ED/OSERS/RSA
Rehabilitation Services Administration
U.S. Department of Education

State Grant for Assistive Technology Program - South Carolina Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

A. Contacts

1. State and Program Title
South Carolina Assistive Technology Program

Lead Agency

2. Agency name
University of South Carolina Research Foundation

3. Mailing address
Center for Disability Resources, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine

4. City
Columbia

5. State
SC

6. Zip code
29208

7. Phone
803-935-5231

8. Fax
803-935-5059

9. Program URL
http://uscm.med.sc.edu/cdrhome/

10. Program E-mail
carol.page@uscmed.sc.edu

11. Program toll-free number
800-915-4522

12. Program TTY number

Implementing Agency

13. Check here if not applicable. If applicable, complete Items 14-24.
Yes

14. Name

15. Mailing address

16. City

17. State

18. Zip code

19. Phone

20. Fax

21. Program URL

22. Program E-mail

23. Program toll-free number

24. Program TTY number

Program Director at Lead Agency

25. Name (last, first)
Rotholz, David

26. Title
Director, Center for Disability Resources

27. Phone
803-935-7819

28. E-mail
david.rotholz@uscmed.sc.edu

Program Director at Implementing Entity - If applicable

29. Name (last, first)
Rotholz, David

30. Title
Director, CDR (UCEDD), School of Medicine

31. Phone
803-935-7819

32. E-mail
david.rotholz@uscmed.sc.edu

Person Responsible for completing this form if other than Program Director

33. Name (last, first)
Page, Carol

34. Title
Program Director

35. Phone
803-935-5301

36. E-mail
carol.page@uscmed.sc.edu

Certifying Representative

38. Name (last, first)
Christmus, Daniel

39. Title
Senior Administrator for Sponsored Programs

40. Phone
803-777-4452

41. E-mail
danielc@mailbox.sc.edu

Overview of Activities Performed

Did your approved State Plan for this reporting period include conducting any State Financing activities?
No

This section is not required based on the data set in the Overview of Activities Performed section.

Overview of Activities Performed

Did your statewide AT program conduct any device reuse activities?
Yes

A. Number of Recipients of Reused Devices

In this section, report the number of recipients of devices through device exchange, reassignment/refurbishment and repair activities, and open-ended loans. In the table below, report on the number of individuals who receive devices through a reuse program. Recipients should be reported only once, even if they receive multiple devices during this reporting period. (The multiple devices will be reported in subsequent sections.)

A. Device exchange
559

B. Reassignment/refurbishment and Repair
0

C. Open-ended loans
1

D. Total Served
560

E. Device Exchange - Excluded from Performance Measure
466

F. Reassignment/refurbishment and Repair and Open-ended loans
Excluded from Performance Measure because AT is provided to
or on behalf of an entity that has an obligation to provide the
AT such as schools under IDEA or VR agencies/clients)
0

G. Total Number of Individuals included in Performance Measure.
94

B. Device Exchange Activities

Type of AT Device/Service Number of Devices Exchanged Total Estimated Current Purchase Price Total Price for Which Device(s) Were Exchanged Savings to Consumers
Vision 13$1,056$0$1,056
Hearing 0$0$0$0
Speech communication 5$605$0$605
Learning, cognition, and developmental 23$5,045$0$5,045
Mobility, seating and positioning 326$436,692$12,810$423,882
Daily living 129$37,823$55$37,768
Environmental adaptations 18$21,934$1,261$20,673
Vehicle modification and transportation 13$81,530$14,280$67,250
Computers and related 23$5,445$0$5,445
Recreation, sports, and leisure 9$8,887$940$7,947
Total 559$599,017$29,346$569,671

C. Device Recycling/Refurbishment/Repair Activities

Type of AT Device/Service Number of Devices Recycled / Refurbished / Repaired Total Estimated Current Purchase Price Total Price for Which Devices Were Sold Savings to Consumers
Vision 0$0$0$0
Hearing 0$0$0$0
Speech communication 0$0$0$0
Learning, cognition, and developmental 0$0$0$0
Mobility, seating and positioning 0$0$0$0
Daily living 0$0$0$0
Environmental adaptations 0$0$0$0
Vehicle modification and transportation 0$0$0$0
Computers and related 0$0$0$0
Recreation, sports, and leisure 0$0$0$0
Total 0$0$0$0

If Other was used in the above table, briefly describe.

