ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

RSA-704 Part I for IL program for North Carolina - H169A110050 FY2011

Subpart I - Administrative Data

Indicate amount received by the DSU as per each funding source. Enter 0 for none.

Item 1 - All Federal Funds Received

(A) Title VII, Ch. 1, Part B
526,704

(B) Title VII, Ch. 1, Part C - For 723 states Only
0

(C) Title VII, Ch. 2
0

(D) Other Federal Funds
1,327,705

Item 2 - Other Government Funds

(E) State Government Funds
14,811,194

(F) Local Government Funds
0

Item 3 - Private Resources

(G) Fees for Service (program income, etc.)
0

(H) Other resources
0

Item 4 - Total Income

Total income = (A)+(B)+(C)+(D)+(E)+(F)+(G)+(H)
16,665,603

Item 5 - Pass-Through Funds

Amount of other funds received as pass through funds to consumers (include funds, received on behalf of consumers, that are subsequently passed on to consumers, e.g., personal assistance services, representative payee funds, Medicaid funds, etc.)
0

Item 6 - Net Operating Resources


[Total Income (Section 4) minus Pass-Through Funds amount (Section 5) = Net Operating Resources
16,665,603

What Activities were Conducted with Part B Funds? Expenditures of Part B Funds by DSU Staff Expenditures for Services Rendered by Grant or Contract
(1) Provided resources to the SILC to carry out its functions 0 151,766
(2) Provided IL services to individuals with significant disabilities 0 340,392
(3) Demonstrated ways to expand and improve IL services 0 0
(4) Supported the general operation of CILs that are in compliance with the standards and assurances set forth in subsections (b) and (c) of section 725 of the Act 0 82,831
(5) Supported activities to increase capacity to develop approaches or systems for providing IL services 0 36,270
(6) Conducted studies and analyses, gathered information, developed model policies, and presented findings in order to enhance IL services 0 15,321
(7) Provided training regarding the IL philosophy 0 0
(8) Provided outreach to unserved or underserved populations, including minority groups and urban and rural populations 0 17,631
Name of Grantee or Contractor Use of Funds (based on the activities listed in Suppart 1, Section B) Amount of Part B Funds Amount of Non-Part B Funds Consumer Eligibility Determined By DSU or Provider CSRs Kept With DSU or Provider
Alliance of Disability Advocates Operating Expenses, diversity training, consumer transitions 19,745 0 Provider Provider
Alliance of Disability Advocates Youth Leadership Forum 17,631 0 Provider N/A
disAbility Resource Center Operating Expenses, diversity training, consumer transitions 11,610 0 Provider Provider
Disability Rights and Resources Operating Expenses, diversity training, consumer transitions 24,719 0 Provider Provider
Eastern NC-CIL Operating Expenses, diversity training, consumer transitions 167,742 0 Provider Provider
Eastern NC-CIL Part B ARRA funds for operating expenses, diversity training 181,863 0 Provider Provider
Joy A. Shabazz CIL Operating Expenses, diversity training, consumer transitions 13,990 0 Provider Provider
Pathways for the Future Operating Expenses, diversity training, consumer transitions 13,655 0 Provider Provider
Pathways for the Future dba Western Alliance Operating Expenses, diversity training, consumer transitions 14,671 0 Provider Provider
The Adaptables, Inc. Operating Expenses, diversity training, consumer transitions 11,498 0 Provider Provider
NCSILC Operating Expenses, training, and conferences 167,086 0 N/A N/A

Describe the objectives, activities and results for each Part B grant or contract awarded for purposes other than IL services or the general operation of centers.

N/A

Provide a summary of the program or fiscal review, evaluation and monitoring conducted by the state of any of the grantees/contractors receiving Part B funds during the reporting year.

Performance contracts were prepared between the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services and the eight (8) Centers for Independent Living (CIL) and the NC Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC). The contracts were reviewed, evaluated and monitored according to State contract rules and regulations. A Scope of Work was prepared by the CILs and SILC which was incorporated into their individual contracts. The Scope of Work identified the activities, outputs, standards, measures, completion dates and budget for the activities to be conducted. Each individual contractor sent invoices to the DVRS Contract Administrator with a report of the activities completed in accordance with the schedule in the Scope of Work and terms of the contract. The Contract Administrator reviewed the reports and invoices, and prepared and submitted the packet requesting payment to DVR’s Fiscal Services Unit. The packets were reviewed and evaluated by the Unit’s Accountant and then submitted for final payment to the NC Controller’s Office.

Item 1 - Administrative Support Services

Describe any administrative support services, including staffing, provided by the DSU to the Part B Program.

DVRS provided extensive in-kind support to the NCSILC, Part B and Part C Centers. One staff spent approximately 75% of time working with new contracts, contract amendments, monthly/quarterly fiscal and performance reports, consulting with the NCSILC and CILS on state guidelines and developing strategies to help streamline reporting requirements. Additionally, this staff researched and provided information as requested by the NCSILC Chair and Executive director. This staff also serves on various SILC committees. The Fiscal Unit within DVRS performed yearly audits for the NCSILC and each CIL. The DVRS Statewide Coordinator for Deafness and Communicative Disorders, researched and provided the ENC-CIL Executive Director with a suggested list of equipment for people with hearing disabilities to purchase with the Part B ARRA funds. The ENC-CIL Executive Director also consulted with the NC Assistive Technology Project regarding equipment to purchase for people with disabilities. In addition, DVRS administrative support staff mailed 381 SILC satisfaction surveys to DVRS clients with closed cases and the clients will return the completed satisfaction survey directly to the SILC office.

Item 2 - Staffing

Enter requested staff information for the DSU and service providers listed in Section C, above (excluding Part C funded CILs)

Type of Staff Total Number of FTEs FTEs filled by Individuals with Disabilities
Decision Making 2.00 1.00
Other Staff 4.60 2.82

Item 1 - Distribution of Part C Funds to Centers

Name of CIL Amount of Part C Funding Received Cost of Living Increase? Excess Funds After Cost of Living Increase? New Center? Onsite Compliance Review of Center?

Item 2 - Administrative Support Services

Describe the administrative support services used by the DSU to administer the Part C program.

Item 3 - Monitoring and Onsite Compliance Reviews

Provide a summary of the monitoring activities involving Part C centers conducted by the state during the current reporting year, including the onsite reviews of at least 15% of centers receiving Part C funds under section 723. The summary should include, at least, the following:
  • centers' level of compliance with the standards and assurances in Section 725 of the Act;
  • any adverse actions taken against centers;
  • any corrective action plans entered into with centers; and
  • exemplary, replicable or model practices for centers.

Item 4 - Updates or Issues

Provide any updates to the administration of the Part C program by the DSU, if any, including any significant changes in the amount of earmarked funds or any changes in the order of priorities in the distribution of Part C funds. Provide a description of any issues of concern addressed by the DSU in its administration of the Part C program.

Subpart II - Number and Types of Individuals With Significant Disabilities Receiving Services

(1) Enter the number of active CSRs carried over from September 30 of the preceding reporting year
335

(2) Enter the number of CSRs started since October 1 of the reporting year
50

(3) Add lines (1) and (2) to get the total number of consumers served
385

(1) Moved
1

(2) Withdrawn
1

(3) Died
11

(4) Completed all goals set
16

(5) Other
4

(6) Add lines (1) + (2) + (3) + (4) +(5) to get total CSRs closed
33

Indicate the number of CSRs active on September 30th of the reporting year.

Section A(3) [minus] Section (B)(6) = Section C
352

Indicate the number of consumers in each category below.

(1) Number of consumers who signed a waiver
35

(2) Number of consumers with whom an ILP was developed
350

Indicate the number of consumers in each category below.

(1) Under 5 years old
0

(2) Ages 5 - 19
3

(3) Ages 20 - 24
2

(4) Ages 25 - 59
291

(5) Age 60 and Older
89

(6) Age unavailable
0

Indicate the number of consumers in each category below.

