with this policy until the staff meets the CSPD requirement.

While the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services has adopted a standard which states rehabilitation counselors will be “eligible to sit” for the CRC exam, the minimum qualifications currently adopted by the State Personnel Department of Alabama require a master’s degree in rehabilitation counseling, rehabilitation services, rehabilitation administration, vocational evaluation, or counseling to be placed on the counselor register of candidates. Rehabilitation counselors wishing to work with the deaf must score intermediate or higher on the Sign Language Proficiency Interview. These minimum qualifications from the State Personnel Department have created training issues with staff already in place with related degrees or staff placed in the more rural counties where rehabilitation specific candidates are more difficult to recruit. Fortunately, individuals with master’s degrees in rehabilitation counseling are more abundant due to the large number of educational programs within the state. It is also the preference of the department to hire these individuals before others who do not meet the state’s CSPD standard; however, it would be difficult to hire in rural areas of the state if the State Personnel Department minimum qualifications were made more stringent. As mentioned earlier in this document, ADRS and state personnel are working to strengthen the application process by requiring that qualified candidates must be eligible to sit for the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) by the end of their probationary period, which can be extended up to one year. ADRS anticipates this new qualification to be in effect by the fall of 2011.

ADRS has, since 2009, and will continue to maintain a high ratio of vocational rehabilitation counselors eligible to sit for the CRC exam. As referenced in the CSPD Attachment, the State Personnel standard is currently being adjusted. The new standard will fall more in line with the ADRS CSPD standard in that no one will be able to receive permanent status as a state employee in the rehabilitation counselor category unless they meet the CSPD standard.

The way the State Personnel standard is written, it is possible that there will always be a handful of staff who are not eligible to sit for the CRC exam during their first year of employment. Once this hiring practice is updated later this year, no one will be given permanent status until they achieve the CSPD standard.

The listed salary range of our beginning rehabilitation counselor positions is $33,902.40- $51,376.80. The senior rehabilitation counselor pay range is $37,389.60-$56,685.60. Each pay range consists of eighteen steps. A new counselor would normally be hired at step one of the rehabilitation counselor classification; however, steps were taken to allow a beginning counselor to start at step three of the eighteen step range, or $35,589.60, in order to help in recruiting efforts.

 

4.) Staff Development and Training: The department has an extensive in-service training program. Each staff member completes a professional development plan (PDP) with his/her supervisor at the time of the annual performance appraisal. The PDP focuses on deficit areas where training is needed to enable an individual to better perform his/her job. The department uses information gathered through the PDP process to develop necessary and appropriate training programs. The department also maintains a departmental training team. This team meets to identify, plan, and coordinate training. A department wide training plan, reviewed by this team on an on-going basis, targets core subjects as well as new topics related to particular job classifications or specialty areas. These topics may include, but are not limited to, the Americans with Disabilities Act, case management, Social Security work incentives, employment development, WIA, medical aspects of disability, assistive technology and multicultural issues.

The department utilizes Registrar? learning management software to track training records for each staff member. This software allows for input from both field and state office staff. Registrar? will track an individual’s training record, training dates, and future training needs.

Video on demand capabilities, and internal intranet site allow the department to disseminate information from the federal level to the local level at speeds often much faster than standard personnel meetings and supervisory instruction. Training and program evaluation staff are currently exploring the use of SharePoint as a training tool. Although instructor led training will continue to be important, these technologies do have definite benefits when timing is critical.

The department’s Leadership Training Institute (LTI) has been continuously changed and updated since 1994 to include new approaches and concepts of leadership. This training, offered seven times since its inception has proven to sufficiently meet the changing needs of the department by preparing staff to fill vacant leadership positions statewide.

The RSA technical assistance and continuing education (TACE) regional partnership is currently offering web based courses for continuing education opportunities and is working with ADRS leadership to develop specific training to address policy and procedure changes in the VR program.

The State Department of Personnel continues to offer supervisory training in the areas of performance appraisal, progressive discipline, FMLA, sexual harassment, employment law, interview and selection, and the dynamics of supervision. A portion of these trainings are required for all new supervisors.

 

5.) Communication with diverse populations: ADRS maintains regular communication with programs providing specialized training in the areas of deafness and blindness. Communication is maintained with Western Oregon University to train staff in the area of deafness. Staff members serving the deaf and hard of hearing populations attend an annual training conference to address issues relative to deaf services and to meet with students at the Alabama School for the Deaf. The department also remains actively involved with Mississippi State University’s blind program. Mississippi State also assists the blind program with consumer satisfaction surveys. Staff members serving the blind and low vision populations attend training programs annually to address issues relative to blind services. The department possesses Braille and large print producing capabilities in local offices to address the needs of Braille and large print users. UbiDuos are available for deaf and hard of hearing consumers in the reception areas of all local offices and resource rooms.

ADRS has partnered with Alabama A&M University to target and recruit candidates for the rehabilitation counseling program in either the blindness or deafness tract. This two year Master’s program includes the second year in Mississippi or Tennessee for the specialized training. ADRS and the A&M faculty have committed to having 5 candidates for the fall 2012 academic year. Priority to receive the RSA scholarship will be given to students interested in pursuing sensory specialties. Also, ADRS rehabilitation counselors with general caseloads but with an interest in working with consumers with sensory impairments may qualify for specialty training through the RSA in-service training grant.

ADRS applicants and eligible individuals who speak limited English can be provided interpreters or are encouraged to access the Language Line. The ADRS consumer guide has been translated into Spanish. Spanish instruction is being explored by using technology and individual instruction either online or in person for staff.

 

6.) Coordination with IDEA initiatives: More than one-third of ADRS cases served and the closures obtained, involved transition students. This year, 17,051 transition students received services and 1,709 were successfully employed. The department continues to strengthen the jointly funded job coach program with more than 67 local school systems across the state. This program is designed to place students with disabilities who are in their final year of school into competitive jobs in their local communities before they leave school. The program is cooperatively managed by local VR service staff and school system staff and employs 68 full-time job coaches. Students, parents, rehabilitation counselors, local school special and regular education staff, and the job coaches, work together to plan for students’ successful and smooth transitions to adult life and work.