D. Open-Ended Loans

Type of AT Device/Service Number of Devices on Long-Term Loan Total Estimated Current Purchase Price Cost to Consumer for the Loan Savings to Consumers
Vision 0$0$0$0
Hearing 0$0$0$0
Speech communication 0$0$0$0
Learning, cognition, and developmental 0$0$0$0
Mobility, seating and positioning 1$150$0$150
Daily living 0$0$0$0
Environmental adaptations 0$0$0$0
Vehicle modification and transportation 0$0$0$0
Computers and related 0$0$0$0
Recreation, sports, and leisure 0$0$0$0
Total 1$150$0$150

If Other was used in the above table, briefly describe.

E. Anecdote

Provide at least one anecdote about an individual who benefited from this activity. For guidance on information to include in the anecdote, please see the General Instructions.

SCATP uses the SC AT Exchange to facilitate equipment exchange and communication among South Carolinians and reuse programs throughout the state. Rather than just managing the online exchange, "technically from afar," SCATP is very pro-active and hands-on in using it to connect people and organizations. A recent article in the State Newspaper provided critical exposure to how this exchange works.

FRIDLA (Friends of the Disabled Latin America), a non-profit based in Rock Hill, serves people in Latin America. They work with a group of trained volunteers from Westminster Presbyterian Church in Rock Hill to refurbish and repair equipment for large shipments to Latin America.

Enabling Technologies Associates, Enabletech, is a nonprofit organization in Saluda and Aiken, using volunteer engineers, fabricators, medical and business professionals to work individually with people to evaluate, custom design and fabricate equipment for independence. They offer unique and very individualized services.

Occasionally FRIDLA receives donated equipment that cannot be refurbished or sent to Latin America. Enabletech doesn’t have access to the large inventory of equipment that FRIDLA maintains in their warehouse. Enabletech contacted SCATP about special equipment needs for a young man living in a double wide trailer with foster parents. He needed a hydraulic bath chair, since there was no room in the bathroom for Enabletech to construct any kind of lift system for them to immerse and remove him from the tub. SCATP contacted FRIDA and was able to procure a hydraulic bath chair that needed minor adjustments.

The young man also needed a power wheel chair with a tilt function. He lives with elderly foster parents who are unable to push him up the six degree incline of the hill from the school bus and into the house. The young man cannot operate the power wheel chair on his own, so the controls needed to be moved to the back of the wheel chair. SCATP had a chair with a broken tilt function, listed on the exchange for over a year, waiting for the right recipient. Enabletech was able to fix the tilt, replace missing hardware in the seat mount, move the hand control to the back handle, and covert it with the special supportive seat that was designed for him by a vendor.

Federal funding and emphasis on equipment reuse has resulted in SCATP’s ability to research, organize and bring together many reuse programs who were unaware of each other’s existence. SCATP, FRIDLA, and Enabletech are continuing to collaborate to increase this young man’s independence and his foster parents’ ability to care for him. As the President of Enabletech put it, "We make a good team!"

F. Performance Measures

ResponseAT Primarily Needed for EducationAT Primarily Needed for EmploymentAT Primarily Needed for Community LivingTotal
1. Could only afford the AT through the statewide AT program (n,d) 414550
2. AT was only available through the statewide AT program (n,d) 001717
3. AT was available through other programs, but the system was too complex or the wait time was too long (n,d) 2035
4. Subtotal 616572
5. None of the above (d) 111315
6. Subtotal 727887
7. Nonrespondent (d) 0077
8. Total 728594
9. Performance on this measure Info: The Performance measure for this column is computed by dividing the sum of rows marked (n) by the sum of rows marked (d). 85.7150.0076.4776.60

G. Customer Satisfaction

Customer Rating of ServicesNumber of CustomersPercent
Highly satisfied 55899.82%
Satisfied 10.18%
Satisfied somewhat 00.00%
Not at all satisfied 00.00%
Nonrespondent 1-
Total surveyed560-
Response rate 99.82%-

H. Notes

Describe any unique issues that may affect your data in this section (e.g., types of devices that are not reused because they are available from another source). If you have a device exchange program, please describe your data collection method, any challenges with collecting these data, and plans for overcoming those challenges.