(1) Number of Females served
196

(2) Number of Males served
189

Indicate the number of consumers served in each category below. Each consumer may be counted under ONLY ONE of the following categories in the 704 Report, even if the consumer reported more than one race and/or Hispanic/Latino ethnicity).

(1) American Indian or Alaska Native
2

(2) Asian
2

(3) Black or African American
124

(4) Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
0

(5) White
257

(6) Hispanic/Latino of any race or Hispanic/Latino only
0

(7) Two or more races
0

(8) Race and ethnicity unknown
0

Indicate the number of consumers in each category below.

(1) Cognitive
4

(2) Mental/Emotional
12

(3) Physical
342

(4) Hearing
1

(5) Vision
1

(6) Multiple Disabilities
24

(7) Other
1

Subpart III - Individual Services and Achievements Funded through Title VII, Chapter 1, Part B Funds

For the reporting year, indicate in the chart below how many consumers requested and received each of the following IL services. Include all consumers who were provided services during the reporting year through Part B funds, either directly by DSU staff or via grants or contracts with other providers. Do not include consumers who were served by any centers that received Part C funds during the reporting year.

Services Consumers
Requesting
Services
Consumers
Receiving
Services
(A) Advocacy/Legal Services 220 199
(B) Assistive Technology 22 17
(C) Children's Services 0 0
(D) Communication Services 1 1
(E) Counseling and Related Services 1 1
(F) Family Services 0 0
(G) Housing, Home Modifications, and Shelter Services 36 22
(H) IL Skills Training and Life Skills Training 29 20
(I) Information and Referral Services 7,660 7,660
(J) Mental Restoration Services 0 0
(K) Mobility Training 0 0
(L) Peer Counseling Services 199 199
(M) Personal Assistance Services 173 173
(N) Physical Restoration Services 0 0
(O) Preventive Services 0 0
(P) Prostheses, Orthotics, and Other Appliances 0 0
(Q) Recreational Services 4 3
(R) Rehabilitation Technology Services 15 14
(S) Therapeutic Treatment 0 0
(T) Transportation Services 7 5
(U) Youth/Transition Services 0 0
(V) Vocational Services 8 8
(W) Other Services 1 0

Item 1 - Goals Related to Increased Independence in a Significant Life Area

Indicate the number of consumers who set goals related to the following significant life areas, the number whose goals are still in progress, and the number who achieved their goals as a result of the provision of IL services.

Significant Life Area Goals Set Goals Achieved In Progress
(A) Self-Advocacy/Self-Empowerment 37 11 25
(B) Communication 1 1 0
(C) Mobility/Transportation 21 19 2
(D) Community-Based Living 13 4 9
(E) Educational 4 2 2
(F) Vocational 3 1 1
(G) Self-care 31 24 7
(H) Information Access/Technology 5 2 3
(I) Personal Resource Management 1 0 1
(J) Relocation from a Nursing Home or Institution to Community-Based Living 1 1 0
(K) Community/Social Participation 1 0 1
(L) Other 2 0 2

 

Item 2 - Improved Access To Transportation, Health Care and Assistive Technology

(A) Table
Area Number of Consumers Requiring Access Number of Consumers Achieving Access Number of Consumers Whose Access is in Progress
(A) Transportation 11 4 9
(B) Health Care Services 11 4 9
(C) Assistive Technology 4 1 4

Note: For most IL services, a consumers access to previously unavailable transportation, health care and assistive technology is documented through his or her CSR. In some instances, consumers may achieve an outcome solely through information and referral (I&R) services. To document these instances as successful outcomes, providers are not required to create CSRs for these consumers but must be able to document that follow-up contacts with these consumers showed access to previously unavailable transportation, health care and assistive technology.


(B) I&R Information

To inform RSA how many service providers engage in I&R follow-up contacts regarding access to transportation, health care services or assistive technology, please indicate the following:

Follow-up contacts with I&R recipients

The service provider did engage in follow-up contacts with I&R recipients to document access gained to previously unavailable transportation, health care or assistive technology.

The 2010 704 report Subpart II and Subpart III included the consumers who received services from dRC, ENC-CIL and DVRS ILRP personal assistance services.

The 2011 704 report Subpart II and Subpart III includes the consumers who received services from ENC-CIL using the Part B and Part B ARRA funds as well as the number of consumers who received DVRS ILRP personal assistance services because the 10% state match was used for the DVRS ILRP personal assistance service.

During the 2010 – 2011 SFY, the DVRS ILRP utilized $14,335,798.00 of state funds appropriated by the NC General Assembly and $1,327,705.00 of Social Security Administration Receipts which served 4,694 individuals with significant disabilities in all 100 counties of NC during this reporting period. The services provided by the DVRS ILRP allowed individuals with disabilities to live more independently in the community prevent nursing home placement and assist individuals in transitioning from skilled nursing facilities. The type of services that the DVRS ILRP provided included home and vehicle modifications, adaptive equipment and assistive devices, personal assistance services, recreation therapy, assistive technology, and guidance and counseling. The DVRS ILRP provided personal assistance services to 311 individuals with significant disabilities during this reporting period. Subpart II and III of this 704 report includes the detailed information about the 311 individuals who received the DVRS ILRP personal assistance services because the ILRP utilized the 10% state match for the Part B funds. Three (3) individuals received the personal assistance services using the 10% state match and additional state funds in the amount of $58,847.30. No Part B dollars were used by the DVRS ILRP, as 100% of those funds were allocated to support the function of the NC Statewide Independent Living Council and the goals and activities of the NC State Plan for Independent Living. The ILRP referred individuals to other resources as needed including the CILs.

During the 2010 – 2011 state fiscal year, the NC General Assembly appropriated $475,396 to the North Carolina Division of Services for the Blind (DSB) Independent Living Rehabilitation (ILR) Program. This funding enabled the DSB ILR Program to provide comprehensive independent living rehabilitation services for individuals who have significant vision loss. Services were provided to residents in all 100 counties of the state by independent living rehabilitation counselors, orientation and mobility specialists, nurse eye care consultants, deaf blind specialists, assistive technology consultants and instructors, social workers and vocational rehabilitation counselors. The services provided helped individuals who are blind, deaf blind and visually impaired to obtain, regain and maintain their functional independence in their homes, communities and employment. DSB Independent living rehabilitation services were provided for 400 consumers, who were less than 55 years of age, in their homes and in small community-based sites called Mini Centers. Program participants were provided adjustment to vision loss counseling and guidance, assessments, information about and referral to other services and supports and direct instruction in areas such as communication skills, personal and home management skills, self-advocacy, orientation and mobility, kitchen safety and cooking techniques, consumer education and the use of assistive technology and adaptive aids and devices. There were 129 individuals who completed the program and achieved their rehabilitation goals during the federal fiscal year. No Part B federal dollars were used by the DSB ILR Program because 100% of those funds were used by the NC Statewide Independent Living Council and the goals and activities of the NC State Plan for Independent Living.

During this reporting period, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services had a financial assistance contract with the ENC-CIL in Greenville and the disability Resource Center (dRC) in Wilmington for the Part B ARRA funds. The total amount of the two Part B ARRA contracts were $445,877.00. Of this amount, $441,280.33 was utilized by the ENC-CIL and the dRC and $4,596.70 of the Part B ARRA funds was reverted back to RSA.

During this reporting period, the ENC-CIL utilized $167,741.97 of Part B funds and $181,862.88 of Part B ARRA funds. The ENC-CIL provided services to 74 individuals with significant disabilities using the Part B and Part B ARRA funds. Subpart II and III of this 704 report includes the detailed information about the individuals who received services from the ENC-CIL.

During this reporting period, the dRC utilized $259,417.45 of Part B ARRA funds. In consultation with RSA, the funding amount and services provided by dRC using the Part B and Part B ARRA funds were not included in the Subpart II and Subpart III of this 704 report because the dRC became a Part C center on October 1, 2010 and will report the funding amount and number of consumers served on their Part C 704 report.