ADRS has continued efforts to develop and improve transition partnerships, programs and service models to meet the needs of students with more-significant disabilities and overcome barriers to employment and community living. In 2010, College Prep Program services were offered at five sites around the state, with more than 200 students participating. ADRS is represented on the State Interagency Transition Team (SITT). This is an interagency work group designed to identify existing interagency barriers to effective transition services and develop appropriate remedies. This group consists of representatives from ADRS, Division of Special Education, Auburn University, University of Alabama, Department of Mental Health, Department of Economic and Community Affairs, Alabama Association of Higher Education and Disability, and the Young Adults in Transition (YAIT) group.

The State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) is annually provided an opportunity to give input about the department’s CSPD initiatives. Current and future personnel issues are presented by field services program directors. Detailed information is presented through discussions, handouts and questions and answers. Comments and suggestions are requested at any time throughout the year.

This screen was last updated on Aug 3 2011 6:02PM by Jim Harris Iii

Provide an assessment of the rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing within the state, particularly the vocational rehabilitation services needs of:

  • individuals with most significant disabilities, including their need for supported employment services;
  • individuals with disabilities who are minorities;
  • individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the vocational rehabilitation program; and
  • individuals with disabilities served through other components of the statewide workforce investment system.

Identify the need to establish, develop, or improve community rehabilitation programs within the state.

ATTACHMENT 4.11(a)

RESULTS OF THE COMPREHENSIVE STATEWIDE ASSESSMENT OF THE NEEDS OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES AND THE NEED TO ESTABLISH, DEVELOP, OR IMPROVE COMMUNITY REHABILITATION PROGRAMS

The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services utilizes a variety of methods to determine the vocational rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities residing in the state. These methods include the following: Staff attends meetings of various consumer groups throughout the state. These meetings include consumer groups related to blindness, deafness, traumatic brain injury, learning disability issues, and other disability groups. Information is also gathered from Client Satisfaction Surveys. In FY 2010, Auburn University conducted a client satisfaction survey for the Agency’s general services program, i.e, on consumers with disabilities other than hearing or visual. Dr. Doug Watson of Communications Plus conducted a survey of consumer satisfaction among deaf and hard of hearing consumers of agency services. The Mississippi State Rehabilitation and a Research Center on Low Vision and Blindness did a satisfaction survy on agency consumers with visual impairments.

Public hearings are conducted throughout the state on an annual basis to gather information about the vocational needs of individuals with disabilities in the state. The agency also has local advisory groups throughout the state that provide information on a local basis about various rehabilitation needs. Also, the Agency interacts with State of Alabama Client Assistance Program to gather information about unmet vocational rehabilitation needs. Finally, information is gathered from members of the State Rehabilitation Council about the needs of individuals with disabilities in Alabama.

While the agency uses a variety of methods to determine the needs, a triannual needs assessment is conducted. It is jointly conducted with the State Rehabi litation Counci l. Infact the study mentioned below conducted by Auburn University was in conjunction Dr. Dave Martin of Auburn, who is also the chair of the State Rehabilitation Counci l. The agency contracted with Auburn University in FY 2011 to conduct a statewide needs assessment of the vocational rehabilitation needs of people with disabilities in the state. Auburn University personnel met with the agency Commissioner on June 10, 2011 to review the findings of the report.

Vocational Rehabilitation Needs of Individuals with the Most Significant Disabilities, Including Their Needs for Supported Employment Services

The vocational rehabilitation needs of the most significantly disabled included: (1) Employment. Under this umbrella of “Employment” comes related matters such as job search assistance, job placement, and supported employment opportunities, (2) job training, (3) technology, (4) transportation.

Vocational Rehabilitation Needs of Individuals Who are Minorities and Individuals Who Have Been Unserved or Underserved

The top five vocational rehabilitation needs in this category are: (1) job placement (2) job search assistance, (3) supported employment opportunities, (4) job retention services and (5) technology services. Again, this group expressed similar issues as seen in the “most significantly disabled” group. The employment issues appear most important.

Vocational Rehabilitation Needs of Individuals with Disabilities Served Through Components of the Statewide Workforce Investment System

The vocational rehabilitation needs of those served in the career centers included: (1) employment, (2) job search and job placement services, (3) on-the-job training.

Another issue noted for the Client Satisfaction Survey conducted by Auburn University was the availability of the counselor to the consumer. A significant number of responders noted that the counselor may be difficult to reach. Large caseloads were cited as a possible reason for this situation. It can be expected this would be an issue for all three groups delineated above.

The Need to Establish, Develop or Improve Community Rehabilitation Programs Within the State

As the agency moves toward serving the more disabled consumer, there may be need for the Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRPs) to enhance capacity to evaluate the more disabled consumer. Also, there is a need for short term training programs to meet labor market needs examples might include Certified Nursing Assistant or forklift operator.

As the agency makes efforts to expand supported employment, there will be a need to develop supported employment opportunities and methods of long term support. CRPs may well be able to assist in this area.

Another area of service need is serving people with autism. CRPs can play a role in expanding services to this population.

This screen was last updated on Aug 17 2011 5:12PM by Jim Harris Iii

It is estimated 25,320 people with disabilities will be eligible for services under the plan.

It is estimated 28,825 people with disabilities will be served under Part B of Title I and 540 people with disabilities will be served under Part B of Title IV of the Rehabilitation Act.

It is estimated $28,000,000 will be expended under Title I and $2,000,000 expended under Title IV.

Category Title I or Title VI Estimated Funds Estimated Number to be Served Average Cost of Services
Part B of title I Title I $70,000,000 28,825 $2,428
Part of title VI Title VI $2,000,000 540 $3,703
Totals   $72,000,000 29,365 $2,451

This screen was last updated on Aug 22 2011 6:00PM by Jim Harris Iii

The goals and priorities are based on the comprehensive statewide assessment, on requirements related to the performance standards and indicators, and on other information about the state agency. (See section 101(a)(15)(C) of the Act.) This attachment should be updated when there are material changes in the information that require the description to be amended.

  • Identify if the goals and priorities were jointly developed and agreed to by the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has a council.
  • Identify if the state VR agency and the State Rehabilitation Council, if the state has such a council, jointly reviewed the goals and priorities and jointly agreed to any revisions.
  • Identify the goals and priorities in carrying out the vocational rehabilitation and supported employment programs.
  • Ensure that the goals and priorities are based on an analysis of the following areas:
    • the most recent comprehensive statewide assessment, including any updates;
    • the performance of the state on standards and indicators; and
    • other available information on the operation and effectiveness of the VR program, including any reports received from the State Rehabilitation Council and findings and recommendations from monitoring activities conducted under section 107.