Overview of Activities Performed

Did your approved State Plan for this reporting period include conducting short-term device loans?
Yes

A. Short-Term Device Loans by Type of Purpose

Report the number of short-term device loans made by primary purpose of the loan. Count each loan in only one category, even if the loan included multiple devices. If at least one device included in the loan was obtained for the purpose of decision-making, report the loan in the first row.

Assist in decision making (device trial or evaluation)
120

Serve as loaner during device repair or while waiting for funding
9

Provide an accommodation on a short-term basis
0

Conduct training, self-education or other professional development activity
5

Total
134

B. Number of Device Loans by Type of Borrower

In this section, report the number of device loans by type of borrowers, by type of individual or entity. The total number of device borrowers should equal the total number of short-term device loans reported by primary purpose in Item A. You must be able to categorize borrowers to report them in this table as there is no option for "unable to categorize" or "other".

Individuals with disabilities
18

Family members, guardians, and authorized representatives
50

Representatives of Education
34

Representatives of Employment
2

Representatives of Health, allied health, and rehabilitation
23

Representatives of Community Living
5

Representatives of Technology
2

Total
134

C. Length of Short-Term Device Loans

What is the length of a short-term device loan, as established by your statewide AT program's policies not including extensions. Please report the length in calendar days. If your policy/procedures establish a range, use the midpoint.

Length of short-term device loan, in days
30

D. Types of Devices Loaned

Enter the number of devices that were loaned, by type of device. For guidance on how to categorize devices, refer to the "General Instructions." The number of devices loaned may exceed the number of loans reported above in Item A, since a loan may include more than one device.

Vision
3

Hearing
6

Speech communication
141

Learning, cognition, and developmental
30

Mobility, seating and positioning
1

Daily living
7

Environmental adaptations
8

Vehicle modification and transportation
0

Computers and related
23

Recreation, sports, and leisure
30

Total
249

E. Anecdote

Provide at least one anecdote about an individual who benefited from this activity. For guidance on information to include in the anecdote, please see the General Instructions.

A mother came in for a demonstration for communication devices for her daughter. While at the resource center, the girl got on the Chariot which is a bike with arm pedals. The girl had one arm that was contracted towards her chest, but she needed to stretch that arm forward to keep the bike from going in circles. The mother borrowed the Chariot for several loan periods and said her daughter loved riding the bike like the other kids. She said that as a result of using her arms to pedal, her daughter’s arm was straightening and becoming stronger. Her daughter is now more independent with other activities as a result of being able to use her arm more.

F. Performance Measures

>
ResponseAT Primarily Needed for EducationAT Primarily Needed for EmploymentAT Primarily Needed for Community LivingIT/CommunicationsTotal
1. Decided that an AT device/service will meet needs (n,d) 59120181
2. Decided that an AT device/service will not meet needs (n,d)50409
3. Subtotal64 124190
4. Have not made a decision (d) 2007330
5. Subtotal84 1314120
6. Nonrespondent (d, if >35%) 00000
7. Total84 1314120
8. Performance on this measure Info: The Performance measure for this column is computed by dividing the sum of rows marked (n) by the sum of rows marked (d). 76.19100.0077.4225.0075.00

G. Customer Satisfaction

Customer Rating of ServicesNumber of CustomersPercent
Highly satisfied 10477.61%
Satisfied 2317.16%
Satisfied somewhat 53.73%
Not at all satisfied 21.49%
Nonrespondent 0-
Total 134-
Response rate 100.00%-

H. Notes

Describe any unique issues that may affect your data in this section (e.g. types of devices that are not loaned because those loans are available from another source, or types of devices that are not loaned because your inventory does not include those devices, difficulty obtaining data from intermediaries, etc).