Nursing Home Transition: Success Story

ENC-CIL was contacted by a lady at a nursing home in Pitt County begging us to please get her out of there. The very next morning, our staff Advocacy Coordinator went to the facility to find this lady plus another lady and a gentleman that was being mistreated due to them reporting instances of sexual molestation and sexual exposure by one of the staff members of the nursing home. The Director of the facility was not cooperative to what had been reported and so therefore, the investigation had been closed. Upon our investigation, the NC State Administrators of Nursing Homes were contacted along with local police enforcement and the case was reopened. This is still an on-going investigation but we were able to transition lady 2 into independent living on 9-30-11. We are in the process of transitioning the gentleman – waiting on eligible housing to become available. Lady 1 left the nursing home on her own and we cannot locate her. Lady 2 is living independently now and is very happy and a lot healthier in her new and safer environment. We continue to monitor her and feel that this is a very successful transition.

Nursing Home Transition

ENC-CIL still finds that affordable, accessible housing is the primary barrier for people who would like to transition into the community from a nursing home. ENC-CIL continues to work with the local housing authority to advocate for housing. The Section 8 program continues to have a long waiting list. In addition, the lack of available funding and community based services continues to be a barrier for people to transition out of a nursing home.

Subpart IV - Community Activities and Coordination

Item 1 - Community Activities Table

In the table below, summarize the community activities involving the DSU, SILC and CILs in the Statewide Network of Centers (excluding Part C fund recipients) during the reporting year. For each activity, identify the primary disability issue(s) addressed as well as the type of activity conducted. Indicate the entity(ies) primarily involved and the time spent. Describe the primary objective(s) and outcome(s) for each activity. Add more rows as necessary.

Issue Area Activity Type Primary Entity Hours Spent Objectives Outcome(s)
Housing Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL staff & ILRP 200 To coordinate services for successful transitions. Have evaluated 3 referrals for transition from a nursing home Cases are on-going
Health care Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL, ILRP, Salvation Army, Stalls Med, Advance Home Care 72 To provide needed adaptive equipment at no cost to the consumer Adaptive equipment storage locker maintained rent-free
Other Community Ed. and Public Info. ENC-CIL Staff 48 Women With a Disability Peer Support Group - To provide a forum for consumers to discuss issues that pertain to them 3 - 9+ women attend each month
Other Community Ed. and Public Info. ENC-CIL Staff 48 Men With a Disability Peer Support Group - To provide a forum for consumers to discuss issues that pertain to them 3 -6-men attend each month
Other Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL Staff 18 Pitt Resource Connections Mtgs & Continuum of Care Meetings - Network of community representatives meet on a monthly basis to gather and share information Network links available resources with needs in the community. Usually 40-50 agencies represented at meetings.
Transportation Community/Systems Advocacy ENC-CIL Staff and Pitt Area Transit System (PATS) 12 To advocate for transportation and resources for people with disabilities Better accessibility to transportation, especially in rural areas of Pitt County
Housing Community/Systems Advocacy ENC-CIL Staff, Greenville Housing Authority, 18 Advocacy Crystal Springs Apartments - To have accessible housing available for people with disabilities in this new apartment complex for the elderly. Crystal Springs was completed and opened in Nov 2010 with accessible housing available for people with disabilities.
Housing Community Ed. and Public Info. ENC-CIL Staff, City of Greenville Human Relations Council 2 To have an inclusive community for building partnerships and raise awareness on the talents of every citizen in the city Ongoing
Other Outreach Efforts ENC-CIL Staff 6 To distribute ENC-CIL brochures to key locations in Wilson County. 150 Brochures placed in 6 high-traffic locations More awareness of services provided by ENC-CIL in out-lying, rural county
Other Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL BOD & Staff, & S.T.A.R. 15 To integrate people with disabilities into recreational settings with people without disabilities Participated in bowling with 20 people attending
Health care Community Ed. and Public Info. ENC-CIL Staff, STAR, ECU 28 To introduce people with disabilities to active/adaptive recreation such as Quad Rugby, Hand Cycling, Seated Volleyball, Wall Climbing, Wheelchair Slalom and various other games. Approximately 78 people with & without disabilities attended with several people with disabilities participating the activities. The experience broadened their opportunities for recreational activity
Health care Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL, ILRP and MFP program 2 To learn steps to referral to MFP Ongoing
Other Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL Staff , Peer Visiting Program (VPV) 10 Train people with disabilities to give VPV support to Persons with disabilities and their families More awareness of services provided by ENC-CIL in Pitt and out-lying, rural counties; ENC-CIL created 13 training notebooks and 5 trainer notebooks – 6 people with disabilities trained
Assistive technology Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL, STAR Volunteers, ECU, NCILR, ILRP, Univ. Health Sys 12 STAR Cultural Arts Day - Expose people with disabilities and their families to various forms of the arts. Approx. 75 persons with disabilities attended and participated in music, art and poetry activities
Other Outreach Efforts ENC-CIL Staff, JH Rose High School Staff and students 2 To educate students with disabilities about independent living skills and our organization Did a presentation to 40 students and 4 teachers about independent living skills training and about our organization as to how we can help them with these skills training.
Health care Community Ed. and Public Info. Pitt Memorial Hospital, ENC Staff 4 To promote socialization and support to the men and women with disabilities that attends our monthly meetings through out the year. 8 staff members present, Jim Barret and Chris Herring (Pitt Memorial Hospital), 10 men and women from the support groups present
Health care Community Ed. and Public Info. ENC-CIL Staff, ECU Medical Students 1 To educate Medical students about living with a spinal cord injury and the services of ENC-CIL Education of ENC-CIL and what we do for people with disabilities and to educate them on daily life living with a spinal cord injury. 40 Medical students attended this presentation.
Other Community Ed. and Public Info. ENC-CIL & local city/county cable access Channel 23 GPAT 1 7 minute ENC-CIL video - To inform the community of the services offered by various agencies and associations. 30 Second PSA on ENC-CIL runs daily ENC-CIL video detailed the philosophy, the 4-core services, the 3-county service area and contact information. The spot played at least 6-8 times every Tuesday for about 3 months.
Assistive technology Collaboration/Networking ENC –CIL staff 2 To educate individuals with disabilities with policies and procedures for services within Vocational Rehabilitation On-going
Health care Collaboration/Networking Pitt Memorial Hospital, ENC-CIL staff 21 To train individuals to work with patients at the hospital as a peer mentor Training was provided to 5 staff members as other volunteers in the community to work with the Volunteer Peer Mentoring Program at Pitt Memorial Rehabilitation Center for people with disabilities
Other Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL & Greenville City Council 24 Efforts made to have staff/BOD members present at Commission mtgs in order to assure that people with disabilities are included/involved in the planning process of City/County. On-going.
Other Community Ed. and Public Info. ENC-CIL Staff 8 To educate students with disabilities options after graduation such as continuing education, our services available and other services from other agencies in our community 2 Staff members attended the Pitt County Education Fair for Students and gave out brochures and flyers about our services
Other Community Ed. and Public Info. ENC-CIL Staff 9 Information Table set-up at Sunday in the Park (Greenville, NC) celebrating the 21th Anniversary of the signing of the ADA. To provide information regarding ADA, ENC-CIL, IL/VR and STAR ENC-CIL Info Table was observed by the 300+ people present at Sunday in the Park. Mayor declared July as “ADA CELEBRATION MONTH” and July 26, 2011 as “AMERICAN WITH DISABILITIES 21st ANNIVERSARY DAY”
Other Community/Systems Advocacy ENC-CIL, VR/IL, Consumers, Clinical Nurse from PMH 11 Awareness about impact of budget cuts for people with disabilities to public officials. Open dialogue to address concerns.
Other Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL Staff, Pitt Resource Connection 24 Collaboration with Pitt Resource Connection Agencies that serve the public throughout the surrounding areas come together to collaborate and network for the good of the community. Ongoing.
Other Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL Staff, NCRA Staff, ECU 5 Collaboration with the NC Rehabilitation Association (NCRA) and make others aware of the NCRA and the people, companies and organizations NCRA is associated with 30 people attended the NCRA baseball game at ECU and included 3 staff members and 12 people with disabilities.
Other Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL Staff, VR Staff 8 To introduce ENC-CIL to the Beaufort County VR office. 5 staff members met with the VR office in Beaufort County to make them aware of what our organization does and how we can work with them for the betterment of our consumers.
Other Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL Staff, VR Staff 8 To introduce ENC-CIL to the Wilson County VR office 4 staff members met with the VR office to make them aware of what our organization does and how we can work with them for the betterment of our consumers.
Other Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL Staff, ECVC staff 2 To network and collaborate with other agencies in the Pitt, Beaufort, and Wilson counties. 1 Staff member attended a presentation from ECVC (East Carolina Vocational Center) on disability sensitivity training. 30 people were in attendance.
Health care Technical Assistance ENC-CIL Staff, UNC-Wilmington 30 To promote recreational water activities and adaptive equipment to the disabled throughout the community. 5 staff members attended the Adaptive Water Sports Day where people with disabilities did adaptive water-skiing and tubing for the first time and other water and land activities. 100 people attended.
Health care Community Ed. and Public Info. ENC-CIL, NC Baptist Aging Ministry, SHIIP 2 Finding the right answers to your Medicare questions. To assist Medicare recipients with Extra Help applications for extra help with Prescription Drug costs. Presentations on lowering medication costs, understanding Medicare benefits & notices, assistance in obtaining prescription drugs.
Transportation Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL, ILRP, City of Greenville 4 To provide county-wide accessible, low-cost public transportation 24/7 Ongoing
Other Collaboration/Networking ENC-CIL, PCCEPD 6 Attended the Pitt County Commission Committee Meeting for the Employment of People with Disabilities (PCCEPD) To represent ENC-CIL on this committee To become a member of this committee to better serve the consumers that ENC-CIL serves
Other Outreach Efforts ENC-CIL, City and state officials, agencies, consumers. 42 To inform and educate the consumers, make public awareness of DARC and its staff and board and to join everyone together in an inclusive atmosphere Community Outreach Day. 75 people attended, Tied a ribbon to symbolize an inclusive community.
Housing Community/Systems Advocacy ENC-CIL Staff, Pitt Community College 3 To advocate for students with disabilities that have been relocated off campus due to their classroom being destroyed by Hurricane Irene at PCC. Presentations on security concerns and length of placement at Lucillle Gorham Center. 75 people present at the mtg. 50 DARC brochures given out.