ATTACHMENT 4.11(c)(1)

STATE GOALS AND PRIORITIES

Based on the Statewide Needs Assessment and the other methods of gathering information about the vocational rehabilitation needs of individuals with disabilities described in Attachment 4.11(a), the agency, in conjunction with the State Rehabilitation Council, will establish the following as goals and priorities:

Goal 1: Job Placement Services. The agency will accomplish sufficient outcomes that meet quality standards to achieve Performance Indicator 1.1.

Goal 2: Vocational Training. The agency will increase by 5% the number of eligible individuals, including minorities, who receive vocational training.

Goal 3: Rehab Technology Services. The agency will increase by 5% the number of individuals that receive assistive technology throughout the rehabilitation process.

Goal 4: Increase availability of counselors to consumers. The agency will develop strategies to keep caseloads at levels that will ensure counselors have adequate time to interact effectively with consumers.

Goal 5 Expand the agency’s supported employment program, including the increase of long term supports.

This screen was last updated on Aug 3 2011 6:02PM by Jim Harris Iii

  • Identify the order to be followed in selecting eligible individuals to be provided vocational rehabilitation services.
  • Identify the justification for the order.
  • Identify the service and outcome goals.
  • Identify the time within which these goals may be achieved for individuals in each priority category within the order.
  • Describe how individuals with the most significant disabilities are selected for services before all other individuals with disabilities.

This agency is not implementing an Order of Selection.

This screen was last updated on Sep 15 2009 2:34PM by rsacoclopeinj

Specify the state's goals and priorities with respect to the distribution of funds received under section 622 of the Act for the provision of supported employment services.

ATTACHMENT 4.11(c)(4)

GOALS AND PLANS FOR DISTRIBUTION FOR TITLE VI PART B FUNDS

The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) has an extensive history and commitment to providing supported employment within the state. Currently, ADRS matches Supported Employment State Grant funds at a ratio of four-to-one. The Department anticipates continuing this level of funding for FY 2011.

ADRS distributes supported employment funds to its rehabilitation counselors who in turn purchase needed supported employment services through a network of approved vendors utilizing a Milestones outcome based payment system. This process provides payments to authorized supported employment providers for assisting individuals in reaching Milestones toward successful employment. These agencies are reimbursed for the following Milestones:

1. Determination of Needs, including a “Discovery” component, if necessary

2. Job Development and Hire

3. Job Coaching and Retention

4. Successful Closure (Employment Stability for a minimum of 90 days)

Each provider receives funding based on the number of individuals served and closed successfully in competitive employment. Provider goals are based upon past performance, input from the ADRS liaison counselor, and the estimated need for supported employment services in each service area of the state. In FY 2011, ADRS expects to provide supported employment services to approximately 450 individuals with the most significant disabilities. The Department’s goal for FY 2012 is to serve 500 individuals in supported employment, with an estimated 300 of these individuals achieving successful employment outcomes in their community during the year. Supported employment services are provided utilizing an individualized, customer driven approach, encompassing each person’s individual support needs to ensure an appropriate and successful job match.

Additionally, the Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services is committed to increasing successful supported employment outcomes through collaboration with other agencies and organizations. ADRS is currently participating in the following collaborative efforts:

• Supported employment coordinators, job coaches, administrators, ADRS counselors and supervisors participated in a focus group to collaborate on supported employment services and to introduce Discovery. The purpose was to increase job development effectiveness at the local level through training, networking, and coordination of supports for those with the most significant disabilities.

• Continuation of Certificate Based Training in collaboration with Alabama APSE, The Network on Employment. This training ensures consistency of service delivery for supported employment providers and provides access to the latest marketing and training techniques. Training is provided by Virginia Commonwealth University’s Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Workplace Supports.

• Extension of the grant program with the Alabama Department of Mental Health (DMH) to conduct a pilot project serving individuals in Alabama who experience the most significant disabilities. DMH has been awarded a grant to conduct this project during FY 2010, and an extension was granted for 2011. ADRS serves as a major stakeholder in this effort. Staff members from ADRS are currently lending their expertise in the field of employment and disability to develop strategies for utilizing Supported Employment and Medicaid Waiver Funds to assist individuals who have previously been unsuccessful with traditional employment approaches. Four pilot sites were selected and these providers are currently providing services to individuals throughout the state. The Discovery profile was utilized to allow customized job development and this initiative was expanded in 2011 to include all 31 SE providers. The additional funding was added to the Milestone 1 and is being utilized for those for whom it is determined that this customized approach would be beneficial.

• In 2010 Stimulus Funds were utilized to collaborate with the Alabama Department of Mental Health to expand Supported Employment Services into underserved areas in West Alabama. This effort was extended through FY 2011.

• It is anticipated that two new vendors for SE services will be added in FY 2011, as well as two existing providers expanding their services to include unserved and underserved populations. Efforts will continue to reach out to unserved or underserved populations.

• In 2012, efforts will continue to address transition age students who have the most significant disabilities and would benefit from SE services. Summer programs are being piloted in FY 2011 that will offer work skills training and classroom instruction, as well as on the job training with job coaches, as part of a summer work program. These students will then transition to supported employment services or transition upon completion of high school.

• A Strategic Plan for SE is being developed. It is anticipated that this plan will identify gaps, provide specific recommendations to strengthen Supported Employment in Alabama and the steps required for the implementation of the recommendations.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2011 4:43PM by Jim Harris Iii

This attachment should include required strategies and how the agency will use these strategies to achieve its goals and priorities, support innovation and expansion activities, and overcome any barriers to accessing the vocational rehabilitation and the supported employment programs. (See sections 101(a)(15)(D) and (18)(B) of the Act and Section 427 of the General Education Provisions Act (GEPA)).

Describe the methods to be used to expand and improve services to individuals with disabilities.

Identify how a broad range of assistive technology services and assistive technology devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities at each stage of the rehabilitation process; and describe how assistive technology services and devices will be provided to individuals with disabilities on a statewide basis.

Identify what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who are minorities, including those with the most significant disabilities; and what outreach procedures will be used to identify and serve individuals with disabilities who have been unserved or underserved by the VR program.

If applicable, identify plans for establishing, developing, or improving community rehabilitation programs within the state.

Describe strategies to improve the performance of the state with respect to the evaluation standards and performance indicators.