Overview of Activities Performed

Did your approved State Plan for this reporting period include conduct device demonstrations?
Yes

A. Number of Device Demonstrations by Device Type

Vision
0

Hearing
0

Speech communication
88

Learning, cognition and developmental
23

Mobility, seating and positioning
2

Daily living
5

Environmental adaptations
2

Vehicle modification and transportation
0

Computers and related
8

Recreation, sports and leisure
4

Total
132

B. Types of Participants

Individuals with disabilities
114

Family members, guardians, and authorized representatives
131

Representatives of Education
91

Representatives of Employment
5

Representatives of Health, allied health, and rehabilitation
50

Representatives of Community Living
22

Representatives of Technology
0

Total
413

C. Number of Referrals

Funding source (non-AT program)
0

Service provider
8

Vendor
240

Repair service
0

Others (required description)
0

Total
248

If Other was used in the above table, briefly describe.

D. Anecdote

Provide at least one anecdote about an individual who benefited from this activity. For guidance on information to include in the anecdote, please see the General Instructions.

A demonstration of communication devices was provided to a man and his spouse and speech-language pathologist. Not only were devices discussed, but also research-based best practices for implementation. The speech-language pathologist responded "I wanted to thank you for your help. I recently spoke with the man’s counselor who reported their sessions were much more productive. He is able to use his communication device to express complex thoughts and ideas with clarity. His wife reported he is using his device in social settings and participating in more conversations."

E. Performance Measures

ResponseAT Primarily Needed for EducationAT Primarily Needed for EmploymentAT Primarily Needed for Community LivingIT/CommunicationsTotal
1. Decided that an AT device/service will meet needs (n,d) 941332130
2. Decided that an AT device/service will not meet needs (n,d)00101
3. Subtotal94 1342131
4. Have not made a decision (d) 01001
5. Subtotal94 2342132
6. Nonrespondent (d) 00000
7. Total94 2342132
8. Performance on this measure Info: The Performance measure for this column is computed by dividing the sum of rows marked (n) by the sum of rows marked (d). 100.0050.00100.00100.0099.24

F. Customer Satisfaction

Customer Rating of ServicesNumber of CustomersPercent
Highly satisfied 38693.46%
Satisfied 276.54%
Satisfied somewhat 00.00%
Not at all satisfied 00.00%
Nonrespondent 0-
Total 413-
Response rate 100.00%-

G. Notes

Describe any unique issues that may affect your data in this section - e.g., types of participants that may appear to be underrepresented because they receive demonstration services from another organization, types of devices/services that are not demonstrated because those demonstrations are available from another source, issues related to use of distance education mechanisms to deliver demonstrations, or issues related to dissatisfaction (e.g.; consumer may be dissatisfied because they assumed the AT Program could purchase the device for them)

Overview of Activities Performed

Training activities are required and must be reported as described below.

A. Training Participants: Number and Types of Participants; Geographical Distribution

1. Enter the number of training participants by type.

Individuals with disabilities
95

Family members, guardians, and authorized representatives
171

Representatives of Education
1,290

Representatives of Employment
91

Representatives of Health, allied health, and rehabilitation
206

Representatives of Community Living
44

Representatives of Technology
237

Unable to categorize
279

Total
2413

2. Enter the number of individuals who participated in training, by the Rural Urban Continuum Code (RUCC) of the participant's county.

Metro (RUCC 1-3)
1,756

Non-Metro (RUCC 4-9)
335

Unknown
322

Total
2,413

B. Training Topics

Enter the number of participants by the primary purpose of the training.

1. AT Products/Services Training focused on AT:
such as instruction to increase skills and competency in using AT,
and integrating AT into different settings.
410

2. AT Funding/Policy/Practice Training focused
on funding sources and related laws, policies, and procedures required
to implement and deliver access to AT devices/services and related.
144

3. Information Technology/Telecommunication Access Training
focused on accessible information technology and
telecommunications including web access, software accessibility, procurement
of accessible IT and telecommunications, etc.
251

4. Combination of any/all of the above AT
Products/Services, AT Funding/Policy/Practice and/or IT/Telecommunications Access.
1,485

5. Transition Training focused on education transition
(school to work or post-secondary education and early intervention (birth to 3)
to school aged (3-21) and community transition (maintaining or transitioning to community living).
(NOTE: A number MUST be reported here unless transition technical
assistance activity/activities are reported).
123

Total
2413

C. Description of Training Activities

1. Briefly describe one innovative or high-impact training activity conducted during this reporting period. Note who conducted the training (e.g., type of expertise of staff) and characteristics of the audience (including number that attended). In one sentence, describe the topic, content, and/or approach of the training. In one sentence, summarize the positive result or intended impact of the training. Do not include overall descriptions of conferences held, unless the conference had a unique purpose and outcome.