Item 2 - Description of Community Activities

For the community activities mentioned above, provide any additional details such as the role of the DSU, SILC, CIL, and/or consumers, names of any partner organizations and further descriptions of the specific activities, services and benefits.

The continued association/collaboration between ENC-CIL staff/BOD members, S.T.A.R. [Support Team for Active Recreation] Regional Rehab Center, DVRS ILRP, PCMH and ECU is a win-win partnership for all concerned, especially our consumers. This association provides our consumers the opportunity to be exposed to the cultural arts, social/holiday gatherings, boating, beach/river excursions, bowling and numerous other sports, especially the Adapted Sports Day held at East Carolina University.

Efforts have been made this year to better inform the business community on how it can partner with ENC-CIL to help make their business more attractive to people with disabilities.

Efforts have been made to have ENC-CIL staff/BOD members present at Commission/committee meetings scheduled by the City of Greenville and Pitt County in order to assure that people with disabilities are included/involved in the planning process of the City/County.

The two DSUs, NCSILC and CILs continue their efforts to maximize the cooperation, coordination, and working relationships among other state agencies on the NCSILC, other councils that address the need of specific disability populations and issues, and other public and private entities. The DSUs shared information with the NCSILC on activities, assessment, and changes in services and programs in order to keep the NCSILC updated on the DSUs’ programs for individuals with disabilities. The Leadership of both DSUs actively participated in NCSILC meetings and initiatives. The ILRP and CILs continued to share referrals and information with consumers. Each new ILRP client was provided with the CIL referral information/brochure.

Subpart V - Statewide Independent Living Council (SILC)

Item 1 - Current SILC Composition

In the chart below, provide the requested information for each SILC member. The category in which the member was appointed can be described, for example, as ex-officio state agency representative, other state agency representative, center representative, person with a disability not employed by a center or state agency, section 121 funded project director, parent of person with a disability, community advocate, other service provider, etc. Include current vacancies, along with the corresponding appointment category for each. Add more rows as necessary.

Name of SILC member Employed by CIL, State Agency or Neither Appointment Category Voting or Non-Voting Term Start Date Term End Date
Dorothy Frye Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 10/12/2007 09/30/2013
Sandy McMillan Neither Parent of person with disability Voting 02/25/2010 09/30/2011
Cornell Turner Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 01/14/2011 09/30/2013
Deborah C. Smith Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 02/01/2010 09/30/2012
Sandi Sinnott Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 01/14/2011 09/30/2013
Michael Martin Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 12/01/2005 09/30/2011
Charles L. DesLaurier Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 01/14/2011 09/30/2013
Brian Jones Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 02/24/2010 09/30/2012
Barbara Davis Center CIL employee Voting 01/14/2011 09/30/2013
Kay Miley Center Person with Disabilities Voting 02/24/2010 09/30/2013
Frank Griffin Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 01/14/2011 09/30/2013
Jeff McLoud Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 01/23/2006 09/30/2011
Fannie Martin Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 01/14/2011 09/30/2013
Teresa Staley Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 02/25/2010 09/30/2012
Sierra Royster Center CIL employee Voting 01/14/2011 09/30/2011
Keith Greenarch Center Person with Disabilities Voting 02/23/2010 09/30/2012
Clyde Goodwin Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 02/25/2010 09/30/2012
William Donohue Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 02/23/2010 09/30/2012
Gloria Bellamy Neither Person with Disabilities Voting 02/25/2010 09/30/2012
Vicki Smith Neither Ex-Officio Non-voting 06/03/2008 09/30/2011
Holly Riddle State agency Ex-Officio Non-voting 10/31/2008 09/30/2014
Cynthia Temoshenko State agency Ex-Officio Non-voting 09/30/2008 09/30/2011
Susanna Bourgeois State agency Ex-Officio Non-voting 09/30/2008 09/30/2011
Vacant   Service provider Voting 10/05/2006 09/30/2012
Toby Easton State agency Ex-Officio Non-voting 02/23/2010 09/30/2011

Item 2 - SILC Composition Requirements

Please provide the information requested in the chart below. Include any current vacancies in a particular appointment category.

(A) How many members are on the SILC?
23

(B) How many members of the SILC are individuals with disabilities not employed by a state agency or a center for independent living?
14

(C) How many members of the SILC are voting members?
19

(D) How many of the voting members of the SILC are individuals with disabilities not employed by a state agency or a center for independent living?
14

Item 1 - Statewide Representation

Describe how the SILC is composed of members who provide statewide representation.

Region 1: Counties of Ashe, Watauga, Caldwell, Burke, Cleveland and all the counties further west. Two SILC members represent these twenty-two counties: One in Jackson and one in Buncombe.

Region 2: Counties of Rockingham, Guilford, Randolph, Moore, Scotland, and all the counties west to Region 1. Eleven members represent this twenty-six county area: Two in Stanly County; five in Guilford County and one in each of Moore, Rockingham, Stokes and Forsyth.

Region 3: Counties of Northampton, Halifax, Edgecombe, Wilson, Wayne, Sampson, Bladen, Columbus, Brunswick, and all the counties west to Region 2. Seven members represent this twenty-seven county region: Six from Wake and one from Alamance.

Region 4 contains the 25 counties west of Region 3. Three members represent this region: One each from Craven, New Hanover and Lenoir.

Item 2 - Broad Range of Individuals with Disabilities from Diverse Backgrounds

Describe how the SILC members represent a board range of individuals with disabilities from diverse backgrounds.