Describe strategies for assisting other components of the statewide workforce investment system in assisting individuals with disabilities.

Describe how the agency's strategies will be used to:

  • achieve goals and priorities identified in Attachment 4.11(c)(1);
  • support innovation and expansion activities; and
  • overcome identified barriers relating to equitable access to and participation of individuals with disabilities in the state Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program and the state Supported Employment Services Program.

ATTACHMENT 4.11(d)

STATE’S STRATEGIES AND USE OF TITLE I FUNDS FOR INNOVATION AND EXPANSION ACTIVITIES

Strategies to Provide Access to Technology Services and Devices on a Statewide Basis During all Phases of the Rehabilitation Process

The agency has a network of degreed and qualified rehabilitation technology specialists. This team is directed and guided by an individual in the central office who, as a part of their assignment, oversees the activities of this team. This team will continue to meet on a quarterly basis to discuss among themselves and partner agency staff various advances and new products in rehabilitation technology. These meetings provide vendors the opportunity to demonstrate new and innovative pieces of technology to demonstrate to the team and to keep the counselors informed throughout the agency about new technology. The team will continue its efforts in gathering samples of technology so they can try them out in the workplace to see how they can assist individuals with disabilities in becoming successfully employed.

This team will act as a training agent for other rehabilitation staff throughout the state. Team members will attend unit meetings throughout the state to discuss and demonstrate technology to frontline counseling staff. The team members will also continue to attend national conferences, such as the Assistive Technology Industries Association (ATIA) conference, where they will be exposed to innovative technology. The rehabilitation technology team will continue to present at various conferences throughout the year. This includes the Supported Employment conference, the agency’s staff conference, and other conferences as appropriate.

The agency plans to add a rehabilitation technology position and create a new classification of rehab technology assistant. The rehab technology assistant will work under the direction of the rehab tech and expand the reach and delivery of technology services.

The agency is utilizing its own technology in an effort to deliver technology information to staff. The agency now has Video on Demand. This is through the agency’s training division and provides the opportunity for staff to view various training videos related to technology and other rehabilitation issues.

A major technology symposium was conducted at Auburn University, October 7-8, 2010. A wide range of rehabilitation technology was displayed and demonstrated. Agency staff attended this event. A second technology symposium was conducted at Auburn University May 19-20, 2011. The agency had staff in attendance. Conferences such as this one provide staff with knowledge and information as to how technology can be used during the rehabilitation process.

Strategies to Identify and Serve Individuals with Disabilities who are Minorities with the Most Significant Disabilities and to Serve Underserved and Unserved Populations

Services to the deaf: The agency will provide a wide range of services to the deaf population. First, the agency will continue its practice of serving consumers who are deaf through specialty counselors who have sign language skills. These counselors are familiar with the needs of the deaf and are involved in the deaf community, thus able to relate very well to our deaf population.

The agency will continue its use of a network of staff interpreters throughout the state. These interpreters will assist deaf consumers in obtaining various types of services, particularly services from employers. The interpreters are able to establish a link between the employers and consumers who are deaf that are recently hired.

We also will continue to work with a network of deaf support specialists. These specialists assist deaf consumers in various aspects of the rehabilitation process and in getting acclimated to a new employment situation.

The agency has two vocational evaluators for the deaf. One is in Montgomery and covers the southern part of the state. The other is in Birmingham and covers the northern part of the state.

The agency will continue to conduct its annual training conference for counselors serving the deaf. A unique aspect of this conference is that students from the Alabama School for the Deaf come to the conference to spend time with the rehabilitation counselors. This interaction is very effective in forging a working alliance between the counselor and consumers who are at the Alabama School for the Deaf.

The agency will host the Southeastern Regional Institute on Deafness, October 15-19, 2011. This conference is an excellent source of training on deafness for agency staff.

The agency will continue its active involvement in the One-Stop Career Center system involving deaf consumers. The agency has established a Video Interpreting Network so that when a consumer who is deaf comes through the career center an interpreter will be available.

The agency has plans to hire two additional deaf support specialists to assist deaf consumers in obtaining and retaining employment.

Troy University, in Troy, Alabama in partnership with ADRS, the Department of Mental Health and the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind, has established an interpreter for the deaf training program. The agency is establishing internships for these students within the agency. This will increase the supply of interpreters and eventually mean more support for deaf consumers. In conjunction with this, the agency is attempting to establish a “professional trainee” position. These students would occupy these positions for one year, then transition into employment with the agency.

Finally, the agency will continue its activities through the interagency agreement that has been established with higher education institutions throughout the state. This agreement delineates the specific responsibilities of the agency and that of each institution of higher education for individuals who are deaf.

Services for the blind: The agency maintains an excellent service delivery system to consumers who are blind or visually impaired. A network of rehabilitation counselors for the blind, rehabilitation teachers, and orientation and mobility specialists provide these services to individuals who are blind or visually impaired. Additionally, there is a State Office specialist who oversees blind services. The agency provides a unique range of services for individuals who are blind or visually impaired.

The agency will continue to conduct its special Transition Career Day for individuals who are blind or visually impaired. This transition career day provides consumers with information about technology, the One-stop Career Center system, and other employment opportunities.

A technology symposium is conducted on an annual basis that provides staff serving the blind and visually impaired and consumers the opportunity to view a wide range of technology related to visual impairment and individuals who are deaf-blind. The symposium was conducted during FY 2011 and approximately 357 individuals attended. Obviously, this will be of great value in assisting the blind visually impaired in obtaining employment.

The agency will continue its summer work program for blind and visually impaired students of the Alabama School for the Blind. It is also noted that this summer work experience is now being expanded to college age students to help them learn about the real world of work.

The agency is cooperating with the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) School of Optometry in a research project entitled “Transferability of Virtual Reality Training to Real World Settings in Patients with Low Vision.” This project will attempt to demonstrate how virtual reality can be utilized to teach orientation and mobility skills.

The agency will collaborate with Louisiana Tech University in conducting a national survey of blind individuals regarding their education, vocational rehabilitation and employment experiences. The purpose is to create a composite snapshot of experiences of the blind related to education and employment and create a statistical database to be utilized in educating legislators and policy makers on the needs of individuals who are blind.

The agency is cooperating with the Mississippi State University Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Blindness and Low Vision in a customized transportation project. The project seeks to develop and evaluate a new intervention addressing transportation barriers to employment for persons who are blind or severely visually impaired.