At the annual AT Expo, a presentation was given called "AT for Early Intervention. An attendee commented "Fantastic presentation. Provided easy/inexpensive ideas I can use with my children and families! Great ideas to help spark my creativity! I can’t wait to implement some of these techniques in my classroom. Helped me to think outside the box of high tech and pricey items. I see better how to use what is available and cheap to create assistive devices."

2. Briefly describe a training activity related to transition conducted during this reporting period. Note who conducted the training (e.g., type of expertise of staff) and characteristics of the audience (including number that attended). In one sentence, describe the topic, content, and/or approach of the training. In one sentence, summarize the positive result or intended impact of the training. Do not include overall descriptions of conferences held, unless the conference had a unique purpose and outcome. This section must be completed unless you are reporting transition technical assistance activities. If this section is completed, an associated number of training participants must be reported in Section B row 5.

Carol Page has a PhD in speech language pathology and is a RESNA-certified assistive technology professional. She presented a training on "AT for College" for twelve college students who are intellectually disabled. These students are part of a program called REACH at the College of Charleston that is structured specifically for students with intellectual disabilities. This training provided homework and notetaking tools for the students to use to attend and complete the assignments for their courses.

D. Notes

Overview of Activities Performed

Technical Assistance activities are required and all activities should be reported in the aggregate in Section A. One Technical Assistance activity must be described in Section B and a transition Technical Assistance activity must be reported unless a transition training activity was reported.

A. Frequency and Nature of Technical Assistance

Complete this section summarizing all major technical assistance activities that you conducted. Indicate the percentage of total technical assistance provided by the type of program or agency receiving the technical assistance. Use the person hours invested in each technical assistance activity to report the percentage by type of program or agency. For example, if you conducted two major TA activities this reporting period with 90 total person hours for an activity related to education and 50 person hours for an activity related to employment, you would report 64% in education and 36% in Employment.

Percentage of all TA
Education 11
Employment 10
Health, Allied Health, Rehabilitation 1
Community Living 67
Technology (Information Technology, Telecommunications, Assistive Technology) 11
Total 100

B. Description of Technical Assistance Activities

1. Describe in detail one innovative or high-impact technical assistance activity conducted during this reporting period.

SCATP provided technical assistance for a federal grant managed by SC Legal Services in collaboration with the SC Access to Justice Commission, the SC Bar Foundation, the SC Court Administration and the SC Judicial Department. The project assists Self-Represented Litigants (SRLs) in completing divorce paperwork online, avoiding the cost of an attorney. South Carolina was the first state to include an accessibility check into their grant. Using trained SC Web Testers (some who use AT and some who don’t) SCATP provided an accessibility/usability evaluation. The report included a demonstration to the grant committee by a JAWS user, showing problems encountered with online forms. This resulted in training for many SC judicial department interns and employees, in creating accessible online forms and documents throughout their web sites. Another impact of this activity is that a major accessibility barrier within the national template for the online interview has been identified and will be corrected. Since the SC Supreme Court Chief Justice has set a priority to encourage efiling and other strategies to help those in poverty and the "working poor" to act as SRLs, future projects will be implemented with a careful eye on accessibilit

2. Briefly describe one technical assistance activity related to transition conducted during this reporting period.

The SCATP director who has her doctorate in speech-language pathology and is a RESNA-certified ATP and the SCATP administrative assistant who is a parent of a young adult with autism continue to provide technical assistance to the SC Transition Education Service Team, which supports the operation of the Youth Employment Services (YES), and is funded by SC Vocational Rehabilitation Department. This grant targets teens with disabilities, to assist them in successfully completing school and transitioning into post-secondary education or jobs. One activity this grant supports each year is the Youth Leadership Forum, a three-day program for high school juniors and seniors with disabilities who have demonstrated leadership potential in their schools and communities. The Helping Americans Vote Act (HAVA) representative returned this crucial election year to teach the students how to use the accessible voting machines so they might demonstrate community leadership. SCATP staff members provide technical assistance throughout the year in planning leadership training events and developing employment-related skill-building activities in a manner that is meaningful and accessible to students of various disabilities.