On September 30, 2011, NCSILC had 23 members; nineteen voting and four nonvoting. Of the nineteen voting members; eight members had physical disabilities, three members with vision loss, two with a hearing disability, one with an emotional/mental disability, one with a systemic disability, one with multiple disabilities that included two or more categories. Three of the voting members have no disability.

The Council includes 14 female and nine male members. There are 18 Caucasian members and five African American members.

Item 3 - Knowledgeable about IL

Describe how SILC members are knowledgeable about centers for independent living and independent living services.

North Carolina residents interested in membership on the NCSILC may complete and submit an application developed by the NCSILC Membership Committee and available through the NC SILC website (www.ncsilc.org). The NCSILC Membership Committee interviews perspective applicants to determine the individual’s knowledge about Centers for Independent Living and independent living services. Prospective applicants who are vetted by the Membership Committee are presented to the NCSILC for approval. The Executive Director then submits the approved applicant’s information to the Governor’s Office for consideration for appointment.

In compliance with NC Executive Order 55 effective April5, 2010, North Carolina residents who are interested in serving on the NCSILC are required to complete the Application for Boards and Commission and submit to the NC Boards and Commission.

NCSILC offers a Member Orientation annually. This orientation reviews the Rehabilitation Act and history of the Independent Living Movement, duties and responsibilities of NCSILC members and the DSUs, current NC-SPIL goals and objectives, and opportunities for involvement as new members. New members are given a Member Handbook containing the information provided in the orientation. New members are strongly encouraged to attend the orientation, which is open to all members.

Item 1 - SILC Staff

Please provide the name and contact information for the SILC executive director. Indicate the number and titles of any other SILC staff, if applicable. Also indicate whether any SILC staff is also a state agency employee.

Cynthia Sexton, Executive Director

401 Oberlin Road, Suite 115

Raleigh, NC 27605

(919) 835-3636

Debbie Hippler, Office Manager

Freida Moore, Fiscal Manager

Michele Proctor, Technology Specialist

None of the above are employed by a state agency.

Item 2 - SILC Support

Describe the administrative support services provided by the DSU, if any.

The DSU researched and provided information as requested by the NCSILC Chair and

Executive Director including providing information about the NC state guidelines and developing strategies to help streamline reporting requirements. In addition, DVRS administrative support staff mailed 381 SILC satisfaction surveys to DVRS clients with closed cases and the clients will return the completed satisfaction survey directly to the SILC office.

Item 1 - SILC Duties

Provide a summary of SILC activities conducted during the reporting year related to the SILC's duties listed below.

(A) State Plan Development

Describe any activities related to the joint development of the state plan. Include any activities in preparation for developing the state plan, such as needs assessments, evaluations of consumer satisfaction, hearings and forums.

A subcommittee of the NCSILC met in August 2011 to discuss the process for obtaining public input which will be used when developing the 2014 – 2016 SPIL. A survey obtained from another state was reviewed and the committee made suggested changes.

(B) Monitor, Review and Evaluate the Implementation of the State Plan

Describe any activities related to the monitoring, review and evaluation of the implementation of the state plan.

A subcommittee of the NCSILC completed the development of a consumer satisfaction survey in September 2011. The NCSILC requested that the eight CILs and DSU provide the NCSILC with consumer contact information so that the NCSILC could send the satisfaction survey to randomly selected individuals with closed cases. The DSU consulted with key State governmental officials and notified NCSILC that DSU would not release the contact information of their consumers to NCSILC since confidentiality is vital to the trust of the clients and delivery of services. The DSU agreed to mail the NCSILC satisfaction survey quarterly to all of their consumers with closed cases and the consumers will return the completed NCSILC satisfaction survey directly to the NCSILC office. On September 30, 2011, DVRS mailed 381 and DSB mailed 141 NCSILC satisfaction surveys to consumers with closed cases.

NCSILC is of the considered opinion that this process does not provide a statistically valid sample with which the Council can fulfill its requirement to monitor, review and evaluate the implementation of the State Plan. The Council is prepared to cooperate with the process as outlined above. However, it is the Council’s position that Activity 6.1.a and 6.1.b of the State Plan, involving surveying the clients has not been met as written this year.

(C) Coordination With Other Disability Councils

Describe the SILC's coordination of activities with the State Rehabilitation Council (SRC) established under section 105, if the state has such a Council, or the commission described in section 101(a)(21)(A), if the state has such a commission, and councils that address the needs of specific disability populations and issues under other Federal law. Please state whether the SILC has at least one representative serving as a member of the SRC and whether the SILC has any members serving on other councils, boards or commissions in the state.

NCSILC members served on other councils, boards and commissions including the NC State Rehabilitation Council, NC Commission for the Blind, NC Assistive Technology Grant Advisory Council, NC Mental Health Planning Council, and NC-DAN. The NCSILC has ex-officio representation from not only the two (2) DSUs, but also the NC Council on Developmental Disabilities, NC Services for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, and Disability Rights North Carolina (NC’s Protection and Advocacy Agency).

(D) Public Meeting Requirements

Describe how the SILC has ensured that all regularly scheduled meetings and other public hearings and forums hosted by the SILC are open to the public and sufficient advance notice is provided.

All NCSILC meetings are open to the public and in accordance with the North Carolina Open Meetings Law. All meetings are publicized via the standard state procedure for Open Meeting compliance. The NCSILC posts the quarterly meeting dates and places on their website. There is contact information for anyone to make comments, apply for membership or ask questions. The meeting dates for NCSILC are set for the entire upcoming year at the last quarterly meeting.

Item 2 - Other Activities

Describe any other SILC activities funded by non-Part B funds.

N/A

Please identify the SILC's training and technical assistance needs. The needs identified in this chart will guide the priorities set by RSA for the training and technical assistance provided to CILs and SILCs. For each category, choose up to 10 Priority Needs - Rate items 1-10 with 1 being most important.

Advocacy/Leadship Development

General Overview
 

Community/Grassroots Organizing
 

Individual Empowerment
2

Systems Advocacy
 

Legislative Process
 

Applicable Laws

General overview and promulgation of various disability laws
 

Americans with Disabilities Act
 

Air-Carrier"s Access Act
 

Fair Housing Act
 

Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act
 

Medicaid/Medicare/PAS/waivers/long-term care
 

Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended
 

Social Security Act
 

Workforce Investment Act of 1998
 

Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999
 

Government Performance Results Act of 1993
 

Assistive Technologies

General Overview
 

Data Collecting and Reporting

General Overview
 

704 Reports
 

Performance Measures contained in 704 Report
 

Dual Reporting Requirements
 

Case Service Record Documentation
 

Disability Awareness and Information

Specific Issues
 

Evaluation

General Overview
 

CIL Standards and Indicators
 

Community Needs Assessment
3

Consumer Satisfaction Surveys
 

Focus Groups
 

Outcome Measures
 

Financial: Grant Management

General Overview
 

Federal Regulations
 

Budgeting
 

Fund Accounting
 

Financial: Resource Development

General Overview
 

Diversification of Funding Base
5

Fee-for-Service Approaches
 

For Profit Subsidiaries
 

Fund-Raising Events of Statewide Campaigns
 

Grant Writing
 

Independent Living Philosophy

General Overview
 

Innovative Programs

Best Practices
 

Specific Examples
10 - Least important

Management Information Systems

Computer Skills
 

Software
 

Marketing and Public Relations

General Overview
 

Presentation/Workshop Skills
 

Community Awareness
 

Network Strategies

General Overview
 

Electronic
 

Among CILs & SILCs
7

Community Partners
8

Program Planning

General Overview of Program Management and Staff Development
 

CIL Executive Directorship Skills Building
 

Conflict Management and Alternative Dispute Resolution
 

First-Line CIL Supervisor Skills Building
 

IL Skills Modules
 

Peer Mentoring
 

Program Design
 

Time Management
 

Team Building
 

Outreach to Unserved/Underserved Populations

General Overview
9

Disability
 

Minority
 

Institutionalized Potential Consumers
 

Rural
 

Urban
 

SILC Roles/Relationship to CILs

General Overview
 

Development of State Plan for Independent Living
1 - Most important

Implementation (monitor & review) of SPIL
 

Public Meetings
 

Role and Responsibilities of Executive Board
 

Role and Responsibilities of General Members
 

Collaborations with In-State Stakeholders
6

CIL Board of Directors

General Overview
 

Roles and Responsibilities
 

Policy Development
 

Recruiting/Increasing Involvement
 

Volunteer Programs

General Overview
 

Option Areas and/or Comments

SILC Board - Recruiting/Increasing Involvement

Subpart VI - SPIL Comparison And Updates

Item 1 - Progress in Achieving Objectives and Goals

Describe progress made in achieving the objectives and goals outlined in the most recently approved SPIL. Discuss goals achieved and/or in progress as well as barriers encountered.