Services to veterans: The agency has an active program in serving military veterans. The agency will continue utilizing the network of rehabilitation counselors around the state who serve as liaisons to the rehabilitation counselors of the Veterans Administration. These agency counselors receive referrals on veterans and initiate the vocational rehabilitation process to assist them in entering employment.

The agency has established a state office position, the duties of which will include the oversight of veteran referrals and the monitoring of their progress through the VR process.

The agency receives referrals from an organization in Huntsville, Alabama known as Still Serving Veterans. This organization assists veterans in returning to civilian life. The agency has completed an interagency agreement and will work cooperatively in processing referrals to assist veterans who may need employment services.

The agency completed an interagency agreement with the Veterans Administration in Montgomery, Alabama to formalize the referral process referenced above. That agreement is still in effect.

Services to Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): The agency has an active program in serving individuals with traumatic brain injury. The agency will utilize a staff person who oversees various grants related to traumatic brain injury. The agency has a task force related to brain injury. It includes members of various social service organizations who may have contact with individuals who have traumatic brain injury. This organization meets on a quarterly basis for the exchange of information which will benefit services to individuals with traumatic brain injury. The agency has a network of TBI care coordinators located strategically throughout the state. The role of the care coordinator is to receive the initial referral of someone with a brain injury, then assist the individual and family in accessing the state’s network of services for persons with TBI. This includes services of the agency and services of other agencies. Alabama has two specialty caseloads dedicated to serving people with TBI, one in Mobile and one in Birmingham. These two counselors also serve as a resource to other counselors in the state who may receive a TBI referral.

Services to Minorities: Over the past three years, 43% of the cases served and 40% of the cases closed rehabilitated in the agency were minorities. The population of the state is approximately 30% minority. Consequently, minority numbers are well represented in the agency’s service delivery system. Nevertheless, outreach efforts will continue at the local level to be sure that minorities are aware of agency services and programs. The agency has a staff member specifically related to diversity. This individual has completed a diversity plan which has been approved by the administration of the agency. This plan indicates the strategies to hire minority staff to work within the agency. It also will provide training to all staff on services to minorities. The agency conducted diversity training for all agency staff. This training addressed the needs of diverse consumers the agency serves.

Another effort of outreach to minorities is through a grant which the agency has from the Alabama Department of Human Resources (DHR). DHR requested agency assistance in providing placement services for hard to place individuals. The grant was given to the agency and individuals were hired utilizing those grant service funds to specifically work with this population. The agency is receiving referrals on many of these individuals who have a significant impediment to employment and may be in need of vocational rehabilitation services.

Services to Individuals in Supported Employment Programs: The agency recognizes a critical factor in a successful supported employment is long term supports. The agency will continue its dialogue with state and private entities that can be involved in the provision of extended services for supported employment consumers.

The agency has hired a specialist whose only responsibility is overseeing the expansion and effectiveness of the agency’s supported employment efforts. The agency is developing a new functional definition of persons with the “most significant disabilities” (MSD).

Services to Individuals with Autism: Autism is an emerging disability with increasing numbers requesting services from the public rehabilitation program. This holds true for Alabama. Staff has participated in several training programs during the current fiscal year related to autism. It is expected this will continue in FY 2012. Also, a staff member has been hired in the state office whose job description will be to develop and enhance the agency’s autism program. The state also participates on a legislative task force related to autism services.

The agency has initiated a new approach to provide consultation to supported employment projects and CRPs who need technical assistance and support in serving individuals with autism. This effort is intended to build capacity within our existing provider network. We have identified Triumph Inc., a successful supported employment provider for persons with autism, to serve as the consulting organization. We are currently piloting this program in two locations in Alabama.

Performance on Performance Indicator 1.1

The agency successfully rehabilitated 5,067 people with disabilities in FY 2010. The agency’s change in leadership has placed an expanded emphasis on quality of outcomes and provision of services to a standard, as opposed to primarily high outcome numbers. The most recent RSA 107 review noted Alabama’s high level of outcomes and large caseload sizes. The exit interview discussions indicated the Alabama VR staff was working at capacity. Consequently, the agency has taken steps to reduce caseload size and develop more realistic outcome expectations coupled with a greater emphasis on quality.

Improvement on Indicator 1.1 The following strategies will be implemented in order to improve on Indicator 1.1:

Reduced Caseload Size: It is anticipated that the reduction in caseload size will give counselors more time to work with individuals with more significant disabilities. Reduced caseloads will allow counselors more time to devote to both the quality and quantity of outcomes. The agency has included a new state goal of the number of individuals who retain employment one year following closure.

Electronic Recruiting: The agency continues use of the Alabama Business Leadership Employment (ABLE) Network. This is an electronic recruiting tool to be used by employers to hire agency consumers for jobs. Counselors place job ready consumers in an applicant pool of the ABLE system. Employers can use the system to review the qualifications of agency consumers for jobs. Confidentiality of consumer identification is protected by the use of a distinct case number rather than the consumer’s personal identifying information. This system may improve placements by allowing direct recruiting by employers.

Skills, Employability, Assets (SEA) Page in SMILE: The agency updated its electronic casework system, SMILE (System for Managing Information on the Leading Edge) in FY 2009. The SEA page is a repository for information about the consumer’s job related skills, employability characteristics, and overall assets related to employment. This information is collected and eventually dropped into the ABLE system described above. This information will enhance the consumer’s possibility of being recruited through the ABLE system.

High Performer Practices: Individual counselor performance data will be reviewed at the completion of FY 2011; specifically, the number of successful placements that meet the quality standards of wages, benefits and job retention a year post closure. The agency will then invite high performing counselors to a forum to identify effective work habits and casework practices to be shared with all counselors.

Review of Agency Business Relations Program: The agency will review its Business Relations Program in FY 2012 to evaluate effectiveness and determine if improvements can be made.

Improvement on Performance Indicator 1.2: The agency achieved a rehabilitation success rate of 25.7% in FY 2010. It was anticipated the success rate would significantly decline when the decision was made to close cases where the individual was not available for services or otherwise no longer actively participating in their program. The agency fully expects the rehabilitation rate to exceed the RSA Standard of 55.8% in FY 2011 and thereafter. In fact, the success rate as of June 1, 2011 for FY 2011 was 71.7%, well in excess of the required 55.8% in the regulations.