C. Notes

Describe any unique issues with data in this section (e.g., reasons why particular topics or audiences were emphasized or were not included during this reporting period).

Overview of Activities Performed

Public awareness and information and assistance activities are required and must be reported.

A. Public awareness activities

Estimated number of individuals reached

Newsletters
0

Other print materials
0

Listservs/blogs/social media
4,582

Internet information
58,626

Other electronic media
0

PSA/radio/TV/other media
114,750

Presentations/expos/conferences
749

Total
178,707

B. Information and Assistance

Types of Recipients of Information and Assistance AT Device / Service AT Funding Total
Individuals with disabilities 64 78 142
Family members, guardians, and authorized representatives 123 14 137
Representative of Education 60 4 64
Representative of Employment 10 1 11
Representative of Health, Allied Health, and Rehabilitation 57 5 62
Representative of Community Living 13 5 18
Representative of Technology 42 0 42
Unable to Categorize 2 4 6
Total 371 111 482

C. Notes

Overview of Activities Performed

State improvement outcomes are not required. You may report up to two MAJOR state improvement outcomes for this reporting period. How many will you be reporting?
1

A. State Improvement Outcomes

1. In one or two sentences, describe the outcome. Be as specific as possible about exactly what changed during this reporting period as a result of the AT program's initiative.

Served on a BabyNet committee that focused on updating the early intervention system’s service guide and funding decision protocol for assistive technology in South Carolina based on the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) Part C regulations. Committee members consulted with people and policies from other states to attempt to achieve consistency from state to state.

2. In one or two sentences, describe the written policies, practices, and procedures that have been developed and implemented as a result of the AT program's initiative. Include information about how to obtain the full documents, such as a Web site address or e-mail address of a contact person, but do not include the full documents here. (If there are no written policies, practices, and procedures, explain why.)

The document explains the overall philosophy of AT in early intervention and provided procedures for AT decision making and funding requests within the BabyNet system of services. It clarifies the role of the BabyNet Service Coordinator and other Individualized Family Service Plan team members in the process of identifying the need and establishing team consensus for requests for BabyNet funding of assistive technology.

3. What was the primary area of impact for this state improvement outcome?
Education

Overview of Activities Performed

Did you have Additional and Leveraged Funds to report?
Yes

A. Leveraged Funding for State Plan Activities (Previously Reported)

Fund Source Amount Use of Funds
Public/State agency 500 Public Awareness, I&A
Public/State agency 2,500 Public Awareness, I&A

B. Leveraged Funding for Activities Not in State Plan (not previously reported)

Fund Source Amount Use of Funds Individuals Served or Other Outcomes
0  

C. Notes

Describe any unique issues with your data in this section (e.g., the reason why you were unable to report the number of individuals served with additional or leveraged funds).

The following information is captured by the MIS.

Last updated on 12/10/2012 at 4:22 PM

Last updated by sgatscodayc

Completed on 12/17/2012 at 5:24 PM

Completed by sgatscchristmusd

Approved on 03/04/2013 at 4:01 PM

Approved by atrob

Published on 03/05/2013 at 11:37 AM

Published by kschelle

OMB Control Number: 1820-0572, approved for use through 10/31/2017

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless such collection displays a valid OMB control number. Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 300 hours per response, including time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. The obligation to respond to this collection is required to obtain or retain a benefit (Section 13 of the Rehabilitation Act, as amended). Send comments regarding the burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to U.S. Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20202-4537 or email ICDocketMgr@ed.gov and reference the OMB Control Number 1820-0572. Note: Please do not return the completed form to this address.