Goal 1. Expand the network of Centers for Independent Living in North Carolina

Goal Description: CIL core services will be available to more people with disabilities in NC increasing their opportunity for independent living and full inclusion in individual communities.

Objective 1.1. Support a statewide network of Centers for Independent Living (CILs) with the capacity to deliver consistent CIL independent living core services that meet the standards and assurances of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended.

Activity 1.1.a. Provide financial support to the existing Part B CIL in Greenville to provide independent living core services and meet the standards and assurances of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended. NCSILC will monitor progress of the Part B CIL by receiving reports during the quarterly NCSILC meetings. The Part B CIL will submit to the NCSILC an annual 704 Report. Consumers will be asked to complete a satisfaction survey to indicate their satisfaction with the quality of services and their increased level of independent living. Surveys will be forwarded to the NCSILC Executive Director to compile in a report for the full NCSILC.

During this reporting period, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services had a financial assistance contract with the existing Part B CIL in Greenville. The contract provided the ENC-CIL with the funds for operating expenses and to provide the four IL core services in accordance with the Rehabilitation Act, as amended. The Executive Director of the ENC-CIL provided a progress report of activities performed at the quarterly NCSILC meetings. The ENC-CIL provided the NCSILC with a copy of the 2010 704 report. A subcommittee of the NCSILC completed the development of a consumer satisfaction survey in September 2011. The NCSILC did not send the satisfaction survey to randomly selected individuals with closed cases prior to September 30, 2011.

This activity is ongoing.

Activity 1.1.b. Provide financial support to the existing Part C CILs for general operations to provide independent living core services. Each person who received services will be asked to complete a satisfaction survey to indicate their satisfaction with the quality of services received and their increased level of independent living. Surveys will be forwarded to the NCSILC Executive Director to compile and report to the full NCSILC.

During this reporting period, the seven Part C funded CIL had a contract with the DSU for operational expenses to provide the independent living core services. The contracts are for a maximum of three years which are required to be amended annually. A subcommittee of the NCSILC completed the development of a consumer satisfaction survey in September 2011. The NCSILC did not send the satisfaction survey to randomly selected individuals with closed cases of the seven CILs prior to September 30, 2011.

This activity is ongoing.

Activity 1.1.c. Provide financial support for training to existing Part B and C funded CIL staff on how to better serve consumers with diverse and significant disabilities.

During this reporting period, all eight CILs in NC provided their staff with training on how to better serve consumers with diverse disabilities. The trainings included attending the National ADA symposium; ILRU for a series of audio conferences; ADA conference on accessible recreational facilities; ADA mediation webinar; ADA para- transit webinar; ADA transportation training audio conference; Impact of the ADA and the senior population audio conference; ADA and the courts; ADA audio conference on reasonable accommodations for employees and job seekers; ADA audio conference training on advocacy; ADA webinar on public transportation accessibility stops announcements; ADA webinar on accessibility in hotels; Obstacles faced by people with disabilities in obtaining employment; PCMH training on peer mentoring skills; Medicaid and new community options; PCMH training on infections in spinal cord patients and treatment; Work incentives information summit; Money follows the person program; option counseling training; American sign language training; CIL history and philosophy training; Improving communication in the work place and promoting a positive work environment. IDEA and the special education process and five CIL attended the National Council on Independent Living Annual Conference.

This activity is ongoing.

Activity 1.1.d. Provide financial support to conduct trainings for CIL staff, NCSILC members and/or grassroots organization related to SILC and/or CIL roles and responsibilities.

During this reporting period, training for CIL staff, NCSILC members and/or grassroots organization related to SILC and/or CIL roles and responsibilities was not conducted. No organization has stepped up to be a new Center for Independent Living during this reporting period. The NCSILC is in the planning process of hosting an IL Summit in the spring of 2012.

This activity is ongoing.

Goal 2. Support the operations of the NCSILC non-profit office.

Goal Description: Part B funds will be used to ensure the NCSILC office will continue to operate in an efficient and effective manner.

2.1. Promote efficient and effective management of the non-profit office to ensure autonomy and independence of the NCSILC.

Activity 2.1.a. Provide Part B funds for general operations of the NCSILC non-profit office and the NCSILC related activities.

During this reporting period, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services had a financial assistance contract with the NCSILC. The contract provided the NCSILC with funds for the general operating expenses of the NCSILC office and related NCSILC activities. The NCSILC staff provided I & R services to 65 individuals and the NCSILC members and/or the NCSILC Executive Director attended the following training activities and meetings:

• The Executive Director attended the APRIL Conference in Overland Park, Kansas from October 29 - November 1, 2010.

• Two members and the NCSILC Executive Director attended the SILC Congress Conference from January 8-12, 2011 in Atlanta, Georgia.

• The Executive Director attended an online training on nonprofit tax return preparation which was held on January 18, 2011.

• The Executive Director attended an online course through ILRU, “Getting on Board” which was held from February 18 through 25, 2011.

• The Treasurer and the Executive Director participated in the 2011 Teleconference “Playing by the Rules: A SILC Fiscal Guide to Federal Dollars” which was held on April 11, April 21, April 26, and April 28, 2011.

• At the April 28, 2011 NCSILC meeting, the NCSILC Chair and a CIL director provided training to members, “Operationalize Effectiveness of SILCs” for members.

• The Executive Director attended the SILC conference on Implementing and Enforcing Olmstead in Atlanta, Georgia from May 11 - 12, 2011.

• The Executive Director participated in the NCACPA Not-for-Profit Accounting Conference from May 22 – 23, 2011 in Greensboro, NC.

• Three members and the Executive Director attended a finance meeting with DVRS staff on June 16, 2011.

• The Executive Director participated in the Best Practice Models to Enhance Transition to College & Careers Webinar on June 20, 2011.

• Two members attended the NCIL Conference from July 13 – 16, 2011 in Washington, D.C.

• The Executive Director attended an on-line course offered by Eve Borenstein on August 24, 2011 concerning the 2011 Form 990 updates.

• One member attended the ILRU on-line course “Smooth as SILC” from September 9-29, 2011.

• The Treasurer and the Executive Director attended an ILRU webinar, “Gathering Consumer Feedback for SILCs on September 27, 2011.

• The Executive Director participated in the ILRU Intensive SILC Support Program through monthly telephone calls from May 30 through September 30, 2011.

• The Executive Director attended the Raleigh 10-year plan to end Homelessness monthly meetings, CRC All Grantee Statewide Meeting, Medicare/Medicaid Dual Eligible Planning Group monthly meetings, DD Council quarterly meetings, MH-DD-SA Council meeting, NC CAP services meeting, and Money Follows the Person Program meeting.

This activity is ongoing.

Activity 2.1.b. VR and NCSILC will research options to better access Part B funds within the guidelines of the Department of Health and Human Services.

On May 18, 2011, DVRS received notice from the Department of Health and Human Services’ Controller’s Office that a cash advance using only federal funds is not required to be returned or settled by June 18 of the year in which the contract terminates. The cash advance using only federal funds is required to be returned or settled by September 18 of the year in which the contract terminates.