Strategies for Assisting Components of the Statewide Workforce Investment System in Assisting Individuals with Disabilities

The agency maintains a very productive relationship with the Workforce System of Alabama. First, the Commissioner of the agency sits on the Statewide Workforce Board. Consequently, the statewide board has a voice at the table for the needs and issues of individuals with disabilities.

The agency has counselors stationed on a permanent basis in One-Stop Career Centers in several of the larger cities in the state. These staff receive referrals and also provide advice and information to other staff in the One-Stop Career Centers about how to serve individuals with disabilities.

The agency will have numerous staff participate in the annual workforce conference that is conducted in the state each year, involving all partners and other service providers related to the statewide workforce system. The agency sits on the planning council of this conference so that various breakout sessions related to the needs of individuals with disabilities are included in the agenda.

Lastly, as mentioned previously, the agency has established a Video Interpreting Network, should a deaf individual come into the local One-Stop Career Center a video interpreting situation can be set up for that individual to be served.

Strategies to Improve Community Rehabilitation Programs (CRP)

As the agency moves toward serving the more significantly disabled, there may be the need to enhance the assessment and evaluation capability of CRPs. Two potential areas of community rehabilitation program improvement were noted: increased availability of comprehensive learning disability evaluations and services to individuals with autism.

One strategy to expand learning disability evaluations will be to attempt to utilize existing learning disability projects to train other community rehabilitation program staff. The sharing of knowledge and practices will assist the agency in expanding this service.

The agency will invite CRP staff to specific trainings in order to improve and elevate skills of CRP employees.

The agency will maintain a specific four person division devoted to working as liaisons to the state’s community rehabilitation programs and supported employment projects. This staff provides CRPs with regular information about the needs of agency consumers.

Strategies to Achieve Goals and Priorities Identified in Attachment 4.11(c) (1)

Goal 1: The agency will accomplish sufficient outcomes that meet quality standards to achieve Performance Indicator 1.1.

The most recent RSA 107 Review indicated that the agency was performing at a very high level with large caseloads and an extremely high rate of successful closures in the agency. Alabama ranked 10th in the nation among VR Combined agencies in regards to successful outcomes in FY 2009. This despite the fact Alabama ranks 23 in population. The agency’s leadership, beginning in FY 2009, noted these issues and initiated greater emphasis towards quality standards of employment outcomes rather than primarily measuring quantity of outcomes. Consequently, the bar is in the process of being reset in regard to successful outcomes expectations of agency rehabilitation counselors. Nevertheless, the agency recognizes the purpose of the VR program is to place people with disabilities into employment. The following strategies will be utilized to accomplish Goal 1.

Electronic Recruiting: The agency is using an electronic recruiting entitled the Alabama Business Leadership Employment (ABLE) Network. This is an electronic recruiting tool to be used by employers to hire agency consumers for jobs. Counselors will place job ready consumers in an applicant pool in the ABLE system. Employers can use the system to review the qualifications of agency consumers for jobs. Confidentiality of consumer identification is protected by the use of a distinct case number rather than the consumer’s personal identifying information. This system may improve placements by allowing direct recruiting by employers.

Skills, Employability, Assets (SEA) Page in SMILE: The agency has updated its electronic casework system, SMILE (System for Managing Information on the Leading Edge), in FY 2009. The SEA page is a repository for information about the consumer’s job related skills, employability characteristics, and overall assets related to employment. This information is collected by the counselor and deposited into the ABLE system described above. This information will enhance the consumer’s possibility of being recruited through the ABLE system.

High Performer Practices: Individual counselor performance data will be reviewed at the completion of FY 2011; specifically, the number of successful placements that meet the quality standards of wages, benefits and job retention a year post closure. The agency will then invite high performing counselors to a forum to identify effective work habits and casework practices to be shared with all counselors.

Review of Agency Business Relations Program: The agency will review its Business Relations Program in FY 2012 to evaluate effectiveness and determine if improvements can be made.

Contracting of staff to serve the most hard to place. The agency will explore the possibility of using contract employees to locate and develop employment for the most difficult to place, i.e., blind, deaf, and supported employment consumers.

Self Employment Training for VR Staff: Self-employment is a viable employment option for some VR consumers. The agency conducted self-employment training for selected VR staff in 2006. There have been significant staff changes since that time. It is appropriate now to train new staff on possibilities presented by self-employment. A new state office specialist was hired in the summer of 2011. A significant portion of that person’s duties will be related to self employment.

Goal 2: The agency will increase by 5% the number of eligible individuals, including minorities, who receive some type of vocational training.

Some of these same strategies utilized to accomplish Goal 1 will be utilized to accomplish this goal. This includes additional initial assessment of the individual to see what types of training may be appropriate for the individual. The concept will be for the counselor to provide guidance and counseling related to additional training and typically higher entry level wages.

Another strategy will involve gathering baseline data about the number of consumers currently involved in training. This data will be looked at on a statewide basis and also on an individual unit basis throughout the state. This will provide information as to which units and caseloads are providing training to consumers.

A survey of rehabilitation counseling staff will be conducted to gather information about their knowledge of training availability in their local areas.

Efforts will then be made to gather information about training opportunities available throughout the state. This information will then be placed into a database and placed on the agency’s intranet for access by rehabilitation counselors when they are discussing vocational goals and training opportunities for consumers.

Labor market information will be gathered and shared with counseling staff about projections for future career opportunities within the state. This will assist the counselors in directing consumers towards training that will lead towards prompt employment.

The agency will utilize its core group of Business Relations Consultants to assist in identifying businesses that will provide internship (training) opportunities for consumers. Internships and on-the-job training opportunities are excellent methods to assist consumers in getting needed training, immediate employment, and also an increase in the average starting wage of the consumers of the agency.

Goal 3: The agency will increase by 5% the number of individuals that receive assistive technology throughout the rehabilitation process.

Strategies to accomplish this goal include the following:

First, we will gather data about the provision of technology on a statewide and unit basis. This will provide us with information to analyze areas where technology is being distributed and utilized.

We will continue to utilize our core of rehabilitation technology specialists to provide assistance to counselors in analyzing the rehabilitation technology needs of consumers. We will continue to be involved in activities such as the Technology Symposium for the Blind which was first conducted in Talladega, Alabama in FY 2011 and is now being conducted on an annual basis.

The agency plans to add a rehabilitation technology position and create a new classification of rehab technology assistant. The rehab technology assistant will work under the direction of the rehab tech and expand the reach and delivery of technology services.

The rehabilitation counselors will be surveyed to determine what their training needs are as it relates to rehabilitation technology. Then, that training will be provided as appropriate.

The agency will monitor rehabilitation service data monthly to determine the progress towards this goal.

The agency will utilize the agency’s Video on Demand technology opportunities for staff training on rehabilitation technology.

Goal 4: The agency will develop strategies to keep caseloads at level that will ensure counselors have adequate time to interact effectively with consumers.

An issue cited in agency client satisfaction surveys is the availability of agency counselors to consumers. Comments were received that counselors were out when called by the consumer or that phone calls were returned later than expected. A factor that may have contributed to receiving these comments was the large caseloads that agency counselors manage. A decision was made in FY 2010 to close cases that after repeated attempts the individual had lost contact with VR or otherwise no longer participating in services. That initiative reduced the average caseload from approximately 225 to 163, as of June 30, 2011. This should provide more availability of counselors to consumers.

The agency has begun a review of caseload types to determine which caseloads and disabilities create the most caseload growth. The agency will make these reviews with particular attention being paid to eligibility. The agency in no way will deny services to eligible consumers; however, the agency wants to ensure eligibility is based on a substantial impediment to employment and that the individual with a disability requires vocational rehabilitation services to prepare for, secure, retain, or regain employment. Driven by numbers, counselors previously may have accepted cases that could have effectively been served by other workforce or employment entities. The agency will conduct training for staff in order to ensure consumer eligibility and other matters related to quality service delivery.

Goal 5: Expand the agency’s supported employment program, including the increase of long term supports.

Strategies to accomplish this goal will include special training for staff on supported employment. Efforts will be made to expand the number of entities providing supported employment services. Collaborative efforts will be made to address the issue of long term supports in supported employment. This will include a review of how other states address this issue.

USES OF INNOVATION AND EXPANSION FUNDS

The agency will utilize a portion of funds allotted to the state for the following innovation and expansion activities in FY 2012.

Succession Planning: The agency is experiencing retirements as a result of baby boomers aging and the loss of personnel due to other frequent reasons for separation. This includes staff in upper management positions. It is important that staff in other management positions be prepared to assume roles of increasing responsibility. The agency will plan to include lower level management and counselors in activities that will prepare them for acceptance of positions of greater responsibility. This will include attendance at conferences such as the Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation (CSAVR) and leadership training activities.

Expansion of the agency’s training capacity for blind consumers through utilization of specialized training facilities, such as the Louisiana Center for the Blind.

Summer work programs for the blind will be conducted in order to allow students who are blind to experience the world of work.

The development of expanded center based services for the blind in order to provide services closer to an individual’s home.

Self-employment is a very viable opportunity, particularly in the current economy. Training will be conducted for a counselor in each unit to serve as resource for other counselors in the unit regarding self-employment.

The agency has initiated a new approach to provide consultation to supported employment projects and CRPs who need technical assistance and support in serving individuals with autism. This effort is intended to build capacity within our existing provider network. We have identified Triumph Inc., a successful supported employment provider for persons with autism, to serve as the consulting organization. We are currently piloting this program in two locations in Alabama.

Additional funding to expand the effectiveness of the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC).

Expansion of services to the Deaf-Blind population through a cooperative effort with the Alabama Institute for the Deaf and Blind.

Expansion of services to the deaf by hiring two additional deaf support specialists.

Addition of two rehabilitation audiologists to expand availability of rehabilitation audiology services.

Staff serving the deaf will attend the Southeastern Regional Institute on Deafness (SERID) to increase knowledge and capacity to serve individuals who are deaf.

 

This screen was last updated on Aug 3 2011 6:02PM by Jim Harris Iii

Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) and Supported Employment (SE) Goals

ATTACHMENT 4.11(e)(2)

EVALUATION AND REPORT OF PROGRESS IN ACHIEVING IDENTIFIED GOALS AND PRIORITIES AND USE OF TITLE I FUNDS FOR INNOVATION AND EXPANSION ACTIVITIES

Goal 1: The agency will accomplish sufficient successful outcomes in order to achieve Performance Indicator 1.1

The agency accomplished 5,067 closures in FY 2010. This is 902 less than in FY 2009, which was 5,969.

Factors affecting accomplishment of this goal are as follows.

First, the Alabama unemployment rate is around 9%. Consequently, there is a lack of available job opportunities. A second factor is the shift of the agency from a numbers driven organization to one which is placing greater emphasis on quality of outcomes. The agency reduced counselor goals and caseload size in FY 2010. The expectation was that this will give counselors more time to conduct counseling activities with agency consumers. A third factor was the hiring freeze the state has been under for three years. This has impacted the ability to hire counselors to fill vacancies, who are producers of employment outcomes.

Goal 2: The agency will increase by 5% the number of eligible individuals, including minorities who receive some type of vocational training.

The agency had mixed results relative to achievement of this goal. Training services to minorities increased by 6.13%, while the training services for non-minorities decreased by 11.36%.

The increase in training services for minorities may be in part due to recent diversity training conducted in the agency. Counselors may be more sensitive to the needs of minorities. The decrease in training services to non-minorities may be in part due to a revision of the agency’s sliding scale. The scale was revised in 2007 in a manner that eliminated the receipt of services based on economic need for some consumers. 2008 data from the U.S. Census Bureau show the income for whites is significantly higher than for than non-whites. It is quite likely whites were impacted by the scale change, since training services are contingent upon economic need.

It should be noted the scale was reverted to its original form in March 2010. Therefore, we would expect this disparate impact to whites to be reversed in the near future.

Goal 3: The agency will increase by 5% the amount expended on tools and rehabilitation technology.

The agency did meet this goal. Technology expenditures increased by $112,306, or 19%, in FY 2010.

First, the revision of the agency’s Sliding Scale required greater financial participation on the part of consumers and, thus, reduced the expenditures by the state agency.

Second, with the depressed economy and fewer placements, it is possible that it was less technology needed in order to assist individuals in obtaining employment.

Lastly, the staff has been urged to utilize technology recycling centers in the state in order to reduce technology expenditures.

 

The agency did not reach supported employment goals. Goals were to serve 600 people and to place 300 successfully.

Factors that impacted goal achievement were the downturn in the economy and th need for additional supported employment providers, especially in rural areas.

Worked with 30 agencies across the state to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities.