In compliance with the Department of Health and Human Services policies and procedures for contract monitoring and oversight, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (DVRS) is required to have a monitoring schedule in place for each contract. DVRS requires all contractors receiving funds to provide the supporting documentation to DVRS at the time of submitting their invoice for payment. This reporting requirement is the same for all contractors regardless of the funding source, contract amount, private non-profit organization or private company. In an effort to expedite the monthly reimbursement process, in September 2011, DVRS offered the Part C CIL an exception to the standard reporting procedures by allowing the Part C CIL to submit the monthly invoice for payment to DVRS without the supporting documentation and DVRS will conduct an annual audit at the CIL office. As a result, five of the Part C CILs will submit the monthly invoice for payment to DVRS without the supporting documentation and DVRS will conduct an annual audit at the CIL office for the FFY 2011 – 2012 contracts.

This activity is ongoing.

Activity 2.1.c. NC DVRS will process, upon receipt of approved required documentation, payments for reimbursement for actual expenses.

*During this reporting period, the NC Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services processed the monthly NCSILC invoice for payment of actual expenditures upon receipt of the approved required documentation.

This activity is ongoing.

Goal 3. Increase Participation and Leadership by Youth with Disabilities.

Goal Description: Support a NC Youth Leadership Forum to increase youth participation in all of NC.

3.1. Objective: Increase Participation and Leadership by Youth with Disabilities.

Activity 3.1.a. A Youth Leadership Committee will be established to develop and implement an annual Leadership Forum. The Committee will be comprised of participants from prior years Forum(s) and will include other youth between the ages of 15 and 28. The Committee will be responsible to develop and implementation of the annual Forum. NCSILC will monitor the progress of the Committee.

During this reporting period, a Youth Leadership Committee was established in April 2011 to develop and implement the 2011 youth Leadership Forum. The Youth Leadership Committee was comprised of three youth mentors from previous YLF and five other youth with disabilities between the ages of 15 and 28. The committee met nine times during the period of April 20, 2011 – July 7, 2011 to plan and evaluate the implementation of the 2011 Youth Leadership Forum. The Youth Leadership Committee provided the NCSILC with an update about the YLF at the NCSILC quarterly meetings.

This activity is ongoing.

Activity 3.1.b. Contract with a CIL or grassroots organization to conduct an annual Youth Leadership Forum will be sponsored each year of the 3-year SPIL to increase participation and leadership by youth with disabilities. The Youth Leadership Forum will be open to youth between the ages of 15 and 28. The Forum will be youth-led and youth-run. Participation by youth will increase 10% each year.

During this reporting period, the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services had a contract with the Alliance of Disability Advocates CIL to conduct a Youth Leadership Forum (YLF) designed to increase participation and leadership by youth with disabilities. The YLF was held at the NC State University from June 20 - 24, 2011. There were 5 Youth Leadership Committee members in attendance, 20 selected applicants between the ages of 15 – 27, three mentors, and four contractor staff. In addition, there were two national youth speaker/facilitators, Ms. Wheelchair America 2011 and a policy analyst from the MS Society.

This activity is ongoing.

Activity 3.1.c. NCSILC will monitor, review and evaluate the Forum each year. The Youth Committee will report quarterly to the NCSILC on the progress of the Committee and its plans for the Forum. Evaluation and satisfaction surveys will be completed by participants of the Forum, forwarded to the NCSILC Executive Director for compilation, and the results reported annually to the NCSILC.

During this reporting period, the Youth Leadership Committee reported on the planning of the 2011 YLF at the NCSILC April 2011 meeting and conducted a presentation about the 2011 YLF at the NCSILC July meeting. The participants of the YLF completed a satisfaction survey which was provided to the NCSILC Executive Director for compilation and the results were reported to the NCSILC at the July 2011 meeting. The results of the consumer satisfaction surveys reflected a satisfaction rate of 93.2% overall, with dorms scoring the lowest rating. All participants reported to have gained personal advocacy skills.

This activity is ongoing.

Objective 3.1.d The Youth Committee will report quarterly to the NCSILC on the progress of the Committee and its plans for the Forum. Evaluation and satisfaction surveys will be completed by participants of the Forum and presented yearly to the NCSILC. Participation by youth will increase 10% each year.

During this reporting period, the Youth Leadership Committee reported on the planning of the 2011 YLF at the NCSILC April 2011 meeting and conducted a presentation about the 2011 YLF at the NCSILC July meeting. The participants of the YLF completed a satisfaction survey which was provided to the NCSILC Executive Director for compilation and the results were reported to the NCSILC at the July 2011 meeting. The results of the consumer satisfaction surveys reflected a satisfaction rate of 93.2% overall, with dorms scoring the lowest rating. All participants reported to have gained personal advocacy skills.

This activity is ongoing.

Objective 3.2. Enhance youth awareness of disability history and independent living.

Activity 3.2.a. Members of the Youth Leadership Committee will coordinate with a CIL to present Disability History and Awareness month in K-12 public education settings. Students will complete evaluations to determine their increased knowledge of disabilities. Results of the evaluations will be presented to the full NCSILC. The Executive Director will monitor the progress of the Youth Leadership Committee. Results will be reported to the full NCSILC quarterly.

No report. This activity is ongoing.

Activity 3.2.b. NCSILC will recruit and recommend for membership qualified youth with disabilities between the ages of 15 and 28.

During this reporting period, the NCSILC has two members who are between the ages of 15 and 28.

This activity is ongoing.

Goal 4. Promote Community Based Living.

Goal description: People with disabilities will have access to funds for deposits, transportation, household items, etc. to use as they transition from institutionalized settings into the community.

Objective 4.1.Support transition of consumers from institutionalized settings into the community.

Activity 4.1.a. Provide Part B funds to Part B and C CILs to assist individuals who are transitioning from an institutionalized setting into the community. The funds will assist transitioning individuals with expenses they may incur during the process including but not limited to: deposits for housing and utilities, initial month’s rent, transportation, furniture, appliances, housing supplies, etc., needs to be determined by the individual. Consumers will be asked to complete a satisfaction survey to indicate their satisfaction with the quality of services and their increased level of independent living. Surveys will be forwarded to the NCSILC Executive Director to compile in a report for the full NCSILC.

During this reporting period, the Part B and C CILs assisted 69 individuals with disabilities to transition from an institutionalized setting into the community. Funds were used during the transitioning process for rent, utilities, deposits, furniture, durable medical equipment, household supplies, clothing, transportation, personal care items, home modifications, air conditioner, and food.

This activity is ongoing.

Goal 5. Promote Civil Rights of People with Disabilities.

Goal Description: NCSILC and CILs will monitor legislation that affects the lives of people with disabilities.

Objective 5.1. NCSILC and NC CILs will monitor disability related legislation to promote increased independence of people with disabilities.

Activity 5.1.a NCSILC will coordinate with Disability Rights NC, NCDAN, CILs and other advocacy groups regarding studies, model policies and procedures for the public in order to enhance independent living services for individuals with disabilities.

During this reporting period, the NCSILC participated in the Disability Awareness Day in Raleigh, NC on March 22, 2011 and distributed approximately 100 NCSILC brochures. The NCSILC monitored disability related legislation that would impact people with disabilities. Members were concerned about proposed cuts in Medicaid and the Americans with Disabilities Act as well as a voter picture ID bill in the NC General Assembly and a proposal to keep Dorothea Dix Hospital open.

Goal 6: Provision of Direct Independent Living Services and Supports

Goal Description: DVR and DSB:

People with disabilities who qualify for DVRS and DSB services will receive direct services to support independent living.

Objective 6.1. NC Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and NC Division of Services for the Blind will provide direct independent living services to people with significant disabilities in all 100 counties. NC CILs will provide services in 42 counties.

Activity 6.1.a DVR will provide specialized and individualized services and supports for individuals with a significant disability. Services to be provided include but are not limited to: home modifications, vehicle modifications, personal assistance services, and the provision of durable medical equipment that leads to deinstitutionalization, the prevention of institutionalization, achieving community living, and/or employment transition to the Vocational Rehabilitation Services program. Consumers will be asked to complete a satisfaction survey to indicate their satisfaction with the quality of services and their increased level of independent living. Surveys will be forwarded to the NCSILC Executive Director to compile in a report for the full NCSILC.