Provided service to more than 500 individuals. Of this number, over 300 obtained employment and 242 were successfully employed. These individuals averaged more than 23 hours per week and earned over $7.70 per hour. Over 900 individuals continued to be followed in long term support. ADRS cintinues to seek methods to increase participation of individuals with all types of disabilities in supported employment programs.

Continued to collaborate closely with Alabama APSE-The Network on Employment, Department of Mental Health, TACE,and DD Council to provide training to staff,transition job coaches, and Milestone employees.

 

STANDARDS AND INDICATORS – FY 2010

INDICATOR STANDARD ALABAMA

1.1 > 5,969 5,067

1.2 > = 55.8% 25.7%

1.3 > = 72.6% 97.9%

1.4 > = 62.4% 87.1

1.5 > = .52 52.3

1.6 > = 53.0 80.3

2.1 > = .80 1.0

The agency met all performance indicators except 1.1 and 1.2.

Indicator 1.1 There was a reduction in the number of successful rehabilitations in FY 2010. This was a result of an economy which has a decreased job market. It is also the result of a change in agency management which is placing a greater emphasis on quality outcomes as opposed to just high numbers of closures.

Indicator 1.2 The agency made a decision in FY 2010 to close cases in which contact had been lost with the consumer; cases in which a consumer had made the decision not to enter employment; and cases in which a consumer had made the decision to obtain or maintain Social Security benefits rather than enter employment. This resulted in 18,901 cases being closed as non rehabilitated. This dramatically impacted the agency’s rehabilitation rate. It is expected the rehabilitation rate will meet the indicator standard in FY 2011. In fact, as of June 1, 2011, the rehabilitation rate is 71.7% for FY 2011.tHE

 

Innovation and Expansion

Innovation and expansion funds in FY 2010 were utilized to fund and to support activities of the State Rehabilitation Council.

This screen was last updated on Aug 22 2011 10:15AM by Jim Harris Iii

  • Describe quality, scope, and extent of supported employment services to be provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities
  • Describe the timing of the transition to extended services

ATTACHMENT 6.3

QUALITY, SCOPE, AND EXTENT OF SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services (ADRS) remains committed to the provision of quality services to individuals with the most significant disabilities through its supported employment program. ADRS provides supported employment services through a collaborative effort with 31 approved service providers throughout the state. These providers offer services to individuals with a variety of significant disabilities without restriction on disability type and are distributed throughout the state in order to ensure maximum availability to those in need of supported employment. Service providers receive funds for the provision of supported employment through an outcome based payment system. Providers must submit evidence that each milestone has been achieved. Some milestones include consumer and employer satisfaction surveys. The consumer satisfaction survey is designed to reflect satisfaction with the job or any concerns the consumer has. The employer satisfaction survey is designed to reflect the consumer’s job performance, stability and training needs. Supported employment funds are distributed to each provider agency based on the number of individuals served and closed successfully in the program.

In FY 2010 this program:

• Worked with 30 agencies across the state to provide supported employment services to individuals with the most significant disabilities.

• Provided service to more than 550 individuals. Of this number over 300 obtained employment and 242 were successfully employed. These individuals averaged more than 23 hours per week and earned over $7.70 per hour. Over 900 individuals continued to be followed in long term support. ADRS continues to seek methods to increase participation of individuals with all types of disabilities in supported employment programs.

• Continued to collaborate closely with Alabama APSE-The Network on Employment, Dept. of Mental Health, TACE, and DD Council, to provide training to staff, transition job coaches, and Milestone employees.

ADRS continues to expand services within the state to increase opportunities for individuals to access supported employment services. Two new vendors will be added as SE providers and two existing vendors have expanded to cover unserved and underserved areas. The quality of these services continues to improve with the implementation of the following initiatives:

• Provide up to date training for supported employment professionals, facilitating access to the most current practices and initiatives to enhance skills and knowledge. Training opportunities will be provided to all provider agency staff, and school job coaches, to ensure a customer-driven focus and consistency of services statewide.

• The agency has initiated a new approach to provide consultation to supported employment projects and CRPs who need technical assistance and support in serving individuals with autism. This effort is intended to build capacity within our existing provider network. We have identified Triumph Inc., a successful supported employment provider for persons with autism, to serve as the consulting organization. We are currently piloting this program in two locations in Alabama.

• Continue marketing and training individuals and families in the community and school settings regarding the availability of supported employment and supported employment services.

• Continue to pilot the Discovery Program in a collaborative effort with the Dept. of Mental Health and the DD Council to use customized employment to enhance opportunities for better job matches within Supportive Employment.

• Continue to conduct focus groups with Supported Employment supervisors, providers, job coaches, and ADRS staff to discuss best practices and areas for improvements within the SE Programs.

• Collaborate with other state agencies and private entities to tailor services to meet the needs of those individuals experiencing the most significant disabilities. This collaboration will center upon enhancements to the provision of supported employment services by utilizing waiver funds and other financial resources to provide ongoing employment supports to consumers.

• Utilize and collaborate with vendors who specialize in autism spectrum disorders in distinct areas within the state where there are a high population of adults and children with autism.

• Continue to seek independent consultation and review of our supported employment programs in the context of a statewide needs assessment. Our intention is to develop a strategic plan for the expansion and improvement of quality of services to persons with the most significant disabilities.

• Further implementation of summer work programs for those with the most significant disabilities in order to provide work related training and retention skills on and off the work site.

The Alabama Department of Rehabilitation Services provides a Supported Employment Specialist to monitor supported employment services and provide training and technical assistance when needed. Each supported employment provider operates under an outcome based program to ensure quality services and appropriate employment options based on individual choice. Consumers are offered the opportunity to participate in community based assessments to facilitate an informed decision regarding their employment goal. Job development is provided on an individual basis to locate employment based on the consumer’s interests, skills, limitations and community living needs. Job coaching is also provided at the work site to ensure that the individual has the necessary training, skills and supports to work. Once the consumer is stable in the workplace, extended services are planned and implemented to protect the long term success of the job. Consumer and employer satisfaction regarding the services provided are measured at the time of employment and again before case closure. Extended services are a continuation of ongoing support services provided to individuals with the most significant disabilities. These extended supports are provided at the completion of stabilization, during the successful rehabilitation milestone, and beyond ADRS case closure.

This screen was last updated on Jun 30 2011 5:08PM by Jim Harris Iii

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