During the 2010 – 2011 SFY, the DVRS ILRP utilized state funds appropriated by the NC General Assembly and Social Security Administration Receipts to serve 4,694 individuals with significant disabilities in all 100 counties of NC during this reporting period. Of this number, the DVRS ILRP provided personal assistance services to 311 individuals, assisted 16 individuals in transitioning from skilled nursing facilities and prevented 279 individuals from nursing home placement. The type of services that the DVRS ILRP provided included home and vehicle modifications, adaptive equipment and assistive devices, personal assistance services, recreation therapy, assistive technology, and guidance and counseling. The services assisted individuals in achieving community living, and/or employment. On September 30, 2011, DVRS mailed 381 NCSILC satisfaction surveys to consumers with closed cases and the consumers will return the completed NCSILC satisfaction survey directly to the NCSILC office to be compiled into a report for the full NCSILC

NCSILC is of the considered opinion that the survey process does not provide a statistically valid sample with which the Council can fulfill its requirement to monitor, review and evaluate the implementation of the State Plan. The Council is prepared to cooperate with the satisfaction survey process as outlined above. However, it is the Council’s position that Activity 6.1.a of the State Plan, involving surveying the clients has not been met as written this year.

Activity 6.1.b. DSB will provide specialized and individualized services and supports for individuals, less than 55 years of age, who have significant visual impairments. Services to be provided include but are not limited to: adjustment to vision loss counseling, information and referral, independent living skills training (mobility, communications, personal and home management, etc.) and individual advocacy. Consumers will be asked to complete a satisfaction survey to indicate their satisfaction with the quality of services and their increased level of independent living. Surveys will be forwarded to the NCSILC Executive Director to compile in a report for the full SILC.

During the 2010 – 2011 state fiscal year, the DSB ILRP received state funds from the NC General Assembly. This funding enabled the DSB ILRP to provide comprehensive independent living rehabilitation services for individuals who have significant vision loss. Services were provided to residents in all 100 counties of the state by independent living rehabilitation counselors, orientation and mobility specialists, nurse eye care consultants, deaf blind specialists, assistive technology consultants and instructors, social workers and vocational rehabilitation counselors. The services provided helped individuals who are blind, deaf blind and visually impaired to obtain, regain and maintain their functional independence in their homes, communities and employment. DSB Independent living rehabilitation services were provided for 400 consumers, who were less than 55 years of age, in their homes and in small community-based sites called Mini Centers. Program participants were provided adjustment to vision loss counseling and guidance, assessments, information about and referral to other services and supports and direct instruction in areas such as communication skills, personal and home management skills, self-advocacy, orientation and mobility, kitchen safety and cooking techniques, consumer education and the use of assistive technology and adaptive aids and devices. There were 129 individuals who completed the program and achieved their rehabilitation goals. On September 30, 2011, DSB mailed 141 NCSILC satisfaction surveys to consumers with closed cases and the consumers will return the completed NCSILC satisfaction survey directly to the NCSILC office to be compiled into a report for the full NCSILC.

NCSILC is of the considered opinion that the survey process does not provide a statistically valid sample with which the Council can fulfill its requirement to monitor, review and evaluate the implementation of the State Plan. The Council is prepared to cooperate with the satisfaction survey process as outlined above. However, it is the Council’s position that Activity 6.1.b of the State Plan, involving surveying the clients has not been met as written this year.

6.1. c NC CILs will provide individualized services and supports and the four core services in each of its 7 Part C and one part B Centers for Independent Living.

During this reporting period, the seven Part C and one Part B funded CIL had a contract with the DSU for operational expenses to provide individualized services and supports and to provide the independent living core services. The seven Part C and one Part B funded CIL transitioned 69 individuals with disabilities from institutionalized facilities into the community, opened 12 case service records and provided the independent living core services to 2,413 individuals with disabilities using the Part B funds.

Item 2 - SPIL Information Updates

If applicable, describe any changes to the information contained in the SPIL that occurred during the reporting year, including the placement, legal status, membership or autonomy of the SILC; the SILC resource plan, the design of the statewide network of centers; and the DSU administration of the SILS program.

In February 2011, DVRS in collaboration with the NC Office of the Governor Boards and Commission provided RSA with documentation (legislative reports and a memo from former Governor Jim Martin) to see if these documents were acceptable to RSA to “establish” the SILC within North Carolina as specified in Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended. In July 2011, RSA notified the NC Boards and Commission that additional action would be needed beyond the documentation provided to RSA to ensure that the NCSILC is not established as an entity within a State agency as specified in Section 705 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended. The NC Boards and Commission is in the process of reviewing this matter to determine the best next steps; reviewing samples from other states and other relevant information and will consult with the NCSILC, RSA and others during this Process.

The total amount of Goal 3, Activity 3.1.b in the 2011 – 2013 SPIL resource plan is $18,527.00 which is broken down into three categories: Youth Leadership Committee $2,300.00; Mentors from Prior Youth Leadership Forums $1,227.00; and the Youth Leadership Forum $15,000.00. At the July 22, 2011 NCSILC quarterly meeting, the NCSILC Youth Leadership Committee requested that the funding breakdown for the three categories be eliminated as the current wording promotes exclusion of individuals with disabilities from participating if funds are not available in a particular category. The NCSILC voted to keep the total amount for activity 3.1.b at $18,527 but to eliminate the funding breakdown for the three categories. DVRS consulted with RSA, after the July 2011 NCSILC meeting. RSA stated that eliminating the break down amount for the three categories did not require notice to the public since the total amount of activity 3.1.b was not changed.

If applicable, describe any significant activities and accomplishments achieved by the DSU and SILC not included elsewhere in the report, e.g. brief summaries of innovative practices, improved service delivery to consumers, etc.

N/A

If applicable, describe any substantial problems encountered by the DSU and SILC, not included elsewhere in this report, and discuss resolutions/attempted resolutions, e.g., difficulty in outreach efforts; disagreements between the SILC and the DSU; complications recruiting SILC members; complications working with other state agencies or organizations within the state.

During this reporting period, the NCSILC worked with the Governor’s Office of Boards and Commission to improve the NCSILC appointment process, however, NCSILC continues to face the challenge of delayed membership appointments. The Governor’s Office of Boards and Commission is working with RSA regarding NCSILC Codification and new NCSILC appointments are delayed until NCSILC Codification is completed. As of September 30, 2011, the Council had one vacancy and two members who are serving in holdover status after the expiration of their term.

Include any additional information, suggestions, comments or explanations not included elsewhere in the report.

N/A

Subpart VII - Signatures

Please type the names and titles of the DSU directors(s) and SILC chairperson and indicate whether the form has been signed by each of them. Retain the signed copy for your records.

As the authorized signatories we will sign, date and retain in the files of the state agency(ies) and the Statewide Independent Living Council this 704 Report and the separate Certification of Lobbying forms ED-80-0013 (available in MS Word and PDF formats) for the state independent living program (IL Part B)

SILC Chairperson

Name and Title
Brian E. Jones, Chair of NC SILC

 
Signed

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
12/21/2011

DSU Director

Name and Title
Linda S. Harrington, Director, NC DVRS

 
Signed

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
12/21/2011

DSU Director (Blind Program)

Name and Title
Donald Eddie Weaver, Director, NC DSB

 
Signed

Date Signed (mm/dd/yyyy)
12/22/2011

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on 12/22/2011 at 12:24 PM

Last updated by sanctemoshenkoc

Completed on 12/22/2011 at 12:24 PM

Completed by sanctemoshenkoc

Approved on 04/30/2012 at 1:35 PM

Approved by rsacotterd

Published on 10/31/2012 at 3:02 PM

Published by kschelle

The following documents have been identified as being related to the information you are viewing.

  • RSA-704 Part I instructions
    MS Word (263KB)

  • RSA-704 Part I Key Guidance
    MS Word (35KB) | PDF (35KB)

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